History Fridge / StarTrekTheNextGeneration

22nd Apr '17 9:28:14 PM Kayube
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** The Federation Council is the equivalent of the UN council. Each member world has its own representative/ambassador on the council, and governs its own internal affairs. The Federation (and its exploration/military arm, Starfleet) handle external affairs. This would explain, in part, why the Cardassians, Klingons, and Romulans are comparatively stronger and more "single minded" for their size - you're dealing with single races without the layers of bearocracy the the Federation has.

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** The Federation Council is the equivalent of the UN council. Each member world has its own representative/ambassador on the council, and governs its own internal affairs. The Federation (and its exploration/military arm, Starfleet) handle external affairs. This would explain, in part, why the Cardassians, Klingons, and Romulans are comparatively stronger and more "single minded" for their size - you're dealing with single races without the layers of bearocracy bureaucracy the the Federation has.has.
** This is probably intentional in and out of universe- the [[https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/2/27/Flag_of_the_United_Federation_of_Planets.svg/1280px-Flag_of_the_United_Federation_of_Planets.svg.png Federation's flag]] is pretty clearly inspired by the [[http://s3.amazonaws.com/libapps/customers/49/images/unflag.gif UN's flag]].
1st Apr '17 10:45:45 AM thatsnumberwang
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* If you actually sit down and think about the implications of Tasha's line in ''The Naked Now'' about growing up dodging gangs of marauding rapists until she was 15, then we potentially have an episode here where a former rape victim is driven to have sex against her will with at least one man/android and make-out with another (we don't know just how far she went with that random crewman that she kisses as the scene cuts out immediately afterwards but the potential is certainly there for heavy petting). No wonder she was so eager to make sure that Data never brought up the subject again. And on that note, we see from Troi, Crusher, and several other crewmen lining the halls that having an uncontrollable desire for sex was by no means limited to her - how many other men and women on-board ship with similar experiences in their past now have full memory of bedding their previously completely unwilling co-workers?
29th Mar '17 11:10:54 AM GunarmDyne
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Added DiffLines:

** WordOfDante is that Gene's idealistic view of the 24th century would have had everyone accepting their fates and waiting for death to take them. But Michael Pillar [[WriterRevolt rebelled against that]] in "The Bonding" when Wesley revealed he acted "as expected" but was still crushed by his father's death internally.
20th Mar '17 6:33:50 AM ShorinBJ
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* A civilization, knowing death was imminent sends out a probe with memories and stories of their lives up to the end, in the form of a scientists life. Picard experiences a fundamentally altering experience, one that he has good reasons to be emotionally uncomfortable with. But he never tells anyone. An entire civilization died and Picard, an archeologist even, is the only one who knows their story. The hopes of an entire people who get the best possible person to tell their story, and those dreams die with Picard being uncomfortable about his feelings.
** To be fair, he's a starship captain and it's a tv show. He is incredibly busy and we don't get to see everything that goes on. For all we can tell, he's been writing Caimin's memoires throughout the entire series after his experience. The only hint we get that he hasn't done anything is his conversation with Lieutenant Darrin, and that can be explained by him not publishing much yet. If you personally retcon that one, there's no reason to think he hasn't told their story. It's not like the dying wish of a civilization is pertinent to the show outside of that one episode. He could have written the whole story and published it without it ever being mentioned again on the show.

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* A civilization, knowing death was imminent imminent, sends out a probe with memories and stories of their lives up to the end, in the form of a scientists scientist's life. Picard experiences a fundamentally altering experience, one that he has good reasons to be emotionally uncomfortable with. But he never tells anyone. An entire civilization died and Picard, an archeologist even, is the only one who knows their story. The hopes of an entire people who get the best possible person to tell their story, and those dreams die with Picard being uncomfortable about his feelings.
** To be fair, he's a starship captain and it's a tv TV show. He is incredibly busy and we don't get to see everything that goes on. For all we can tell, he's been writing Caimin's memoires throughout the entire series after his experience. The only hint we get that he hasn't done anything is his conversation with Lieutenant Darrin, and that can be explained by him not publishing much yet. If you personally retcon that one, there's no reason to think he hasn't told their story. It's not like the dying wish of a civilization is pertinent to the show outside of that one episode. He could have written the whole story and published it without it ever being mentioned again on the show.



