History Fridge / Music

26th Jun '16 3:43:13 AM gewunomox
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* I didn't get the song ''Handlebars'' (by the Flobots) at first, how it changes from sounding like Cake to more like LinkinPark. Then I realized that it tells a story: As the song goes along, the music gets more complicated, the feats get more impressive and the singing gets louder. --{{Stinkoman87}}

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* I didn't get the song ''Handlebars'' (by the Flobots) at first, how it changes from sounding like Cake to more like LinkinPark.Music/LinkinPark. Then I realized that it tells a story: As the song goes along, the music gets more complicated, the feats get more impressive and the singing gets louder. --{{Stinkoman87}}
23rd Jun '16 2:35:11 AM gewunomox
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* The Minutemen included a live version of their cover of "Don't Look Now" by CreedenceClearwaterRevival on ''Double Nickels On The Dime'', which is otherwise entirely a studio album. I had always wondered why this was, especially since it's not a very clear recording of the song, and you can hear the audience talking over most of it. I figured maybe they really wanted the song to be on the album, but couldn't seem to do a good studio performance of it, so they just grabbed the best live recording they happened to have of it. Then I read the book from the 33 1/3 series on the album, and it was noted that a friend of the band had made the recording from the audience, and convinced them to use it because he thought the audience chatter actually added something to the song. It suddenly started to make sense: "Don't Look Now" is sort of about taking conveniences for granted (and more specifically the hard work that goes into those conveniences), so using a live recording where the audience seems to be too busy talking among themselves to hear the message of the song adds a level of irony. -Tropers/MikeK

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* The Minutemen included a live version of their cover of "Don't Look Now" by CreedenceClearwaterRevival Music/CreedenceClearwaterRevival on ''Double Nickels On The Dime'', which is otherwise entirely a studio album. I had always wondered why this was, especially since it's not a very clear recording of the song, and you can hear the audience talking over most of it. I figured maybe they really wanted the song to be on the album, but couldn't seem to do a good studio performance of it, so they just grabbed the best live recording they happened to have of it. Then I read the book from the 33 1/3 series on the album, and it was noted that a friend of the band had made the recording from the audience, and convinced them to use it because he thought the audience chatter actually added something to the song. It suddenly started to make sense: "Don't Look Now" is sort of about taking conveniences for granted (and more specifically the hard work that goes into those conveniences), so using a live recording where the audience seems to be too busy talking among themselves to hear the message of the song adds a level of irony. -Tropers/MikeK
9th Jun '16 6:05:47 PM TheMightyHeptagon
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* I already liked JonathanCoulton 's song Code Monkey, but I like it even more now that I realise exactly why he hates his job so much. He's bad at it. His code doesn't necessarily have to be elegant, but it should at least be functional, when he's depressed he pretends to work and he'd rather be jobless and mooching around. - TheGerkuman

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* I already liked JonathanCoulton 's song Code Monkey, but I like it even more now that I realise exactly why he hates his job so much. He's bad at it. His code doesn't necessarily have to be elegant, but it should at least be functional, when he's depressed he pretends to work and he'd rather be jobless and mooching around. - TheGerkumanTheGerkuman
* The chorus of Joseph Arthur's BreakupSong "In the Sun" has no words but the catchy refrain "May God's love be with you, always," making the ultimate sentiment of the song come off as a warm and heartfelt IWantMyBelovedToBeHappy. This can seem odd, given that the rest of the lyrics seem to portray a tumultuous relationship that ended with heartbreak and hurt feelings. Then you realize: the singer is wishing God's love for his ex-lover because he no longer loves her himself, but hopes that God--who is immune to anger and sadness and regret--still might. "May God's love be with you" is a subtle way of saying "I don't love you anymore, but I hope you're OK."
25th May '16 8:53:23 PM HypnoticMeerkat
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* I was listening to "Happy Birthday" by TheBirthdayMassacre again, and it hit me: in the chorus, when she sings "'You're a murder tramp, murder tramp'/I think he said/'You're a murder boy, birthday boy'/I think I said", he's not repeating 'murder tramp', it's what he's ''calling her by'', just like how she's calling him 'birthday boy'. - Tropers/{{Zadia}}

