History Fridge / StarTrekEnterprise

13th Sep '17 7:53:42 PM jogirard
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* In "United", Shran, an Andorian, challenges a Tellarite ambassador to an Ushaan, which is an honor battle with Ushaan-Tor. An Ushaan-Tor is basically brass knuckles if they were a giant knife. The fridge brilliance is that it's an ice miner's tool, coming from the Andorians who are known to have an icy planet, and it is incredibly similar to a knife known as an Ulu, which is a traditional knife from Alaska, which the coldest state in the US.

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* In "United", Shran, an Andorian, challenges a Tellarite ambassador to an Ushaan, which is an honor battle with Ushaan-Tor. An Ushaan-Tor is basically brass knuckles if they were a giant knife. The fridge brilliance is that it's an ice miner's tool, coming from the Andorians who are known to have an icy planet, and it is incredibly similar to a knife known as an Ulu, which is a traditional knife from Alaska, which the coldest state in the US.US.
* Malcolm's strong objections to Archer's actions during the Xindi crisis make even greater sense when you realize that [[spoiler:it's likely he may have committed deeds in his past as an agent for Section 31 that he may not have been proud of and cannot anymore justify with the Greater Good]] which is the slippery slope that Archer seems to have gotten himself into.
22nd Jul '17 6:10:22 AM thatsnumberwang
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* The Vissians in the episode ''Cogenitor'' try to describe the life of a congenitor in very happy, bright terms; but we are essentially talking about a race where two sexes of this world force the entire third to move from family to family to impregnate the females ''without any belief at all that what they are doing is rape.'' Perhaps some of the congenitors give their permission or that some of the males and females are opposed to this horrible treatment as we don't have enough of a reference pool to say either way, but there is no way that the one we see in the episode is and that doesn't change the views or actions of the Vissians that we meet at all (and of course also gets into the thorny issue of whether such an oppressed class could ever be legitimately consensual). And then that gets into other implications, such as what level of indoctrination and treatment goes into cementing this way of life from a young age for all three sexes (because no one goes from normal life to passive rape slave in the span of a single birthday). It certainly makes you wonder how if at all their parents maternal instincts manifest when they give birth to one.

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* The Vissians in the episode ''Cogenitor'' try to describe the life of a congenitor cogenitor in very happy, bright terms; but we are essentially talking about a race where two sexes of this world force the entire third to move from family to family to impregnate the females ''without any belief at all that what they are doing is rape.'' Perhaps some of the congenitors cogenitors give their permission or that some of the males and females are opposed to this horrible treatment as we don't have enough of a reference pool to say either way, but there is no way that the one we see in the episode is and that doesn't change the views or actions of the Vissians that we meet at all (and of course also gets into the thorny issue of whether such an oppressed class could ever be legitimately consensual). And then that gets into other implications, such as what level of indoctrination and treatment goes into cementing this way of life from a young age for all three sexes (because no one goes from normal life to passive rape slave in the span of a single birthday). It certainly makes you wonder how if at all their parents maternal instincts manifest when they give birth to one.
22nd Jul '17 6:07:30 AM thatsnumberwang
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to:

* The Vissians in the episode ''Cogenitor'' try to describe the life of a congenitor in very happy, bright terms; but we are essentially talking about a race where two sexes of this world force the entire third to move from family to family to impregnate the females ''without any belief at all that what they are doing is rape.'' Perhaps some of the congenitors give their permission or that some of the males and females are opposed to this horrible treatment as we don't have enough of a reference pool to say either way, but there is no way that the one we see in the episode is and that doesn't change the views or actions of the Vissians that we meet at all (and of course also gets into the thorny issue of whether such an oppressed class could ever be legitimately consensual). And then that gets into other implications, such as what level of indoctrination and treatment goes into cementing this way of life from a young age for all three sexes (because no one goes from normal life to passive rape slave in the span of a single birthday). It certainly makes you wonder how if at all their parents maternal instincts manifest when they give birth to one.
20th Jun '17 9:59:58 PM korben600
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* In "North Star" at first it seemed strange that the humans were apparently able to overthrow these aliens who were obviously technologically advanced (at least enough to have transporters, beam weapons, the ability to travel to Earth then take slaves the fifty light-years from Earth to the Delphic Expanse) but that none of those technologically advanced aliens ever showed up to find out what happened to their people in the last 200 years. Then it hit me that this colony was in the 'Delphic Expanse', basically the Bermuda Triangle of space where ships go in but don't come out and where Vulcans fear to tread. After they didn't hear back from their people they probably learnt something of the reputation of the place and decided not to send another ship. Of course, it's extremely unlikely we'd ever see a return of the Skagarans in a future Trek series but if we did it'd be interesting to encounter a group of technologically advanced Skagarans who may not like the idea of a group of cowboy humans having oppressed their people.