* In "Brothers," Noonien Soong, Data's creator, summons him to a planet and tells him the Data has "found his father". However, Soong doesn't ''act'' like a father, for reasons not the least of which was subverting Data's will to summon him, instead of simply calling him. He also states that he was only interested in the challenge of creating an artilect. Poor Data (and [[EvilTwin Lore]]) had an [[AbusiveParents abusive father]].

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* In "Brothers," Noonien Soong, Data's creator, summons him to a planet and tells him the Data he has "found his father". However, Soong doesn't ''act'' like a father, for reasons not the least of which was subverting Data's will to summon him, instead of simply calling him. He also states that he was only interested in the challenge of creating an artilect. Poor Data (and [[EvilTwin Lore]]) had an [[AbusiveParents abusive father]].



** It's pretty thin. Remember, Earth at the time is a planet of little consequence, whose biggest achievement to date is building a starship capable of warp 5. Of all the civilizations in the galaxy, why should the Borg look at this one that's far away from the region of space they control and decide, "We need to assimilate them ''now''"? There are a couple other reasons they might already have been on their way. One is the signal the Borg tried to send to their brethren in the past during the events of ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact''. They might have succeeded, but it leaves open the question of why it took them three centuries to show up after that. Also, remember that the Hansens were assimilated along with whatever they knew about the Federation eighteen years before Seven of Nine was liberated from the collective, about nine years before the ''Enterprise'' first encountered the Borg.



** Because Data was the most qualified in handling the shuttle craft in such situations. He could ensure the shuttle stayed on course and not be scared of transporting the volatile material needed for the job.

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** Because Data was the most qualified in handling the shuttle craft shuttlecraft in such situations. He could ensure the shuttle stayed on course and not be scared of transporting the volatile material needed for the job.



* In "The Naked Now," Data establishes that he is versed in sexuality multiple techniques and a wide variety of pleasuring. Its an early episode with lots of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness but the stuff with Data and Tasha is referenced several times throughout the series and even gets a callback in eighth movie. So how come in "Angel One" this living supercomputer with vast repositories of knowledge in his head doesn't know what the word ''aphrodisiac'' means?
** Well, given that he's [[PowerPerversionPotential well-versed in multiple techniques]], why would ''he'' need to use an aphrodisiac to enchance the sexual act for his partner? The guy's a ''[[IncrediblyLamePun machine!]]''

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* In "The Naked Now," Data establishes that he is versed in sexuality multiple techniques and a wide variety of pleasuring. Its It's an early episode with lots of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness but the stuff with Data and Tasha is referenced several times throughout the series and even gets a callback in eighth movie. So how come in "Angel One" this living supercomputer with vast repositories of knowledge in his head doesn't know what the word ''aphrodisiac'' means?
** Well, given that he's [[PowerPerversionPotential well-versed in multiple techniques]], why would ''he'' need to use an aphrodisiac to enchance enhance the sexual act for his partner? The guy's a ''[[IncrediblyLamePun machine!]]''




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* In "Cause and Effect", the whole thing could have been avoided. It ended up with Data, using information from previous loops, deciding Riker had the right idea of decompressing the main shuttle bay to push themselves out of the way. But using the tractor beam, they nearly manage to push the other ship off course without hitting them. They would certainly have succeeded if Data hadn't taken so many words to suggest it.



* Stardates for the 24th century shows ACTUALLY MAKE SENSE once it's been explained. The Next Generation's first episode has a stardate of 41153.7. All of the episodes from the first year of TNG are 41XXX.X where the X's count up from 41000.0 to 41999.9. So so from stardate 41000.0 to stardate 41999.9, one year has passed. The second year and season comprises stardates 42000.0 through 42999.9. And so on and so on. This also works for Deep Space Nine and Voyager. Deep Space Nine began it's first season while The Next Generation was in its sixth. (Stardates 46000.0 through 46999.9). What stardate does the first episode of Deep Space Nine have? 46379.1. Deep Space Nine ran for another seven years. That should make it around stardate 52XXX.X. The final episode of Deep Space Nine: stardate 52576.2, 11 years after the first season of TNG.Voyager began airing about a year after Next Gen ended, in what would have been TNG's 8th season. Voyager's first episode has the stardate 48315.6. It continued for seven years as well. Which would make the final stardate 55XXX.X, 14 years after the first season of TNG. Its final episode has the stardate 54973.4. Close enough for me.

