History Fridge / StarTrekTheNextGeneration

6th Apr '18 10:17:15 AM Conhale
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** Could also be a self-fulfilling prophecy. The Borg had scouted the Federation/Romulan Neutral Zone, making off with entire outposts and presumably assimilating both people and tech. They may have chewed on that and, based on the "inferior" rating applied to humans, decided humanity/Starfleet wasn't worth the trouble. Then a cube runs into the Q-propelled ''Enterprise'', rather distant from Federation territory. Humans look tastier based on their warp capability - how efficient is Starfleet's warp drive? The Borg scan the ship, access the computer, sample the crew, and try to run down the Enterprise to figure out how they accomplished this marvel - if the Borg weren't specifically interested, they would have just ignored the ''Enterprise''. The nail in the coffin, however, comes when they pursue the ''Enterprise'' - threatening the ship to provoke it to demonstrate its capabilities, and Q spins the ''Enterprise'' out of range. Borg are now VERY interested, they want whatever engine the ''Enterprise'' has which apparently defies analysis - the computer wouldn't have any record and the warp core is unremarkable. Humanity is given a dose of cold water AND now has to actively deal with the Borg threat. Especially if the Q avoid the Borg, then the Borg may be unable to conceive of the idea that the ''Enterprise'' itself wasn't the engine.
3rd Apr '18 7:29:25 PM wyattte
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* The otherwise excellent "Measure Of A Man" has one particular sticking point. If Data's very personhood is being called into question enough that it requires a legal hearing, why is this not something that was addressed with Data signing up for Starfleet in the first place? To serve with them at all must mean that he was enough of a person to make the choice, and someone considered him enough of a person to admit him. The fact that this hearing happened after the fact; well, that really doesn't say a lot for Starfleet, does it? Good thing Data's captain was Picard.



* The otherwise excellent "Measure Of A Man" has one particular sticking point. If Data's very personhood is being called into question enough that it requires a legal hearing, why is this not something that was addressed with Data signing up for Starfleet in the first place? To serve with them at all must mean that he was enough of a person to make the choice, and someone considered him enough of a person to admit him. The fact that this hearing happened after the fact; well, that really doesn't say a lot for Starfleet, does it? Good thing Data's captain was Picard.
3rd Apr '18 7:26:27 PM wyattte
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* The otherwise excellent "Measure Of A Man" has one particular sticking point. If Data's very personhood is being called into question enough that it requires a legal hearing, why is this not something that was addressed with Data signing up for Starfleet in the first place? To serve with them at all must mean that he was enough of a person to make the choice, and someone considered him enough of a person to admit him. The fact that this hearing happened after the fact; well, that really doesn't say a lot for Starfleet, does it? Good thing Data's captain was Picard.


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* The otherwise excellent "Measure Of A Man" has one particular sticking point. If Data's very personhood is being called into question enough that it requires a legal hearing, why is this not something that was addressed with Data signing up for Starfleet in the first place? To serve with them at all must mean that he was enough of a person to make the choice, and someone considered him enough of a person to admit him. The fact that this hearing happened after the fact; well, that really doesn't say a lot for Starfleet, does it? Good thing Data's captain was Picard.
3rd Apr '18 7:25:38 PM wyattte
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* The otherwise excellent "Measure Of A Man" has one particular sticking point. If Data's very personhood is being called into question enough that it requires a legal hearing, why is this not something that was addressed with Data signing up for Starfleet in the first place? To serve with them at all must mean that he was enough of a person to make the choice, and someone considered him enough of a person to admit him. The fact that this hearing happened after the fact; well, that really doesn't say a lot for Starfleet, does it? Good thing Data's captain was Picard.
30th Mar '18 1:03:40 AM Cupcakes
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** Luckily for Picard we've seen proof in the past that two-way transporting exist where both transporters at the destination and sending point activate so if one goes down the other can continue on. Starfleet seems to routinely do this whenever transporting between ships or locations where this is possible as well, hence why staff go from transporter room to transporter room not transporter room to ten-forward or anywhere else. Since he was transporting to a starfleet station presumably he would have been doing this and been picked up fully by the station transporter when power cut.
23rd Mar '18 12:17:53 PM AFP
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* The SecretTest that Worf adminsters in "Lower Decks" is intended to reinforce the lesson that you should not just accept mistreatment without complaint or trying to do something about it. While it is applicable to Ensign Sito Jaxa, who had to learn to fight for fair treatment (she had a bad reputation due to a scandal she was involved in as a cadet, but had exemplary performance since then), it is also applicable for ''Worf'', whose father had been unfairly discommended by the Klingon High Council as part of a frame-up job by Duras. Much of Worf's CharacterArc on TNG and ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' center on his ongoing efforts to reclaim his family's honor (and realizing why his family honor must take a back seat to the [[TheNeedsOfTheMany needs of the Empire and the Federation]]).

