History Fridge / StarTrekDeepSpaceNine

3rd Jun '16 9:40:00 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** They probably would have avoided the war altogether; their attempts to trick the Alpha Quadrant powers into destroying each other were only barely averted as it was, and that was because the hastily thrown together infiltration meant there were threads to spot.
3rd Jun '16 8:25:05 PM backpack
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* I was initially quite baffled by the court in ''House of Quark''. It seemed downright bizarre that the Council running the entire Klingon Empire had no means of assessing the validity of Quark's accusation of financial crimes, and no one on call who could (the whole situation came down to his word against D'Ghor). Then I talked with a friend who understood Klingon society better than me, and nearly burst out laughing when I realized that Grilka actually got screwed over precisely because she was of such a high caste: If the same crime had been committed to (or by) a member of a lower caste, they would have gone to a lower court, and an accountant could have been called to assess the case. However, anyone even capable of sitting through Quark's lecture (let alone following it) would be too dishonorable to associate with the High Council, and thus there was no way to resolve the question of D'Ghor's guilt without a duel.
28th May '16 3:05:50 PM TwinBladeWarrior
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** A couple of points to be made:
*** The host lives at least 20 years before being joined to the symbiote and we don't know if that time is included in the 356 years
*** Torias and Joran were joined for less than a year each before dying and having Dax taken away respectively
*** Recalculating for 6 hosts[[labelnote:*]]Ignoring Jadzias early death[[/labelnote]] this gives an approximate lifespan of 59 years or 79 years if we assumed they all were joined at 20.
27th May '16 9:39:17 PM TimeTravelerJessica
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* In "To the Death," Weyoun mentions that he's an expert both in telling lies and in spotting them. We see that this is true throughout the show. On rewatch of this show after watching the Daredevil Neftlix series, I think I've figured out how, other than facial expressions. In "In the Cards," Jake tells Weyoun the truth, which Weyoun disbelieves, then tells him a really ridiculous story. Rather than believing the second story, as the rules of fiction usually demand, he suddenly believes the first story. Why? In "Favor the Bold" it's established that the Vorta have excellent hearing. He probably heard Jake's heartbeat change while telling the second story and knew what it sounded like when he lied, and realized he wasn't a good enough liar to have pulled off the first story without a change in heart rate if it wasn't true.
5th May '16 6:27:17 AM Na_Cl_H20
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the episode "Defiant", William [[spoiler:(actually Thomas)]]Riker is commanding the [[SubmarinePirates newly stolen Defiant]] into Cardassian space, he activates the [[AppliedPhlebotinum Defiant's cloak in order that they are not detected]] by the patrolling Cardassian Warships. Interestingly, when the cloak is activated, one of his Maquis crewman cuts main power and enters a sort of [[SpaceIsAnOcean silent running]] subcommand which is visibly similar to when Commander Sisco and company disastrously attempt to evade the Jem'Hadar earlier in the series (antiproton beams, etc), They find that running silent helps to some degree. At any rate, we can assume that Sisco and his crew, being great Starfleet officers, made very accurate reports about the incident- but for any number of reasons up to and including that a Romulan Cloaking Device would be top secret and by extension the Defiant's ability to cloak- though it is later revealed in the same episode to Sisco's surprise that the obsidian order knew about the cloak. We can begin to construct a conspiracy suggesting the Maquis have intimate knowledge of the Defiant's capabilities. This blooms wonderfully into [[FridgeBrilliance Fridge Brilliance]] as it begins to flesh out the very real threat of [[SwissCheeseSecurity systemic infiltration]] by a number of interested entities into high levels of the Starfleet intelligence infrastructure, which more or less morphs right back into [[FridgeHorror Fridge Horror]].

