History Fridge / Music

10th Feb '16 11:11:08 PM GranChi
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* MarkPrindle's [[Music/HenryRollins Rollins Band]] page had [[http://markprindle.com/rollinsband.htm#weighting one for the song "Liar"]] that prompted one of my own: He pointed out how he thought the chorus was just poorly written, until he realized the guitar riff was meant to emulate the playground chant "liar, liar, pants on fire". This made me realize how the backing music is used to complement the lyrics: The verse sections are uncharacteristically mellow and jazzy because the narrator is trying to lull you into believing him, and the chorus is deliberately grating and childish-sounding because he's mocking you for falling for his lies.
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* MarkPrindle's [[Music/HenryRollins Rollins Band]] page had [[http://markprindle.com/rollinsband.htm#weighting one for the song "Liar"]] that prompted one of my own: He pointed out how he thought the chorus was just poorly written, until he realized the guitar riff was meant to emulate the playground chant "liar, liar, pants on fire". This made me realize how the backing music is used to complement the lyrics: The verse sections are uncharacteristically mellow and jazzy because the narrator is trying to lull you into believing him, and the chorus is deliberately grating and childish-sounding because he's mocking you for falling for his lies.lies. * In "I Need a Doctor" by Dr. Dre (featuring Eminem and Skylar Gray), the chorus goes "I need a doctor, doctor, to bring me back to life". The first time Gray sings it, you hear the sound of a heart rate monitor that starts beeping, then flatlines. Two choruses later, at probably the most dramatic point in the song, the heart rate monitor sound comes back, first a flatline, then it starts beeping. Immediately afterwards Dre comes in for his verse. It took me five years to realize what they did with the heart rate monitor sounds: the doctor brought her back to life. That's genius.
10th Jan '16 5:41:05 PM Alhambra
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Edit cleanup.
* On the topic of movie soundtracks... I just realized that "Across the Stars", Anakin and Padmé's sweeping love theme from ''AttackOfTheClones'', is in fact a [[ShoutOut reference]] to the phrase "StarCrossedLovers". Sheer genius! ...[[{{Foreshadowing}} This works]] [[{{Tragedy}} from any]] [[RomeoAndJuliet number]] [[ExactlyWha****aysOnTheTin of different]] [[LongDistanceRelationship angles.]] Hell, it's even mentioned on that trope's page!
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* On the topic of movie soundtracks... I just realized that "Across the Stars", Anakin and Padmé's sweeping love theme from ''AttackOfTheClones'', is in fact a [[ShoutOut reference]] to the phrase "StarCrossedLovers". Sheer genius! ...[[{{Foreshadowing}} This works]] [[{{Tragedy}} from any]] [[RomeoAndJuliet number]] [[ExactlyWha****aysOnTheTin [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin of different]] [[LongDistanceRelationship angles.]] Hell, it's even mentioned on that trope's page!
10th Jan '16 5:37:41 PM Alhambra
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*** A mention of the JokerJury of the courtroom, and the general violent nature of Wonderland, perhaps? More noticably, the White Rabbit and Alice were both inspired by the Reverend, specifically his habit for wearing gloves, and his own sane man tendencies towards what was happening in math.

* Dropkick Murphys' ''State of Massachusetts'' is a good song as is, but as a good Masshole I eventually realized that ''it is about [[PolarOppositeTwins the]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Bulger Bulger]][[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_J._Bulger Brothers]].'' Once I realized that, it became even better.--{{Namta}}
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* Dropkick Murphys' ''State of Massachusetts'' is a good song as is, but as a good Masshole M******* I eventually realized that ''it is about [[PolarOppositeTwins the]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Bulger Bulger]][[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_J._Bulger Brothers]].'' Once I realized that, it became even better.--{{Namta}}

* Dropkick Murphys' ''State ** Given the sensitivity of Massachusetts'' is such a good song topic, this may also explain the title as is, but as a good Masshole I eventually realized that ''it is about [[PolarOppositeTwins the]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Bulger Bulger]][[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_J._Bulger Brothers]].'' Once I realized that, it became even better.--{{Namta}}an attempt to Bowdlerize the inevitable result of such an addition, namely death.

