History Fridge / SherlockHolmes

14th Jan '16 4:45:57 PM Zephyr7
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* Right before [[spoiler: Holmes sacrificed himself by pushing him and Moriarty over the edge]], he closed his eyes just as [[spoiler: Watson]] walked in. He wanted [[spoiler: Watson]] to be the last thing he saw.




* Right before [[spoiler: Holmes sacrificed himself by pushing him and Moriarty over the edge]], he closed his eyes just as [[spoiler: Watson]] walked in. He wanted [[spoiler: Watson]] to be the last thing he saw.

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* Right before [[spoiler: Holmes sacrificed himself by pushing him and Moriarty over the edge]], he closed his eyes just as [[spoiler: Watson]] walked in. He wanted [[spoiler: Watson]] to be the last thing he saw.
14th Jan '16 4:41:10 PM Zephyr7
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to:

* Right before [[spoiler: Holmes sacrificed himself by pushing him and Moriarty over the edge]], he closed his eyes just as [[spoiler: Watson]] walked in. He wanted [[spoiler: Watson]] to be the last thing he saw.
1st Dec '15 5:38:57 AM annieholmes
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*** Alternatively, given that many clients learned of Holmes through Watson's stories, Watson may have intentionally devalued himself so that criminals would underestimate him and dismiss him as Holmes' weakling lackey.
24th Nov '15 3:01:17 PM Sharlee
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* The sheer number of times when Holmes manages to find the real culprit and exonerate an innocent party can become FridgeHorror if you consider that each and every one of those wrongfully-accused parties would likely have been imprisoned or executed without him. Holmes only begins practicing his trade in the 1870s. Just how many innocent people were being convicted of crimes they had nothing to do with, ''before'' he or his methods became established?
15th Nov '15 10:37:23 AM MURPHYCHACHO
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* "The Adventure of the Speckled Band" starts with Watson explaining to the reader that he had kept the story from the public eye until now due to a promise he made to an unnamed young woman. He adds that the young lady's untimely death is part of the reason he now feels that he can come forward with it. Fair enough, however [[spoiler: this becomes considerably more tragic at the end of the story when the reader realizes that Helen Stoker is the only significant female character in the story. So not only did the poor woman have to endure her mother's death at an early age, growing up in the "care" of her abusive and violent stepfather with only her twin sister for company, watching said sister die in her arms due to a murder plot by her stepfather, and narrowly dodging the same fate, but it can be inferred that she didn't live very long after the case.]] It's even possible that [[spoiler: the strain of the ordeal could have contributed to her death.]] Even sadder if you recall [[spoiler: Helen was about to be married at the time of the case. This means her husband would have lost his wife not long after the wedding.]]

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* "The Adventure of the Speckled Band" starts with Watson explaining to the reader that he had kept the story from the public eye until now due to a promise he made to an unnamed young woman. He adds that the young lady's untimely death is part of the reason he now feels that he can come forward with it. Fair enough, however [[spoiler: this becomes considerably more tragic at the end of the story when the reader realizes that Helen Stoker is the only significant female character in the story. So not only did the poor woman have to endure [[TraumaCongaLine her mother's death at an early age, growing up in the "care" of her abusive and violent stepfather with only her twin sister for company, watching said sister die in her arms due to a murder plot by her stepfather, and narrowly dodging the same fate, fate,]] but it can be inferred that she didn't live very long after the case.]] It's even possible that [[spoiler: the strain of the ordeal could have contributed to her death.]] Even sadder if you recall [[spoiler: Helen was about to be married at the time of the case. This means her husband would have lost his wife not long after the wedding.]]
15th Nov '15 10:36:09 AM MURPHYCHACHO
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Added DiffLines:

* "The Adventure of the Speckled Band" starts with Watson explaining to the reader that he had kept the story from the public eye until now due to a promise he made to an unnamed young woman. He adds that the young lady's untimely death is part of the reason he now feels that he can come forward with it. Fair enough, however [[spoiler: this becomes considerably more tragic at the end of the story when the reader realizes that Helen Stoker is the only significant female character in the story. So not only did the poor woman have to endure her mother's death at an early age, growing up in the "care" of her abusive and violent stepfather with only her twin sister for company, watching said sister die in her arms due to a murder plot by her stepfather, and narrowly dodging the same fate, but it can be inferred that she didn't live very long after the case.]] It's even possible that [[spoiler: the strain of the ordeal could have contributed to her death.]] Even sadder if you recall [[spoiler: Helen was about to be married at the time of the case. This means her husband would have lost his wife not long after the wedding.]]
29th Oct '15 9:36:07 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* Blackwood [[spoiler:kills the ginger dwarf with cyanide (which deprives the body of ''air''), and buries him in the '''earth'''. He kills his father in a bathtub filled with ''fire''-heated '''water'''. He kills the American lodge member with by setting him on '''fire''' with what said member thought to be ''rain''. And finally, his machine, beneath the ''earth'', would poison the very '''air''' Parliament breathed.]] ''It's elementary.'' -- Tropers/{{Jonn}}
** [[spoiler:Lord Blackwood's death]] ended up being an unintentional replacement for [[spoiler:the parliament]]. How, you ask? [[spoiler:Lord Blackwood died by hanging, in the '''air''', from a bridge, which connects two pieces of ''earth'']].
* The scene where Holmes is confronted by Lord Coward. Holmes shuts the fireplace to fill the room with smoke and prevent Coward from shooting him. How Holmes doesn't cough in the middle of all that smoke? Take in consideration how heavy smoker he is especially in books.