to:

* In the episode "Defiant", William [[spoiler:(actually Thomas)]]Riker is commanding the [[SubmarinePirates newly stolen Defiant]] into Cardassian space, he activates the [[AppliedPhlebotinum Defiant's cloak in order that they are not detected]] by the patrolling Cardassian Warships. Interestingly, when the cloak is activated, one of his Maquis crewman cuts main power and enters a sort of [[SpaceIsAnOcean silent running]] subcommand which is visibly similar to when Commander Sisco and company disastrously attempt to evade the Jem'Hadar earlier in the series (antiproton beams, etc), They find that running silent helps to some degree. At any rate, we can assume that Sisco and his crew, being great Starfleet officers, made very accurate reports about the incident- but for any number of reasons up to and including that a Romulan Cloaking Device would be top secret and by extension the Defiant's ability to cloak- though those reports would be difficult to access, and probably not readily available to rank and file members of starfleet. This may extend even to Thomas, assuming the main computer [[ClarkKenting cannot tell the difference between a goatee and a beard]]. Also to underscore the gravity of the reports, it is later revealed in the same episode to (to Sisco's surprise surprise) that the obsidian order knew about the cloak.cloak already. We can begin to construct a conspiracy suggesting the Maquis have intimate knowledge of the Defiant's capabilities. This blooms wonderfully into [[FridgeBrilliance Fridge Brilliance]] as it begins to flesh out the very real threat of [[SwissCheeseSecurity systemic infiltration]] by a number of interested entities into high levels of the Starfleet intelligence infrastructure, which more or less morphs right back into [[FridgeHorror Fridge Horror]].
30th Apr '16 11:03:08 PM Chengar
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** Not to mention that the Mirror Universe is rather known for self-serving backstabbing. Perhaps Mirror Leeta just thinks she has more to gain from being on what looks like the winning side.
29th Apr '16 7:59:46 AM Na_Cl_H20
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

*In the episode "Defiant", William [[spoiler:(actually Thomas)]]Riker is commanding the [[SubmarinePirates newly stolen Defiant]] into Cardassian space, he activates the [[AppliedPhlebotinum Defiant's cloak in order that they are not detected]] by the patrolling Cardassian Warships. Interestingly, when the cloak is activated, one of his Maquis crewman cuts main power and enters a sort of [[SpaceIsAnOcean silent running]] subcommand which is visibly similar to when Commander Sisco and company disastrously attempt to evade the Jem'Hadar earlier in the series (antiproton beams, etc), They find that running silent helps to some degree. At any rate, we can assume that Sisco and his crew, being great Starfleet officers, made very accurate reports about the incident- but for any number of reasons up to and including that a Romulan Cloaking Device would be top secret and by extension the Defiant's ability to cloak- though it is later revealed in the same episode to Sisco's surprise that the obsidian order knew about the cloak. We can begin to construct a conspiracy suggesting the Maquis have intimate knowledge of the Defiant's capabilities. This blooms wonderfully into [[FridgeBrilliance Fridge Brilliance]] as it begins to flesh out the very real threat of [[SwissCheeseSecurity systemic infiltration]] by a number of interested entities into high levels of the Starfleet intelligence infrastructure, which more or less morphs right back into [[FridgeHorror Fridge Horror]].
24th Apr '16 2:34:33 PM esq263
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The entire series, from beginning to end, is about the conflict between Sisko and Dukat. First, both characters make their debut in the first episode, where Dukat was the former commander of the station and Sisko is the incoming commander. Both of them hold similar ranks throughout the series: Sisko starts out as a commander who is promoted to captain, while Dukat (even when he is running Cardassia), retains the rank of Gul (stated in the TNG episode "The Wounded" to be equivalent to Captain) through the entire series (with a brief stint as Legate). Both Dukat and Sisko are family men who are devoted to their children, and we see Jake and (to a lesser extent) Ziyal on screen. Now, the differences that divide the two: Sisko serves the Federation, a free, peaceful society while Dukat serves the oppressive, warlike Cardassian regime. Whereas Sisko sees his task as overseeing the reconstruction of Bajor in the hope that they will take their place as an equal member of the Federation, Dukat, in "Indiscretion" and "Waltz", deluded himself into thinking that he would improve the lot of the Bajorans, but refused to respect them as equals and became their greatest oppressor. It should be noted that, of the ten million people who died in the fifty-year Occupation (cf. "Cardassians"), half of them did so during the ten years Dukat was in charge (cf. "Waltz"). The opposition becomes even more clear when Dukat leads Cardassia into the Dominion, which has been noted on this page, and confirmed by WordOfGod, to be the anti-Federation. Additionally, Sisko becomes the Emissary of Bajor, a role he endures reluctantly, at least until "Accession" when the Prophets teach him a lesson, showing how even a well-meaning alternative could prove disastrous to Bajor. Gul Dukat, on the other hand, evinces messianic delusions throughout the series, particularly in his conversations with Kira in "Indiscretion" and with Sisko in "Waltz". After the latter episode, Dukat joins the Pah Wraths, eventually becoming ''their'' Emissary