* On the topic of movie soundtracks... I just realized that "Across the Stars", Anakin and Padmé's sweeping love theme from ''AttackOfTheClones'', is in fact a [[ShoutOut reference]] to the phrase "StarCrossedLovers". Sheer genius! ...[[{{Foreshadowing}} This works]] [[{{Tragedy}} from any]] [[RomeoAndJuliet number]] [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin of different]] [[LongDistanceRelationship angles.]] Hell, it's even mentioned on that trope's page!
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* On the topic of movie soundtracks... I just realized that "Across the Stars", Anakin and Padmé's sweeping love theme from ''AttackOfTheClones'', is in fact a [[ShoutOut reference]] to the phrase "StarCrossedLovers". Sheer genius! ...[[{{Foreshadowing}} This works]] [[{{Tragedy}} from any]] [[RomeoAndJuliet number]] [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin [[ExactlyWha****aysOnTheTin of different]] [[LongDistanceRelationship angles.]] Hell, it's even mentioned on that trope's page!

* For the longest time, I never understood "Thumb Cinema" by [[TheWorldInfernoFriendshipSociety The World/Inferno Friendship Society]]. I got that it was a rant about consumerism, materialism and excess, but it didn't seem to fit with the rest of the songs on "Addicted to Bad Ideas", which is about PeterLorre's life and generally narrated from his point of view. Suddenly, a year and a half later, it occured to me that since the album was heavily based on a recent biography which elaborates more on Lorre's friendship with BertholtBrecht, the song might be from Brecht's point of view instead. After three songs where Lorre rants about his career decline while deciding to just give in, Brecht criticizes the excesses of Hollywood and how they've damaged Lorre, and begs him to return to postwar Germany with him: "You're not happy, well, no one gives a shit/ This is a game and you're part of it/ Maybe it's time for you to quit." It would fit the album's timeline as well with the next song, "Addicted to Bad Ideas", being about Lorre's growing addiction and despair after returning to Hollywood when his German comeback film flops. - Tropers.TechnicolorPachyderm
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* For the longest time, I never understood "Thumb Cinema" by [[TheWorldInfernoFriendshipSociety The World/Inferno Friendship Society]]. I got that it was a rant about consumerism, materialism and excess, but it didn't seem to fit with the rest of the songs on "Addicted to Bad Ideas", which is about PeterLorre's life and generally narrated from his point of view. Suddenly, a year and a half later, it occured to me that since the album was heavily based on a recent biography which elaborates more on Lorre's friendship with BertholtBrecht, the song might be from Brecht's point of view instead. After three songs where Lorre rants about his career decline while deciding to just give in, Brecht criticizes the excesses of Hollywood and how they've damaged Lorre, and begs him to return to postwar Germany with him: "You're not happy, well, no one gives a shit/ ****/ This is a game and you're part of it/ Maybe it's time for you to quit." It would fit the album's timeline as well with the next song, "Addicted to Bad Ideas", being about Lorre's growing addiction and despair after returning to Hollywood when his German comeback film flops. - Tropers.TechnicolorPachyderm

* [[{{JHM}} I]] have had a few moments of musical Fridge Brilliance in my life, but perhaps the most satisfying was that which accompanied figuring out ''exactly'' what Wire's (utterly baffling) B-side "Former Airline" was about. Then I lost it. I'm still trying to recover my wee epiphany... That said, unraveling the lyrics to the same band's "Silk Skin Paws" comes damnably close. In short, they are from the perspective of a ManipulativeBastard banker watching the stock market implode, realizing what he has done/become, and finally snapping under the pressure and committing suicide. It's so subtly written, so insidious and sardonic that you don't quite get the full picture until the last lines:
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* [[{{JHM}} I]] have had a few moments of musical Fridge Brilliance in my life, but perhaps the most satisfying was that which accompanied figuring out ''exactly'' what Wire's (utterly baffling) B-side "Former Airline" was about. Then I lost it. I'm still trying to recover my wee epiphany... That said, unraveling the lyrics to the same band's "Silk Skin Paws" comes damnably ****ably close. In short, they are from the perspective of a ManipulativeBastard banker watching the stock market implode, realizing what he has done/become, and finally snapping under the pressure and committing suicide. It's so subtly written, so insidious and sardonic that you don't quite get the full picture until the last lines:

* [[{{JHM}} I]] have had a few moments of musical Fridge Brilliance in my life, but perhaps **** LampshadeHanging by Alanis Morisette on the most satisfying was that which accompanied figuring out ''exactly'' what Wire's (utterly baffling) B-side "Former Airline" was about. Then I lost it. I'm still trying to recover my wee epiphany... That said, unraveling the lyrics to the same band's "Silk Skin Paws" comes damnably close. In short, they are from the perspective of a ManipulativeBastard banker watching the stock market implode, realizing what he has done/become, and finally snapping under the pressure and committing suicide. It's so subtly written, so insidious and sardonic that you don't quite get the full picture until the last lines:Late Late Show:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2UQqzFJee4

*** I might be reading too much into all of this, obviously, but it's still rather interesting. Also, as another piece of Fridge Brilliance for you, you might be asking yourself: "That's all well and good, but why dress as clowns? Why are they so vulgar?" Here's the reason: Because they can spread their message easier that way. A court jester, in the medieval era, was actually one of the king's most intelligent advisors. However, rather than risk being decapitated by insulting the king's idiocy, he would [[ObfuscatingStupidity play the fool]] and drop hints that the king is fucking up under the guise of playful acts of comedy. Insane Clown Posse are modern court jesters for society, explaining our flaws to us and the solutions that are within our grasp under the guise of two high-school dropouts who wear paint and act hard, and even this could be a satirical statement about mainstream rap being gaudy and ridiculously commercial drivel hiding under a loose facade of toughness. Why has nobody mentioned this yet? -Tropers/{{Ometta7}}
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*** I might be reading too much into all of this, obviously, but it's still rather interesting. Also, as another piece of Fridge Brilliance for you, you might be asking yourself: "That's all well and good, but why dress as clowns? Why are they so vulgar?" Here's the reason: Because they can spread their message easier that way. A court jester, in the medieval era, was actually one of the king's most intelligent advisors. However, rather than risk being decapitated by insulting the king's idiocy, he would [[ObfuscatingStupidity play the fool]] and drop hints that the king is fucking ****ing up under the guise of playful acts of comedy. Insane Clown Posse are modern court jesters for society, explaining our flaws to us and the solutions that are within our grasp under the guise of two high-school dropouts who wear paint and act hard, and even this could be a satirical statement about mainstream rap being gaudy and ridiculously commercial drivel hiding under a loose facade of toughness. Why has nobody mentioned this yet? -Tropers/{{Ometta7}}

* "Grenade" by Bruno Mars would make so much more sense when viewed as being from a bodyguard's point of view. The bodyguard gets into a brief affair with his client, who decides to toy with his feelings. And although it hurts him, he's got no choice but to keep protecting her because it's his damn job. -- Tropers/MiraShio
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* "Grenade" by Bruno Mars would make so much more sense when viewed as being from a bodyguard's point of view. The bodyguard gets into a brief affair with his client, who decides to toy with his feelings. And although it hurts him, he's got no choice but to keep protecting her because it's his damn **** job. -- Tropers/MiraShio

* I always thought Papoose's song [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KH-eJODRWZI ''Gun of Mines'']] (also known as ''Drop It'') was just another gangsta rap track he put out, but when I took my first look at the [[http://www.lyricsmania.com/drop_it_lyrics_papoose.html lyrics]] realized the song title should have been "Gun to Mind", because it's a song that explores the advantages of both. For example, the chorus. It's basically Papoose asking, "Knowledge or Power/Violence: which one is more important to survival, and why?" The rest of the first half of the chorus is him saying knowledge is more important because the mind drives all action refines the ignorant, and gives man a way to protect himself from anything he may encounter, while the rest of the second half is him saying that when the shit hits the fan, power/violence is your umbrella. Further backed up by the fact that the first verse is the argument in defense of knowledge, while the third verse is the same for power. But that leaves the question: What about the second verse? The middle verse by Busta Rhymes basically bridges both ideas by basically saying they're both valid (and necessary) means of survival, which is why he lives by both.
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* I always thought Papoose's song [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KH-eJODRWZI ''Gun of Mines'']] (also known as ''Drop It'') was just another gangsta rap track he put out, but when I took my first look at the [[http://www.lyricsmania.com/drop_it_lyrics_papoose.html lyrics]] realized the song title should have been "Gun to Mind", because it's a song that explores the advantages of both. For example, the chorus. It's basically Papoose asking, "Knowledge or Power/Violence: which one is more important to survival, and why?" The rest of the first half of the chorus is him saying knowledge is more important because the mind drives all action refines the ignorant, and gives man a way to protect himself from anything he may encounter, while the rest of the second half is him saying that when the shit **** hits the fan, power/violence is your umbrella. Further backed up by the fact that the first verse is the argument in defense of knowledge, while the third verse is the same for power. But that leaves the question: What about the second verse? The middle verse by Busta Rhymes basically bridges both ideas by basically saying they're both valid (and necessary) means of survival, which is why he lives by both.