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* In "North Star" at first it seemed strange that the humans were apparently able to overthrow these aliens who were obviously technologically advanced (at least enough to have transporters, beam weapons, the ability to travel to Earth then take slaves the fifty light-years from Earth to the Delphic Expanse) but that none of those technologically advanced aliens ever showed up to find out what happened to their people in the last 200 years. Then it hit me that this colony was in the 'Delphic Expanse', basically the Bermuda Triangle of space where ships go in but don't come out and where Vulcans fear to tread. After they didn't hear back from their people they probably learnt something of the reputation of the place and decided not to send another ship. Of course, it's extremely unlikely we'd ever see a return of the Skagarans in a future Trek series but if we did it'd be interesting to encounter a group of technologically advanced Skagarans who may not like the idea of a group of cowboy humans having oppressed their people.people.
* In "United", Shran, an Andorian, challenges a Tellarite ambassador to an Ushaan, which is an honor battle with Ushaan-Tor. An Ushaan-Tor is basically brass knuckles if they were a giant knife. The fridge brilliance is that it's an ice miner's tool, coming from the Andorians who are known to have an icy planet, and it is incredibly similar to a knife known as an Ulu, which is a traditional knife from Alaska, which the coldest state in the US.
2nd Jan '17 11:15:38 PM ApeAccount
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* Another "Carbon Creek" example was T'pol referring to her "second foremother". Initially this just seems like a typical example of a Vulcan using SpockSpeak rather than using a more common (though perhaps less exact term) like great grandmother. However, it makes a lot of sense that Vulcans would refer to ancestors by these sort of terms. Given the length of their lifespans it is possible if they reproduced at young ages for many generations to be alive at the same time at which point terms like "great great great grandmother" would become cumbersome. So it's actually quite (if you'll forgive me) ''logical'' that a Vulcan would use such a term.

to:

* Another "Carbon Creek" example was T'pol referring to her "second foremother". Initially this just seems like a typical example of a Vulcan using SpockSpeak rather than using a more common (though perhaps less exact term) like great grandmother. However, it makes a lot of sense that Vulcans would refer to ancestors by these sort of terms. Given the length of their lifespans it is possible if they reproduced at young ages for many generations to be alive at the same time at which point terms like "great great great grandmother" would become cumbersome. So it's actually quite (if you'll forgive me) ''logical'' that a Vulcan would use such a term.term.
* In "North Star" at first it seemed strange that the humans were apparently able to overthrow these aliens who were obviously technologically advanced (at least enough to have transporters, beam weapons, the ability to travel to Earth then take slaves the fifty light-years from Earth to the Delphic Expanse) but that none of those technologically advanced aliens ever showed up to find out what happened to their people in the last 200 years. Then it hit me that this colony was in the 'Delphic Expanse', basically the Bermuda Triangle of space where ships go in but don't come out and where Vulcans fear to tread. After they didn't hear back from their people they probably learnt something of the reputation of the place and decided not to send another ship. Of course, it's extremely unlikely we'd ever see a return of the Skagarans in a future Trek series but if we did it'd be interesting to encounter a group of technologically advanced Skagarans who may not like the idea of a group of cowboy humans having oppressed their people.
18th Dec '16 10:59:28 PM ApeAccount
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* Remember that BewareTheNiceOnes speech that Quark gave Nog in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' about how when pushed hard enough, "hoo-mans" can become as dangerous as [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Klingons]]? "The Expanse" demonstrates this subtly but effectively, and not just the part where ''Enterprise'' blasts Duras' bird-of-prey to hell. The area where ''Enterprise'' is headed, called the Delphic Expanse, is considered so dangerous and unpredictable that even the Klingons are afraid of it. When ''Enterprise'' is just about to enter the Expanse, Duras' wingmen bug out, and his own crew think he's nuts for wanting to chase ''Enterprise'' in there. Yet our heroes are flying in without a second thought to find the Xindi who attacked Earth. Piss humanity off enough, and they'll charge in where ''Klingons'' fear to tread.