to reinforce his position as Sisko's equal and opposite counterpart. In a conversation in "Ties of Blood and Water", Dukat indicates that, despite being the ruler of Cardassia, he has retained the title Gul rather than a pretentious title such as Emissary. Here, we see that he is the inverse of Sisko: whereas Dukat has a modest title, he pursues absolute power, sees himself in messianic terms, and craves adoration; Sisko, meanwhile, despite his exalted title, has the comparatively modest ambition of the admiralty, sees himself only as a very good Starfleet officer, and is uncomfortable with the reverence and adoration the Bajorans give him. Another example of their differences is found in the Season 4 episode "To the Death", when Weyoun offers Sisko a chance to be absolute ruler of the Federation, answerable to no one. Sisko, of course, declines, but this is a foreshadowing of the offer that Dukat will accept, to become the absolute ruler of Cardassia under the Dominion. The episode "Covenant" brings the point home. In this episode, Dukat has taken over Empok Nor, a Cardassian space station in Dominion space which is almost the twin of Deep Space Nine (Formerly Terok Nor). Here, he has set himself up as the Emissary of the Cult of the Pagh Wraiths, surrounded by devoted Bajorans, including one of Kira's former teachers. As leader of the cult, he has even arrogated to himself the power to determine whether couples are allowed to have sex and have children, in a parody of Sisko's duty as Emissary (seen in "Accession" and "Call to Arms"), which includes blessing marriages and performing wedding ceremonies. The end of the episode, in which Dukat is prepared to sacrifice the cultists to save himself, prefigures and inverts the end of the series, in which Sisko sacrifices himself to save Bajor from the Pah Wraiths.

to:

* The entire series, from beginning to end, is about the conflict between Sisko and Dukat. First, both characters make their debut in the first episode, where Dukat was the former commander of the station and Sisko is the incoming commander. Both of them hold similar ranks throughout the series: Sisko starts out as a commander who is promoted to captain, while Dukat (even when he is running Cardassia), retains the rank of Gul (stated in the TNG episode "The Wounded" to be equivalent to Captain) through the entire series (with a brief stint as Legate). Both Dukat and Sisko are family men who are devoted to their children, and we see Jake and (to a lesser extent) Ziyal on screen. Now, the differences that divide the two: Sisko serves the Federation, a free, peaceful society while Dukat serves the oppressive, warlike Cardassian regime. Whereas Sisko sees his task as overseeing the reconstruction of Bajor in the hope that they will take their place as an equal member of the Federation, Dukat, in "Indiscretion" and "Waltz", deluded himself into thinking that he would improve the lot of the Bajorans, but refused to respect them as equals and became their greatest oppressor. It should be noted that, of the ten million people who died in the fifty-year Occupation (cf. "Cardassians"), half of them did so during the ten years Dukat was in charge (cf. "Waltz"). The opposition becomes even more clear when Dukat leads Cardassia into the Dominion, which has been noted on this page, and confirmed by WordOfGod, to be the anti-Federation. Additionally, Sisko becomes the Emissary of Bajor, a role he endures reluctantly, at least until "Accession" when the Prophets teach him a lesson, showing how even a well-meaning alternative could prove disastrous to Bajor. Gul Dukat, on the other hand, evinces messianic delusions throughout the series, particularly in his conversations with Kira in "Indiscretion" and with Sisko in "Waltz". After the latter episode, Dukat joins the Pah Wraths, eventually becoming ''their'' Emissary to reinforce his position as Sisko's equal and opposite counterpart. In a conversation in "Ties of Blood and Water", Dukat indicates that, despite being the ruler of Cardassia, he has retained the title Gul rather than a pretentious title such as Emissary. Here, we see that he is the inverse of Sisko: whereas Dukat has a modest title, he pursues absolute power, sees himself in messianic terms, and craves adoration; Sisko, meanwhile, despite his exalted title, has the comparatively modest ambition of the admiralty, sees himself only as a very good Starfleet officer, and is uncomfortable with the reverence and adoration the Bajorans give him. Another example of their differences is found in the Season 4 episode "To the Death", when Weyoun offers Sisko a chance to be absolute ruler of the Federation, answerable to no one. Sisko, of course, declines, but this is a foreshadowing of the offer that Dukat will accept, to become the absolute ruler of Cardassia under the Dominion. The episode "Covenant" brings the point home. In this episode, Dukat has taken over Empok Nor, a Cardassian space station in Dominion space which is almost the twin of Deep Space Nine (Formerly Terok Nor). Here, parodying Sisko's role as commander of DS9 and Emissary, he has set himself up as the Emissary of the Cult of the Pagh Wraiths, surrounded by devoted Bajorans, including one of Kira's former teachers. As leader of the cult, he has even arrogated to himself the power to determine whether couples are allowed to have sex and have children, in a parody of Sisko's duty as Emissary (seen in "Accession" and "Call to Arms"), which includes blessing marriages and performing wedding ceremonies. The end of the episode, in which Dukat is prepared to sacrifice the cultists to save himself, prefigures and inverts the end of the series, in which Sisko sacrifices himself to save Bajor from the Pah Wraiths.
