History Fridge / Music

24th Mar '18 8:33:28 PM nombretomado
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* [[{{randomfanboy}} I]] hated [[TheyMightBeGiants The Statue Got Me High]] the first few times I heard it. It sounded like TMBG at their worst, with lyrics that sounded vaguely meaningful without it actually meaning much. After listening to it a bit more ([[GenreSavvy due to having lived this trope before]]), I realised it was ''very deliberately'' meaningless - unlike most of their songs, it's just a song about a guy whose head blows up because of a statue. I love it now.

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* [[{{randomfanboy}} I]] hated [[TheyMightBeGiants [[Music/TheyMightBeGiants The Statue Got Me High]] the first few times I heard it. It sounded like TMBG at their worst, with lyrics that sounded vaguely meaningful without it actually meaning much. After listening to it a bit more ([[GenreSavvy due to having lived this trope before]]), I realised it was ''very deliberately'' meaningless - unlike most of their songs, it's just a song about a guy whose head blows up because of a statue. I love it now.



** It gets better. I didn't like [[TheyMightBeGiants Apollo 18]] at all -- until I realized that its songs were all references to bad SF/Fantasy movie tropes. ''The Statue Got Me High'' is all about the black monolith at the start of ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'', and referenced in other Creator/ArthurCClarke's works. -- zenfrodo

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** It gets better. I didn't like [[TheyMightBeGiants [[Music/TheyMightBeGiants Apollo 18]] at all -- until I realized that its songs were all references to bad SF/Fantasy movie tropes. ''The Statue Got Me High'' is all about the black monolith at the start of ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'', and referenced in other Creator/ArthurCClarke's works. -- zenfrodo
5th Mar '18 4:26:14 PM nombretomado
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* The first time I heard "You Could Drive A Person Crazy" from the musical ''Company'', it was ripped out of context and I found it weird and annoying (why were they singing so fast? and what was with the "do-do-do"s?). Years later, having heard some of the Andrews Sisters songs [[StephenSondheim Sondheim]] was pastiching, and having had a chance to understand the lyrics and the place the song has in the show, I realised what a brilliant piece of work it was: using a bright, cheerful style of music, previously associated with inane, dippy lyrics, to deliver a scathing and rather bitter smackdown to an unresponsive boyfriend. - puritybrown

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* The first time I heard "You Could Drive A Person Crazy" from the musical ''Company'', it was ripped out of context and I found it weird and annoying (why were they singing so fast? and what was with the "do-do-do"s?). Years later, having heard some of the Andrews Sisters songs [[StephenSondheim [[Music/StephenSondheim Sondheim]] was pastiching, and having had a chance to understand the lyrics and the place the song has in the show, I realised what a brilliant piece of work it was: using a bright, cheerful style of music, previously associated with inane, dippy lyrics, to deliver a scathing and rather bitter smackdown to an unresponsive boyfriend. - puritybrown
12th Feb '18 5:06:48 PM nombretomado
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* For the longest time, I never understood "Thumb Cinema" by Music/TheWorldInfernoFriendshipSociety. I got that it was a rant about consumerism, materialism and excess, but it didn't seem to fit with the rest of the songs on "Addicted to Bad Ideas", which is about PeterLorre's life and generally narrated from his point of view. Suddenly, a year and a half later, it occured to me that since the album was heavily based on a recent biography which elaborates more on Lorre's friendship with BertholtBrecht, the song might be from Brecht's point of view instead. After three songs where Lorre rants about his career decline while deciding to just give in, Brecht criticizes the excesses of Hollywood and how they've damaged Lorre, and begs him to return to postwar Germany with him: "You're not happy, well, no one gives a ***/ This is a game and you're part of it/ Maybe it's time for you to quit." It would fit the album's timeline as well with the next song, "Addicted to Bad Ideas", being about Lorre's growing addiction and despair after returning to Hollywood when his German comeback film flops. - Tropers.TechnicolorPachyderm

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* For the longest time, I never understood "Thumb Cinema" by Music/TheWorldInfernoFriendshipSociety. I got that it was a rant about consumerism, materialism and excess, but it didn't seem to fit with the rest of the songs on "Addicted to Bad Ideas", which is about PeterLorre's Creator/PeterLorre's life and generally narrated from his point of view. Suddenly, a year and a half later, it occured to me that since the album was heavily based on a recent biography which elaborates more on Lorre's friendship with BertholtBrecht, the song might be from Brecht's point of view instead. After three songs where Lorre rants about his career decline while deciding to just give in, Brecht criticizes the excesses of Hollywood and how they've damaged Lorre, and begs him to return to postwar Germany with him: "You're not happy, well, no one gives a ***/ This is a game and you're part of it/ Maybe it's time for you to quit." It would fit the album's timeline as well with the next song, "Addicted to Bad Ideas", being about Lorre's growing addiction and despair after returning to Hollywood when his German comeback film flops. - Tropers.TechnicolorPachyderm
11th Feb '18 6:12:54 PM nombretomado
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* This may in fact just be me reading too much into things in order to solve my own [[{{Headscratchers}} headscratcher]], but... in {{Music/Nirvana}}'s "Sliver" the line "fell asleep and watched TV" always struck me as a LyricalShoehorn, and not even a particularly necessary one, because the more logical "watched TV and fell asleep" would have fit just as well. However, you sort of ''could'' sleep while watching TV - if you fall asleep with the TV on, for a little while you could still be just alert enough to sort of follow what's going on by hearing dialogue. - Tropers/MikeK

