History Fridge / TeenTitans

18th Apr '18 11:08:51 AM costanton11
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*** Wouldn't that be more at home on the WildMassGuessing page for [[WMG/TeenTitans Teen Titans]]? I figured that the reason Slade wasn't in the Brotherhood was because he's just too arrogant. He probably considers himself above them, and wouldn't want to take orders from the Brain (orders from Trigon were acceptable...because, c'mon, he's a ''frickin' demon''). Wintergreen was in the Brotherhood because he'd broken away from Slade's service (we hadn't seen him with Slade since his first appearance as his butler). - [[Tropers/GracieGeek Gracie Geek]]

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*** Wouldn't that be more at home on the WildMassGuessing page for [[WMG/TeenTitans Teen Titans]]? I figured that the reason Slade wasn't in the Brotherhood was because he's just too arrogant. He probably considers himself above them, and wouldn't want to take orders from the Brain (orders from Trigon were acceptable...because, c'mon, he's a ''frickin' demon''). Wintergreen was in the Brotherhood because he'd broken away from Slade's service (we hadn't seen him with Slade since his first appearance as his butler). - [[Tropers/GracieGeek Gracie Geek]]
18th Apr '18 11:07:42 AM costanton11
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* In the episode "Overdrive", this troper initially considered the ending where Cyborg and the rest of the Titans to use a series of incredibly realistic holograms to beat the villain Billy Numerous a bit of a BigLippedAlligatorMoment that came out of freakin' nowhere. Then he realized two things: first off, Robin had used a hologram in "Masks", so that technology is not beyond the Titans. Secondly, the way the Titans beat Billy Numerous is the same way Billy had managed to keep the upper hand on a supercharged Cyborg throughout the episode: by tricking him into overtaxing his abilities. After Cyborg spent most of an episode convinced that he was a OneManArmy and nearly killing himself in the process, this final battle was about him stepping back and letting Billy exhaust himself. It fits nicely with the episode's theme of realizing [[AnAesop you're an individual and can only do so much in a day.]] ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' has some pretty damn good writing. -@/RomanticistCaveman
** Even more so, Billy's power is based on dividing like a cell. Remember when he couldn't divide anymore? He hit the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayflick_limit Hayflick limit.]] -@/CarlHummus
* At the start of Season 5, the Brotherhood of Evil inducts into their ranks most of the villains the Teen Titans had fought up to that point in time, including a couple who had actually ''died'' in their earlier appearances. This seems like a PlotHole until you remember: at the end of Season 4, Slade broke open the gates to Hell. When that happened, we saw several beams of light shoot out of the gateway; one of these went into Slade's body, restoring the flesh that he lost when he became undead, but we never saw where the other beams went. If we assume those were the souls of dead villains escaping from Hell, it all makes a lot more sense. -@/RavenWilder
** Speaking of Slade and The Brotherhood of Evil, some fans were complaining how the newly resurrected Slade wasn’t in the Brotherhood, but his butler Wintergreen was. This could’ve been done for the sake of a cameo and cramming as many villains as they could into the Brotherhood, but there’s also that Jericho, one of the Titans being hunted down, is Slade’s son in the comics. Perhaps Slade sent Wintergreen to save his son from the Brotherhood when he couldn’t for whatever reasons; also in his very, very few appearances, Wintergreen's solely been Slade's assistant and never directly fought the Titans until Season 5. -GlassOwl