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* I was listening to "Happy Birthday" by TheBirthdayMassacre Music/TheBirthdayMassacre again, and it hit me: in the chorus, when she sings "'You're a murder tramp, murder tramp'/I think he said/'You're a murder boy, birthday boy'/I think I said", he's not repeating 'murder tramp', it's what he's ''calling her by'', just like how she's calling him 'birthday boy'. - Tropers/{{Zadia}}
5th May '16 4:31:24 PM nombretomado
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* The line "Put on your ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Red_Shoes_(fairy_tale) red shoes]]'' and dance the blues" immediately makes DavidBowie's "Let's Dance" darker than most dance tunes of the early [[Main/TheEighties 1980s]] if you know your Creator/HansChristianAndersen. -- Sapphire Redux

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* The line "Put on your ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Red_Shoes_(fairy_tale) red shoes]]'' and dance the blues" immediately makes DavidBowie's Music/DavidBowie's "Let's Dance" darker than most dance tunes of the early [[Main/TheEighties 1980s]] if you know your Creator/HansChristianAndersen. -- Sapphire Redux



* The line "kick out the jams" among the rebel slogans in DavidBowie's "Cygnet Committee" seems like {{Narm}} born of ignorance with the knowledge that "kick out the jams" wasn't meant to be anything subversive or countercultural, as many theories had it, but just a way of telling the audience "do I look like [[TheGratefulDead Jerry Garcia]] to you?!" However, recall that the song was inspired by the creative bankruptcy Bowie saw in the Arts Lab he had been trying to set up, when people would go for his performances, contributing nothing, a kind of dynamic being not only endorsed but ''enforced'' by [=MC5=] - he knew ''exactly'' what it meant, tying the two "acts" together. - Tropers/TwinBird

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* The line "kick out the jams" among the rebel slogans in DavidBowie's Music/DavidBowie's "Cygnet Committee" seems like {{Narm}} born of ignorance with the knowledge that "kick out the jams" wasn't meant to be anything subversive or countercultural, as many theories had it, but just a way of telling the audience "do I look like [[TheGratefulDead [[Music/TheGratefulDead Jerry Garcia]] to you?!" However, recall that the song was inspired by the creative bankruptcy Bowie saw in the Arts Lab he had been trying to set up, when people would go for his performances, contributing nothing, a kind of dynamic being not only endorsed but ''enforced'' by [=MC5=] - he knew ''exactly'' what it meant, tying the two "acts" together. - Tropers/TwinBird



* At first I thought the Lupe Fiasco's 'Dumb It Down' was just a bit of irony; the lyrics in the song are far from dumbed down, they're possibly the most complicated lyrics i've read. But when I saw the video for the song, which is in black and white, and only really features Lupe and a few other people, I realised how brilliant the song was. Everything has been dumbed down, EXCEPT the lyrics. The song also ends with 'but I flatly refuse I ain't dumb down nothing.' Which confused me until I realised that he hasnt dumbed down anything that matters. He's dumbed down everything but the lyrics, and uses just the lyrics themselves to show how much he doesnt need fancy videos and money etc. The lyrics are all that matter.
* Bush's "Glycerine" has a seemingly arbitrary Music/TheBeatles ShoutOut ("...when we rise it's like strawberry fields"), while "Everything Zen" has an equally arbitrary DavidBowie ShoutOut ("Minnie Mouse has grown up a cow, Dave's on sale again"). The thing "Strawberry Fields" and "Life On Mars?" happen to have in common is WordSaladLyrics, something Bush themselves are also known for. Maybe those shout outs are their way of saying "Yeah, none of this makes any sense, but hey, you let The Beatles and David Bowie get away with it..." - Tropers/MikeK

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* At first I thought the Lupe Fiasco's 'Dumb "Dumb It Down' Down" was just a bit of irony; the lyrics in the song are far from dumbed down, they're possibly the most complicated lyrics i've I've read. But when I saw the video for the song, which is in black and white, and only really features Lupe and a few other people, I realised how brilliant the song was. Everything has been dumbed down, EXCEPT the lyrics. The song also ends with 'but I flatly refuse I ain't dumb down nothing.' Which confused me until I realised that he hasnt dumbed down anything that matters. He's dumbed down everything but the lyrics, and uses just the lyrics themselves to show how much he doesnt need fancy videos and money etc. The lyrics are all that matter.
* Bush's "Glycerine" has a seemingly arbitrary Music/TheBeatles ShoutOut ("...when we rise it's like strawberry fields"), while "Everything Zen" has an equally arbitrary DavidBowie Music/DavidBowie ShoutOut ("Minnie Mouse has grown up a cow, Dave's on sale again"). The thing "Strawberry Fields" and "Life On Mars?" happen to have in common is WordSaladLyrics, something Bush themselves are also known for. Maybe those shout outs are their way of saying "Yeah, none of this makes any sense, but hey, you let The Beatles and David Bowie get away with it..." - Tropers/MikeK
22nd Apr '16 4:18:30 PM BKelly95
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Added DiffLines:

** "Adam's Song" features a brief reference to the Music/{{Nirvana}} song "Come As You Are". ("I took my time, hurried up./The choice was mine, I didn't think enough.") I later realized that the reference works with the song's theme of suicide. Music/KurtCobain committed suicide and "Come As You Are" contains possibly the band's biggest FunnyAneurysmMoment about his method of suicide. (Cobain died by shooting himself and the bridge of "Come As You Are" repeatedly says "I don't have a gun.")
5th Apr '16 1:13:40 AM erforce
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* ''In A Lonely Place'', the main character's theme from ''Film/{{Oldboy}}'', is atmospheric and appropriate and awesome. But there's more. In the movie, the main character Oh Dae-Su is imprisoned for fifteen years in a room where the only wall decoration is a rather horrifying picture of Jesus Man of Sorrows, complemented by the first line from Ella Wheeler Wilcox' poem ''Solitude'': "Laugh and the world laughs with you / Weep and you weep alone." On the soundtrack, the song is preceded by Oh Dae-Su reading the line from the poem out loud in Korean. Now listen to the song with the poem next to it. Count the first line as read. Count the number of times the piano theme recurs. Not only does it fit the number of lines in the poem, it also breaks when the poem does, and rises and falls like the lines in the poem do. Yes. Oh Dae-Su's theme is ''Solitude'' set to music. Brilliant. - Dessek

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* ''In "In A Lonely Place'', Place", the main character's theme from ''Film/{{Oldboy}}'', ''Film/{{Oldboy 2003}}'', is atmospheric and appropriate and awesome. But there's more. In the movie, the main character Oh Dae-Su is imprisoned for fifteen years in a room where the only wall decoration is a rather horrifying picture of Jesus Man of Sorrows, complemented by the first line from Ella Wheeler Wilcox' poem ''Solitude'': "Laugh and the world laughs with you / Weep and you weep alone." On the soundtrack, the song is preceded by Oh Dae-Su reading the line from the poem out loud in Korean. Now listen to the song with the poem next to it. Count the first line as read. Count the number of times the piano theme recurs. Not only does it fit the number of lines in the poem, it also breaks when the poem does, and rises and falls like the lines in the poem do. Yes. Oh Dae-Su's theme is ''Solitude'' set to music. Brilliant. - Dessek
15th Mar '16 3:16:39 PM TheGerkuman
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* Music/BetterThanEzra has a couple of songs on their ''Deluxe'' album: "Rosealia", a song about a DomesticAbuse victim who tries to escape from or fight back against her abusive husband, and "Summerhouse", a MurderBallad about an AssholeVictim who's so despised that not even his wife is really upset at his murder. Then, I thought of something: what if the wife from "Summerhouse" was Rosealia and the victim was her abusive husband?

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* Music/BetterThanEzra has a couple of songs on their ''Deluxe'' album: "Rosealia", a song about a DomesticAbuse victim who tries to escape from or fight back against her abusive husband, and "Summerhouse", a MurderBallad about an AssholeVictim who's so despised that not even his wife is really upset at his murder. Then, I thought of something: what if the wife from "Summerhouse" was Rosealia and the victim was her abusive husband?husband?
* I already liked JonathanCoulton 's song Code Monkey, but I like it even more now that I realise exactly why he hates his job so much. He's bad at it. His code doesn't necessarily have to be elegant, but it should at least be functional, when he's depressed he pretends to work and he'd rather be jobless and mooching around. - TheGerkuman
9th Mar '16 1:47:53 AM Morgenthaler
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* I kept misreading the song on ThemCrookedVultures self-titled as 'Interlude with Lutes', which made no sense but I figured it was just another WordSaladTitle that Josh Homme appears so fond. When I actually looked and saw it was 'Interlude with LUDES', the reason why it seemed so psychadelic compared to the rest of the album was suddenly so obvious - [[spoiler:the 'Ludes' of the title refer to Quaaludes.]] - {{Be}}