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* Stardates for the 24th century shows ACTUALLY MAKE SENSE once it's been explained. The Next Generation's first episode has a stardate of 41153.7. All of the episodes from the first year of TNG are 41XXX.X where the X's count up from 41000.0 to 41999.9. So so from stardate 41000.0 to stardate 41999.9, one year has passed. The second year and season comprises stardates 42000.0 through 42999.9. And so on and so on. This also works for Deep Space Nine and Voyager. Deep Space Nine began it's its first season while The Next Generation was in its sixth. (Stardates 46000.0 through 46999.9). What stardate does the first episode of Deep Space Nine have? 46379.1. Deep Space Nine ran for another seven years. That should make it around stardate 52XXX.X. The final episode of Deep Space Nine: stardate 52576.2, 11 years after the first season of TNG.Voyager began airing about a year after Next Gen ended, in what would have been TNG's 8th season. Voyager's first episode has the stardate 48315.6. It continued for seven years as well. Which would make the final stardate 55XXX.X, 14 years after the first season of TNG. Its final episode has the stardate 54973.4. Close enough for me.



** This also explains why the Romulans and Klingons are never seen using their cloak/warp/decloak/fire/cloak/warp hit and runs with Photon Torpedos (multi-megaton explosives) against planets. They don't want to provoke the federation into retaliating.
** In ''StarTrek'' lore, the Treaty of Algeron was negotiated by ''subspace radio'' due to the Romulans being paranoid. The Federation by contrast, is a democracy. A democracy has to play to the masses. The Federation got an end to the war and could rationalize it as "we don't sneak around" and it prevents another war. The Romulans could see the treaty as a RestrainingBolt on the Starfleet hardliners and, as stated above (and in the shows) Starfleet engineers could have won the arms race with the Romulans.

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** This also explains why the Romulans and Klingons are never seen using their cloak/warp/decloak/fire/cloak/warp hit and runs with Photon Torpedos photon torpedoes (multi-megaton explosives) against planets. They don't want to provoke the federation Federation into retaliating.
** In ''StarTrek'' lore, the Treaty of Algeron was negotiated by ''subspace radio'' due to the Romulans being paranoid. The Federation by contrast, is a democracy. A democracy has to play to the masses. The Federation got an end to the war and could rationalize it as "we don't sneak around" and it prevents another war. The Romulans could see the treaty as a RestrainingBolt on the Starfleet hardliners and, as stated above (and in the shows) Starfleet engineers could have won the arms race with the Romulans. Romulans.
*** No, as I recall, that was a different treaty, ending a conflict in the 22nd century. The Treaty of Algeron was signed in the early 24th century.



*** Makes even more sense considering the ''Defiant'' is a warship, without any of those frills, which makes it far better suited for cloaking than a Galaxy-class.



* Why do [=PADD=]s and other screens have such simple user interfaces and why are diagrams so often in basic 2D despite being in the future? Because they need to be usable by all the species across the Federation who could potentially join Star Fleet. Sure, you can design a complex GUI when you know the user has hands, but what about a user that has Tellarite hooves, or something even stranger? And has to have a colour scheme that is readable to a hundred different species version of 'sight'.

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* Why do [=PADD=]s and other screens have such simple user interfaces and why are diagrams so often in basic 2D despite being in the future? Because they need to be usable by all the species across the Federation who could potentially join Star Fleet. Starfleet. Sure, you can design a complex GUI when you know the user has hands, but what about a user that has Tellarite hooves, or something even stranger? And has to have a colour color scheme that is readable to a hundred different species version of 'sight'.



** This is addressed in the episode "Tin Man": When questioned why Tam Elbrun didn't mention something in a previous mission of his that apparently went disastrously wrong, he stated he thought it was obvious. Perhaps Troi is covering her bases - what's obvious to someone with telepathic/empathic senses might not be obvious to someone without those senses. Imagine if a blind person trips over an object in their path, then asks a seeing person why they didn't mention the object. To the seeing person, it was obvious, so why mention it. Troi knows most of her ships mates aren't empathic, so she mentions everything she senses empathicly in case it might be relevent.

