History Fridge / StarTrekTheNextGeneration

30th Jul '16 7:42:20 PM Whiplasherman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The first time I saw "Datalore," I dismissed part of the plot as just "[[CreatorsPet Wesley]] is right but gets [[CassandraTruth ignored]] because he's a kid". I saw it again recently and realized that there's a lot more going on. The first time Wesley gets yelled at, they do listen to ''what'' he says (Riker goes to check his theory, and finds some evidence that he's wrong); the reason he gets hassled is that ''how'' he said it was unacceptably rude--not a small deal in a quasimilitary organization like Starfleet. The second time (the infamous "Shut up, Wesley!" scene), if you look closely at Picard's face (and consider that right after that scene, he [[spoiler: sends security to arrest "Data", who--as Wesley realized first--has been replaced by his evil twin]]), you can see that he's figuring everything out for himself. Meanwhile, this annoying kid is talking and talking while he's trying to think and not telling him anything he doesn't know. "Shut up, Wesley" is not an instance of AdultsAreUseless--it's an instance of UnwantedAssistance.

to:

* The first time I saw "Datalore," I dismissed part of the plot as just "[[CreatorsPet Wesley]] is right but gets [[CassandraTruth ignored]] because he's a kid". I saw it again recently and realized that there's a lot more going on. The first time Wesley gets yelled at, they do listen to ''what'' he says (Riker goes to check his theory, and finds some evidence that he's wrong); the reason he gets hassled is that ''how'' he said it was unacceptably rude--not a small deal in a quasimilitary organization like Starfleet. The second time (the infamous "Shut up, Wesley!" scene), if you look closely at Picard's face (and consider that right after that scene, he [[spoiler: sends security to arrest monitor "Data", who--as Wesley realized first--has been replaced by his evil twin]]), you can see that he's figuring everything out for himself. Meanwhile, this annoying kid is talking and talking while he's trying to think and not telling him anything he doesn't know. "Shut up, Wesley" is not an instance of AdultsAreUseless--it's an instance of UnwantedAssistance.UnwantedAssistance.
**Part of it is possibly self-recrimination by Picard that he didn't catch on as fast as Wesley did. You can see the reactions on their faces when [["Data"]] call Number One "Riker" rather than the usual formal address by rank, and it slams home when [["Data"]] doesn't understand a common command. And there may also have been some disapproval of the manner of Wesley's previous comments, [[calling out a highly dangerous android in the middle of the command center, rather than taking aside a superior officer and relaying his suspicions so as to allow Lore to be lulled into a false sense of security.]]. Picard's calm response to Dr. Crusher's objections seem almost apologetic. "I want you to keep an eye on your son" sounded more like [["Go with him and help him save the day, he seems to be the one who knows what's really going on"]]
18th Jul '16 8:05:16 AM longWriter
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The first time I saw "Datalore," I dismissed part of the plot as just "[[CreatorsPet Wesley]] is right but gets [[CassandraTruth ignored]] because he's a kid". I saw it again recently and realized that there's a lot more going on. The first time Wesley gets yelled at, they do listen to ''what'' he says (Riker goes to check his theory, and finds some evidence that he's wrong); the reason he gets hassled is that ''how'' he said it was unacceptably rude--not a small deal in a quasimilitary organization like Starfleet. The second time (the infamous "Shut up, Wesley!" scene), if you look closely at Picard's face (and consider that right after that scene, he [[spoiler: sends security to arrest "Data", who--as Wesley realized first--has been replaced by his evil twin]]), you can see that he's figuring everything out for himself. Meanwhile, this annoying kid is talking and talking while he's trying to think and not telling him anything he doesn't know. "Shut up, Wesley" is not an instance of AdultsAreUseless--it's an instance of StopHelpingMe.

to:

* The first time I saw "Datalore," I dismissed part of the plot as just "[[CreatorsPet Wesley]] is right but gets [[CassandraTruth ignored]] because he's a kid". I saw it again recently and realized that there's a lot more going on. The first time Wesley gets yelled at, they do listen to ''what'' he says (Riker goes to check his theory, and finds some evidence that he's wrong); the reason he gets hassled is that ''how'' he said it was unacceptably rude--not a small deal in a quasimilitary organization like Starfleet. The second time (the infamous "Shut up, Wesley!" scene), if you look closely at Picard's face (and consider that right after that scene, he [[spoiler: sends security to arrest "Data", who--as Wesley realized first--has been replaced by his evil twin]]), you can see that he's figuring everything out for himself. Meanwhile, this annoying kid is talking and talking while he's trying to think and not telling him anything he doesn't know. "Shut up, Wesley" is not an instance of AdultsAreUseless--it's an instance of StopHelpingMe.UnwantedAssistance.
25th Apr '16 6:58:32 AM ambessalion
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The novel Q&A suggests that Q's plan was to prevent the Borg from discovering an artificial planet, that he intended for Picard to discover first. Picard ends up saving existence once again, by laughing.
11th Apr '16 6:46:08 AM LordInsane
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Possibly Mendon was very slightly exaggerating, and Benzites ''are'' willing to forgo a full analysis and finding a solution if the problem seems immediate and terminal, they just have exaggerated standards for 'immediate' and 'terminal' in space-faring situations. There is also that they apparently can explain what they've found before the full analysis and solution if asked, Benzite superiors might also have the cultural difference of often asking the people under them if they've found anything at no prompting at all.



