History Fridge / TheBible

5th Jul '17 10:43:00 AM Brigid
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*** The sun is a big, burning ball of gas. Light isn't just generated by gas, mind you. Though, plants do need sunlight to survive. However, think about what kind of plants these must have been to survive in a world without life.

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*** The sun is a big, burning ball of gas. Light isn't just generated by gas, mind you. Though, plants do need sunlight to survive. However, think about what kind of plants these must have been to survive in a world without life.life.
** Maybe the plants did what life in the deepest parts of the ocean do.
5th Jul '17 10:03:28 AM Brigid
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** * Some of God's stronger punishments (such as killing thousands for mourning or the Plagues of Egypt), especially how there are more strong punishments in the Old Testament than the New Testament, may be off-putting and have at times been cited by critics as reasons to question His benevolence. However, what happened in both cases was not "a few sinned so God punished many" but "''many'' sinned so God punished '''some of them'''." It's not DisproportionateRetribution, but MakeAnExampleOfThem.
** * What happened to Ananias, Sapphira, and Herod Agrippa I in the Acts of The Apostles also shows that God still hates sin as much as he does in the Old Testament
** * Anyone's who's read the Book of Esther or seen the film "One Night with the King" can testify to the fact that this is 100% correct. The pregnant wife of King Agag survived the Israelite's genocide against the Amalekites and her son, Haman, made it his mission in life to commit genocide against all of the Jews in the Persian Empire (and would have succeeded if not for Esther). A very chilling answer to the question of "Why couldn't God tell them to spare the children?"

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** * Some of God's stronger punishments (such as killing thousands for mourning or the Plagues of Egypt), especially how there are more strong punishments in the Old Testament than the New Testament, may be off-putting and have at times been cited by critics as reasons to question His benevolence. However, what happened in both cases was not "a few sinned so God punished many" but "''many'' sinned so God punished '''some of them'''." It's not DisproportionateRetribution, but MakeAnExampleOfThem.
** * What happened to Ananias, Sapphira, and Herod Agrippa I in the Acts of The Apostles also shows that God still hates sin as much as he does in the Old Testament
** * Anyone's who's read the Book of Esther or seen the film "One Night with the King" can testify to the fact that this is 100% correct. The pregnant wife of King Agag survived the Israelite's genocide against the Amalekites and her son, Haman, made it his mission in life to commit genocide against all of the Jews in the Persian Empire (and would have succeeded if not for Esther). A very chilling answer to the question of "Why couldn't God tell them to spare the children?"
5th Jul '17 10:02:06 AM Brigid
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*** They did ''not'' have other children in Catholic tradition. The "brothers" mentioned later in the gospels act as if they're older than Him, so they may have been Joseph's by a previous marriage or cousins ("adelphios" literally means 'from the same womb,' but was commonly used for any male relatives of the same generation or even for close friends).
1st Jun '17 1:12:44 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* A hundred Philistine ''foreskins''? Ugh. King Saul, why would you command David to perform such a ''disgusting'' CollectionSidequest? Well, Saul wanted David to give him proof that he had slain 100 of the enemy, and a taking a tally of heads, hands or whatnot made it far too easy to cheat, since those could be collected from David's own dead soldiers. With that in mind, what part of the body did their [uncircumcised] Gentile foes still have that the Israelites did not?
3rd May '17 5:54:36 AM mdwall
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to:

** * Anyone's who's read the Book of Esther or seen the film "One Night with the King" can testify to the fact that this is 100% correct. The pregnant wife of King Agag survived the Israelite's genocide against the Amalekites and her son, Haman, made it his mission in life to commit genocide against all of the Jews in the Persian Empire (and would have succeeded if not for Esther). A very chilling answer to the question of "Why couldn't God tell them to spare the children?"
30th Apr '17 2:12:42 PM huberd
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** * What happened to Ananias, Sapphira, and Herod Agrippa I in the Acts of The Apostles also shows that God still hates sin as much as he does in the Old Testament



* I'll toss out this theory about Abraham and Isaac: it's one of many religious reforms that populate the bible and the post Jesus history of Christianity. In Abraham's day, he was immersed in a society that worshipped the Canaanite Gods. These God demanded Child sacrifice. So when JHWH ordered him to kill Isaac, he makes no protest, nor does Isaac. Off they go to do the deed in the prescribed manner, and at the last minute JHWH says "stop - don't do that anymore. Kill this ram instead" thus the substitution of killing livestock instead of humans. Later Jesus comes along when animal sacrifice is a major industry and he, too says "stop - don't do that anymore. Instead sacrifice your spirit / will". Pretty much any major shift in worship is the same thing - a method of worship becomes outdated, or morally repugnant, or obviously damaging to society, and someone invokes God to change it. Islam replaced the brutal fights over the divinity of Christ. Protestantism replaced Catholic secular power (to a certain extent). Other examples are left as an exercise to the reader.

