History Fridge / Hercules

3rd Dec '16 1:11:11 AM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** Most likely, he "enlisted" her services sometime in the 18 years Hercules spent growing up - Hades never even mentioned or hinted at having her at the beginning of the film, even offhandedly.
3rd Nov '16 1:03:17 PM ScroogeMacDuck
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* Even though the ending of this movie was treated as a HappyEnding, no good can really come out of it. Hercules will eventually die, and poor Zeus and Hera will have to watch and then suffer with it for all of eternity. Keep in mind that those two already missed out on his whole childhood, and now this! Even if he does ascend to Mt. Olympus after his death (since he did earn his godhood, he simply chose to give it up), there's no way Meg will be allowed up there, meaning Herc will have to live for eternity alone, while the love of his life is stuck floating in a river. Even if he was able to save her from the face of death before, I doubt he can do anything about her dying of old age.

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* Even though the ending of this movie was treated as a HappyEnding, no good can really come out of it. Hercules will eventually die, and poor Zeus and Hera will have to watch and then suffer with it for all of eternity. Keep in mind that those two already missed out on his whole childhood, and now this! Even if he does ascend to Mt. Olympus after his death (since he did earn his godhood, he simply chose to give it up), there's no way Meg will be allowed up there, meaning Herc will have to live for eternity alone, while the love of his life is stuck floating in a river. Even if he was able to save her from the face of death before, I doubt he can do anything about her dying of old age.age.
** Though to be fair, it happened more than once in the real myths that a genuien god would be able to deify their chosen mortal bride.
6th Oct '16 11:35:36 AM Josef5678
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* Hercules' last deal with Hades--"[Meg] goes. [Hercules] stays" in the River Styx. Even with the whole "you'll be dead before you get there" caveat, it would seem Hercules broke the deal by leaving the Underworld, right? Not exactly; if you watch closely, Hades and Hercules never shook on the deal. It was never binding, so technically there was no deal for either party to go bwck on.

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* Hercules' last deal with Hades--"[Meg] goes. [Hercules] stays" in the River Styx. Even with the whole "you'll be dead before you get there" caveat, it would seem Hercules broke the deal by leaving the Underworld, right? Not exactly; if you watch closely, Hades and Hercules never shook on the deal. It was never binding, so technically there was no deal for either party to go bwck back on.
6th Oct '16 9:12:46 AM ambiguousCase
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* Hercules' last deal with Hades--"[Meg] goes. [Hercules] stays" in the River Styx. Even with the whole "you'll be dead before you get there" caveat, it would seem Hercules broke the deal by leaving the Underworld, right? Not exactly; if you watch closely, Hades and Hercules never shook on the deal. It was never binding, so technically there was no deal for either party to go bwck on.
1st Oct '16 9:59:28 PM That70sgeek
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* The tallest one of The Fates was originally keeping the other ones from telling Hades the future. They only told him their prophecy after he gave back them back the eye. Now can anyone tell me how Perseus had to blackmail them into giving him help to defeat Medusa?
16th Aug '16 3:55:32 PM ShorinBJ
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* In the usual HappyEnding, Hercules renounces to immortality in order to live with Meg. Now, this may be a good way to end a Disney classic. But...did we forget he became a *MORTAL* again? Unless he and Meg will spend the rest of eternity in the Elysian Fields, they will age, die and descend in the river of death as everyone else did earlier (thereby, Herc was stuck in a MortonsFork, as he had to decide whether entering into Mount Olympus and leave Meg alone, or abandoning it once again and spend the rest of his life as a mortal). I wonder if this time Zeus will tolerate an exception to the rule, for his son already experienced a breath-taking dive in that place. And let's not forget Hades is still stuck there (yeah, he somehow could think about this FridgeHorror thread as a TakingYouWithMe). This may also explain why Zeus agreed to forge a new constellation: although Hercules, who was born as a GOD, would have spended his eternity in the Underworld, his legend would have lived on with him...on the sky whence it came from.
* In Hercules, Hades' afterlife is a deep whirlpool where [[FateWorseThanDeath souls are condemned to swirl around forever]] under the watch of [[EverybodyHatesHades an apathetic death god.]] While the Elysian Fields exists, only the souls of heroes go there. In the world of Hercules ''the majority of mankind'' is condemned to [[AndIMustScream eternally drift in a vortex or splash around in the River Styx]](and even if Hades ended up being booted off, that still means a billion souls have suffered for centuries). At least in the actual Hades you can wander...