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* This may in fact just be me reading too much into things in order to solve my own [[{{Headscratchers}} [[Headscratchers/HomePage headscratcher]], but... in {{Music/Nirvana}}'s "Sliver" the line "fell asleep and watched TV" always struck me as a LyricalShoehorn, and not even a particularly necessary one, because the more logical "watched TV and fell asleep" would have fit just as well. However, you sort of ''could'' sleep while watching TV - if you fall asleep with the TV on, for a little while you could still be just alert enough to sort of follow what's going on by hearing dialogue. - Tropers/MikeK
7th Feb '18 11:11:21 AM MikeK
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* The first time I heard Nightwish's "Passion and the Opera", I liked it well enough, but felt that Tarja's OneWomanWail at the end [[EndingFatigue went on longer than it probably should have]]. Then I actually paid attention to [[IntercourseWithYou the lyrics]], and I was in church of all places when it finally hit me [[TheImmodestOrgasm what the ending was]]. - Mattthelurker

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* The first time I heard Nightwish's "Passion and the Opera", I liked it well enough, but felt that Tarja's OneWomanWail at the end [[EndingFatigue went on longer than it probably should have]]. Then I actually paid attention to [[IntercourseWithYou the lyrics]], and I was in church of all places when it finally hit me [[TheImmodestOrgasm what the ending was]]. - MattthelurkerMattthelurker
* Music/SufjanStevens' ''Illinois'' originally featured an image of Superman in its album artwork; His label subsequently realized they never got permission from Creator/DCComics to use Superman's image, and subsequent copies either replaced him with a string of balloons, {{Creator/Marvel}}'s Chicago-based superhero The Blue Marvel, or just an empty sky. The balloon version of the cover can still be considered an abstract representation of Superman: The balloons match the red and blue color scheme of his clothing, the positions of the three balloons sort of resembles his head and arms in his trademark flying pose, and the balloons' strings are flowing behind them like a "cape".
3rd Feb '18 11:14:45 AM nombretomado
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* Long ago (about 6 years ago, give or take), when I first heard Interpol's "Turn On the Bright Lights," I thought it was a sweet album, but I felt that there was nothing more to it other than being a great entrance album for people who didn't understand what indie rock was. As I've lived in a city for the better part of 4 years now, elements from that album popped into my head here and there, but I couldn't understand. Now, as a music journalist, a few weeks ago (in April 2009), it all came to me: The album wasn't a random meshing of 90's indie-rock atrophy. It was a band making an image of New York City, the New York City outside of a few blocks that had everyone's attention because some buildings blew up, the New York City that existed and lived as though September 11, 2001 was really just another day in the grand scheme of all things. And it was prolly NYC at its best: Before the security lockdowns, before clean-up and glamour went into overdrive, before Williamsburg became gentrified and created a cancer that is killing Brooklyn, before the hipsters were identified as the new counterculture, cannibalized, and commodified. A New York City that was, in many ways, '''''real.''''' But more importantly, because of this imagery, it was the last great album to symbolize a regional sound outside of hip hop, just before MySpace decimated the concept of regional music. It was, very much, an album that was perfect for its time, like Michael Jackson's ''Thriller.'' -- brokenwit

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* Long ago (about 6 years ago, give or take), when I first heard Interpol's "Turn On the Bright Lights," I thought it was a sweet album, but I felt that there was nothing more to it other than being a great entrance album for people who didn't understand what indie rock was. As I've lived in a city for the better part of 4 years now, elements from that album popped into my head here and there, but I couldn't understand. Now, as a music journalist, a few weeks ago (in April 2009), it all came to me: The album wasn't a random meshing of 90's indie-rock atrophy. It was a band making an image of New York City, the New York City outside of a few blocks that had everyone's attention because some buildings blew up, the New York City that existed and lived as though September 11, 2001 was really just another day in the grand scheme of all things. And it was prolly NYC at its best: Before the security lockdowns, before clean-up and glamour went into overdrive, before Williamsburg became gentrified and created a cancer that is killing Brooklyn, before the hipsters were identified as the new counterculture, cannibalized, and commodified. A New York City that was, in many ways, '''''real.''''' But more importantly, because of this imagery, it was the last great album to symbolize a regional sound outside of hip hop, just before MySpace Website/MySpace decimated the concept of regional music. It was, very much, an album that was perfect for its time, like Michael Jackson's ''Thriller.'' -- brokenwit
25th Jan '18 2:52:22 AM Cryoclaste
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* When I first started listening to OKGo, I wasn't much into 'A Million Ways.' But today, I was listening to it in the car when I heard them chanting. I started it again and laughed when I realized they weren't chanting, they were saying one million as a numerical value.

