History Fridge / StarTrektheOriginalSeries

26th May '16 9:51:00 AM SteveMB
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** Also, Starfleet's decision to drop the charges against Spock was in response to "images from Talos Four". The quarantine was entirely dependent on the Talosians, who could break it any time they wanted -- hence, there was no point in punishing Spock for the violation.
1st Apr '16 7:29:35 PM SteveMB
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* In "Spock's Brain," Bones uses The Teacher to get the smarts necessary to reinstall Spock's brain. Unfortunately, it wears off before he's finished, and using it again will kill him. So why didn't they bring down Nurse Chapel or Doctor M'Benga to take over, and have either one already standing by with The Teacher as soon as Bones started faltering?

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* In "Spock's Brain," Bones uses The Teacher to get the smarts necessary to reinstall Spock's brain. Unfortunately, it wears off before he's finished, and using it again will kill him. So why didn't they bring down Nurse Chapel or Doctor M'Benga to take over, and have either one already standing by with The Teacher as soon as Bones started faltering?faltering?
** For that matter, they could have just had Scotty use the Teacher -- granted, he's not a doctor, but neither is Kara and that didn't prevent her from using the Teacher to learn how to remove an intact brain and install it into the Controller interface.
18th Dec '15 1:52:05 PM HeraldAlberich
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** There were other yeomen besides Rand; she wasn't extremely important. Also, she disappears from the series just before "Court Martial" or "The Menagerie" depending on whether you're going by production order or airdate; both episodes feature the Enterprise visiting Starbase 11, which would be the first opportunity for one of the crew to leave for a new post.

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** There were other yeomen besides Rand; she wasn't extremely important. Also, she disappears from the series just before "Court Martial" or "The Menagerie" depending on whether you're going by production order or airdate; both episodes feature the Enterprise ''Enterprise'' visiting Starbase 11, which would be the first opportunity for one of the crew to leave for a new post.



* In the episode "Where No Man Has Gone Before," Kirk's best friend Gary Mitchell is zapped by an energy barrier which amplifies his ESP abilities. Gary starts the episode with jet black hair and ends with distinct grey streaks. Remember, he is already stated to possess heightened ESP abilities which technically make it part of his biology - his ESP is powered ''by his own lifeforce!'' On repeated viewing, this actually increases Kirk's dilemma; if he chooses to keep Mitchell alive instead of kill or abandon him, Kirk would almost certainly recover his friend's sanity due to losing his powers through the passage of time - as long as he runs the risk of Mitchell destroying the ship first...

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* In the episode "Where No Man Has Gone Before," Kirk's best friend Gary Mitchell is zapped by an energy barrier which amplifies his ESP abilities. Gary starts the episode with jet black hair and ends with distinct grey streaks. Remember, he is already stated to possess heightened ESP abilities which technically make it part of his biology - his biology--his ESP is powered ''by his own lifeforce!'' On repeated viewing, this actually increases Kirk's dilemma; if he chooses to keep Mitchell alive instead of kill or abandon him, Kirk would almost certainly recover his friend's sanity due to losing his powers through the passage of time - as time--as long as he runs the risk of Mitchell destroying the ship first...



* In "The Menagerie", we learn that visiting Talos IV carries the "only capital offense on the books" under General Order 7, which seems both unusually draconian and bizarrely specific. At the end of the episode, we find that the Talosians' powers of illusion extend far beyond their own planet, and that the "Commodore Mendez" who left the Starbase with the Enterprise was a fabrication... General Order 7 was created by the Talosians themselves.

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* In "The Menagerie", we learn that visiting Talos IV carries the "only capital offense on the books" under General Order 7, which seems both unusually draconian and bizarrely specific. At the end of the episode, we find that the Talosians' powers of illusion extend far beyond their own planet, and that the "Commodore Mendez" who left the Starbase with the Enterprise ''Enterprise'' was a fabrication... General Order 7 was created by the Talosians themselves.



** At least that was Evil Spock doing the mind raping, so it's only horror for the viewer because of what it does to Bones. It doesn't affect the normal character. However, in ''Star Trek VI'', regular Spock forcibly mind-melds with the junior Vulcan officer on the Enterprise who's been working with the bad guys. She makes faint mewing sounds at first, and then she SCREAMS. During all this, everyone on the bridge is watching and looking really uncomfortable about it. So, basically, Spock mind-raped a women to get information that would prevent a war. The needs of the many etc. etc.

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** At least that was Evil Spock doing the mind raping, so it's only horror for the viewer because of what it does to Bones. It doesn't affect the normal character. However, in ''Star Trek VI'', regular Spock forcibly mind-melds with the junior Vulcan officer on the Enterprise ''Enterprise'' who's been working with the bad guys. She makes faint mewing sounds at first, and then she SCREAMS. During all this, everyone on the bridge is watching and looking really uncomfortable about it. So, basically, Spock mind-raped a women to get information that would prevent a war. The needs of the many etc. etc.



* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'': S1E11 "Miri" -- The adults are all dead. Once a child hits puberty, s/he dies. ''Where are the babies coming from?''

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* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'': S1E11 "Miri" -- The "Miri"--The adults are all dead. Once a child hits puberty, s/he dies. ''Where are the babies coming from?''



** Dr. Mc Coy asks the same question you did, about fifteen or twenty minutes into the episode. The reason you didn't hear it is that he uses an arcane expression in order to get around the censors.
--> '''Spock.''' It's illogical. It does not follow. All the adults on this planet died three hundred years ago, but there are children in the streets.
--> '''Kirk.''' Who die when they enter adolescence.
--> '''Mc Coy.''' But -- ''how do they keep their line going?''

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** Dr. Mc Coy [=McCoy=] asks the same question you did, about fifteen or twenty minutes into the episode. The reason you didn't hear it is that he uses an arcane expression in order to get around the censors.
--> '''Spock.''' --->'''Spock:''' It's illogical. It does not follow. All the adults on this planet died three hundred years ago, but there are children in the streets.
--> '''Kirk.'''
streets.\\
'''Kirk:'''
Who die when they enter adolescence.
--> '''Mc Coy.''' But -- ''how
adolescence.\\
'''[=McCoy=]:''' But--''how
do they keep their line going?''



** This was discussed in the ExpandedUniverse novel "Federation" - transporters work on the quantum level rather than just the molecular level. Rather than simply producing a copy that thinks it's the original (molecular level) at the destination, it converts your specific atoms to energy, beams them to a target location, and then reassembles them.

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** This was discussed in the ExpandedUniverse novel "Federation" - transporters "Federation"--transporters work on the quantum level rather than just the molecular level. Rather than simply producing a copy that thinks it's the original (molecular level) at the destination, it converts your specific atoms to energy, beams them to a target location, and then reassembles them.



* In "Plato's Stepchildren", the PowerTrio encounter a race of aliens who can -- and will -- force others to do anything for their amusement. One of their victims was Spock, a telepath. It's lucky they didn't think of forcing him to use his powers on anyone.

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* In "Plato's Stepchildren", the PowerTrio encounter a race of aliens who can -- and will -- force can--and will--force others to do anything for their amusement. One of their victims was Spock, a telepath. It's lucky they didn't think of forcing him to use his powers on anyone.



* OK, somebody, I must know: Who pilots the Enterprise when Kirk is asleep? No one can pull continuous 24-hour shifts, so somebody else must be in the captain's chair for at least a few hours. If a computer could do it, then why have a captain and bridge crew at all? Someone needs to write a fanfic about this.

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* OK, somebody, I must know: Who pilots the Enterprise ''Enterprise'' when Kirk is asleep? No one can pull continuous 24-hour shifts, so somebody else must be in the captain's chair for at least a few hours. If a computer could do it, then why have a captain and bridge crew at all? Someone needs to write a fanfic about this.



** There's presumably a night crew -- on TNG, Data usually ran the bridge at "night" (since he was an android and didn't need to sleep) with a different set of officers than the usual cast of the show. We explicitly see him end one shift and then later begin another as the bookends to a {{Spotlight}} episode. When he takes over at the end of the episode he relieves Worf. So it appears most of the senior staff are in command at some point while Picard & Riker are off doing something else. Crusher also mentions taking the "night" command shift on occasion because she liked running the ship and wanted to keep the command skills she picked up at the Academy and throughout her career sharp.

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** There's presumably a night crew -- on crew--on TNG, Data usually ran the bridge at "night" (since he was an android and didn't need to sleep) with a different set of officers than the usual cast of the show. We explicitly see him end one shift and then later begin another as the bookends to a {{Spotlight}} episode. When he takes over at the end of the episode he relieves Worf. So it appears most of the senior staff are in command at some point while Picard & Riker are off doing something else. Crusher also mentions taking the "night" command shift on occasion because she liked running the ship and wanted to keep the command skills she picked up at the Academy and throughout her career sharp.



** Allow ''Series/RobotChicken'' to explain what happens during TNG's night shift: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4ApQrbhQp8



** It is canon that other species/planets use their own schedules -- Deep Space Nine runs on the 26-hour Bajoran clock, not the 24-hour Earth one. And while night shift may not be crewed by the highest-ranking bridge officers (like Kirk and Spock), it's not being crewed by a bunch of cadets who don't know what they're doing or anything. To once again use one of the later series as proof, the Enterprise-D is run on night shift by senior officers like Data and Beverly Crusher (though of course Data is a special case since he can work literally all the time as an android).