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** This is addressed in the episode "Tin Man": When questioned why Tam Elbrun didn't mention something in a previous mission of his that apparently went disastrously wrong, he stated he thought it was obvious. Perhaps Troi is covering her bases - what's obvious to someone with telepathic/empathic senses might not be obvious to someone without those senses. Imagine if a blind person trips over an object in their path, then asks a seeing person why they didn't mention the object. To the seeing person, it was obvious, so why mention it. Troi knows most of her ships mates shipmates aren't empathic, so she mentions everything she senses empathicly in case it might be relevent.relevant.



** There is a reason everyone except Picard is the same. Q. Q promised him that if he changed the past, *nothing but him would change*. Picard was reluctant to change anything before this, because of the various impacts he had had in his life. But Q basically said "don't worry, I'll make it so that if you change things only you will change, nobody else". Q has godlike power over spacetime, so he has the ability to make that happen.

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** There is a reason everyone except Picard is the same. Q. Q promised him that if he changed the past, *nothing but him would change*. Picard was reluctant to change anything before this, because of the various impacts he had had in his life. But Q basically said "don't worry, I'll make it so that if you change things only you will change, nobody else". Q has godlike power over spacetime, so he has the ability to make that happen.[[note]]Some other captain is commanding the ''Enterprise'' instead of whatever he was supposed to be doing, but one assumes this is a step up.[[/note]]



* By the fourth season of TNG, Riker was actively turning down a promotion to captain and his own command, yet somehow he stays a Commander and First Officer for almost a decade after ''Generations''. It seems like ignoring continuity to keep him around for the movies, until you remember that Riker was in command of the Enterprise-D when it was destroyed. Losing the Federation's flag ship is the sort of thing that sets your career back a decade or two.
** A bit harsh though. Saves Earth and maybe the entire Federation from the Borg that destroyed 39 Starfleet ships in "The Best of Both Worlds," no promotion. Loses one ship, stays Commander for 10 years.
** Which is why he wasn't reduced in rank, and received a posting to the new Enterprise. Also, you have to consider he made several blunders during the battle in ''Generations'' and he had at least one powerful enemy in Starfleet Command (Captain Jellico, who may well have been an admiral by that time). So, the end result is a wash for Riker and he ends up waiting eight years to get his own command.
** He's turning down promotions because he LIKES his role as First Officer. Think back to the pilot. Riker states flat out the Captain's job is to stay on the ship and command from there, as he's too important for away missions. Using that philosophy, Riker gets to be Kirk -- running around on alien worlds, making out with alien chicks, getting in phaser fights in caves, etc. If he took a promotion, he'd be stuck on the bridge while HIS XO got to run around, doing all the fun stuff.
** The end of ''Generations'' makes no secret of Riker's ambitions: "I always thought I'd have a crack at that chair one day." "That chair" being the captain's chair from the destroyed Enterprise-D, which he's ''looking at'' as he says this. He figures it'll be easier for him to get there from the seat on Picard's right instead of from the Captain's chair on another ship.

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* By the fourth season of TNG, Riker was actively turning down a promotion to captain and his own command, yet somehow he stays a Commander commander and First Officer first officer for almost a decade after ''Generations''. It seems like ignoring continuity to keep him around for the movies, until you remember that Riker was in command of the Enterprise-D when it was destroyed. Losing the Federation's flag ship flagship is the sort of thing that sets your career back a decade or two.
** A bit harsh though. Saves Earth and maybe the entire Federation from the Borg that destroyed 39 Starfleet ships in "The Best of Both Worlds," no promotion. Loses one ship, stays Commander commander for 10 years.
** Which is why he wasn't reduced in rank, and received a posting to the new Enterprise.''Enterprise''. Also, you have to consider he made several blunders during the battle in ''Generations'' and he had at least one powerful enemy in Starfleet Command (Captain Jellico, who may well have been an admiral by that time). So, the end result is a wash for Riker and he ends up waiting eight years to get his own command.
** He's turning down promotions because he LIKES his role as First Officer.first officer. Think back to the pilot. Riker states flat out the Captain's captain's job is to stay on the ship and command from there, as he's too important for away missions. Using that philosophy, Riker gets to be Kirk -- running around on alien worlds, making out with alien chicks, getting in phaser fights in caves, etc. If he took a promotion, he'd be stuck on the bridge while HIS XO got to run around, doing all the fun stuff.
** The end of ''Generations'' makes no secret of Riker's ambitions: "I always thought I'd have a crack at that chair one day." "That chair" being the captain's chair from the destroyed Enterprise-D, which he's ''looking at'' as he says this. He figures it'll be easier for him to get there from the seat on Picard's right instead of from the Captain's captain's chair on another ship.