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* In the episode "Overdrive", this troper initially considered the ending where Cyborg and the rest of the Titans to use a series of incredibly realistic holograms to beat the villain Billy Numerous a bit of a BigLippedAlligatorMoment that came out of freakin' nowhere. Then he realized two things: first off, Robin had used a hologram in "Masks", so that technology is not beyond the Titans. Secondly, the way the Titans beat Billy Numerous is the same way Billy had managed to keep the upper hand on a supercharged Cyborg throughout the episode: by tricking him into overtaxing his abilities. After Cyborg spent most of an episode convinced that he was a OneManArmy and nearly killing himself in the process, this final battle was about him stepping back and letting Billy exhaust himself. It fits nicely with the episode's theme of realizing [[AnAesop you're an individual and can only do so much in a day.]] ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' has some pretty damn good writing. -@/RomanticistCaveman\n
** Even more so, Billy's power is based on dividing like a cell. Remember when he couldn't divide anymore? He hit the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayflick_limit Hayflick limit.]] -@/CarlHummus
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* At the start of Season 5, the Brotherhood of Evil inducts into their ranks most of the villains the Teen Titans had fought up to that point in time, including a couple who had actually ''died'' in their earlier appearances. This seems like a PlotHole until you remember: at the end of Season 4, Slade broke open the gates to Hell. When that happened, we saw several beams of light shoot out of the gateway; one of these went into Slade's body, restoring the flesh that he lost when he became undead, but we never saw where the other beams went. If we assume those were the souls of dead villains escaping from Hell, it all makes a lot more sense. -@/RavenWilder\n
** Speaking of Slade and The Brotherhood of Evil, some fans were complaining how the newly resurrected Slade wasn’t in the Brotherhood, but his butler Wintergreen was. This could’ve been done for the sake of a cameo and cramming as many villains as they could into the Brotherhood, but there’s also that Jericho, one of the Titans being hunted down, is Slade’s son in the comics. Perhaps Slade sent Wintergreen to save his son from the Brotherhood when he couldn’t for whatever reasons; also in his very, very few appearances, Wintergreen's solely been Slade's assistant and never directly fought the Titans until Season 5. -GlassOwl



*** Speaking of characters coming back to life possibly from Trigon's defeat, this led me to an interesting theory. Remember that everyone on Earth save for the Titans were turned to stone, and were changed back with Trigon's defeat. Well, I think that's how Terra was restored to life. Somehow, her petrification was undone by a completely unrelated spell being broken (probably Slade getting his flesh and blood back and releasing other people's as well). Of course, I never read the comic series that tied in, so I wouldn't know if there was a more clear explanation. -@/OrpheumZero

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*** Speaking of characters coming back to life possibly from Trigon's defeat, this led me to an interesting theory. Remember that everyone on Earth save for the Titans were turned to stone, and were changed back with Trigon's defeat. Well, I think that's how Terra was restored to life. Somehow, her petrification was undone by a completely unrelated spell being broken (probably Slade getting his flesh and blood back and releasing other people's as well). Of course, I never read the comic series that tied in, so I wouldn't know if there was a more clear explanation. -@/OrpheumZeroo
18th Apr '18 11:06:43 AM costanton11
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* "Things Change". Season 5's big idea is that Beast Boy has to learn to grow up. We all thought the Brotherhood of Evil, his old nemeses, would do it. We thought his early days with the Doom Patrol would handle it. Nope, by the end of the Doom Patrol cameo, we learned his first name. By the time the Brotherhood was beaten, he made a brain freeze joke (all the Titans groaned at that one). No, the point of the last episode wasn't to [[ShipSinking sink ships.]] It wasn't a desperate attempt to write off Terra. It was there to remind you there are more things than heroes and villains out there. Terra lost her powers and she was glad for it; she couldn't handle being a hero or villain. In the last scene, Beast Boy finally gets it through his head that there is more than Black or White morals out there and is finally ready to move onto the next stage of his life. The ep is quite a bit of CerebusSyndrome from normal (and I expected a Batman cameo based on the title), but here we are. - @/{{Chadius}}
* Another example for me is the much-maligned episode "Troq", usually accused of being {{anvilicious}} about how racism is bad. And it really is, but there are two subtler, much braver {{aesop}}s hidden within it. One is that racism isn't always confined to {{Card Carrying Villain}}s. Val-Yor's presented as a genuine hero who really is (all {{Alternate Character Interpretation}}s about the Locrix being innocent victims aside) trying to save the galaxy. At one point, he even orders Starfire to leave him behind and save herself - and yet he's also a racist bastard toward Starfire. Now usually, in a television show where an otherwise sympathetic character is a racist, he'll learn his lesson by the end of the episode, which leads to the BrokenAesop that it's somehow up to the victim to win over racists. But Val-Yor doesn't change, and the Titans instead accept that there will always be people like him, and simply refuse to tolerate his behavior and tell him he has to leave. This is actually a much more subdued and realistic aesop than the usual message that either only complete monsters can be racists, or that any racist who's not a complete monster can always be redeemed by the victim working hard enough to prove herself. - [=BritBllt=]
** Speaking of "Troq," I knew many people who thought of, when asked if he faced prejudice, Cyborg saying that he was "half robot" as a cop-out from saying that he was black. However, when thinking about it, race isn't the only source of discrimination as what Cyborg could've been referencing is that the handicapped (physically disabled people, amputees), which he's technically a part of, are often discriminated against as well. So it wasn't Cyborg copping out of referencing himself as part of the more-expected minority group rather than referencing a more-overlooked one. - Tropers/{{LLSmoothJ}}