to:

* Remember that BewareTheNiceOnes speech that Quark gave Nog in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' about how when pushed hard enough, "hoo-mans" can become as dangerous as [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Klingons]]? "The Expanse" demonstrates this subtly but effectively, and not just the part where ''Enterprise'' blasts Duras' bird-of-prey to hell. The area where ''Enterprise'' is headed, called the Delphic Expanse, is considered so dangerous and unpredictable that even the Klingons are afraid of it. When ''Enterprise'' is just about to enter the Expanse, Duras' wingmen bug out, and his own crew think he's nuts for wanting to chase ''Enterprise'' in there. Yet our heroes are flying in without a second thought to find the Xindi who attacked Earth. Piss humanity off enough, and they'll charge in where ''Klingons'' fear to tread.tread.
* Another "Carbon Creek" example was T'pol referring to her "second foremother". Initially this just seems like a typical example of a Vulcan using SpockSpeak rather than using a more common (though perhaps less exact term) like great grandmother. However, it makes a lot of sense that Vulcans would refer to ancestors by these sort of terms. Given the length of their lifespans it is possible if they reproduced at young ages for many generations to be alive at the same time at which point terms like "great great great grandmother" would become cumbersome. So it's actually quite (if you'll forgive me) ''logical'' that a Vulcan would use such a term.
18th Dec '16 10:29:04 AM thatsnumberwang
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Added DiffLines:

** This is certainly a good explanation for the catsuit. After all, no other Vulcan wears one, so if you believe humans to be brutes ruled by their base emotions, it makes perfect logical sense to try and use that to your advantage by highlighting T'Pol's ''assets''. She was just too unskilled and/or unwilling in the art of the femme fatale to really capitalise on it.
24th Oct '16 9:41:32 PM nombretomado
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* The "alternate" opening to ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'''s MirrorUniverse episode "In a Mirror Darkly" still says "Based on ''Franchise/StarTrek'' Created by GeneRoddenberry." Do we even want to ''know'' what ''that'' looked like?

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* The "alternate" opening to ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'''s MirrorUniverse episode "In a Mirror Darkly" still says "Based on ''Franchise/StarTrek'' Created by GeneRoddenberry.Creator/GeneRoddenberry." Do we even want to ''know'' what ''that'' looked like?
16th Oct '16 6:14:17 PM Zatman
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Added DiffLines:

** There's another bit of Fridge Brilliance on the part of the Borg that was dinged by ''Website/SFDebris''. In his review, Chuck dinged the Borg for not including the "We are the Borg" part of their standard greeting. Given that these Borg were from the future, so they know how it plays out, they wouldn't want to give the Federation any heads up. If they did their standard greeting, then when Picard got back from J25, all Starfleet would have had to do is type "Borg" into LCARS-Google and they'd get ways to resist/stop assimilation, ways to modify weapons to work, etc. and already be at a post Best of Both Worlds level of tactics and tricks. Or even better, when the El-Aurians started talking about the Borg, they would start preparing nearly 70 years ahead of time. But this way, all they have are some vague 200 year old references buried deep in some archives somewhere that probably just has vague references to cybernetics, which could easily be confused with something like, say, the Bynars. -- Tropers/Zatman
13th Aug '16 6:38:37 AM StarTropes
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Added DiffLines:

*** They're not talking about phaser rifles. They're talking about something more like an AK-47. Sometimes KineticWeaponsAreJustBetter.
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