History Fridge / TheBible

26th Sep '16 8:04:51 PM BrendanRizzo
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** Adam isn't a KarmaHoudini. [[CriticalResearchFailure Have you ever]] ''[[CriticalResearchFailure been]]'' [[CriticalResearchFailure a farmer?]]
31st Aug '16 8:25:32 PM esq263
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* Looking at the story of Joseph in Genesis, at first glance, it appears to be a RagsToRiches story about a guy who really [[EarnYourHappyEnding earns his happy ending]]. Fred Clark, in a Slacktivist blog entry titled "Joseph and the Appalling Tyrannical Despot", shows the FridgeHorror behind this, discussing how the story credits Joseph with establishing the system of despotic tyranny and slavery that characterized the Pharaohs' regime in Egypt. He concludes that this is a "just-so story", about how Egypt got its tyranny. However, taking the story in combination with the Exodus narrative leads to an alternative interpretation -- as a cautionary tale. The lesson advanced is that an absolute government might serve you well for the present, especially under a benevolent ruler; however, in creating such a state, you are in fact fashioning the tools of oppression that can be used by a less ethical successor. NiceJobBreakingItHero indeed.

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* Looking at the story of Joseph in Genesis, at first glance, it appears to be a RagsToRiches story about a guy who really [[EarnYourHappyEnding earns his happy ending]]. Fred Clark, in a Slacktivist blog entry titled "Joseph and the Appalling Tyrannical Despot", shows the FridgeHorror behind this, discussing how the story credits Joseph with establishing the system of despotic tyranny and slavery that characterized the Pharaohs' regime in Egypt. He concludes that this is a "just-so story", about how Egypt got its tyranny. However, taking the story in combination with the Exodus narrative leads to an alternative interpretation -- as a cautionary tale. The lesson advanced is that an absolute government might serve you well for the present, especially under a benevolent ruler; however, in creating such a state, you are in fact fashioning the tools of oppression that can be used by a less ethical successor. NiceJobBreakingItHero indeed. [[note]] This anti-absolute government interpretation would certainly be in keeping with Samuel's warnings to Israel about the dangers of having a king (cf. 1 Samuel 8). Such an interpretation, if accurate, would make the Bible a very revolutionary text for its time; when the Bible was written, people generally took it for granted that absolute government was the way to get things done. The notion of the enlightened despot who brings prosperity remains with us even now, motivating such disparate entities as ISIS, North Korea, and the People's Republic of China. [[/note]]
29th Jul '16 12:19:20 AM conankane1
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* Some of God's stronger punishments (such as killing thousands for mourning or the Plagues of Egypt), especially how there are more strong punishments in the Old Testament than the New Testament, may be off-putting and have at times been cited by critics as reasons to question His benevolence. However, what happened in both cases was not "a few sinned so God punished many" but "''many'' sinned so God punished '''some of them'''." It's not DisproportionateRetribution, but MakeAnExampleOfThem.




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** * Some of God's stronger punishments (such as killing thousands for mourning or the Plagues of Egypt), especially how there are more strong punishments in the Old Testament than the New Testament, may be off-putting and have at times been cited by critics as reasons to question His benevolence. However, what happened in both cases was not "a few sinned so God punished many" but "''many'' sinned so God punished '''some of them'''." It's not DisproportionateRetribution, but MakeAnExampleOfThem.
29th Jul '16 12:17:08 AM conankane1
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* Some of God's stronger punishments (such as killing thousands for mourning or the Plagues of Egypt), especially how there are more strong punishments in the Old Testament than the New Testament, may be off-putting and have at times been cited by critics as reasons to question His benevolence. However, what happened in both cases was not "a few sinned so God punished many" but "many sinned so God punished some of them." It's not DisproportionateRetribution, but MakeAnExampleOfThem.