* One of the points of criticism that was raised was that Holmes and Watson's relationship was more tense and prone to bickering than their solid friendship in the original novels. Of course, if you subscribe to the idea that Watson's a bit of an UnreliableNarrator and that the movie is getting under the skin of the original stories this makes a bit more sense, since Watson's hardly going to write about all the times that he and Holmes bicker like an old married couple.
** Also I would like to fill this in somewhat. He has a HeterosexualLifePartner in real life. While our friendship can never be broken, we bicker A LOT, often sounding like a married couple. So having them bicker for me didn't make it feel as if they were less friends. The opposite, they were so good friends they were ''basically married''. This is the reason Holmes is so jealous of Watson's fiance!
*** I'd reverse that cause and effect - after years of sharing a home, a job and a life, Watson is marrying someone else, moving away and quitting the detective business. Holmes is enormously jealous and feeling abandoned and is lashing out at his best friend.
* Holmes drinking eye surgery medicine just seems like an amusing throwaway joke, until you learn that [[ContinuityNod cocaine]] was widely used in Victorian times as an local anesthetic for eye surgery. In the books, Holmes' drug of choice was cocaine rather than alcohol.
** Even better, Holmes's creator Conan Doyle, specialised as an opthalmologist (eye doctor) in real life.

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* One of the points of criticism that was raised was that * Watson chastises Holmes and Watson's relationship was more tense and prone to bickering than their solid friendship in the original novels. Of course, if you subscribe to the idea that Watson's a bit of an UnreliableNarrator and that the movie is getting under the skin of the original stories this makes a bit more sense, since Watson's hardly going to write about all the times that he and Holmes bicker like an old married couple.
** Also I would like to fill this in somewhat. He has a HeterosexualLifePartner in real life. While our friendship can never be broken, we bicker A LOT, often sounding like a married couple. So having them bicker
for me didn't make it feel as if they were less friends. The opposite, they were so good friends they were ''basically married''. This is the reason Holmes is so jealous of Watson's fiance!
*** I'd reverse that cause and effect - after years of sharing a home, a job and a life, Watson is marrying someone else, moving away and quitting the detective business. Holmes is enormously jealous and feeling abandoned and is lashing out at his best friend.
* Holmes
drinking eye surgery medicine just seems like an amusing throwaway joke, until you learn that [[ContinuityNod cocaine]] was widely used in Victorian times medicine. It's cocaine, which (even today) has a medical use as an a local anesthetic for eye surgery. In the books, Holmes' drug of choice was cocaine rather than alcohol.
** Even better, Holmes's creator Conan Doyle, specialised as an opthalmologist (eye doctor) in real life.
Holmes uses cocaine.



* At the end of the film, look closer at the ring Holmes gave to Mary and Watson... [[spoiler: "Is that the Maharajah's missing diamond?"]]
** There's even a clue to this as the last thing we saw Holmes do before this scene was [[spoiler: grab Irene's necklace which held the diamond.]]
* At some points, Holmes wears shaded glasses. Common today, but back in that era they were considered medical aids. In Holmes' case--for someone who is stuck on HyperAwareness all the time--they're aid for an out of control brain, to help reduce the amount of information Holmes has to take in.

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* At the end of the film, look closer at the ring Holmes gave to Mary and Watson... [[spoiler: "Is that the Maharajah's missing diamond?"]]
** There's even a clue to this as the
diamond?"]] The last thing we saw see Holmes do before this scene was is [[spoiler: grab Irene's necklace which held the diamond.]]
* At some points, Holmes wears shaded glasses. Common today, but back in that era they were considered medical aids. In Holmes' case--for someone who is stuck on HyperAwareness all the time--they're aid for an out of control brain, to help reduce the amount of information Holmes has to take in.
21st Jun '15 2:55:59 PM Milarqui
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* Professor James Moriarty is nicknamed "The Napoleon of Crime". Napoleon was finally defeated in Waterloo. What better way to end him than with a lot of water?
25th Mar '15 1:09:20 PM maxwellsilver
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** Also [[Tropers/{{Gabel}} this troper]] would like to fill this in somewhat. He has a HeterosexualLifePartner in real life. While our friendship can never be broken, we bicker A LOT, often sounding like a married couple. So having them bicker for me didn't make it feel as if they were less friends. The opposite, they were so good friends they were ''basically married''. This is the reason Holmes is so jealous of Watson's fiance!

to:

** Also [[Tropers/{{Gabel}} this troper]] I would like to fill this in somewhat. He has a HeterosexualLifePartner in real life. While our friendship can never be broken, we bicker A LOT, often sounding like a married couple. So having them bicker for me didn't make it feel as if they were less friends. The opposite, they were so good friends they were ''basically married''. This is the reason Holmes is so jealous of Watson's fiance!
10th Mar '15 11:05:52 PM dmcreif
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* The conductor telling the disguised Holmes, "I'm sorry, madam, you can't use the lavatory while the train's in the station". It may take a few viewings to realize that the movie takes place in a time period where, when you flushed the toilet in a lavatory, your waste was flushed right onto the tracks, and thus it was not wise to flush while the train was stopped in a station (these days, passenger trains use retention tanks that are emptied at stops where the train is scheduled for lengthy servicing).
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