History Fridge / Frozen

23rd Dec '17 9:01:14 AM BenOfHouston
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** This is easily explained via cultural clash. It's quite likely that Grandpabbie's advice is clear and concise to the Trolls. Most notably, what little we see of troll culture seems to be based around family (their leader's title is 'Grandfather' for goodness sake). The idea needing love meaning "see your family" might be brazenly obvious to him, but the humans simply don't understand due to [[PoorCommunicationKills the culture shock]].
23rd Dec '17 8:45:41 AM BenOfHouston
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** On a meta level Olaf was probably based on a lesser known Andersen tale in which a snowman falls in love with a fireplace.

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** On a meta level Olaf was probably based on a lesser known Andersen tale [[http://hca.gilead.org.il/snow_man.html in which a snowman falls in love with a fireplace.fireplace]].
17th Dec '17 6:35:20 PM karategal
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* A quick moment of foreshadowing: during Elsa and Anna's fight in Elsa's ice palace, Elsa says, almost imploringly, "What power do you have that can stop this winter? That can stop ''me?''" The line highlights how Elsa feels she has lost control over her powers and her mounting fears of hurting everyone - but her question is actually answered in the end. Anna DOES have a power that can stop the winter and Elsa: namely, ThePowerOfLove. Anna's HeroicSacrifice directly leads to Elsa gaining control over her powers. Even though Anna's powers aren't like [[AnIcePerson Elsa's]], hers are every bit as important.

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* A quick moment of foreshadowing: during Elsa and Anna's fight in Elsa's ice palace, Elsa says, almost imploringly, "What power do you have that can stop this winter? That can stop ''me?''" The line highlights how Elsa feels she has lost control over her powers and her mounting fears of hurting everyone - -- but her question is actually answered in the end. Anna DOES have a power that can stop the winter and Elsa: namely, ThePowerOfLove. Anna's HeroicSacrifice directly leads to Elsa gaining control over her powers. Even though Anna's powers aren't like [[AnIcePerson Elsa's]], hers are every bit as important.



* One of the things that some readers fail to realize about Elsa – but this is a vitally important point – is that in her flight from Arendelle, she is, in fact, fullfiling the primary oath that she took when she was crowned monarch: and that is, to be the “protector of her dominion.” According to the novelization – in the film, this speech is uttered in Old Norse, so for this we need to refer to the novelization – the bishop proclaims Elsa to be "The undoubted queen, protector of this dominion," as he bestows upon Elsa the crown jewels. And Elsa – whose sense of responsibility and self-sacrifice always supplants any concerns for her own well-being or happiness – takes these words very seriously and, by her actions, fulfills them. Why does Elsa leave the kingdom? Because she becomes a danger to it. It is precisely because of the oath that she took – the oath to be the “protector of this dominion” – that she exiles herself. She is literally defending the realm by removing herself from Arendelle, because she herself has become the biggest threat to Arendelle.

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* One of the things that some readers fail to realize about Elsa –- but this is a vitally important point – is that in her flight from Arendelle, she is, in fact, fullfiling the primary oath that she took when she was crowned monarch: and that is, to be the “protector of her dominion.” According to the novelization – in the film, this speech is uttered in Old Norse, so for this we need to refer to the novelization – the bishop proclaims Elsa to be "The undoubted queen, protector of this dominion," as he bestows upon Elsa the crown jewels. And Elsa – whose sense of responsibility and self-sacrifice always supplants any concerns for her own well-being or happiness – takes these words very seriously and, by her actions, fulfills them. Why does Elsa leave the kingdom? Because she becomes a danger to it. It is precisely because of the oath that she took – the oath to be the “protector of this dominion” – that she exiles herself. She is literally defending the realm by removing herself from Arendelle, because she herself has become the biggest threat to Arendelle.



* Dropping the cloak is just as iconic: for most of her life, Elsa has been dressing in warm clothes that wall her in and make her look like everyone else, clothes made to ''shut out the cold'' that she fears unleashing. But now, as she finally admits that she doesn't ''need'' warm clothes, either to shield herself from low temperatures or to "pass" as an ordinary girl, she can accept that the cold is part of ''who she is'' - one with the wind and sky - and finally stop being afraid of that fact. And suddenly she's ''enjoying herself'' for the first time as a grown woman.

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* Dropping the cloak is just as iconic: for most of her life, Elsa has been dressing in warm clothes that wall her in and make her look like everyone else, clothes made to ''shut out the cold'' that she fears unleashing. But now, as she finally admits that she doesn't ''need'' warm clothes, either to shield herself from low temperatures or to "pass" as an ordinary girl, she can accept that the cold is part of ''who she is'' - -- one with the wind and sky - -- and finally stop being afraid of that fact. And suddenly she's ''enjoying herself'' for the first time as a grown woman.



* Look at the names of four main characters - all names of good Nordic roots: Hans, Kristoff, Anna, Sven. Sounds like... ''Hans Christian Andersen.''[[note]] The name of the author of ''The Snow Queen," the literary work that inspired Frozen. [[/note]]

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* Look at the names of four main characters - -- all names of good Nordic roots: Hans, Kristoff, Anna, Sven. Sounds like... ''Hans Christian Andersen.''[[note]] The name of the author of ''The Snow Queen," the literary work that inspired Frozen. [[/note]]



* Prince Hans is very much a NiceGuy...[[spoiler:in the real world slang, EntitledToHaveYou sense, brought down to its basic elements - much like real people who only pretend to be perfect to a potential romantic partner, he's just a selfish manipulator.]] This plays into the overall plot ''perfectly'', as [[spoiler:the [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen traditional villainess]] is simply an unhappy lady trying to live in peace, and the traditional hero is the BigBad. It's a complete inversion of the typical fairy tale!]] In fact, they work as very good foils. Elsa acts cold and distant because she wants to keep her people (and her sister) safe from harm, despite the fact that she doesn't want to be alone. [[spoiler: Hans acts friendly and kind-hearted only so he can manipulate and hurt people, all for his own benefit.]]