* Self's "Trunk Full Of Amps" would practically be a SingleStanzaSong if not for the fact that every verse namechecks a different rock band or vocalist ("Got a trunk full of amps, motherfucker / like (insert musician here), motherfucker!"). What do all the acts mentioned have in common beyond being famous rock musicians? They all have songs prominently featuring the word "mother" (or "mama") in their titles or lyrics! Lenny Kravitz's "Mama Said", ElectricLightOrchestra's "Mama" (or possibly "Ma-Ma-Ma Belle"), {{Queen}}'s "Tie Your Mother Down" (or less obviously "Bohemian Rhapsody") and of course Music/{{Danzig}}'s "Mother". - Tropers/MikeK
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* Self's "Trunk Full Of Amps" would practically be a SingleStanzaSong if not for the fact that every verse namechecks a different rock band or vocalist ("Got a trunk full of amps, motherfucker mother****er / like (insert musician here), motherfucker!").mother****er!"). What do all the acts mentioned have in common beyond being famous rock musicians? They all have songs prominently featuring the word "mother" (or "mama") in their titles or lyrics! Lenny Kravitz's "Mama Said", ElectricLightOrchestra's "Mama" (or possibly "Ma-Ma-Ma Belle"), {{Queen}}'s "Tie Your Mother Down" (or less obviously "Bohemian Rhapsody") and of course Music/{{Danzig}}'s "Mother". - Tropers/MikeK

* "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" by The Charlie Daniels Band seems to show Johnny victorious, but that's only in the short term. In beating the Devil, Johnny claimed a golden fiddle and mockingly declared his superiority, thus commiting two of the SevenDeadlySins: Greed and Pride. Not only that, but he did so in full knowledge that taking the bet was a sin. As such, he has committed at least one mortal sin, potentially damning his soul. So long as Johnny does not repent and gain forgiveness, the Devil was the real winner. - [=TSBasilisk=]
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* "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" by The Charlie Daniels Band seems to show Johnny victorious, but that's only in the short term. In beating the Devil, Johnny claimed a golden fiddle and mockingly declared his superiority, thus commiting two of the SevenDeadlySins: Greed and Pride. Not only that, but he did so in full knowledge that taking the bet was a sin. As such, he has committed at least one mortal sin, potentially damning ****ing his soul. So long as Johnny does not repent and gain forgiveness, the Devil was the real winner. - [=TSBasilisk=]

* I listened to a few Anarchy Club albums and thought they were good but slightly meh; they were just standard angry rock. Then I had one bad day and listened to their "The Way And It's Power" album. That's when it clicked: the songs weren't angry, they were bitter. "King of Everything" isn't an egotistical song about how cool the lead singer is; it's a mission statement about how much the lead singer isn't going to let himself be put-down by how much shit life and other people have served him. "Kill For You" isn't about a man who was dumped by his girlfriend and thus is going to take it out on everyone else; it's about a man who was dumped by his girlfriend and was left so depressed and desperate by it that he was left no other option but to take it out on others. When the album's tone was shifted from unneeded anger and violence to a highly bitter violent reaction to a highly bitter and violent world ("I'm sick and tired of the sick and tired..."), it went from meh and unneeded to something genuinely awe-inspiring and relevant. Now I love their work.
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* I listened to a few Anarchy Club albums and thought they were good but slightly meh; they were just standard angry rock. Then I had one bad day and listened to their "The Way And It's Power" album. That's when it clicked: the songs weren't angry, they were bitter. "King of Everything" isn't an egotistical song about how cool the lead singer is; it's a mission statement about how much the lead singer isn't going to let himself be put-down by how much shit **** life and other people have served him. "Kill For You" isn't about a man who was dumped by his girlfriend and thus is going to take it out on everyone else; it's about a man who was dumped by his girlfriend and was left so depressed and desperate by it that he was left no other option but to take it out on others. When the album's tone was shifted from unneeded anger and violence to a highly bitter violent reaction to a highly bitter and violent world ("I'm sick and tired of the sick and tired..."), it went from meh and unneeded to something genuinely awe-inspiring and relevant. Now I love their work.