* I'd also point out that three of those command offers came out before word of the Pegasus incident got out, which, as Picard said, would probably hurt Riker's reputation. Admittedly, however, with all the attrition that surely happened during the Dominion War, he probably still should've been made a captain.

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** Well, not the last time. He was first officer of the ''Hood'' as a lieutenant commander, and was promoted to commander and assigned to the ''Enterprise'', without Troi being involved. I think he left Troi as a result of his promotion ''to'' lieutenant commander.
* I'd also point out that three of those command offers came out before word of the Pegasus ''Pegasus'' incident got out, which, as Picard said, would probably hurt Riker's reputation. Admittedly, however, with all the attrition that surely happened during the Dominion War, he probably still should've been made a captain.



* The first time I saw "Datalore," I dismissed part of the plot as just "[[CreatorsPet Wesley]] is right but gets [[CassandraTruth ignored]] because he's a kid". I saw it again recently and realized that there's a lot more going on. The first time Wesley gets yelled at, they do listen to ''what'' he says (Riker goes to check his theory, and finds some evidence that he's wrong); the reason he gets hassled is that ''how'' he said it was unacceptably rude--not a small deal in a quasimilitary organization like Starfleet. The second time (the infamous "Shut up, Wesley!" scene), if you look closely at Picard's face (and consider that right after that scene, he [[spoiler: sends security to monitor "Data", who--as Wesley realized first--has been replaced by his evil twin]]), you can see that he's figuring everything out for himself. Meanwhile, this annoying kid is talking and talking while he's trying to think and not telling him anything he doesn't know. "Shut up, Wesley" is not an instance of AdultsAreUseless--it's an instance of UnwantedAssistance.

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* The first time I saw "Datalore," I dismissed part of the plot as just "[[CreatorsPet Wesley]] is right but gets [[CassandraTruth ignored]] because he's a kid". I saw it again recently and realized that there's a lot more going on. The first time Wesley gets yelled at, they do listen to ''what'' he says (Riker goes to check his theory, and finds some evidence that he's wrong); the reason he gets hassled is that ''how'' he said it was unacceptably rude--not a small deal in a quasimilitary organization like Starfleet. The second time (the infamous "Shut up, Wesley!" scene), if you look closely at Picard's face (and consider that right after that scene, he [[spoiler: sends [[spoiler:sends security to monitor "Data", who--as Wesley realized first--has been replaced by his evil twin]]), you can see that he's figuring everything out for himself. Meanwhile, this annoying kid is talking and talking while he's trying to think and not telling him anything he doesn't know. "Shut up, Wesley" is not an instance of AdultsAreUseless--it's an instance of UnwantedAssistance.



** Also, the Federation is referred to in the episode. In the Mirror Universe, there ''is'' no Federation, only the Terran Empire. And they probably wouldn't be thinking, "If only our previous flagship had sacrificed itself to protect a Klingon outpost, we would be friends with them now."



*** Given Kahless' history and circumstances when the dagger from which the clones's source blood was gathered, there is a better than good chance that the clone was sourced from Moroth, Kahless' dishonorable brother and BigBad of Klingon history.

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*** Given Kahless' history and circumstances when the dagger from which the clones's clone's source blood was gathered, there is a better than good chance that the clone was sourced from Moroth, Kahless' dishonorable brother and BigBad of Klingon history.