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* When I first started listening to OKGo, Music/OKGo, I wasn't much into 'A Million Ways.' But today, I was listening to it in the car when I heard them chanting. I started it again and laughed when I realized they weren't chanting, they were saying one million as a numerical value.
21st Jan '18 3:08:04 PM nombretomado
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* For the longest time, I never understood "Thumb Cinema" by [[TheWorldInfernoFriendshipSociety The World/Inferno Friendship Society]]. I got that it was a rant about consumerism, materialism and excess, but it didn't seem to fit with the rest of the songs on "Addicted to Bad Ideas", which is about PeterLorre's life and generally narrated from his point of view. Suddenly, a year and a half later, it occured to me that since the album was heavily based on a recent biography which elaborates more on Lorre's friendship with BertholtBrecht, the song might be from Brecht's point of view instead. After three songs where Lorre rants about his career decline while deciding to just give in, Brecht criticizes the excesses of Hollywood and how they've damaged Lorre, and begs him to return to postwar Germany with him: "You're not happy, well, no one gives a ***/ This is a game and you're part of it/ Maybe it's time for you to quit." It would fit the album's timeline as well with the next song, "Addicted to Bad Ideas", being about Lorre's growing addiction and despair after returning to Hollywood when his German comeback film flops. - Tropers.TechnicolorPachyderm

to:

* For the longest time, I never understood "Thumb Cinema" by [[TheWorldInfernoFriendshipSociety The World/Inferno Friendship Society]].Music/TheWorldInfernoFriendshipSociety. I got that it was a rant about consumerism, materialism and excess, but it didn't seem to fit with the rest of the songs on "Addicted to Bad Ideas", which is about PeterLorre's life and generally narrated from his point of view. Suddenly, a year and a half later, it occured to me that since the album was heavily based on a recent biography which elaborates more on Lorre's friendship with BertholtBrecht, the song might be from Brecht's point of view instead. After three songs where Lorre rants about his career decline while deciding to just give in, Brecht criticizes the excesses of Hollywood and how they've damaged Lorre, and begs him to return to postwar Germany with him: "You're not happy, well, no one gives a ***/ This is a game and you're part of it/ Maybe it's time for you to quit." It would fit the album's timeline as well with the next song, "Addicted to Bad Ideas", being about Lorre's growing addiction and despair after returning to Hollywood when his German comeback film flops. - Tropers.TechnicolorPachyderm
19th Jan '18 12:15:02 AM mattthelurker
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Added DiffLines:

** More "Adam's Song" related brilliance - at first, while I thought it was a good pop-punk tune, I didn't catch the significance of the changes in the instrumentation during the chorus. The first half is similar to the verses, while the second sounds much fuller. Then I realized that the fuller instrumentation indicates that ''the narrator doesn't really want to die''. This is supported by [[LyricSwap the more idealistic final chorus]] having the fuller sound throughout. -Mattthelurker
8th Jan '18 9:46:06 PM mattthelurker
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* I totally dismissed Music/twentyonepilots' "Car Radio" when I first heard it. A few months later, it came up on a playlist one day as I was listening to music in my car. About a minute into the song, I said, out loud, "Is this about Kierkegaard?!" The rest of the song confirmed my suspicions. Now, "Car Radio" is one of my favorite songs. -TheFunkyMan

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* I totally dismissed Music/twentyonepilots' "Car Radio" when I first heard it. A few months later, it came up on a playlist one day as I was listening to music in my car. About a minute into the song, I said, out loud, "Is this about Kierkegaard?!" The rest of the song confirmed my suspicions. Now, "Car Radio" is one of my favorite songs. -TheFunkyMan-TheFunkyMan
* The first time I heard Nightwish's "Passion and the Opera", I liked it well enough, but felt that Tarja's OneWomanWail at the end [[EndingFatigue went on longer than it probably should have]]. Then I actually paid attention to [[IntercourseWithYou the lyrics]], and I was in church of all places when it finally hit me [[TheImmodestOrgasm what the ending was]]. - Mattthelurker
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