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** It is canon that other species/planets use their own schedules -- Deep schedules--Deep Space Nine runs on the 26-hour Bajoran clock, not the 24-hour Earth one. And while night shift may not be crewed by the highest-ranking bridge officers (like Kirk and Spock), it's not being crewed by a bunch of cadets who don't know what they're doing or anything. To once again use one of the later series as proof, the Enterprise-D ''Enterprise''-D is run on night shift by senior officers like Data and Beverly Crusher (though of course Data is a special case since he can work literally all the time as an android).


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** Because it's really hard to (legally) take command from a superior officer who doesn't want to give it to you, especially one of flag rank (above Captain). Starfleet officers are expected to be sensible enough to know when they're unfit for command and remove themselves--see, for example, the scene where Spock resigns command after Kirk proves that he's emotionally compromised in [[Film/StarTrek the 2009 film]]. No one has to charge him with anything; he shows himself off the bridge. Stocker, arrogant bastard that he is, ''isn't'' that sensible.
28th Oct '15 6:30:00 AM StarTropes
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** Okay, but once it became clear that Stocker had no friggin' idea what he was doing, why didn't Sulu or Uhura throw him off the bridge and take charge?
5th Sep '15 7:49:09 AM StarTropes
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** Stocker was promoted to commodore of a starbase, implying a career of rising through rear-echelon administrative positions. His claims were just a haughty way of saying "I have seniority and I outrank you, so I'm in command here". Of course, given that Stocker is not just inexperienced but ''jaw-droppingly incompetent'' (a first-year cadet would've known that taking a shortcut through ''the Romulan Neutral Zone'' was a dumb idea), Starfleet clearly has some personnel policies to review...

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** Stocker was promoted to commodore of a starbase, implying a career of rising through rear-echelon administrative positions. His claims were just a haughty way of saying "I have seniority and I outrank you, so I'm in command here". Of course, given that Stocker is not just inexperienced but ''jaw-droppingly incompetent'' (a first-year cadet would've known that taking a shortcut through ''the Romulan Neutral Zone'' was a dumb idea), Starfleet clearly has some personnel policies to review...review...
* In "Spock's Brain," Bones uses The Teacher to get the smarts necessary to reinstall Spock's brain. Unfortunately, it wears off before he's finished, and using it again will kill him. So why didn't they bring down Nurse Chapel or Doctor M'Benga to take over, and have either one already standing by with The Teacher as soon as Bones started faltering?
1st Jul '15 11:53:40 AM Snarf
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*** Because Kirk was able to override the ''Reliant'''s shields to attack Khan in Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan. That could have been a subsequent technological advance, though.

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*** Because Kirk was able to override the ''Reliant'''s shields to attack Khan in Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan. ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan''. That could have been a subsequent technological advance, though.however, made in response to the previous two incidents.
1st Jul '15 11:52:19 AM Snarf
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*** Because Kirk was able to override the ''Reliant'''s shields to attack Khan in Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan. That could have been a subsequent technological advance, though.
27th Jun '15 9:27:24 AM Thinker
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** Though that might be beyond the Platonians' power, since they're telekineticse, not mind controllers. They can force people to say and do physical things,but not something like a mind meld.

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** Though that might be beyond the Platonians' power, since they're telekineticse, telekinetics, not mind controllers. They can force people to say and do physical things,but things, but not something like a mind meld.
27th Jun '15 9:25:23 AM Thinker
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** Though that might be beyond the Platonians' power, since they're telekineticse, not mind controllers. They can force people to say and do physical things,but not something like a mind meld.
22nd May '15 8:26:53 AM Fleetlord
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* In "The Deadly Years," with Kirk, Spock, and Scotty incapacitated by the radiation aging, Commodore Stocker assumes command--despite, as Spock points out, the fact that Stocker has never commanded a starship. So how the hell did he get promoted to commodore? And on that same note, he claims that he'd be better than "a junior officer with far less experience." How can he say that if he ''has'' no experience? And isn't Sulu experienced enough? After all, he's taken command previously. Someone should've brought this up--or thrown Stocker's own words back at him after the battle where he froze up and couldn't do anything useful.

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* In "The Deadly Years," with Kirk, Spock, and Scotty incapacitated by the radiation aging, Commodore Stocker assumes command--despite, as Spock points out, the fact that Stocker has never commanded a starship. So how the hell did he get promoted to commodore? And on that same note, he claims that he'd be better than "a junior officer with far less experience." How can he say that if he ''has'' no experience? And isn't Sulu experienced enough? After all, he's taken command previously. Someone should've brought this up--or thrown Stocker's own words back at him after the battle where he froze up and couldn't do anything useful.useful.
** Stocker was promoted to commodore of a starbase, implying a career of rising through rear-echelon administrative positions. His claims were just a haughty way of saying "I have seniority and I outrank you, so I'm in command here". Of course, given that Stocker is not just inexperienced but ''jaw-droppingly incompetent'' (a first-year cadet would've known that taking a shortcut through ''the Romulan Neutral Zone'' was a dumb idea), Starfleet clearly has some personnel policies to review...
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