23rd Apr '16 4:43:58 PM esq263
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The entire series, from beginning to end, is about the conflict between Sisko and Dukat. First, both characters make their debut in the first episode, where Dukat was the former commander of the station and Sisko is the incoming commander. Both of them hold similar ranks throughout the series: Sisko starts out as a commander who is promoted to captain, while Dukat (even when he is running Cardassia), retains the rank of Gul (stated in the TNG episode "The Wounded" to be equivalent to Captain) through the entire series (with a brief stint as Legate). Both Dukat and Sisko are family men who are devoted to their children, and we see Jake and (to a lesser extent) Ziyal on screen. Now, the differences that divide the two: Sisko serves the Federation, a free, peaceful society while Dukat serves the oppressive, warlike Cardassian regime. Whereas Sisko sees his task as overseeing the reconstruction of Bajor in the hope that they will take their place as an equal member of the Federation, Dukat, in "Indiscretion" and "Waltz", deluded himself into thinking that he would improve the lot of the Bajorans, but refused to respect them as equals and became their greatest oppressor. It should be noted that, of the ten million people who died in the fifty-year Occupation (cf. "Cardassians"), half of them did so during the ten years Dukat was in charge (cf. "Waltz"). The opposition becomes even more clear when Dukat leads Cardassia into the Dominion, which has been noted on this page, and confirmed by WordOfGod, to be the anti-Federation. Additionally, Sisko becomes the Emissary of Bajor, a role he endures reluctantly, at least until "Accession" when the Prophets teach him a lesson, showing how even a well-meaning alternative could prove disastrous to Bajor. Gul Dukat, on the other hand, evinces messianic delusions throughout the series, particularly in his conversations with Kira in "Indiscretion" and with Sisko in "Waltz". After the latter episode, Dukat joins the Pah Wraths, eventually becoming ''their'' Emissary to reinforce his position as Sisko's equal and opposite counterpart. In a conversation in "Ties of Blood and Water", Dukat indicates that, despite being the ruler of Cardassia, he has retained the title Gul rather than a pretentious title such as Emissary. Here, we see that he is the inverse of Sisko: whereas Dukat has a modest title, he pursues absolute power, sees himself in messianic terms, and craves adoration; Sisko, meanwhile, despite his exalted title, has the comparatively modest ambition of the admiralty, sees himself only as a very good Starfleet officer, and is uncomfortable with the reverence and adoration the Bajorans give him. Another example of their differences is found in the Season 4 episode "To the Death", when Weyoun offers Sisko a chance to be absolute ruler of the Federation, answerable to no one. Sisko, of course, declines, but this is a foreshadowing of the offer that Dukat will accept, to become the absolute ruler of Cardassia under the Dominion. In the end, looking back on the entire series, the fact that it culminates in a duel to the death between the two is not at all surprising.