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* Some of God's stronger punishments (such as killing thousands for mourning or the Plagues of Egypt), especially how there are more strong punishments in the Old Testament than the New Testament, may be off-putting and have at times been cited by critics as reasons to question His benevolence. However, what happened in both cases was not "a few sinned so God punished many" but "many "''many'' sinned so God punished some '''some of them.them'''." It's not DisproportionateRetribution, but MakeAnExampleOfThem.
29th Jul '16 12:16:05 AM conankane1
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* Some of God's stronger punishments (such as killing thousands for mourning or the Plagues of Egypt), especially how there are more strong punishments in the Old Testament than the New Testament, may be off-putting and have at times been cited by critics as reasons to question His benevolence. However, what happened in both cases was not "a few sinned so God punished many" but "many sinned so God punished some of them." It's not DisproportionateRetribution, but MakeAnExampleOfThem.



** In addition, this in light of the fact that the other gods were unreal and it was in the face of everything God did for them (right down to giving the Israelites a variety of food because they grew bored with the first food item He gave them).

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** In addition, this in light of the fact that the other gods were unreal unreal or a case of mistaken identity regarding another supernatural being, albeit one less powerful and benevolent than God, and it was in the face of everything God did for them (right down to giving the Israelites a variety of food because they grew bored with the first food item He gave them).


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8th Jul '16 1:18:39 PM Fireblood
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** Any person can feel that food goes into their stomach to digest there. This really isn't compelling evidence of divine knowledge. Everyone knew this.
8th Jul '16 11:00:13 AM Robinton
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**** The location where Abraham was willing (probably) to sacrifice Issac has been lost to history. Oddly enough, one decent guess is Golgotha - the place Jesus was crucified. (Also note: if the location was remembered, would crucifixions have taken place there? Probably not...) -Robinton
8th Jul '16 9:30:36 AM Robinton
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* In Matthew 17 (the Transfiguration), Jesus takes three disciples onto a high mountain. Moses and Elijah show up. Moses - the great prophet who never got to set foot in the Promised Land while he lived. -{{@/Robinton}}
7th Jun '16 12:01:39 AM ArtemisPal
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* In light of the example above, there is insight into when God ordered Israel to inflict genocide (such as what happened to the Amalekites), extreme as that may be seen. People in those days tended to get caught up in [[[CycleOfRevenge tribal wars that spanned generations]], and there had been a long and bitter feud between the Amalekites and the Israelites; [[TheExtremistWasRight a genocide would stop that completely]] and given the length of the feud it's possible other methods were tried but they failed (also note that the Amalekites were a tribe, like Ghana's Ashanti and Fante tribes, possibly not a race/ethnicity). Also, these people were attacking His chosen, so instead of doing something extreme like killing everybody in the nation but his chosen, [[MakeAnExampleOfThem God only ordered this on a select few when all else failed so the others would leave His people alone and thus peace, or at least co-habitation, was achieved]].

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* In light of the example above, there is insight into when God ordered Israel to inflict genocide (such as what happened to the Amalekites), extreme as that may be seen. People in those days tended to get caught up in [[[CycleOfRevenge [[CycleOfRevenge tribal wars that spanned generations]], and there had been a long and bitter feud between the Amalekites and the Israelites; [[TheExtremistWasRight a genocide would stop that completely]] and given the length of the feud it's possible other methods were tried but they failed (also note that the Amalekites were a tribe, like Ghana's Ashanti and Fante tribes, possibly not a race/ethnicity). Also, these people were attacking His chosen, so instead of doing something extreme like killing everybody in the nation but his chosen, [[MakeAnExampleOfThem God only ordered this on a select few when all else failed so the others would leave His people alone and thus peace, or at least co-habitation, was achieved]].
6th Jun '16 11:51:52 PM ArtemisPal
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* As stated above, God was giving Abraham a SecretTestOfCharacter, which the latter passed. Before he had to carry it out, God stopped him and provided a lamb for sacrifice. Even if that hadn't happened God, being TheOmnipotent, could have easily done something such as reverse time, [[BackFromTheDead bring Issac back to life]] or prevent the knife from penetrating his skin to name a few.

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* **** As stated above, God was giving Abraham a SecretTestOfCharacter, which the latter passed. Before he had to carry it out, God stopped him and provided a lamb for sacrifice. Even if that hadn't happened God, being TheOmnipotent, could have easily done something such as reverse time, [[BackFromTheDead bring Issac back to life]] or prevent the knife from penetrating his skin to name a few.
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