History Fridge / TheHobbit

16th Jul '16 2:38:29 PM GothicProphet
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* Wife's keepsake or not, Thranduil's obsession with the white gems to the point of abandoning the Dwarves completely and later jailing Thorin and company6 over them shows an obsessive streak that in his case at least highlights how Thranduil is NotSoDifferent from the Dwarves he so despises.

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* Wife's keepsake or not, Thranduil's obsession with the white gems to the point of abandoning the Dwarves completely and later jailing Thorin and company6 company over them shows an obsessive streak that in his case at least highlights how Thranduil is NotSoDifferent from the Dwarves he so despises.
24th May '16 11:44:22 AM BanjoTCat
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* Dwarves stereotypically favor the axe as a weapon, so it at first seems odd that the Iron Hill dwarves are primarily pikemen. But consider the native environment of dwarves: hills and mountains. Both of these are terrain with confined areas that are ideal for frontal assaults with phalanxes since the flanks would be covered by the terrain. It is not unlike ancient Greek military tactics.
24th May '16 11:19:28 AM MrDeath
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* The scene where one of Bard's daughters asked where her dad is makes sense both in and out of universe - both her on-screen dad (Bard) and her real-life dad (James Nesbitt who plays Bofur) are not in the house during that scene.



* Near the end of the Battle of the Five Armies, Bilbo is knocked unconscious while wearing his Ring and therefore is not found until he wakes up after the battle and takes off the Ring. Imagine if he'd been mortally wounded or slipped into a coma while unconscious.
24th May '16 11:12:13 AM MrDeath
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* Tolkien, unsurprisingly, knew exactly what he was doing when he picked the sign for Gandalf to put on Bilbo's door. The sign is the Norse rune Fehu, which in Norse mysticism stands for possessions won or earned, luck, a sign of hope and plenty, and success. In short, all the things that the Dwarves hope for in their adventure. The sign reversed refers to a loss of personal property, greed, and discord--in other words, a short summary of the fall of the Dwarf kingdom. It also refers to poverty (which the Dwarfs are in) and dullness/cowardice (which Gandalf wants to jolt Bilbo out of). In Middle-Earth, it matches the letter G -- G for Gandalf.

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* Tolkien, unsurprisingly, knew exactly what he was doing when he picked Though Tolkien never describes the sign for Gandalf to put rune on Bilbo's door. door in the book, Peter Jackson was pretty clever in picking the one for the movie. The sign is Middle-Earth's 'G' for Gandalf, and is shown as his insignia in ''Film/TheLordOfTheRings,'' but it also matches the Norse rune Fehu, which in Norse mysticism stands for possessions won or earned, luck, a sign of hope and plenty, and success. In short, all the things that the Dwarves hope for in their adventure. The sign reversed refers to a loss of personal property, greed, and discord--in other words, a short summary of the fall of the Dwarf kingdom. It also refers to poverty (which the Dwarfs are in) and dullness/cowardice (which Gandalf wants to jolt Bilbo out of). In Middle-Earth, it matches the letter G -- G for Gandalf.
8th May '16 5:34:49 PM Kalaong
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* During the battle with Smaug, the only attack that the worm doesn't laugh off is getting doused with a couple tons of water. Given how he's essentially a living furnace, it probably felt like being [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vcsxB5dKJMg these soda cans.]]
28th Apr '16 7:28:06 AM MrDeath
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* Also from the book (crossing over with ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', supposing Bilbo still remembers the incident with the spiders in Mirkwood well, how do you suppose he reacted when/if he eventually found out about the incident with Shelob? Imagining [[FamilyUnfriendlyDeath what would have happened]] if Sam hadn't been so stubborn, or if he'd been less lucky, would be horrifying for anyone, but Bilbo is Frodo's adoptive father and Sam's BenevolentBoss.
27th Apr '16 10:05:23 PM HeroGal2347
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** There's also a slightly more prosaic reason in the fact that Bilbo was on his adventure for a little over a year, at least according to the book's version of events. Not everything in his larder would have lasted that long without spoiling or getting eaten by mice, so it may have been a subtle way for Tolkein to imply Bilbo was going to be away from home for quite awhile.