----

to:

----
14th Feb '16 1:07:53 PM Darth_Rasputin32898
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Or maybe it is the simple matter of the Regeneration episode being a Retcon of established Star Trek canon. Until that episode, Q Who was the first official contact with the Borg. Though there was an episode in Voyager where it was established that 7 of 9's parents did research on the Borg, even though at time first contact hadn't been made.
13th Feb '16 11:30:45 PM TairaMai
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** In ''StarTrek'' lore, the Treaty of Algeron was negotiated by ''subspace radio'' due to the Romulans being paranoid. The Federation by contrast, is a democracy. As SfDebris points out, a democracy has to play to the masses. The Federation got an end to the war and could rationalize it as "we don't sneak around" and it prevents another war. The Romulans could see the treaty as a RestrainingBolt on the Starfleet hardliners and, as stated above (and in the shows) Starfleet engineers could have won the arms race with the Romulans.
1st Jan '16 3:01:27 PM Nyperold
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In "The Pegasus", Picard is ordered to help an admiral salvage what later turns out to be a phased cloaking device: a device that would allow a capable ship to turn invisible and pass through solid objects. Earlier in the episode, that same admiral dismisses the tone of his earlier comments by saying the mission brought back "ghosts of the past." Now, what is it ghosts are supposed to be able to do again?
18th Dec '15 9:17:18 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the ''TNG'' episode "Samaritan Snare," Picard recounts to Wesley how he got into a fight with Nausicaans, only to get stabbed through the heart. He remembers looking at his wound and laughing for some reason. SFDebris theorizes that it's because when Q lets Picard relive that scenario during "Tapestry" (after making himself worse off earlier), he's laughing because he knows everything's in order once again. Even if he's going to die in the future, he's going to die as a person who actually did something with his life.

to:

* In the ''TNG'' episode "Samaritan Snare," Picard recounts to Wesley how he got into a fight with Nausicaans, only to get stabbed through the heart. He remembers looking at his wound and laughing for some reason. SFDebris WebSite/SFDebris theorizes that it's because when Q lets Picard relive that scenario during "Tapestry" (after making himself worse off earlier), he's laughing because he knows everything's in order once again. Even if he's going to die in the future, he's going to die as a person who actually did something with his life.
18th Dec '15 9:17:10 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* This one belongs to SFDebris. In "Hide and Q," First-Season Picard quotes ''Hamlet'' without irony about how awesome humans are. Q vanishes in a huff. The next time we see him, he introduces Picard to the Borg, and ''that'' ultimately resulted in Picard's hate-filled rant in ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact.'' Who's laughing now?

to:

* This one belongs to SFDebris.WebSite/SFDebris. In "Hide and Q," First-Season Picard quotes ''Hamlet'' without irony about how awesome humans are. Q vanishes in a huff. The next time we see him, he introduces Picard to the Borg, and ''that'' ultimately resulted in Picard's hate-filled rant in ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact.'' Who's laughing now?
30th Oct '15 9:28:36 AM jaquellae
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** There may be another reason: Starfleet Command expressed doubts concerning Picard and the Borg as late as the movie "First Contact". If they leave Riker as first officer, they leave an experienced officer with a proved ability to command, intimate knowledge of the Enterprise, a history of speaking up when he thinks something is wrong, and the trust of Picard. The events of "First Contact", as well as the events in "Voyager" concerning the Borg. give Starfleet Command enough confidence in Picard by "Nemesis" for them to offer Riker his own command in case anything "hinky" happens with Picard. This time, he accepts, with Troi by his side.

to:

** There may be another reason: Starfleet Command expressed doubts concerning Picard and the Borg as late as the movie "First Contact". If they leave Riker as first officer, they leave an experienced officer with a proved ability to command, intimate knowledge of the Enterprise, a history of speaking up when he thinks something is wrong, and the trust of Picard, just in case anything "hinky" happens with Picard. The events of "First Contact", as well as the events in "Voyager" concerning the Borg. Borg, give Starfleet Command enough confidence in Picard by "Nemesis" for them to offer Riker his own command in case anything "hinky" happens with Picard.command. This time, he accepts, with Troi by his side.
This list shows the last 10 events of 125. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.StarTrekTheNextGeneration