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* Prince Hans is very much a NiceGuy...[[spoiler:in the real world slang, EntitledToHaveYou sense, brought down to its basic elements - -- much like real people who only pretend to be perfect to a potential romantic partner, he's just a selfish manipulator.]] This plays into the overall plot ''perfectly'', as [[spoiler:the [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen traditional villainess]] is simply an unhappy lady trying to live in peace, and the traditional hero is the BigBad. It's a complete inversion of the typical fairy tale!]] In fact, they work as very good foils. Elsa acts cold and distant because she wants to keep her people (and her sister) safe from harm, despite the fact that she doesn't want to be alone. [[spoiler: Hans acts friendly and kind-hearted only so he can manipulate and hurt people, all for his own benefit.]]



** There's a line in the song that says "You and I were just meant to be." But Hans says "You" and Anna says "I". Like all the other confusions in the song, it's so fast that you don't even notice it - just like how fast their relationship is moving.

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** There's a line in the song that says "You and I were just meant to be." But Hans says "You" and Anna says "I". Like all the other confusions in the song, it's so fast that you don't even notice it - -- just like how fast their relationship is moving.



* Three of the songs in ''Frozen'' have a similar theme in their titles: homes. There's "Do You Want to '''Build''' a Snowman?", "Love is an Open '''Door'''", and "Fixer-Upper", the latter being a term often used for a home that needs extra renovations to become livable. The subtle message here is that '''home is where the heart is'''. Elsa and Anna saw their own castle as a prison for so long, and then later Elsa created her own castle entirely out of her own magic. But after she is captured, she never returns to her Palace of Ice-olation, and she and Anna declare that they are never closing the doors to their home again - and this is only possible because love thawed out both their hearts. Extra brilliance for "Fixer-Upper" - the trolls are singing about how love is the ultimate thing to fix a fixer-upper. Love was what ultimately allowed Anna and Elsa to reunite in their childhood home and to transform their home into a joyous place, rather than allow it to remain a prison for them both.

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* Three of the songs in ''Frozen'' have a similar theme in their titles: homes. There's "Do You Want to '''Build''' a Snowman?", "Love is an Open '''Door'''", and "Fixer-Upper", the latter being a term often used for a home that needs extra renovations to become livable. The subtle message here is that '''home is where the heart is'''. Elsa and Anna saw their own castle as a prison for so long, and then later Elsa created her own castle entirely out of her own magic. But after she is captured, she never returns to her Palace of Ice-olation, and she and Anna declare that they are never closing the doors to their home again - -- and this is only possible because love thawed out both their hearts. Extra brilliance for "Fixer-Upper" - -- the trolls are singing about how love is the ultimate thing to fix a fixer-upper. Love was what ultimately allowed Anna and Elsa to reunite in their childhood home and to transform their home into a joyous place, rather than allow it to remain a prison for them both.



** Elsa is winter, Anna is spring. This theme heavily influenced their design- Elsa is pale and blue-eyed, and her clothes heavily cover most of her body. Anna has pinker skin (and a tendency to blush), freer clothes, and turquoise eyes. Don't forget that in the original story, Gerta visits the Queen of Summer, who's the Snow Queen's sister. She also didn't want to be alone, which is why she worked summer magic on Gerta to make her forget.

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** Elsa is winter, Anna is spring. This theme heavily influenced their design- design -- Elsa is pale and blue-eyed, and her clothes heavily cover most of her body. Anna has pinker skin (and a tendency to blush), freer clothes, and turquoise eyes. Don't forget that in the original story, Gerta visits the Queen of Summer, who's the Snow Queen's sister. She also didn't want to be alone, which is why she worked summer magic on Gerta to make her forget.



*** Anna's card is the Two of Cups, talking about a harmonious relationship (that could potentially break down over time if not nurtured, which is exactly what happened between the two sisters). Having a harmonious relationship is Anna's life goal as well: she tries to reunite with Elsa, who she had that bond with before, but Elsa keeps pushing her away. She thought she found that with Hans, but he's a [[spoiler: evil villain]]. And in the end she found her sister again and her love interest in Kristoff, but their relationships are given time to grow, develop and strengthen, not a "hooray everything is back to normal again" or "love at first sight". The Two of Cups also speaks about interpersonal growth, and learning the idea of love. It points towards knowing what love is and loving yourself before you can be expected to be loved by anyone else - which is Anna's character development arc. (Her act of sacrifice for Elsa is both an act of self-love and love for others: she considers her life valuable enough to be given away in trade of Elsa's.)

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*** Anna's card is the Two of Cups, talking about a harmonious relationship (that could potentially break down over time if not nurtured, which is exactly what happened between the two sisters). Having a harmonious relationship is Anna's life goal as well: she tries to reunite with Elsa, who she had that bond with before, but Elsa keeps pushing her away. She thought she found that with Hans, but he's a [[spoiler: evil villain]]. And in the end she found her sister again and her love interest in Kristoff, but their relationships are given time to grow, develop and strengthen, not a "hooray everything is back to normal again" or "love at first sight". The Two of Cups also speaks about interpersonal growth, and learning the idea of love. It points towards knowing what love is and loving yourself before you can be expected to be loved by anyone else - -- which is Anna's character development arc. (Her act of sacrifice for Elsa is both an act of self-love and love for others: she considers her life valuable enough to be given away in trade of Elsa's.)



* During "For The First Time In Forever" Anna sings "I suddenly see him standing there, a beautiful stranger, tall and fair!" Hans is average height and brunette. Who's tall and fair-haired? ''Kristoff.'' Totally.

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* During "For The First Time In Forever" Forever", Anna sings "I suddenly see him standing there, a beautiful stranger, tall and fair!" Hans is average height and brunette. Who's tall and fair-haired? ''Kristoff.'' Totally.



** The song really is all about Elsa, who is an "icy force both foul and fair." "There's beauty and there's danger here" - yup. "Strike for love and strike for fear"...[[spoiler:and that's exactly what she does to Anna, hitting her once with her powers out of love (trying to prevent her from falling) and again out of fear (to keep her out of the ice castle.)]] The whole song is an excellent foreshadowing of the story.

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** The song really is all about Elsa, who is an "icy force both foul and fair." "There's beauty and there's danger here" - -- yup. "Strike for love and strike for fear"...[[spoiler:and that's exactly what she does to Anna, hitting her once with her powers out of love (trying to prevent her from falling) and again out of fear (to keep her out of the ice castle.)]] The whole song is an excellent foreshadowing of the story.



*** Kristof is the only main character who hears the song, thus, it's meant for him.

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*** Kristof Kristoff is the only main character who hears the song, thus, it's meant for him.