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* I'll toss out this theory about Abraham and Isaac: it's one of many religious reforms that populate the bible and the post Jesus history of Christianity. In Abraham's day, he was immersed in a society that worshipped worshiped the Canaanite Gods. These God demanded Child sacrifice. So when JHWH ordered him to kill Isaac, he makes no protest, nor does Isaac. Off they go to do the deed in the prescribed manner, and at the last minute JHWH says "stop - don't do that anymore. Kill this ram instead" thus the substitution of killing livestock instead of humans. Later Jesus comes along when animal sacrifice is a major industry and he, too says "stop - don't do that anymore. Instead sacrifice your spirit / will". Pretty much any major shift in worship is the same thing - a method of worship becomes outdated, or morally repugnant, or obviously damaging to society, and someone invokes God to change it. Islam replaced the brutal fights over the divinity of Christ. Protestantism replaced Catholic secular power (to a certain extent). Other examples are left as an exercise to the reader.
25th Apr '17 7:00:49 PM tommy1138
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** Adam and Eve technically were not the first humans, something Jewish scholars noted since at least the fifth century. The book of genesis describes the creation of people, male and female, with the order to populate the Earth and the founding of what will eventually become nations on day six. God rests, then goes on to create a garden and a man to tend to it named Adam. Adam gets Eve, Adam and Eve are kicked out and start mating with the older population. Giants start emerging in the older population(what happens when you mix too similar but ultimately different species?), God floods the Earth. Some books blame the flood on these hybrid giants, of course they also change the giants into half human angel hybrids rather than the product of two groups meeting so maybe it is better those books are not canon to most denominations.
** If it helps, think of Adam and Eve as a metaphor for cell division.
*** First you have Adam, a single cell.
*** God makes Eve from his rib - Adam divides, one cell becomes two.
*** Eve has two children by Adam - two cells become four.
** The Bible isn't meant to be taken literally (even Jesus taught in parables, after all). It is a compilation of attempts by early man to understand humanity and the universe we inhabit. Whether they had divine help is a matter of belief, but to take the stories in it literally is to deliberately make oneself ignorant of the many layers of knowledge and truth contained within. Adam and Eve are just one example, where in nitpicking the unlikelihood of inbreeding as the origin of life, we fail to spot it actually does describe in a sense the origin of life.
21st Apr '17 4:07:50 AM Vampireandthen
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*** But that only leads to a new question: If there was no sun on the first day, where exactly did that light come from?

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*** But that only leads to a new question: If there was no sun on the first day, where exactly did that light come from?from?
**** The sun is a big, burning ball of gas. Light isn't just generated by gas, mind you. Though, plants do need sunlight to survive. However, think about what kind of plants these must have been to survive in a world without life.
21st Dec '16 8:36:34 AM Furienna
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** Some people might argue that since David was the king, Bathsheba had no choice but to let him do what he wanted to do with her. But she ''did'' have a choice, as we could later see with Susanna in the Apocrypha version of The Book of David (she refused to cheat on her husband, even if that almost ended badly for her). So if Bathsheba had been as righteous as Susanna, or if she simply had really loved Uriah, it is very likely that she would have refused to sleep with David, even if that could have had harsh consequences for her. Of course, we never got to hear her side of the story or hear her feelings about what happened. But it makes sense to think that Bathsheba was stuck in a loveless marriage to a man, whom she found nice but boring and whom she couldn't love back. So when David summoned her to him and told her that he wanted her, she found it flattering and exciting and didn't care if what they did was wrong or not. Either way, it is pretty safe to conclude that she wasn't innocent. Because if she had been a guiltless victim of David's lust for her, the text would have ''told us'' that she was.

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** Some people might argue that since David was the king, Bathsheba had no choice but to let him do what he wanted to do with her. But she ''did'' have a choice, as we could later see with Susanna in the Apocrypha version of The Book of David Daniel (she refused to cheat on her husband, even if that almost ended badly for her). So if Bathsheba had been as righteous as Susanna, or if she simply had really loved Uriah, it is very likely that she would have refused to sleep with David, even if that could have had harsh consequences for her. Of course, we never got to hear her side of the story or hear her feelings about what happened. But it makes sense to think that Bathsheba was stuck in a loveless marriage to a man, whom she found nice but boring and whom she couldn't love back. So when David summoned her to him and told her that he wanted her, she found it flattering and exciting and didn't care if what they did was wrong or not. Either way, it is pretty safe to conclude that she wasn't innocent. Because if she had been a guiltless victim of David's lust for her, the text would have ''told us'' that she was.
15th Dec '16 11:45:34 PM Furienna
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*** But that only leads to a new question: If there was no sun on the first day, where exactly did the light come from?

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*** But that only leads to a new question: If there was no sun on the first day, where exactly did the that light come from?
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