to:

* The entire series, from beginning to end, is about the conflict between Sisko and Dukat. First, both characters make their debut in the first episode, where Dukat was the former commander of the station and Sisko is the incoming commander. Both of them hold similar ranks throughout the series: Sisko starts out as a commander who is promoted to captain, while Dukat (even when he is running Cardassia), retains the rank of Gul (stated in the TNG episode "The Wounded" to be equivalent to Captain) through the entire series (with a brief stint as Legate). Both Dukat and Sisko are family men who are devoted to their children, and we see Jake and (to a lesser extent) Ziyal on screen. Now, the differences that divide the two: Sisko serves the Federation, a free, peaceful society while Dukat serves the oppressive, warlike Cardassian regime. Whereas Sisko sees his task as overseeing the reconstruction of Bajor in the hope that they will take their place as an equal member of the Federation, Dukat, in "Indiscretion" and "Waltz", deluded himself into thinking that he would improve the lot of the Bajorans, but refused to respect them as equals and became their greatest oppressor. It should be noted that, of the ten million people who died in the fifty-year Occupation (cf. "Cardassians"), half of them did so during the ten years Dukat was in charge (cf. "Waltz"). The opposition becomes even more clear when Dukat leads Cardassia into the Dominion, which has been noted on this page, and confirmed by WordOfGod, to be the anti-Federation. Additionally, Sisko becomes the Emissary of Bajor, a role he endures reluctantly, at least until "Accession" when the Prophets teach him a lesson, showing how even a well-meaning alternative could prove disastrous to Bajor. Gul Dukat, on the other hand, evinces messianic delusions throughout the series, particularly in his conversations with Kira in "Indiscretion" and with Sisko in "Waltz". After the latter episode, Dukat joins the Pah Wraths, eventually becoming ''their'' Emissary to reinforce his position as Sisko's equal and opposite counterpart. In a conversation in "Ties of Blood and Water", Dukat indicates that, despite being the ruler of Cardassia, he has retained the title Gul rather than a pretentious title such as Emissary. Here, we see that he is the inverse of Sisko: whereas Dukat has a modest title, he pursues absolute power, sees himself in messianic terms, and craves adoration; Sisko, meanwhile, despite his exalted title, has the comparatively modest ambition of the admiralty, sees himself only as a very good Starfleet officer, and is uncomfortable with the reverence and adoration the Bajorans give him. Another example of their differences is found in the Season 4 episode "To the Death", when Weyoun offers Sisko a chance to be absolute ruler of the Federation, answerable to no one. Sisko, of course, declines, but this is a foreshadowing of the offer that Dukat will accept, to become the absolute ruler of Cardassia under the Dominion. In The episode "Covenant" brings the end, looking back on point home. In this episode, Dukat has taken over Empok Nor, a Cardassian space station in Dominion space which is almost the entire twin of Deep Space Nine (Formerly Terok Nor). Here, he has set himself up as the Emissary of the Cult of the Pagh Wraiths, surrounded by devoted Bajorans, including one of Kira's former teachers. As leader of the cult, he has even arrogated to himself the power to determine whether couples are allowed to have sex and have children, in a parody of Sisko's duty as Emissary (seen in "Accession" and "Call to Arms"), which includes blessing marriages and performing wedding ceremonies. The end of the episode, in which Dukat is prepared to sacrifice the cultists to save himself, prefigures and inverts the end of the series, in which Sisko sacrifices himself to save Bajor from the fact that it culminates in a duel to the death between the two is not at all surprising.Pah Wraiths.
20th Apr '16 1:35:13 PM esq263
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The entire series, from beginning to end, is about the conflict between Sisko and Dukat. First, both characters make their debut in the first episode, where Dukat was the former commander of the station and Sisko is the incoming commander. Both of them hold similar ranks throughout the series: Sisko starts out as a commander who is promoted to captain, while Dukat (even when he is running Cardassia), retains the rank of Gul (stated in the TNG episode "The Wounded" to be equivalent to Captain) through the entire series (with a brief stint as Legate). Both Dukat and Sisko are family men who are devoted to their children, and we see Jake and (to a lesser extent) Ziyal on screen. Now, the differences that divide the two: Sisko serves the Federation, a free, peaceful society while Dukat serves the oppressive, warlike Cardassian regime. Whereas Sisko sees his task as overseeing the reconstruction of Bajor in the hope that they will take their place as an equal member of the Federation, Dukat, in "Indiscretion" and "Waltz", deluded himself into thinking that he would improve the lot of the Bajorans, but refused to respect them as equals and became their greatest oppressor. It