*** Twice in the film, two characters let things go, but they are ill informed missteps. Elsa sheds her duties as queen, unaware of the growing danger she is to the kingdom, and Kristof let's Anna go to her true love, unaware of who that is.

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*** Twice in the film, two characters let things go, but they are ill informed missteps. Elsa sheds her duties as queen, unaware of the growing danger she is to the kingdom, and Kristof Kristoff let's Anna go to her true love, unaware of who that is.



** Even better: Hans has gained the surname Westergård from a (possible) earlier version of his character in the script when Elsa is still villainous, and it doesn't conflict with Anna saying this, because Westergård could be the surname of the Southern Isles' royal family. Charles I of England was referred to derisively as Charles Stuart after his overthrow, because he's part of the House of Stuart - so Hans could be part of the House of Westergård.

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** Even better: Hans has gained the surname Westergård from a (possible) earlier version of his character in the script when Elsa is still villainous, and it doesn't conflict with Anna saying this, because Westergård could be the surname of the Southern Isles' royal family. Charles I of England was referred to derisively as Charles Stuart after his overthrow, because he's part of the House of Stuart - -- so Hans could be part of the House of Westergård.



** Alternatively, while Pabbie is smart and knows his stuff, he's not all-knowing. He actively shows the King a scene where people are afraid/angry of Elsa, who then fears them, and alters Anna's memories to protect even ''her'' from Elsa's power, so you can easily see why the King went to the "we have to hide Elsa from everyone" thing from there. He warns Elsa to control her powers, but doesn't say exactly ''how''. One could argue that it's because he straight-up has no idea how to do that, or else he'd have said so. Pabbie also says "an act of True Love can thaw a frozen heart", which is true—it's the other Trolls who automatically assume it's True Love's Kiss (and the movie doesn't actually say that ''wouldn't'' work—we never get to see if it does). [[spoiler: That's why Anna's sacrifice was so big—she turned down what she thought was a sure chance at her own survival to protect her sister with a dying breath.]]
* While it now seems foolish for the parents to hide Elsa's powers, they were only going by what they know from being royalty because holding back is probably what they're used to. As king and queen, there is always a physical and emotional wall between themselves and the subjects they are in charge of. Notice some of the lyrics of "Let It Go" include ''Don't let them in, don't let them see. // Be the good girl you always had to be. // Conceal, don't feel, don't let them know.'' They apply to Elsa's status as a future queen as well as someone with potentially dangerous powers. There's also the fact that some people were were really afraid of magic: [[spoiler: like the Duke, whose first act upon seeing Elsa's powers is to call for her execution as a "witch"]]. The King and Queen knew that they had to protect their daughter from such a fate. Additionally, while it's easy to critisize in hindsight, their logic was sound. Elsa is afraid of hurting people. We close the gates to all visitors except authorized personnel and those with permission, reduce ourselves to only a skeletal staff, and separate her from Anna so there's less of a chance of her accidentally hurting people until she learns to control her powers. Unfortunately, this ultimately increased her fear, making the situation worse, but it ''could'' have worked.

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** Alternatively, while Pabbie is smart and knows his stuff, he's not all-knowing. He actively shows the King a scene where people are afraid/angry of Elsa, who then fears them, and alters Anna's memories to protect even ''her'' from Elsa's power, so you can easily see why the King went to the "we have to hide Elsa from everyone" thing from there. He warns Elsa to control her powers, but doesn't say exactly ''how''. One could argue that it's because he straight-up has no idea how to do that, or else he'd have said so. Pabbie also says "an act of True Love can thaw a frozen heart", which is true—it's the other Trolls who automatically assume it's True Love's Kiss (and the movie doesn't actually say that ''wouldn't'' work—we never get to see if it does). [[spoiler: That's why Anna's sacrifice was so big—she big -- she turned down what she thought was a sure chance at her own survival to protect her sister with a dying breath.]]
* While it now seems foolish for the parents to hide Elsa's powers, they were only going by what they know from being royalty because holding back is probably what they're used to. As king and queen, there is always a physical and emotional wall between themselves and the subjects they are in charge of. Notice some of the lyrics of "Let It Go" include ''Don't let them in, don't let them see. // Be the good girl you always had to be. // Conceal, don't feel, don't let them know.'' They apply to Elsa's status as a future queen as well as someone with potentially dangerous powers. There's also the fact that some people were were really afraid of magic: [[spoiler: like the Duke, whose first act upon seeing Elsa's powers is to call for her execution as a "witch"]]. The King and Queen knew that they had to protect their daughter from such a fate. Additionally, while it's easy to critisize criticize in hindsight, their logic was sound. Elsa is afraid of hurting people. We close the gates to all visitors except authorized personnel and those with permission, reduce ourselves to only a skeletal staff, and separate her from Anna so there's less of a chance of her accidentally hurting people until she learns to control her powers. Unfortunately, this ultimately increased her fear, making the situation worse, but it ''could'' have worked.



** Also this job - whether or not the position existed previously - could serve the purpose to introduce and establish Kristoff at court while he and Anna are dating. That way he can learn court manners, etiquette and maybe a bit about economics and politics (considering he's the boyfriend to Princess Anna, who ''is'' next in line for the throne) while potentially also building himself up financially. After all, IF it ever comes to a wedding there probably would be a bit of a ruckus if the next heir apparent married a poor, uncivilized country bumpkin, True Love and all this be damned. So, Elsa both made the position useful and ensured Kristoff would eventually be able to move somewhat graceful on the proverbial political ice.

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** Also this job - -- whether or not the position existed previously - -- could serve the purpose to introduce and establish Kristoff at court while he and Anna are dating. That way he can learn court manners, etiquette and maybe a bit about economics and politics (considering he's the boyfriend to Princess Anna, who ''is'' next in line for the throne) while potentially also building himself up financially. After all, IF it ever comes to a wedding there probably would be a bit of a ruckus if the next heir apparent married a poor, uncivilized country bumpkin, True Love and all this be damned. So, Elsa both made the position useful and ensured Kristoff would eventually be able to move somewhat graceful on the proverbial political ice.