** The Federation Council is the equivalent of the UN council. Each member world has it's own representative/ambassador on the council, and governs it's own internal affairs. The Federation (and it's exploration/military arm, Starfleet) handle external affairs. This would explain, in part, why the Cardassians, Klingons, and Romulans are comparatively stronger and more "single minded" for their size - you're dealing with single races without the layers of bearocracy the the Federation has.

to:

** The Federation Council is the equivalent of the UN council. Each member world has it's its own representative/ambassador on the council, and governs it's its own internal affairs. The Federation (and it's its exploration/military arm, Starfleet) handle external affairs. This would explain, in part, why the Cardassians, Klingons, and Romulans are comparatively stronger and more "single minded" for their size - you're dealing with single races without the layers of bearocracy the the Federation has.



* In the episode "Where No One Has Gone Before", the Enterprise warps to an unknown region "over a billion light-years" from Federation Space. Several members of the crew, including Picard, began manifesting their thoughts in to reality. It struck me that they may well have entered the Q Continuum, and the flashes of light seen flying around were members of the Q.

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* In the episode "Where No One Has Gone Before", the Enterprise warps to an unknown region "over a billion light-years" from Federation Space. Several members of the crew, including Picard, began manifesting their thoughts in to into reality. It struck me that they may well have entered the Q Continuum, and the flashes of light seen flying around were members of the Q.



* In the episode "Manhunt", Picard is hiding in the Holodeck, running his Dixon Hill program, but not conveying to the program what he wants to do. At one point, the program materializes a thug shooting a tommy gun. As ThisTroper found out through ThisVeryWiki, this is the program literally following ChandlersLaw, or the Trekverse version of it. Makes sense, doesn't it?

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* In the episode "Manhunt", Picard is hiding in the Holodeck, holodeck, running his Dixon Hill program, but not conveying to the program what he wants to do. At one point, the program materializes a thug shooting a tommy gun. As ThisTroper found out through ThisVeryWiki, this is the program literally following ChandlersLaw, or the Trekverse version of it. Makes sense, doesn't it?



* Throughout Season 1, chief engineers and their assistants would come and go with no discernable reason. However, "The Arsenal of Freedom" suggests a reason for one of them: Logan. He spends the entire crisis undermining Geordi's authority (as granted by Captain Picard himself), arguing with every decision he makes ("We can't take this pounding! We have to leave orbit now! Wait, why are we leaving orbit? What about the away team?"), and just being a JerkAss CommanderContrarian. No doubt that when everything settled down, Picard read Geordi's after-action report, determined Logan's behavior to be a threat to the chain of command, and had him put off the ''Enterprise'' at the nearest Starbase.

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* Throughout Season 1, chief engineers and their assistants would come and go with no discernable reason. However, "The Arsenal of Freedom" suggests a reason for one of them: Logan. He spends the entire crisis undermining Geordi's authority (as granted by Captain Picard himself), arguing with every decision he makes ("We can't take this pounding! We have to leave orbit now! Wait, why are we leaving orbit? What about the away team?"), and just being a JerkAss {{Jerkass}} CommanderContrarian. No doubt that when everything settled down, Picard read Geordi's after-action report, determined Logan's behavior to be a threat to the chain of command, and had him put off the ''Enterprise'' at the nearest Starbase.



** Its a post Wolf-357 universe. Its clear that with the Romulans absent, the Klingons as allies, and every other major power just not up to them militarily and scientifically; the Federation was in a period of long-standing comfortable peace that caused them to grow soft. Its not just the families that disappear, its the counselors having a seat on the bridge and the peach-coloured plush decor. Come Wolf-359 and the deaths of thousands of people (''including'' families as we see in ''Emissary'') and suddenly the Federation is kicked out of its complacency and into the real world. Season one of ''The Next Generation'' and season one of ''Voyager'' is incredible to watch back-to-back if you want to analyze the sociological in-universe reasons that led to it.

