History Fridge / MadMen

4th Sep '17 10:25:30 PM 2dzfox
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** First thing: [[spoiler:Lane staged the office so that his body would block the door. Joan would be the most likely person to try to key into his office to leave the books on his desk. Considering they were such close friends ans he had obvious feelings for her, it's likely he intentionally set his death up to spare her from having to see his body hanging in another part of the room as a sort of morbid final favor to her. Technically he could have tied the rope anywhere in the room; the structural cross-beams in a building run throughout a room with acoustic tiles like that.]]

to:

** First thing: [[spoiler:Lane staged the office so that his body would block the door. Joan would be the most likely person to try to key into his office to leave the books on his desk. Considering they were such close friends ans he had obvious feelings for her, it's likely he intentionally set his death up to spare her from having to see his body hanging in another part of the room body, as a sort of morbid final favor to her. Technically he could have tied the rope anywhere in the room; the structural cross-beams in a building run throughout a room with acoustic tiles like that.]]
4th Sep '17 10:22:20 PM 2dzfox
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** First thing: [[spoiler:Lane staged the office so that his body would block the door. Joan would be the most likely person to try to key into his office to leave the books on his desk, and she was (mercifully) spared the visceral horror of his corpse suspended over, say, his desk. Technically he could have tied the rope anywhere in the room; the structural cross-beams in a building run throughout a room with acoustic tiles like that.]] It also happened to be the hardest thing for Don to have to deal with, physically and emotionally.
** In an interview, series costume designer Janie Bryant said that the rope Lane [[spoiler:eventually used was the sash from his bathrobe, the gray one he wore at home in "Signal 30". He obviously bought the supplies to rig the Jaguar, but had to improvise his noose. It's more visible just as Pete has the scissors, but it's clearly a shiny silken cord, and not a nylon rope from the hardware store. It means that Lane, who even failed at having a nice, quiet death the way he wanted, had to come up with a plan B in the few hours before the Monday morning workday started. And hangings can often take a long time, with the victim suffering anywhere from 4 to 15 minutes before death finally sets in.]] Shudder.
** [[spoiler:The body doesn't look so good (obviously) in the closeup shots when Roger and Don go to catch him—it's mostly the weird way his hair is done; it looks very uncharacteristically and unattractively plastered to his scalp in the closeup. It makes sense that he would have sweat it out while choking to death, but I realized that Lane was so set on killing himself that weekend that he saw no reason to bathe or wash his hair for three days, and that's why it was so greasy and flat.]]

to:

** First thing: [[spoiler:Lane staged the office so that his body would block the door. Joan would be the most likely person to try to key into his office to leave the books on his desk, and she was (mercifully) spared desk. Considering they were such close friends ans he had obvious feelings for her, it's likely he intentionally set his death up to spare her from having to see his body hanging in another part of the visceral horror room as a sort of his corpse suspended over, say, his desk.morbid final favor to her. Technically he could have tied the rope anywhere in the room; the structural cross-beams in a building run throughout a room with acoustic tiles like that.]] It ]]
**It
also happened to be the hardest thing for Don to have to deal with, physically and emotionally.
** In an interview, series costume designer Janie Bryant said that the [[spoiler:the rope Lane [[spoiler:eventually eventually used was the sash from his bathrobe, the gray one he wore at home in "Signal 30". He obviously bought the supplies to rig the Jaguar, but had to improvise his noose. It's more visible just as Pete has the scissors, but it's clearly a shiny silken cord, and not a nylon rope from the hardware store. It means that Lane, who even failed at having a nice, quiet death the way he wanted, had to come up with a plan B in the few hours before the Monday morning workday started. And hangings can often take a long time, with the victim suffering anywhere from 4 to 15 minutes before death finally sets in.]] Shudder.
** [[spoiler:The body doesn't look so good (obviously) in the closeup shots when Roger and Don go to catch him—it's mostly the weird way his hair is done; it looks very uncharacteristically and unattractively plastered to his scalp in the closeup. It makes sense that he would have sweat it out while choking to death, but I realized that Lane was so set on killing himself that weekend that he saw no reason to bathe or wash his hair for three days, and that's why it was so greasy and flat.]]
4th Sep '17 10:13:04 PM 2dzfox
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* The Patio ''Film/ByeByeBirdie'' commercial. When you see it, you can tell that something's clearly off when compared to what it was based on. While Roger Sterling immediately points out the fact that the singer isn't Ann-Margret, there's another reason it feels off: Sal Romano, the brainchild of it, is playing up more of the campy musical theatre quality of the original and didn't direct it with the intention of sex appeal because he's gay. It's so subtle that you don't notice it.