--->'''Anna:''' ''[Exhilarated]'' Nothing's in my waaaa-''[BAM, slams into Hans]''

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--->'''Anna:''' ''[Exhilarated]'' Nothing's in my waaaa-''[BAM, waaaa--''[BAM, slams into Hans]''



* Olaf seems to be made of FridgeBrilliance, because another one of his lines ("Some people are worth melting for.") could apply to not just his love/adoration for Anna, but for [[spoiler: Elsa's love towards Anna. Seeing Anna's [[HeroicSacrifice Heroic Sacrifice]], and as an extension her love for Elsa, caused Elsa to realize that she didn't have to be alone anymore--and unfroze the fjords.]] Anna really ''is'' someone worth melting for!

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* Olaf seems to be made of FridgeBrilliance, because another one of his lines ("Some people are worth melting for.") could apply to not just his love/adoration for Anna, but for [[spoiler: Elsa's love towards Anna. Seeing Anna's [[HeroicSacrifice Heroic Sacrifice]], and as an extension her love for Elsa, caused Elsa to realize that she didn't have to be alone anymore--and anymore -- and unfroze the fjords.]] Anna really ''is'' someone worth melting for!



* Much black comedy (and drama) is made of Olaf's impossible desire for summer. But look at how he was created, and it makes perfect sense. Elsa didn't even know that she was bringing a snowman to life, much less that she could. Olaf ''himself'' is the impossible made possible. He'd understand- if on nothing more than a subconscious level- that reality's limitations are meaningless faced with magic.

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* Much black comedy (and drama) is made of Olaf's impossible desire for summer. But look at how he was created, and it makes perfect sense. Elsa didn't even know that she was bringing a snowman to life, much less that she could. Olaf ''himself'' is the impossible made possible. He'd understand- understand -- if on nothing more than a subconscious level- level -- that reality's limitations are meaningless faced with magic.



* Grown-up Elsa never slips on her own ice again, be that her castle, or the bridge, or the rink - because sliding occurs due to a thin coating of melted water (while skating, it's melted by mass concentrated on a very thin sharp blade), and she's freezing water, not vice versa.

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* Grown-up Elsa never slips on her own ice again, be that her castle, or the bridge, or the rink - -- because sliding occurs due to a thin coating of melted water (while skating, it's melted by mass concentrated on a very thin sharp blade), and she's freezing water, not vice versa.



* While [[spoiler: Hans]]' color motif being [[ManInWhite white]] makes a delicious [[LightIsNotGood subversion]] of Disney [[LightIsGood expectations]], there's also a more symbolic dimension. White was indeed a colour associated with death in slavic countries and at the very least a colour associated with evil in surviving pagan Scandinavian records, as seen in the comparisons between "White Jesus" and "[[RedIsHeroic Red]] [[Myth/NorseMythology Thor]]" by Norse pagans, and certainly not a very pleasant colour when you're in the middle of the freaking winter, naturally or otherwise.

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* While [[spoiler: Hans]]' color motif being [[ManInWhite white]] makes a delicious [[LightIsNotGood subversion]] of Disney [[LightIsGood expectations]], there's also a more symbolic dimension. White was indeed a colour associated with death in slavic Slavic countries and at the very least a colour associated with evil in surviving pagan Scandinavian records, as seen in the comparisons between "White Jesus" and "[[RedIsHeroic Red]] [[Myth/NorseMythology Thor]]" by Norse pagans, and certainly not a very pleasant colour when you're in the middle of the freaking winter, naturally or otherwise.



* The scene where [[spoiler: Hans reveals his true intentions]] has a [[TheChessmaster chess set]] visible. A few minutes later when [[spoiler: Olaf tries to warm Anna up]] said character [[SpannerInTheWorks inadvertently knocks over the pieces.]] Even better, when the window first blows open, that chess set is out of focus in the foreground as Olaf is rushing to the window to close it--even so, we can hear and see the [[RuleOfSymbolism White Queen]] piece fall over. [[spoiler: At that moment, Elsa is on the run from Hans, who is planning on killing her]].

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* The scene where [[spoiler: Hans reveals his true intentions]] has a [[TheChessmaster chess set]] visible. A few minutes later when [[spoiler: Olaf tries to warm Anna up]] said character [[SpannerInTheWorks inadvertently knocks over the pieces.]] Even better, when the window first blows open, that chess set is out of focus in the foreground as Olaf is rushing to the window to close it--even it -- even so, we can hear and see the [[RuleOfSymbolism White Queen]] piece fall over. [[spoiler: At that moment, Elsa is on the run from Hans, who is planning on killing her]].



*** Their plot involve the pursuit of a pretty lady, both metaphorically and literally? Double check, because Hans initially intended to woo Elsa, the elegant ladylike one, but settled for Anna, the spunky cute one. Ella, Prince Topher's dream girl, is elegant, ladylike, spunky and cute all at once. (Also - Ella, Elsa and Anna? See the resemblance yet?)

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*** Their plot involve the pursuit of a pretty lady, both metaphorically and literally? Double check, because Hans initially intended to woo Elsa, the elegant ladylike one, but settled for Anna, the spunky cute one. Ella, Prince Topher's dream girl, is elegant, ladylike, spunky spunky, and cute all at once. (Also - -- Ella, Elsa Elsa, and Anna? See the resemblance yet?)



* Much like real-life sociopaths, [[spoiler: Hans]] tailors himself to match up to the person he's manipulating - he's a [[{{Adorkable}} goofy dork]] towards Anna, a would-be MoralityPet towards Elsa, and a cold {{Jerkass}} towards the Duke. What was the thing that really fucked shit up in the original story? ''A mirror''.

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* Much like real-life sociopaths, [[spoiler: Hans]] tailors himself to match up to the person he's manipulating - -- he's a [[{{Adorkable}} goofy dork]] towards Anna, a would-be MoralityPet towards Elsa, and a cold {{Jerkass}} towards the Duke. What was the thing that really fucked shit up in the original story? ''A mirror''.



* One interpretation of the ending: when Pabbie said that "true love will thaw a frozen heart", he really was talking about [[spoiler:Elsa]]. [[spoiler:Anna's revival]] isn't so much a result of the ice magic's mechanics as it is [[spoiler:Elsa's action, her [[EmotionlessGirl long-frozen heart]] finally in full harmony with her power]]. This ties in brilliantly with Olaf's earlier suggestion that "love is putting someone else's need before yours": for thirteen years of her life, all Elsa has really known of love is enduring untold heartbreak, isolation and pain so that the people she cares about stay safe, without expecting any measure of acknowledgement in return. When [[spoiler:Anna throws aside her own survival for Elsa's, she embraces her sister's hard but true notion of love - thus showing Elsa for the first time in forever that yes, Anna will always love her no matter what.]]