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* I kept misreading the song on ThemCrookedVultures Music/ThemCrookedVultures self-titled as 'Interlude with Lutes', which made no sense but I figured it was just another WordSaladTitle that Josh Homme appears so fond. When I actually looked and saw it was 'Interlude with LUDES', the reason why it seemed so psychadelic compared to the rest of the album was suddenly so obvious - [[spoiler:the 'Ludes' of the title refer to Quaaludes.]] - {{Be}}



* In TheyMightBeGiants' "Weep Day", there are the lines "I didn't write the words you hear me singing \ I didn't sing the line before this one", which fits in perfectly with the MindScrew self-contradiction of the rest of the lyrics. But John Flansburgh repeats those lyrics right after John Linnell sings them, and when ''he'' sings them, they're both true: Flansburgh didn't write the lyrics and didn't sing the previous line. - Tropers/MikeK

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* In TheyMightBeGiants' Music/TheyMightBeGiants' "Weep Day", there are the lines "I didn't write the words you hear me singing \ I didn't sing the line before this one", which fits in perfectly with the MindScrew self-contradiction of the rest of the lyrics. But John Flansburgh repeats those lyrics right after John Linnell sings them, and when ''he'' sings them, they're both true: Flansburgh didn't write the lyrics and didn't sing the previous line. - Tropers/MikeK



* In {{Pink}}'s music video for "Raise Your Glass", it bothered me that the non-outcasts were being treated like...um. Outcasts. Then came the prom scene: ''everybody's'' having fun; it's not the closer-to-average people who are being treated like that, just bullies. --@/RedWren
* {{Queen}}'s ''39' isn't about someone who returns from WorldWarII. It's about an astronaut in 2039, who returns from colonising other planets to find that time dilation has made him only one year older while his love has grown old.
* Angus Young of [[Music/{{ACDC}} AC/DC]] pointed out in ''Long Way To The Top: Stories of Australian Rock & Roll'' that the chord sequence in "Long Way to the Top" is A, C, D, C.

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* In {{Pink}}'s Music/{{Pink}}'s music video for "Raise Your Glass", it bothered me that the non-outcasts were being treated like...um. Outcasts. Then came the prom scene: ''everybody's'' having fun; it's not the closer-to-average people who are being treated like that, just bullies. --@/RedWren
* {{Queen}}'s Music/{{Queen}}'s ''39' isn't about someone who returns from WorldWarII. It's about an astronaut in 2039, who returns from colonising other planets to find that time dilation has made him only one year older while his love has grown old.
* Angus Young of [[Music/{{ACDC}} AC/DC]] Music/{{ACDC}} pointed out in ''Long Way To The Top: Stories of Australian Rock & Roll'' that the chord sequence in "Long Way to the Top" is A, C, D, C.



* FrankZappa's "Why Does It Hurt When I Pee" is obviously a parody of over-dramatic rock opera songs, and based on some crude humor, but consider this: What can be more heartbreaking than contracting an [=STD=] from someone you love and trust implicitly? -Tropers/{{Cuchulainn}}
* The video for {{Iamamiwhoami}}'s [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VduvB5xY2L0 "Clump"]] alternates between a static shot of Jonna Lee from the neck up lip-synching while laying on a toilet paper bed and bobbing up and down rather suggestively, and outdoor scenes in a thicket of tall grass and reeds. Sometimes the latter shots only occur for half a second. It took someone's youtube comment to make me realize that they cut to the outdoor shots every time Jonna closes her eyes, and cut back to her on the bed every time she opens them again. Thus, those scenes are apparently what she sees when her eyes are closed, or just what she's imagining. Tropers/MikeK
* The classic '80s song "867-5309/Jenny" by TommyTutone contains the lines "Jenny, Jenny, you're the girl for me/You don't know me but you make me so happy." That rhyme is a bit of a stretch. Can you think of a different word that starts with H and rhymes better with "for me"? Tropers/{{Skagway}}