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* "Things Change". Season 5's big idea is that Beast Boy has to learn to grow up. We all thought the Brotherhood of Evil, his old nemeses, would do it. We thought his early days with the Doom Patrol would handle it. Nope, by the end of the Doom Patrol cameo, we learned his first name. By the time the Brotherhood was beaten, he made a brain freeze joke (all the Titans groaned at that one). No, the point of the last episode wasn't to [[ShipSinking sink ships.]] It wasn't a desperate attempt to write off Terra. It was there to remind you there are more things than heroes and villains out there. Terra lost her powers and she was glad for it; she couldn't handle being a hero or villain. In the last scene, Beast Boy finally gets it through his head that there is more than Black or White morals out there and is finally ready to move onto the next stage of his life. The ep is quite a bit of CerebusSyndrome from normal (and I expected a Batman cameo based on the title), but here we are. - @/{{Chadius}}
are.
* Another example for me is the much-maligned episode "Troq", usually accused of being {{anvilicious}} about how racism is bad. And it really is, but there are two subtler, much braver {{aesop}}s hidden within it. One is that racism isn't always confined to {{Card Carrying Villain}}s. Val-Yor's presented as a genuine hero who really is (all {{Alternate Character Interpretation}}s about the Locrix being innocent victims aside) trying to save the galaxy. At one point, he even orders Starfire to leave him behind and save herself - and yet he's also a racist bastard toward Starfire. Now usually, in a television show where an otherwise sympathetic character is a racist, he'll learn his lesson by the end of the episode, which leads to the BrokenAesop that it's somehow up to the victim to win over racists. But Val-Yor doesn't change, and the Titans instead accept that there will always be people like him, and simply refuse to tolerate his behavior and tell him he has to leave. This is actually a much more subdued and realistic aesop than the usual message that either only complete monsters can be racists, or that any racist who's not a complete monster can always be redeemed by the victim working hard enough to prove herself. - [=BritBllt=]\n
** Speaking of "Troq," I knew many people who thought of, when asked if he faced prejudice, Cyborg saying that he was "half robot" as a cop-out from saying that he was black. However, when thinking about it, race isn't the only source of discrimination as what Cyborg could've been referencing is that the handicapped (physically disabled people, amputees), which he's technically a part of, are often discriminated against as well. So it wasn't Cyborg copping out of referencing himself as part of the more-expected minority group rather than referencing a more-overlooked one. - Tropers/{{LLSmoothJ}}
9th Apr '18 5:22:11 PM hellwolf99
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* A minor case, but Cyborg's ''spectacularly'' unhealthy diet makes sense considering his body is primarily made up of cybernetics with a few organic components. He doesn't need to worry about nutrients, he just needs carbs to make energy for his biological parts.
8th Apr '18 6:38:44 PM nombretomado
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* Mother Mae-Eye, straight out. She plans on baking the Teen Titans into a pie. But they've been eating pies the whole episode, so does that mean [[ImAHumanitarian they've been eating people]]? It would explain how she got them, but it also means that [[PoliceAreUseless no one's figured out she's the one killing the people she bakes]]! I'm seeing HanselAndGretel parallels, here.