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** Its It's a post Wolf-357 Wolf-359 universe. Its It's clear that with the Romulans absent, the Klingons as allies, and every other major power just not up to them militarily and scientifically; the Federation was in a period of long-standing comfortable peace that caused them to grow soft. Its It's not just the families that disappear, its it's the counselors having a seat on the bridge and the peach-coloured plush decor. Come Wolf-359 and the deaths of thousands of people (''including'' families as we see in ''Emissary'') and suddenly the Federation is kicked out of its complacency and into the real world. Season one of ''The Next Generation'' and season one of ''Voyager'' is incredible to watch back-to-back if you want to analyze the sociological in-universe reasons that led to it.
19th Mar '17 1:40:04 PM thatsnumberwang
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** Its a post Wolf-357 universe. Its clear that with the Romulans absent, the Klingons as allies, and every other major power just not up to them militarily and scientifically; the Federation was in a period of long-standing comfortable peace that caused them to grow soft. Its not just the families that disappear, its the counselors having a seat on the bridge and the peach-coloured plush decor. Come Wolf-359 and the deaths of thousands of people (''including'' families as we see in ''Emissary'') and suddenly the Federation is kicked out of its complacency and into the real world. Season one of ''The Next Generation'' and season one of ''Voyager'' is incredible to watch back-to-back if you want to analyze the sociological in-universe reasons that led to it.
19th Mar '17 10:13:28 AM StarTropes
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* Ever noticed that ships launched after the ''Enterprise''-D (such as ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'' or the next ''[[Film/StarTrekFirstContact Enterprise]]'') are no longer designed to have families on board? It's because after 7+ years, Starfleet (and the writing staff) finally realized that putting civilians and children on a ship that gets into trouble every other week is a very bad idea. It may have looked good on paper, but so have many other things that simply didn't pan out.
10th Mar '17 6:43:30 AM StarTropes
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* Throughout Season 1, chief engineers and their assistants would come and go with no discernable reason. However, "The Arsenal of Freedom" suggests a reason for one of them: Logan. He spends the entire crisis undermining Geordi's authority (as granted by Captain Picard himself), arguing with every decision he makes ("We can't take this pounding! We have to leave orbit now! Wait, why are we leaving orbit? What about the away team?"), and just being a JerkAss CommanderContrarian. No doubt that when everything settled down, Picard read Geordi's after-action report, determined Logan's behavior to be a threat to the chain of command, and had him put off the ''Enterprise'' at the nearest Starbase.
8th Mar '17 11:12:21 AM thatsnumberwang
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* In "The Outcast," the J'naii flip human phobias (homophobia, transphobia) by being genderless/sexless and forbidding gender and sex. But when you consider the etymology of cisgender and transgender, they are still being transphobic. "Cis" means "on the side of" and "trans" means "across / beyond." (e.g. cis-linked genes occur on the same chromosome, trans-linked on different ones) For a J'naii, agender ''is'' cisgender. Soren, by being female, is still "crossing" to her non-biological gender and is transgender.
7th Mar '17 4:19:35 PM Nakuyabi
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* In "The Outcast," the J'naii flip human phobias (homophobia, transphobia) by being genderless/sexless and forbidding gender and sex. But when you consider the etymology of cisgender and transgender, they are still being transphobic. "Cis" means "on the side of" and "trans" means "across / beyond." (e.g. cis-linked genes occur on the same chromosome, trans-linked on different ones) For a J'naii, agender ''is'' cisgender. Soren, by being female, is still "crossing" to her non-biological gender and is transgender.
24th Feb '17 7:41:11 AM Anddrix
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** In ''StarTrek'' lore, the Treaty of Algeron was negotiated by ''subspace radio'' due to the Romulans being paranoid. The Federation by contrast, is a democracy. As SfDebris points out, a democracy has to play to the masses. The Federation got an end to the war and could rationalize it as "we don't sneak around" and it prevents another war. The Romulans could see the treaty as a RestrainingBolt on the Starfleet hardliners and, as stated above (and in the shows) Starfleet engineers could have won the arms race with the Romulans.

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** In ''StarTrek'' lore, the Treaty of Algeron was negotiated by ''subspace radio'' due to the Romulans being paranoid. The Federation by contrast, is a democracy. As SfDebris points out, a A democracy has to play to the masses. The Federation got an end to the war and could rationalize it as "we don't sneak around" and it prevents another war. The Romulans could see the treaty as a RestrainingBolt on the Starfleet hardliners and, as stated above (and in the shows) Starfleet engineers could have won the arms race with the Romulans.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.StarTrekTheNextGeneration