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** There's also a slightly more prosaic reason in the fact that Bilbo was on his adventure for a little over a year, at least according to the book's version of events. Not everything in his larder would have lasted that long without spoiling or getting eaten by mice, so it may have been a subtle way for Tolkein Tolkien to imply Bilbo was going to be away from home for quite awhile.



* In ''Film/TheHobbitAnUnexpectedJourney'' Thranduil's army appearance in the Prologue seems forced: did he just march his entire army to help, only to turn around on the mere sight of the Dragon? How did he learn of the impending Dragon attack to be able to assemble and march his host so swiftly? And if he did not intend to help at all, why bring the army in thf first place? Then, ''Film/TheHobbitTheBattleOfTheFiveArmies'' puts it into perspective: he always intended to reclaim what he deemed rightfully his from the Dwarves by force, he just choose the timing poorly and had the misfortunate to arrive just behind the rampaging Dragon. Helping the refugees was never in question, but since the treasures were lost, there was no point in attacking them either.

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* In ''Film/TheHobbitAnUnexpectedJourney'' Thranduil's army appearance in the Prologue seems forced: did he just march his entire army to help, only to turn around on the mere sight of the Dragon? How did he learn of the impending Dragon attack to be able to assemble and march his host so swiftly? And if he did not intend to help at all, why bring the army in thf the first place? Then, ''Film/TheHobbitTheBattleOfTheFiveArmies'' puts it into perspective: he always intended to reclaim what he deemed rightfully his from the Dwarves by force, he just choose the timing poorly and had the misfortunate misfortune to arrive just behind the rampaging Dragon. Helping the refugees was never in question, but since the treasures were lost, there was no point in attacking them either.


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* Also from the book (crossing over with ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', supposing Bilbo still remembers the incident with the spiders in Mirkwood well, how do you suppose he reacted when/if he eventually found out about the incident with Shelob? Imagining [[FamilyUnfriendlyDeath what would have happened]] if Sam hadn't been so stubborn, or if he'd been less lucky, would be horrifying for anyone, but Bilbo is Frodo's adoptive father and Sam's BenevolentBoss.
23rd Apr '16 6:54:41 PM immortalfrieza
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* Wife's keepsake or not, Thranduil's obsession with the white gems to the point of abandoning the Dwarves completely and later jailing Thorin and company6 over them shows an obsessive streak that in his case at least highlights how Thranduil is NotSoDifferent from the Dwarves his so despises.

to:

* Wife's keepsake or not, Thranduil's obsession with the white gems to the point of abandoning the Dwarves completely and later jailing Thorin and company6 over them shows an obsessive streak that in his case at least highlights how Thranduil is NotSoDifferent from the Dwarves his he so despises.
23rd Apr '16 6:52:59 PM immortalfrieza
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* Elephants, which are migratory animals, form protective circles around their young when faced with danger, much like the dwarves did in Rivendell. The fact that the dwarves instinctively use this tactic really drives home the point of Bilbo's speech about how the dwarves are used to not belonging anywhere.

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* Elephants, which are migratory animals, form protective circles around their young when faced with danger, much like the dwarves did in Rivendell. The fact that the dwarves instinctively use this tactic really drives home the point of Bilbo's speech about how the dwarves are used to not belonging anywhere. It would also make sense from an evolutionary perspective, as per canon dwarves very rarely have children, and thus taking a similar stance to protect the weaker amongst them is born of a strong instinctual need to protect the next generation.


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* Wife's keepsake or not, Thranduil's obsession with the white gems to the point of abandoning the Dwarves completely and later jailing Thorin and company6 over them shows an obsessive streak that in his case at least highlights how Thranduil is NotSoDifferent from the Dwarves his so despises.
21st Apr '16 12:37:46 AM StormKensho
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* Elrond spends the movie in a much better mood compared to ''LOTR''. Not only is it because the world's fate isn't at stake: his daughter is spending time in Lothlórien and Aragorn is only ten - he doesn't have to deal with those complicated family issues yet!

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* Elrond spends the movie in a much better mood compared to ''LOTR''. Not only is it because the world's fate isn't at stake: his daughter is spending time in Lothlórien and Aragorn is only ten hasn't even met her yet - he doesn't have to deal with those complicated family issues yet!
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