* The Linkin Park album, "A Thousand Suns", starts off with small portion of "The Catalyst", the penultimate track on said album, creating a sort of BookEnds effect. However, halfway through is a track called "Jornuda del Muerto", which is basically the words "Moshiagete, tokihanashite" ("Lift me up, Let me go") repeated a couple of times to a slower version of "The Catalyst"s melody. It seems as if the entire album actually slowly builds up tension and has its climax at "The Catalyst", the same way a movie would build up tension, while also foreshadowing both at the beginning and the middle.
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* The Linkin Park album, "A Thousand Suns", starts off with small portion of "The Catalyst", the penultimate track on said album, creating a sort of BookEnds effect. However, halfway through is a track called "Jornuda del Muerto", which is basically the words "Moshiagete, tokihanashite" tokihana****e" ("Lift me up, Let me go") repeated a couple of times to a slower version of "The Catalyst"s melody. It seems as if the entire album actually slowly builds up tension and has its climax at "The Catalyst", the same way a movie would build up tension, while also foreshadowing both at the beginning and the middle.
5th Nov '15 5:57:28 AM Berrenta
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Sinkhole: used as a Troper Tic.
** "Quiet Talks And Summer Walks". I was annoyed with how the voice was barely audible over the music...and then [[CaptainObvious thought back to the title.]] Also, it finishes with a sound not that unlike a buzzsaw or similar -- the forest the singer was walking through is getting cut down as he walks.
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** "Quiet Talks And Summer Walks". I was annoyed with how the voice was barely audible over the music...and then [[CaptainObvious thought back to the title.]] title. Also, it finishes with a sound not that unlike a buzzsaw or similar -- the forest the singer was walking through is getting cut down as he walks.
1st Oct '15 2:34:37 PM Willbyr
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* ''In A Lonely Place'', the main character's theme from {{Oldboy}}, is atmospheric and appropriate and awesome. But there's more. In the movie, the main character Oh Dae-Su is imprisoned for fifteen years in a room where the only wall decoration is a rather horrifying picture of Jesus Man of Sorrows, complemented by the first line from Ella Wheeler Wilcox' poem ''Solitude'': "Laugh and the world laughs with you / Weep and you weep alone." On the soundtrack, the song is preceded by Oh Dae-Su reading the line from the poem out loud in Korean. Now listen to the song with the poem next to it. Count the first line as read. Count the number of times the piano theme recurs. Not only does it fit the number of lines in the poem, it also breaks when the poem does, and rises and falls like the lines in the poem do. Yes. Oh Dae-Su's theme is ''Solitude'' set to music. Brilliant. - Dessek
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* ''In A Lonely Place'', the main character's theme from {{Oldboy}}, ''Film/{{Oldboy}}'', is atmospheric and appropriate and awesome. But there's more. In the movie, the main character Oh Dae-Su is imprisoned for fifteen years in a room where the only wall decoration is a rather horrifying picture of Jesus Man of Sorrows, complemented by the first line from Ella Wheeler Wilcox' poem ''Solitude'': "Laugh and the world laughs with you / Weep and you weep alone." On the soundtrack, the song is preceded by Oh Dae-Su reading the line from the poem out loud in Korean. Now listen to the song with the poem next to it. Count the first line as read. Count the number of times the piano theme recurs. Not only does it fit the number of lines in the poem, it also breaks when the poem does, and rises and falls like the lines in the poem do. Yes. Oh Dae-Su's theme is ''Solitude'' set to music. Brilliant. - Dessek
12th Sep '15 10:36:03 PM nombretomado
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* This may in fact just be me reading too much into things in order to solve my own [[{{Headscratchers}} headscratcher]], but... in {{Nirvana}}'s "Sliver" the line "fell asleep and watched TV" always struck me as a LyricalShoehorn, and not even a particularly necessary one, because the more logical "watched TV and fell asleep" would have fit just as well. However, you sort of ''could'' sleep while watching TV - if you fall asleep with the TV on, for a little while you could still be just alert enough to sort of follow what's going on by hearing dialogue. - Tropers/MikeK