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* Mother Mae-Eye, straight out. She plans on baking the Teen Titans into a pie. But they've been eating pies the whole episode, so does that mean [[ImAHumanitarian they've been eating people]]? It would explain how she got them, but it also means that [[PoliceAreUseless no one's figured out she's the one killing the people she bakes]]! I'm seeing HanselAndGretel Literature/HanselAndGretel parallels, here.
7th Feb '18 5:09:13 PM nombretomado
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* Beast Boy is the one most at ease with the sillier villains like Control Freak, The Amazing Mumbo, and [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs the Source]], even beating Robin who comes from the same city as TheJoker and the Creeper (so silly ''[[EvenEvilHasStandards Joker called him a lunatic]]''). Seems strange... Until you realize he comes from the ''ComicBook/DoomPatrol''. Before being kicked out, he faced foes who, like [[http://www.headinjurytheater.com/article59.htm The Codpiece]], made the Creeper seem downright well-adjusted.

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* Beast Boy is the one most at ease with the sillier villains like Control Freak, The Amazing Mumbo, and [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs the Source]], even beating Robin who comes from the same city as TheJoker ComicBook/TheJoker and the Creeper (so silly ''[[EvenEvilHasStandards Joker called him a lunatic]]''). Seems strange... Until you realize he comes from the ''ComicBook/DoomPatrol''. Before being kicked out, he faced foes who, like [[http://www.headinjurytheater.com/article59.htm The Codpiece]], made the Creeper seem downright well-adjusted.



** And of course, Robin's suspicion that Slade could still be alive because they {{Never Found The Body}} makes sense when you realize that, as Batman's former sidekick, he has more experience with {{Joker Immunity}} than most, having fought the [[TheJoker trope namer]].

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** And of course, Robin's suspicion that Slade could still be alive because they {{Never Found The Body}} makes sense when you realize that, as Batman's former sidekick, he has more experience with {{Joker Immunity}} than most, having fought the [[TheJoker [[ComicBook/TheJoker trope namer]].
21st Nov '17 4:04:40 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** Robin was trained by Batman to be GenreSavvy, even while offering Terra a second chance. Plasmus and Cinderblock have been employed by Slade before, and Terra has already tried to kill them once. Thus it would be like him to keep tabs on all his team members as they're separated, knowing if they need help.

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** Robin was trained by Batman to be GenreSavvy, Batman, even while offering Terra a second chance. Plasmus and Cinderblock have been employed by Slade before, and Terra has already tried to kill them once. Thus it would be like him to keep tabs on all his team members as they're separated, knowing if they need help.



** Alternatively, it could be Slade's version of BullyingADragon. Batman would be GenreSavvy enough to know that Robin wouldn't steal from him without a good reason, and would be [[PapaWolf livid to hear what Slade has done to his adoptive son]]. It's probably for the best, for Slade at least, that the Titans confronted him instead . ..

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** Alternatively, it could be Slade's version of BullyingADragon. Batman would be GenreSavvy enough to know that Robin wouldn't steal from him without a good reason, and would be [[PapaWolf livid to hear what Slade has done to his adoptive son]]. It's probably for the best, for Slade at least, that the Titans confronted him instead . ..
14th Oct '17 12:07:42 PM RandomReader
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**It's possible that his choice of lair wasn't as stupid as it seems. First, he gave Terra that special suit which interfaced with her nervous system and allowed him control over her body. Much like with Robin and the nanites, he probably didn't expect her to be able to overcome that. Indeed, the first time we see Terra try to remove the suit, she's unable to do so. Second, choosing an extinct volcano was part of [[SinkOrSwimMentor helping Terra learn to control her powers.]] Terra has two options when they first move in to their little cave: [[DieOrFly control her powers, or else.]]
8th Aug '17 10:40:00 AM goldenpurple
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* In the episode 'Haunted', you could say the gas that made Robin think Slade was there was Scarecrow's fear gas.
26th Jul '17 1:44:49 PM DanMat6288
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* In "Revolution", Mad Mod cited the phrase "those who do not learn from history ar doomed to repeat it" to a British author. The phrase was actually a reference to the words of George Santayana, an ''American'' author. CriticalResearchFailure or just [[EvilBrit Mad Mod]] refusing to acknowledge something as American?
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