should be noted that, of the ten million people who died in the fifty-year Occupation (cf. "Cardassians"), half of them did so during the ten years Dukat was in charge (cf. "Waltz"). The opposition becomes even more clear when Dukat leads Cardassia into the Dominion, which has been noted on this page, and confirmed by WordOfGod, to be the anti-Federation. Additionally, Sisko becomes the Emissary of Bajor, a role he endures reluctantly, at least until "Accession" when the Prophets teach him a lesson, showing how even a well-meaning alternative could prove disastrous to Bajor. Gul Dukat, on the other hand, evinces messianic delusions throughout the series, particularly in his conversations with Kira in "Indiscretion" and with Sisko in "Waltz". After the latter episode, Dukat joins the Pagh Wraths, eventually becoming ''their'' Emissary to reinforce his position as Sisko's equal and opposite counterpart. In a conversation in "Ties of Blood and Water", Dukat indicates that, despite being the ruler of Cardassia, he has retained the title Gul rather than a pretentious title such as Emissary. Here, we see that he is the inverse of Sisko: whereas Dukat has a modest title, he pursues absolute power, sees himself in messianic terms, and craves adoration; Sisko, meanwhile, despite his exalted title, has the comparatively modest ambition of the admiralty, sees himself only as a very good Starfleet officer, and is uncomfortable with the reverence and adoration the Bajorans give him. Another example of their differences is found in the Season 4 episode "To the Death", when Weyoun offers Sisko a chance to be absolute ruler of the Federation, answerable to no one. Sisko, of course, declines, but this is a foreshadowing of the offer that Dukat will accept, to become the absolute ruler of Cardassia under the Dominion. In the end, looking back on the entire series, the fact that it culminates in a duel to the death between the two is not at all surprising.

to:

* The entire series, from beginning to end, is about the conflict between Sisko and Dukat. First, both characters make their debut in the first episode, where Dukat was the former commander of the station and Sisko is the incoming commander. Both of them hold similar ranks throughout the series: Sisko starts out as a commander who is promoted to captain, while Dukat (even when he is running Cardassia), retains the rank of Gul (stated in the TNG episode "The Wounded" to be equivalent to Captain) through the entire series (with a brief stint as Legate). Both Dukat and Sisko are family men who are devoted to their children, and we see Jake and (to a lesser extent) Ziyal on screen. Now, the differences that divide the two: Sisko serves the Federation, a free, peaceful society while Dukat serves the oppressive, warlike Cardassian regime. Whereas Sisko sees his task as overseeing the reconstruction of Bajor in the hope that they will take their place as an equal member of the Federation, Dukat, in "Indiscretion" and "Waltz", deluded himself into thinking that he would improve the lot of the Bajorans, but refused to respect them as equals and became their greatest oppressor. It should be noted that, of the ten million people who died in the fifty-year Occupation (cf. "Cardassians"), half of them did so during the ten years Dukat was in charge (cf. "Waltz"). The opposition becomes even more clear when Dukat leads Cardassia into the Dominion, which has been noted on this page, and confirmed by WordOfGod, to be the anti-Federation. Additionally, Sisko becomes the Emissary of Bajor, a role he endures reluctantly, at least until "Accession" when the Prophets teach him a lesson, showing how even a well-meaning alternative could prove disastrous to Bajor. Gul Dukat, on the other hand, evinces messianic delusions throughout the series, particularly in his conversations with Kira in "Indiscretion" and with Sisko in "Waltz". After the latter episode, Dukat joins the Pagh Pah Wraths, eventually becoming ''their'' Emissary to reinforce his position as Sisko's equal and opposite counterpart. In a conversation in "Ties of Blood and Water", Dukat indicates that, despite being the ruler of Cardassia, he has retained the title Gul rather than a pretentious title such as Emissary. Here, we see that he is the inverse of Sisko: whereas Dukat has a modest title, he pursues absolute power, sees himself in messianic terms, and craves adoration; Sisko, meanwhile, despite his exalted title, has the comparatively modest ambition of the admiralty, sees himself only as a very good Starfleet officer, and is uncomfortable with the reverence and adoration the Bajorans give him. Another example of their differences is found in the Season 4 episode "To the Death", when Weyoun offers Sisko a chance to be absolute ruler of the Federation, answerable to no one. Sisko, of course, declines, but this is a foreshadowing of the offer that Dukat will accept, to become the absolute ruler of Cardassia under the Dominion. In the end, looking back on the entire series, the fact that it culminates in a duel to the death between the two is not at all surprising.
This list shows the last 10 events of 224. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.StarTrekDeepSpaceNine