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* The SecretTest HiddenPurposeTest that Worf adminsters in "Lower Decks" is intended to reinforce the lesson that you should not just accept mistreatment without complaint or trying to do something about it. While it is applicable to Ensign Sito Jaxa, who had to learn to fight for fair treatment (she had a bad reputation due to a scandal she was involved in as a cadet, but had exemplary performance since then), it is also applicable for ''Worf'', whose father had been unfairly discommended by the Klingon High Council as part of a frame-up job by Duras. Much of Worf's CharacterArc on TNG and ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' center on his ongoing efforts to reclaim his family's honor (and realizing why his family honor must take a back seat to the [[TheNeedsOfTheMany needs of the Empire and the Federation]]).
23rd Mar '18 9:57:07 AM AFP
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Added DiffLines:

* The SecretTest that Worf adminsters in "Lower Decks" is intended to reinforce the lesson that you should not just accept mistreatment without complaint or trying to do something about it. While it is applicable to Ensign Sito Jaxa, who had to learn to fight for fair treatment (she had a bad reputation due to a scandal she was involved in as a cadet, but had exemplary performance since then), it is also applicable for ''Worf'', whose father had been unfairly discommended by the Klingon High Council as part of a frame-up job by Duras. Much of Worf's CharacterArc on TNG and ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' center on his ongoing efforts to reclaim his family's honor (and realizing why his family honor must take a back seat to the [[TheNeedsOfTheMany needs of the Empire and the Federation]]).
22nd Mar '18 4:25:48 AM ErikModi
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*** It gets worse. Genesis was doomed from the start not just because of dangerously unstable protomatter, but because in Star Trek, any planet in a habitable zone from a star already has some form of life, which Genesis would destroy (shown by ''Reliant'' being completely unsuccessful at finding a test site for phase three). Genesis is actually ''only'' useful as a weapon of mass destruction, that leaves a still-habitable planet behind after wiping out everyone and everything. Small wonder the Klingons were quaking in their boots about it in Star Trek III, and one can assume the Romulans felt the same when they caught wind of it.
22nd Mar '18 3:58:49 AM ErikModi
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** [[FromBadToWorse Factor in]] [[RapeAsBackstory what was implied about Tasha's]] DarkAndTroubledPast. . .
16th Mar '18 5:07:24 PM nombretomado
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* In the episode "Manhunt", Picard is hiding in the holodeck, running his Dixon Hill program, but not conveying to the program what he wants to do. At one point, the program materializes a thug shooting a tommy gun. As ThisTroper found out through ThisVeryWiki, this is the program literally following ChandlersLaw, or the Trekverse version of it. Makes sense, doesn't it?

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* In the episode "Manhunt", Picard is hiding in the holodeck, running his Dixon Hill program, but not conveying to the program what he wants to do. At one point, the program materializes a thug shooting a tommy gun. As ThisTroper found out through ThisVeryWiki, Wiki/ThisVeryWiki, this is the program literally following ChandlersLaw, or the Trekverse version of it. Makes sense, doesn't it?
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