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* One interpretation of the ending: when Pabbie said that "true love will thaw a frozen heart", he really was talking about [[spoiler:Elsa]]. [[spoiler:Anna's revival]] isn't so much a result of the ice magic's mechanics as it is [[spoiler:Elsa's action, her [[EmotionlessGirl long-frozen heart]] finally in full harmony with her power]]. This ties in brilliantly with Olaf's earlier suggestion that "love is putting someone else's need before yours": for thirteen years of her life, all Elsa has really known of love is enduring untold heartbreak, isolation and pain so that the people she cares about stay safe, without expecting any measure of acknowledgement in return. When [[spoiler:Anna throws aside her own survival for Elsa's, she embraces her sister's hard but true notion of love - -- thus showing Elsa for the first time in forever that yes, Anna will always love her no matter what.]]



* Elsa's posture is always very elegant, regal and composed, except, of course, when she's having emotional breakdowns, which is more than 70% of the movie. This is particularly noticeable after the "Let It Go" sequence, where Elsa sheds all the pretenses that held her back and made her miserable. But then you notice that Elsa continues her queenly mannerisms even in her scenes after "Let it Go". For instance, notice that her manners and gestures when Anna first finds her in the ice castle are very similar to the way she acts during the post-coronation party, or the way she keeps herself composed when Olaf enters earlier than instructed. They show that they are '''not''' just a pretence, they are who Elsa really is, and likewise being the queen of Arendelle is not a role that has merely been forced upon her, it is who she is truly meant to be - it's her higher calling. So for all to be right with the world, Elsa not only needs to be free to live as an ice-sorceress, she also needs to return and live among her people as their rightful ruler.

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* Elsa's posture is always very elegant, regal and composed, except, of course, when she's having emotional breakdowns, which is more than 70% of the movie. This is particularly noticeable after the "Let It Go" sequence, where Elsa sheds all the pretenses that held her back and made her miserable. But then you notice that Elsa continues her queenly mannerisms even in her scenes after "Let it Go". For instance, notice that her manners and gestures when Anna first finds her in the ice castle are very similar to the way she acts during the post-coronation party, or the way she keeps herself composed when Olaf enters earlier than instructed. They show that they are '''not''' just a pretence, they are who Elsa really is, and likewise being the queen of Arendelle is not a role that has merely been forced upon her, it is who she is truly meant to be - -- it's her higher calling. So for all to be right with the world, Elsa not only needs to be free to live as an ice-sorceress, she also needs to return and live among her people as their rightful ruler.



* A very subtle bit of foreshadowing, when Olaf shouts in excitement (while- rather oddly- [[LeaningOnTheFourthWall looking into the camera to address us ]]: "Let's go kiss Hans! Who is this Hans?" Partly it draws attention to the fact that Anna seems to have forgotten about the existence of Hans for a couple of days, as if she's never even mentioned him to Olaf, which already says something about the state of the relationship. However we immediately cut to Hans at the head of the force about to make a raid on Elsa's palace, so we do ask ourselves, "Who is this Hans, indeed?"

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* A very subtle bit of foreshadowing, when Olaf shouts in excitement (while- (while -- rather oddly- oddly -- [[LeaningOnTheFourthWall looking into the camera to address us ]]: "Let's go kiss Hans! Who is this Hans?" Partly it draws attention to the fact that Anna seems to have forgotten about the existence of Hans for a couple of days, as if she's never even mentioned him to Olaf, which already says something about the state of the relationship. However we immediately cut to Hans at the head of the force about to make a raid on Elsa's palace, so we do ask ourselves, "Who is this Hans, indeed?"



* If you look very carefully at Elsa's glove during the "Couldn't keep it in, heaven knows I tried" in 'Let it go', you can just about see a snowflake on the back of the hand. This shows that the gloves can't hold the power in for much longer, i.e. "can't hold it back anymore." The powers have built up so much that the thing she sees as stopping her can't. This means that even without the argument, she probably would've ended up freezing everything sooner or later anyway. Also, foreshadowing the fact she escapes the prison by freezing her shackles until they become so brittle that they break.

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* If you look very carefully at Elsa's glove during the "Couldn't keep it in, heaven knows I tried" in 'Let it go', you can just about see a snowflake on the back of the hand. This shows that the gloves can't hold the power in for much longer, i.e. "can't hold it back anymore." The powers have built up so much that the thing she sees as stopping her can't. This means that even without the argument, she probably would've ended up freezing everything sooner or later anyway.later, anyways. Also, foreshadowing the fact she escapes the prison by freezing her shackles until they become so brittle that they break.



* Watch the finale again. Do you know what else is subverted about Disney movies here? The heroic male lead. Oh yes, Kristoff cares for Anna. He's being brave. But he has nothing to do with the rescue. He doesn't even get to Anna in time. It was ''Olaf'' who risked his life inside the castle - he unlocked Anna's door, helped to warm her up at the very strong risk of melting, and got her out of the castle to find Elsa. And then Anna saved Elsa. And then Elsa saved Anna. Yes, Olaf really does deserve that prominent position in the advertising.
** At the same time, Kristoff's presence isn't ''entirely'' superfluous to the climax: if you think about it, everything might have gone wrong if Sven hadn't convinced him to return or he hadn't arrived right then. Why? Because it was only Kristoff's presence that made Anna's act of willing self-sacrifice a ''genuine'' self-sacrifice, not just a case of DefiantToTheEnd. Until Anna saw Kristoff coming to save her, she'd been doomed ''for sure'', and saving Elsa under those circumstances would've rated more as an attempt to make her own imminent death count for something than a genuine forfeiture of life. But because Anna'd come to believe that ''Kristoff's'' kiss could save her, her decision to shield Elsa rather than go to her own potential savior became a genuine HeroicSacrifice - a willing surrender of a life she thought could yet be preserved - rather than merely a DoNotGoGentle attempt to make her last seconds count. We'll never know if the latter would've rated as a sufficient ActOfTrueLove to unfreeze Anna's heart or not, but thanks to Kristoff, it became a sure thing.