to:

* The Patio ''Film/ByeByeBirdie'' commercial. When you see it, you can tell that something's clearly off when compared to what it was based on. While Roger Sterling immediately points out the fact that the singer isn't Ann-Margret, there's another reason it feels off: Sal Romano, the whose brainchild of it, it is, is playing up more of the campy musical theatre quality of the original and didn't direct it with the intention of sex appeal because he's gay. It's so subtle that you don't notice it.
9th Aug '17 9:27:34 AM Burgerkrieg
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Added DiffLines:

** This may not be 100% accurate, but, seeing as Sterling-Cooper is a partnership and not a publicly traded company, the partners have every right to take any equipment and office supplies for themselves. They do own them, after all. This would be different in a publicly traded corporation, where all things belong to the company, not the investors.
1st Jan '17 11:47:19 PM toongrrl1990
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25th Aug '16 3:43:12 PM lalaTKG
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* [[TheAllegedCar The Chevrolet Vega]]. Gorgeous, American-muscle-meets-Italian-''carrozeria'' styling over cutting-edge technology developed at record-breaking expense by the largest engineering organization in the world, yours for an economy-car price. And then the engine starts to burn oil at 12,000 miles, warps its' head not long after, and then it fails state inspection on rust at a year old. The perfect metaphor for [[TheSeventies the decade they're about to enter]].

to:

* [[TheAllegedCar The Chevrolet Vega]]. Gorgeous, American-muscle-meets-Italian-''carrozeria'' styling over cutting-edge technology developed at record-breaking expense by the largest engineering organization in the world, yours for an economy-car price. And then the engine starts to burn oil at 12,000 miles, warps its' its head not long after, and then it fails state inspection on rust at a year old. The perfect metaphor for [[TheSeventies the decade they're about to enter]].
14th May '16 11:15:47 PM nombretomado
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* When Joan impatiently waits for Kevin's babysitter, he watches ''Series/SesameStreet'', which seems like just a cute little moment of childhood. Then you think about the concept: The show mimics advertising to "sell" learning; ''MadMen'' itself is a show about advertising. Kevin doesn't know it yet, but he's seeing the impact of "Mommy's Job".

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* When Joan impatiently waits for Kevin's babysitter, he watches ''Series/SesameStreet'', which seems like just a cute little moment of childhood. Then you think about the concept: The show mimics advertising to "sell" learning; ''MadMen'' ''Series/MadMen'' itself is a show about advertising. Kevin doesn't know it yet, but he's seeing the impact of "Mommy's Job".
4th Jan '16 7:13:56 PM LeeM
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Added DiffLines:

* At the end of Season 3 the senior staff of Sterling Cooper take all of the documentation and physical artifacts from their accounts out of the office, effectively ''stealing their own company''. You really have to wonder if such a thing would be legal, or even possible.
26th Dec '15 4:47:37 PM nombretomado
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** They are both a typical embodiment of [[AmericanDream The American Dream]], both coming from very poor families and, by themselves, climbing their way up the social ladder.

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** They are both a typical embodiment of [[AmericanDream The American Dream]], UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream, both coming from very poor families and, by themselves, climbing their way up the social ladder.
13th Dec '15 12:28:11 PM dmcreif
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to:

* The Patio ''Film/ByeByeBirdie'' commercial. When you see it, you can tell that something's clearly off when compared to what it was based on. While Roger Sterling immediately points out the fact that the singer isn't Ann-Margret, there's another reason it feels off: Sal Romano, the brainchild of it, is playing up more of the campy musical theatre quality of the original and didn't direct it with the intention of sex appeal because he's gay. It's so subtle that you don't notice it.
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