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* In the usual HappyEnding, Hercules renounces to his immortality in order to live with Meg. Now, this may be a good way to end a Disney classic. But...did we forget he became a *MORTAL* again? Unless he and Meg will spend the rest of eternity in the Elysian Fields, they will age, die die, and descend in the river of death as everyone else did earlier (thereby, Herc was stuck in a MortonsFork, as he had to decide whether about entering into Mount Olympus and leave Meg alone, or abandoning it once again and spend the rest of his life as a mortal). I wonder if this time Zeus will tolerate an exception to the rule, for his son already experienced a breath-taking dive in that place. And let's not forget Hades is still stuck there (yeah, he somehow could think about this FridgeHorror thread as a TakingYouWithMe). This may also explain why Zeus agreed to forge a new constellation: although Hercules, who was born as a GOD, would have spended spent his eternity in the Underworld, his legend would have lived on with him...on the sky whence it came from.
* In Hercules, Hades' afterlife is a deep whirlpool where [[FateWorseThanDeath souls are condemned to swirl around forever]] under the watch of [[EverybodyHatesHades an apathetic death god.]] While the Elysian Fields exists, only the souls of heroes go there. In the world of Hercules ''the majority of mankind'' is condemned to [[AndIMustScream eternally drift in a vortex or splash around in the River Styx]](and Styx]] (and even if Hades ended up being booted off, that still means a billion souls have suffered for centuries). At least in the actual Hades you can wander...wander...
** It's not clearly established what slice of humanity is in that whirlpool, or where, if anywhere, it leads to.
16th Aug '16 3:51:37 PM ShorinBJ
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* In Phil's song "One Last Hope", at least a couple lyrics are foreshadow-y. He says "It's not about sinew/it's about what's within you", and what does Zeus tell Herc when he finally ascends? "A hero isn't defined by the size of his strength, but by the strength of his heart." Phil was right, but even he forgot to teach Hercules that lesson and reinforce it.
* During Phil's song about how every hero he's trained has died, he jumps on to a stump and is about to say something along the lines of "I won't train you" until he's struck by lightning and suddenly agrees by saying "Ok". At first it looks like it's for comedic effect, until you realize that Zeus is the God of lightning, and therefore Zeus is threatening/ordering Phil to train Herc'. Phil isn't just talking to Hercules when he agrees, he's talking to Zeus.

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** Similarly, the prophecy warns about what will happen if Hercules ''fights''. It doesn't say he needs his strength for Hades to fail.
* In Phil's song "One Last Hope", at least a couple lyrics are foreshadow-y. He says "It's not about sinew/it's about "It takes more than sinew/comes down to what's within in you", and what does Zeus tell Herc when he finally ascends? "A hero isn't defined measured by the size of his strength, but by the strength of his heart." Phil was right, but even he forgot to teach Hercules that lesson and reinforce it.
* During Phil's song about how every hero he's trained has died, he jumps on to a stump and is about to say something along the lines of "I won't train you" "No way" until he's struck by lightning and suddenly agrees by saying "Ok". "Okay". At first it looks like it's for comedic effect, until you realize that Zeus is the God of lightning, and therefore Zeus is threatening/ordering Phil to train Herc'.Herc. Phil isn't just talking to Hercules when he agrees, he's talking to Zeus.
16th Aug '16 3:47:56 PM ShorinBJ
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* As the main page points out, there is an apparent plot hole between the animated series and the movie, due to Hades being surprised to learn the Hercules is alive in movie despite having antagonized him throughout his teen years. However, there is a way to reconcile these two. In [[CardCarryingVillain classical cartoon bad guy fashion]], many of Hades plans to kill Herc in the series involve placing him in peril remotely, and just assuming that the plan worked and that he is dead, only for the hero to show up to foil him later. Indeed, it is exactly this type of behavior that leads to his reaction in the movie. So, its possible to suppose that at the time that Hercules interrupted Meg's deal with Nessus in the movie, Hades was still under the assumption that Herc was dead due to a ''much more recent'' death plan he had sent Pain and Panic to enact on his behalf (and which they again bungled and lied about, since they clearly never learn). Combine this with the television series featuring several episodes using Lethe water, which causes a loss of memory, as a plot device and there you go.