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* Watch the finale again. Do you know what else is subverted about Disney movies here? The heroic male lead. Oh yes, Kristoff cares for Anna. He's being brave. But he has nothing to do with the rescue. He doesn't even get to Anna in time. It was ''Olaf'' who risked his life inside the castle - -- he unlocked Anna's door, helped to warm her up at the very strong risk of melting, and got her out of the castle to find Elsa. And then Anna saved Elsa. And then Elsa saved Anna. Yes, Olaf really does deserve that prominent position in the advertising.
** At the same time, Kristoff's presence isn't ''entirely'' superfluous to the climax: if you think about it, everything might have gone wrong if Sven hadn't convinced him to return or he hadn't arrived right then. Why? Because it was only Kristoff's presence that made Anna's act of willing self-sacrifice a ''genuine'' self-sacrifice, not just a case of DefiantToTheEnd. Until Anna saw Kristoff coming to save her, she'd been doomed ''for sure'', and saving Elsa under those circumstances would've rated more as an attempt to make her own imminent death count for something than a genuine forfeiture of life. But because Anna'd come to believe that ''Kristoff's'' kiss could save her, her decision to shield Elsa rather than go to her own potential savior became a genuine HeroicSacrifice - -- a willing surrender of a life she thought could yet be preserved - -- rather than merely a DoNotGoGentle attempt to make her last seconds count. We'll never know if the latter would've rated as a sufficient ActOfTrueLove to unfreeze Anna's heart or not, but thanks to Kristoff, it became a sure thing.



* It's no wonder Kristoff "only likes to tinkle in the woods"! For nearly all his life, before he met Anna, he's lived ''in the mountains''--and he's often away from the trolls (who are also only active during the night) for a long period of time anyway because of his work. What did you expect?

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* It's no wonder Kristoff "only likes to tinkle in the woods"! For nearly all his life, before he met Anna, he's lived ''in the mountains''--and mountains'' -- and he's often away from the trolls (who are also only active during the night) for a long period of time anyway because of his work. What did you expect?



** Aside from these reasons - which would apply to ''any'' royal family of the time, not just Arendelle's - Elsa also has a very personal reason to want Anna's marriage to be negotiated with political advantage in mind: Elsa is ''afraid to touch anyone''. Which means that she doesn't expect to ever get married herself, so it'd fall to ''Anna's'' children to assume the throne in the next generation. Thus, who marries Anna becomes a '''very''' important matter of state.

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** Aside from these reasons - -- which would apply to ''any'' royal family of the time, not just Arendelle's - -- Elsa also has a very personal reason to want Anna's marriage to be negotiated with political advantage in mind: Elsa is ''afraid to touch anyone''. Which means that she doesn't expect to ever get married herself, so it'd fall to ''Anna's'' children to assume the throne in the next generation. Thus, who marries Anna becomes a '''very''' important matter of state.



* Try to imagine the events of the film's ending from the point of view of people in kingdoms around the globe, and how Elsa appears to them. A new princess just ascended to the throne of Arendelle - ''a superhuman, emotionally unstable, unmarried girl with the power to summon blizzards at her whim,'' and her first act as a ruler, after a three day blizzard that she apparently conjured up in a fit of depression, is to banish a foreign dignitary and cut off trade with his kingdom. Go to war with Elsa and she's liable to [[PersonOfMassDestruction summon a massive blizzard/ice storm to slam your entire country. Try to invade by land and she'll send a blizzard that makes it impossible for your supplies to travel over the roads, and any attempt to invade by sea will end with your ships stuck in an ice sheet.]] Any attempt to assassinate her is doomed to failure: she can shield herself from projectiles and blades, extinguish any fire before it becomes a threat, and no poisoner will get the opportunity to strike. No, the most logical course of action is to seek her favor however you can, and if that means emptying your own treasury as tribute or pimping your sons to her so be it.

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* Try to imagine the events of the film's ending from the point of view of people in kingdoms around the globe, and how Elsa appears to them. A new princess just ascended to the throne of Arendelle - -- ''a superhuman, emotionally unstable, unmarried girl with the power to summon blizzards at her whim,'' and her first act as a ruler, after a three day blizzard that she apparently conjured up in a fit of depression, is to banish a foreign dignitary and cut off trade with his kingdom. Go to war with Elsa and she's liable to [[PersonOfMassDestruction summon a massive blizzard/ice storm to slam your entire country. Try to invade by land and she'll send a blizzard that makes it impossible for your supplies to travel over the roads, and any attempt to invade by sea will end with your ships stuck in an ice sheet.]] Any attempt to assassinate her is doomed to failure: she can shield herself from projectiles and blades, extinguish any fire before it becomes a threat, and no poisoner will get the opportunity to strike. No, the most logical course of action is to seek her favor however you can, and if that means emptying your own treasury as tribute or pimping your sons to her so be it.



* Speaking of losing your parents - in the burial scene, Anna is by herself. Meaning Elsa wasn't even able to attend the funeral and give a final goodbye to her own parents. Meanwhile, Anna has to lead a country in mourning ''alone'', and the last remaining member of her family won't even stay in a room with her. She probably knows that there's something badly wrong with her sister, would do anything to help or even just support her, but she's not even told what the problem is. She's '''fifteen years old'''.

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* Speaking of losing your parents - -- in the burial scene, Anna is by herself. Meaning Elsa wasn't even able to attend the funeral and give a final goodbye to her own parents. Meanwhile, Anna has to lead a country in mourning ''alone'', and the last remaining member of her family won't even stay in a room with her. She probably knows that there's something badly wrong with her sister, would do anything to help or even just support her, but she's not even told what the problem is. She's '''fifteen years old'''.



* A big deal is made in the ice harvester work song "Frozen Heart" is about how ice is beautiful, but it's also dangerous. With that in mind, the fact that Elsa's winter magic makes her immune to cold (and immune to the potential of frostbite or hypothermia) seems to make her almost a goddess, as though she were ice itself. Equal part FridgeBrilliance. You ever heard the simile "pure as the driven snow"? She is also the most purehearted, selfless and giving human character in the movie (exceeded only by Olaf, who literally is the driven snow itself).

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* A big deal is made in the ice harvester work song "Frozen Heart" is about how ice is beautiful, but it's also dangerous. With that in mind, the fact that Elsa's winter magic makes her immune to cold (and immune to the potential of frostbite or hypothermia) seems to make her almost a goddess, as though she were ice itself. Equal part FridgeBrilliance. You ever heard the simile "pure as the driven snow"? She is also the most purehearted, pure-hearted, selfless and giving human character in the movie (exceeded only by Olaf, who literally is the driven snow itself).