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* FrankZappa's Music/FrankZappa's "Why Does It Hurt When I Pee" is obviously a parody of over-dramatic rock opera songs, and based on some crude humor, but consider this: What can be more heartbreaking than contracting an [=STD=] from someone you love and trust implicitly? -Tropers/{{Cuchulainn}}
* The video for {{Iamamiwhoami}}'s Music/{{Iamamiwhoami}}'s [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VduvB5xY2L0 "Clump"]] alternates between a static shot of Jonna Lee from the neck up lip-synching while laying on a toilet paper bed and bobbing up and down rather suggestively, and outdoor scenes in a thicket of tall grass and reeds. Sometimes the latter shots only occur for half a second. It took someone's youtube comment to make me realize that they cut to the outdoor shots every time Jonna closes her eyes, and cut back to her on the bed every time she opens them again. Thus, those scenes are apparently what she sees when her eyes are closed, or just what she's imagining. Tropers/MikeK
* The classic '80s song "867-5309/Jenny" by TommyTutone Music/TommyTutone contains the lines "Jenny, Jenny, you're the girl for me/You don't know me but you make me so happy." That rhyme is a bit of a stretch. Can you think of a different word that starts with H and rhymes better with "for me"? Tropers/{{Skagway}}



* A MyChemicalRomance example; Danger Days is incredidably pop-based, which was a turn-off to some fans. I was one of those fans, however, I decided to give the album a second listen before writing it off as crap, and found it a lot more enjoyable the second time around. That's not the brilliance part. The next day, contemplating how awesome the album was, something occured to me -- the album is being broadcasted from a radio station. What does the radio play more than anything else? Pop. That was the brilliance part.

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* A MyChemicalRomance Music/MyChemicalRomance example; Danger Days is incredidably pop-based, which was a turn-off to some fans. I was one of those fans, however, I decided to give the album a second listen before writing it off as crap, and found it a lot more enjoyable the second time around. That's not the brilliance part. The next day, contemplating how awesome the album was, something occured to me -- the album is being broadcasted from a radio station. What does the radio play more than anything else? Pop. That was the brilliance part.
9th Mar '16 1:31:05 AM Morgenthaler
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* In Ana Ng by TheyMightBeGiants there is the line "I saw this painted on a BRIDGE, "I don't want the world I just want your half." Guess what section of the song it happens in? Here's a hint, it's not in the verse, chorus, intro, or outro... also the answer is in caps. - {{brainlesswonder}}
* "Hey Ya!" by {{Outkast}} was/is very popular and very catchy, yet has the culturally unpopular message that love fades. I always found it funny that no-one ever talks about the lyrics, then realized that the line 'Y'all don't want me here you just wanna dance' after a verse shows that the band predicted this phenomenon. After this, I've noticed many Outkast songs have lines that seem to bash mainstream music and ways of thinking, while remaining pop songs themselves. - {{Littleloup}}

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* In Ana Ng by TheyMightBeGiants Music/TheyMightBeGiants there is the line "I saw this painted on a BRIDGE, "I don't want the world I just want your half." Guess what section of the song it happens in? Here's a hint, it's not in the verse, chorus, intro, or outro... also the answer is in caps. - {{brainlesswonder}}
* "Hey Ya!" by {{Outkast}} Music/{{Outkast}} was/is very popular and very catchy, yet has the culturally unpopular message that love fades. I always found it funny that no-one ever talks about the lyrics, then realized that the line 'Y'all don't want me here you just wanna dance' after a verse shows that the band predicted this phenomenon. After this, I've noticed many Outkast songs have lines that seem to bash mainstream music and ways of thinking, while remaining pop songs themselves. - {{Littleloup}}



* For a while, I've been wondering why {{Angelspit}} named a song "Homo-Machinery", as I was thinking of the name as the insult. Several months, many Biology lessons and another look at the lyrics later and it hit me... their point is that by following constant routines, we are becoming humanoid machines, or Homo machinery- Homo as in the genus. God, I'm an idiot sometimes...- @/{{Zadia}}

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* For a while, I've been wondering why {{Angelspit}} Music/{{Angelspit}} named a song "Homo-Machinery", as I was thinking of the name as the insult. Several months, many Biology lessons and another look at the lyrics later and it hit me... their point is that by following constant routines, we are becoming humanoid machines, or Homo machinery- Homo as in the genus. God, I'm an idiot sometimes...- @/{{Zadia}}
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