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* %%* As the main page points out, there is an apparent plot hole between the animated series and the movie, due to Hades being surprised to learn the Hercules is alive in movie despite having antagonized him throughout his teen years. However, there is a way to reconcile these two. In [[CardCarryingVillain classical cartoon bad guy fashion]], many of Hades plans to kill Herc in the series involve placing him in peril remotely, and just assuming that the plan worked and that he is dead, only for the hero to show up to foil him later. Indeed, it is exactly this type of behavior that leads to his reaction in the movie. So, its possible to suppose that at the time that Hercules interrupted Meg's deal with Nessus in the movie, Hades was still under the assumption that Herc was dead due to a ''much more recent'' death plan he had sent Pain and Panic to enact on his behalf (and which they again bungled and lied about, since they clearly never learn). Combine this with the television series featuring several episodes using Lethe water, which causes a loss of memory, as a plot device and there you go.go.
%% This doesn't work. Why then would Hades be surprised to learn Pain and Panic had failed to kill Hercules and lied about it. You'd think he'd be like, "You screwed up and lied to me AGAIN?" This could MAYBE go on the YMMV page.
16th Aug '16 3:42:43 PM ShorinBJ
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** Hercules' abilities were surprising cunning for someone you wouldn't expect it from (just see how he cleaned the Augean Stables or made a fool of Atlas) and being so strong to go BeyondTheImpossible and defeat death. We see him proving his cunning against the Hydra (how do you kill a monster that regenerates every time you cut its head? You squash it) and the Cyclop (Herc had been BroughtDownToNormal, yet he managed to win by outsmarting him), he proves the ability to defeat death when he survives what should have killed him and revives Megara, and for the ability to go BeyondTheImpossible... The Titans were gods, thus immortal (hence why Zeus imprisoned them), yet Hercules ''killed them''. And that's without going with the whole thing of writing his own fate...

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** Hercules' abilities were surprising cunning for someone you wouldn't expect it from (just see how he cleaned the Augean Stables or made a fool of Atlas) and being so strong to go BeyondTheImpossible and defeat death. We see him proving his cunning against the Hydra (how do you kill a monster that regenerates every time you cut its head? You squash it) and the Cyclop Cyclops (Herc had been BroughtDownToNormal, yet he managed to win by outsmarting him), he proves the ability to defeat death when he survives what should have killed him and revives Megara, and for the ability to go BeyondTheImpossible... The Titans were gods, thus immortal (hence why Zeus imprisoned them), yet Hercules ''killed them''. And that's without going with the whole thing of writing his own fate...
11th Aug '16 5:09:17 AM EDP
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** Hercules killing the Titans actually has a root in Greek mythology: the war against the Giants established that gods (such as the Giants) can be killed if attacked by mortals and gods at the same time... And Hercules, being a god who was turned into mortal but still has a spark of divinity, counts as both, even without being helped by Zeus in the fight. Bonus point for the mythological Herakles being the leader of the army of mortals that assisted the Olympians against the Giants.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.Hercules