* How about a triple dose of FridgeLogic, FridgeBrilliance AND FridgeHorror? Let's start with the scene where Anna confronts Elsa in the ice palace; Elsa's panic over finding out she has frozen over Arendelle causes a snowstorm ''indoors'', when the weather outside is still pretty calm and clear.

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* How about a triple dose of FridgeLogic, FridgeBrilliance FridgeBrilliance, AND FridgeHorror? Let's start with the scene where Anna confronts Elsa in the ice palace; Elsa's panic over finding out she has frozen over Arendelle causes a snowstorm ''indoors'', when the weather outside is still pretty calm and clear.



** This brings another question - Is Elsa's weather-control power related strongly to her (to the point of being centered on her), or can she ''lock'' a place in a given weather (such as cold weather) until she orders otherwise? She manages to turn the mountain weather from snowy to clear, but somehow this clear weather doesn't extend to Arendelle. And in the climax, [[spoiler:when her anxiety causes a massive blizzard, a bit of the cold wind does reach the mountains where Kristoff is at that point, but otherwise the full brunt of the blizzard is centered at Arendelle.]] This brings another question: After Elsa dispels winter from Arendelle, what happens to other places which may have been affected by her winter?

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** This brings another question - -- Is Elsa's weather-control power related strongly to her (to the point of being centered on her), or can she ''lock'' a place in a given weather (such as cold weather) until she orders otherwise? She manages to turn the mountain weather from snowy to clear, but somehow this clear weather doesn't extend to Arendelle. And in the climax, [[spoiler:when her anxiety causes a massive blizzard, a bit of the cold wind does reach the mountains where Kristoff is at that point, but otherwise the full brunt of the blizzard is centered at Arendelle.]] This brings another question: After Elsa dispels winter from Arendelle, what happens to other places which may have been affected by her winter?



* Combines to make a sort of Fridge Tearjerker: At the point that [[spoiler:Hans]] delivers his WhamLine to Anna, she's just parted from Kristoff and Olaf, possibly forever (and they'd never really established whether there was anything there), and her always-difficult relationship with Elsa is at an all-time low, and... that's about all there is for her. [[spoiler:Hans']] revelation comes at the moment when she's about the most vulnerable and alone she's ever been in her life; there really doesn't seem to be anyone else to turn to, or even any comeback to what he's just said to her- his cutting remark probably just keeps going into her skin deeper and deeper. And Hans very much probably realizes it. [[spoiler:From his point of view, it's probably a particularly vicious invocation of NotSoDifferent, seeing as WordOfGod says he's long known he's chronically unloved.]]

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* Combines to make a sort of Fridge Tearjerker: At the point that [[spoiler:Hans]] delivers his WhamLine to Anna, she's just parted from Kristoff and Olaf, possibly forever (and they'd never really established whether there was anything there), and her always-difficult relationship with Elsa is at an all-time low, and... that's about all there is for her. [[spoiler:Hans']] revelation comes at the moment when she's about the most vulnerable and alone she's ever been in her life; there really doesn't seem to be anyone else to turn to, or even any comeback to what he's just said to her- her -- his cutting remark probably just keeps going into her skin deeper and deeper. And Hans very much probably realizes it. [[spoiler:From his point of view, it's probably a particularly vicious invocation of NotSoDifferent, seeing as WordOfGod says he's long known he's chronically unloved.]]



* Consider that Hans has been shown to be a MagnificentBastard on a scale rarely seen in Disney canon, who expertly manipulated both the protagonist [[TheFourthWallWillNotProtectYou and the audience]] until TheReveal. It seems out of character, then, for him to immediately engage in BondVillainStupidty and simply assume Anna would be a good girl and die out of sight, as opposed to, say, [[NightmareFuel locking the door, pulling up a chair, and watching to be sure.]] This wouldn't even change the subsequent scene's script much. Upgrading Hans to that level of evil, though, would have cost the film its G-rating.
** It actually makes Hans worse - he cares so little for Anna that he just walks out and doesn't think twice about leaving her to die alone in the cold when there's a kingdom to start ruling.
* If you listen to "First Time In Forever" (Reprise) When Anna and Elsa's argument really picks up, you can almost imagine Kristoff and Olaf (whose minute is up) going from admiring the ice castle to hearing them and racing up the stairs searching for them - then Anna gets hit, a second or two later Kristoff bursts in and runs to her, and it's a bit like he's thinking "If only I'd gotten here sooner..."

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* Consider that Hans has been shown to be a MagnificentBastard on a scale rarely seen in Disney canon, who expertly manipulated both the protagonist [[TheFourthWallWillNotProtectYou and the audience]] until TheReveal. It seems out of character, then, for him to immediately engage in BondVillainStupidty BondVillainStupidity and simply assume Anna would be a good girl and die out of sight, as opposed to, say, [[NightmareFuel locking the door, pulling up a chair, and watching to be sure.]] This wouldn't even change the subsequent scene's script much. Upgrading Hans to that level of evil, though, would have cost the film its G-rating.
** It actually makes Hans worse - -- he cares so little for Anna that he just walks out and doesn't think twice about leaving her to die alone in the cold when there's a kingdom to start ruling.
* If you listen to "First Time In Forever" (Reprise) When when Anna and Elsa's argument really picks up, you can almost imagine Kristoff and Olaf (whose minute is up) going from admiring the ice castle to hearing them and racing up the stairs searching for them - -- then Anna gets hit, a second or two later Kristoff bursts in and runs to her, and it's a bit like he's thinking "If only I'd gotten here sooner..."
13th Dec '17 6:54:10 PM Sharlee
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** Aside from these reasons - which would apply to ''any'' royal family of the time, not just Arendelle's - Elsa also has a very personal reason to want Anna's marriage to be negotiated with political advantage in mind: Elsa is ''afraid to touch anyone''. Which means that she doesn't expect to ever get married herself, so it'd fall to ''Anna's'' children to assume the throne in the next generation. Thus, who marries Anna becomes a '''very''' important matter of state.
13th Dec '17 6:41:48 PM Sharlee
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** She'd also ''already'' collapsed from grief and horror about [[spoiler: Anna's death]], when [[spoiler: Hans]] lied about having witnessed it. That lie had rendered her so broken that she just stayed there on the ice and didn't move [[spoiler: even as Hans audibly drew his sword to kill her]]. By the time Elsa actually embraces [[spoiler: frozen Anna]], she's probably so far gone into bereaved misery that she's emotionally shutting down for an entirely ''new'' reason: not repression or stoicism, but sheer abject despair.
13th Dec '17 6:33:53 PM Sharlee
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** On the other hand, ''somebody'' must have ''cut'' that smaller block of ice that Kristoff was wrangling, so it's possible that at least one of the men ''was'' keeping a discreet eye on the boy: the man just let Kristoff figure out how to haul the block himself, knowing that the boy would feel embarrassed if he hadn't managed it on his own.
12th Dec '17 9:13:30 PM CritterKeeper
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* The Duke of Weselton is widely seen as being less dastardly than [[spoiler: Prince Hans]], but [[spoiler: they are in fact very similar in the scope and nature of their vices. What makes them insidious is the rather narrow limits of their obsessions. Hans wants to be a beloved King, and the Duke simply wants trade and has a judgmental hatred of all things sorcery and magic. These are obsessions and goals they will act both ruthlessly and sneakily upon, but outside of these limits they're mostly capable of decent acts, which makes makes most people oblivious to them, and even them being oblivious to each other.]]