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* This may in fact just be me reading too much into things in order to solve my own [[{{Headscratchers}} headscratcher]], but... in {{Nirvana}}'s {{Music/Nirvana}}'s "Sliver" the line "fell asleep and watched TV" always struck me as a LyricalShoehorn, and not even a particularly necessary one, because the more logical "watched TV and fell asleep" would have fit just as well. However, you sort of ''could'' sleep while watching TV - if you fall asleep with the TV on, for a little while you could still be just alert enough to sort of follow what's going on by hearing dialogue. - Tropers/MikeK
21st Jul '15 12:27:39 PM Willbyr
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* Self's "Trunk Full Of Amps" would practically be a SingleStanzaSong if not for the fact that every verse namechecks a different rock band or vocalist ("Got a trunk full of amps, motherfucker / like (insert musician here), motherfucker!"). What do all the acts mentioned have in common beyond being famous rock musicians? They all have songs prominently featuring the word "mother" (or "mama") in their titles or lyrics! Lenny Kravitz's "Mama Said", ElectricLightOrchestra's "Mama" (or possibly "Ma-Ma-Ma Belle"), {{Queen}}'s "Tie Your Mother Down" (or less obviously "Bohemian Rhapsody") and of course {{Danzig}}'s "Mother". - Tropers/MikeK
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* Self's "Trunk Full Of Amps" would practically be a SingleStanzaSong if not for the fact that every verse namechecks a different rock band or vocalist ("Got a trunk full of amps, motherfucker / like (insert musician here), motherfucker!"). What do all the acts mentioned have in common beyond being famous rock musicians? They all have songs prominently featuring the word "mother" (or "mama") in their titles or lyrics! Lenny Kravitz's "Mama Said", ElectricLightOrchestra's "Mama" (or possibly "Ma-Ma-Ma Belle"), {{Queen}}'s "Tie Your Mother Down" (or less obviously "Bohemian Rhapsody") and of course {{Danzig}}'s Music/{{Danzig}}'s "Mother". - Tropers/MikeK
3rd Jul '15 4:23:37 PM nombretomado
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* A while ago, I was listening to LadyGaga's 'So Happy I Could Die' and I realised something: there's more than a few references to masturbation in there, along with the repeated line 'So happy I could die'... and 'die' was repeatedly used by Shakespeare to mean orgasm. - Tropers/{{Zadia}}
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* A while ago, I was listening to LadyGaga's 'So Music/LadyGaga's "So Happy I Could Die' Die" and I realised something: there's more than a few references to masturbation in there, along with the repeated line 'So happy I could die'... and 'die' was repeatedly used by Shakespeare to mean orgasm. - Tropers/{{Zadia}}
17th May '15 7:28:49 PM MikeK
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Added DiffLines:
* MarkPrindle's [[Music/HenryRollins Rollins Band]] page had [[http://markprindle.com/rollinsband.htm#weighting one for the song "Liar"]] that prompted one of my own: He pointed out how he thought the chorus was just poorly written, until he realized the guitar riff was meant to emulate the playground chant "liar, liar, pants on fire". This made me realize how the backing music is used to complement the lyrics: The verse sections are uncharacteristically mellow and jazzy because the narrator is trying to lull you into believing him, and the chorus is deliberately grating and childish-sounding because he's mocking you for falling for his lies.
3rd May '15 11:26:36 AM AlanPalgut
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Added stuff
Added DiffLines:
** I always saw a potential meaning in "I am the Walrus" despite its WordSaladLyrics. Everything slowly seemed to come together -- no, not "right now," and not "over me" -- and what I got was a whole batch of lines related in some way to ''Literature/AliceInWonderland'' and ''Through the Looking-Glass''. Yes, "The Walrus and the Carpenter" was the most blatant part, but still. The very first line is about Creator/LewisCarroll (presented in first person, since he wrote both) and his two alter egos, the Dodo (''Wonderland'', second person) and the White Knight (''Looking-Glass'', third person). Then ''who'' was running? Exactly. I don't care if [[Music/JeffersonAirplane he has his own song]]. And we all know who cried. The two lines that seemed confusing to me were "Mister City Policeman sitting pretty little policemen in a row" and "Yellow matter custard dripping from a dead dog's eye."
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