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* The Duke of Weselton is widely seen as being less dastardly than [[spoiler: Prince Hans]], but [[spoiler: they are in fact very similar in the scope and nature of their vices. What makes them insidious is the rather narrow limits of their obsessions. Hans wants to be a beloved King, and the Duke simply wants trade and has a judgmental hatred of all things sorcery and magic. These are obsessions and goals they will act both ruthlessly and sneakily upon, but outside of these limits they're mostly capable of decent acts, which makes makes most people oblivious to them, and even makes them being oblivious to each other.]]



* More of a romantic foreshadowing as to who ends up with who but during Olaf's "In Summer", we see in one brief scene a picnic. Anna and Kristoff are looking at the snowman with [[spoiler: sandwiches.]] What is that infamous line that Anna sang earlier about finishing each other's [[spoiler: sentences/sandwiches?]] This becomes extra significant when you remember that Olaf is composed of both Elsa and Anna's personalities. So for Olaf, depicting a couple [[spoiler: finishing each other's sandwiches]] in his daydreams indicates that their in love because '''Anna''' considers it to be a sign that their in love. So even though he's only known Kristoff and Anna for a few minutes, he can already forsee love between them. I guess he really is a love expert!

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* More of a romantic foreshadowing as to who ends up with who but during Olaf's "In Summer", we see in one brief scene a picnic. Anna and Kristoff are looking at the snowman with [[spoiler: sandwiches.]] What is that infamous line that Anna sang earlier about finishing each other's [[spoiler: sentences/sandwiches?]] This becomes extra significant when you remember that Olaf is composed of both Elsa and Anna's personalities. So for Olaf, depicting a couple [[spoiler: finishing each other's sandwiches]] in his daydreams indicates that their they're in love because '''Anna''' considers it to be a sign that their they're in love. So even though he's only known Kristoff and Anna for a few minutes, he can already forsee love between them. I guess he really is a love expert!
10th Dec '17 1:19:59 AM Sharlee
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** At the same time, Kristoff's presence isn't ''entirely'' superfluous to the climax: if you think about it, everything might have gone wrong if Sven hadn't convinced him to return or he hadn't arrived right then. Why? Because it was only Kristoff's presence that made Anna's act of willing self-sacrifice a ''genuine'' self-sacrifice, not just a case of DefiantToTheEnd. Until Anna saw Kristoff coming to save her, she'd been doomed ''for sure'', and saving Elsa under those circumstances would've rated more as an attempt to make her own imminent death count for something than a genuine forfeiture of life. But because Anna'd come to believe that ''Kristoff's'' kiss could save her, her decision to shield Elsa rather than go to her own potential savior became a genuine HeroicSacrifice - a willing surrender of a life she thought could yet be preserved - rather than merely a DoNotGoGentle attempt to make her last seconds count. We'll never know if the latter would've rated as a sufficient ActOfTrueLove to heal her heart or not, but thanks to Kristoff, it became a sure thing.

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** At the same time, Kristoff's presence isn't ''entirely'' superfluous to the climax: if you think about it, everything might have gone wrong if Sven hadn't convinced him to return or he hadn't arrived right then. Why? Because it was only Kristoff's presence that made Anna's act of willing self-sacrifice a ''genuine'' self-sacrifice, not just a case of DefiantToTheEnd. Until Anna saw Kristoff coming to save her, she'd been doomed ''for sure'', and saving Elsa under those circumstances would've rated more as an attempt to make her own imminent death count for something than a genuine forfeiture of life. But because Anna'd come to believe that ''Kristoff's'' kiss could save her, her decision to shield Elsa rather than go to her own potential savior became a genuine HeroicSacrifice - a willing surrender of a life she thought could yet be preserved - rather than merely a DoNotGoGentle attempt to make her last seconds count. We'll never know if the latter would've rated as a sufficient ActOfTrueLove to heal her unfreeze Anna's heart or not, but thanks to Kristoff, it became a sure thing.
10th Dec '17 1:18:29 AM Sharlee
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** At the same time, Kristoff's presence isn't ''entirely'' superfluous to the climax: if you think about it, everything might have gone wrong if Sven hadn't convinced him to return or he hadn't arrived right then. Why? Because it was only Kristoff's presence that made Anna's act of willing self-sacrifice a ''genuine'' self-sacrifice, not just a case of DefiantToTheEnd. Until Anna saw Kristoff coming to save her, she'd been doomed ''for sure'', and saving Elsa under those circumstances would've rated more as an attempt to make her own imminent death count for something than a genuine forfeiture of life. But because Anna'd come to believe that ''Kristoff's'' kiss could save her, her decision to shield Elsa rather than go to her own potential savior became a genuine HeroicSacrifice - a willing surrender of a life she thought could yet be preserved - rather than merely a DoNotGoGentle attempt to make her last seconds count.

to:

** At the same time, Kristoff's presence isn't ''entirely'' superfluous to the climax: if you think about it, everything might have gone wrong if Sven hadn't convinced him to return or he hadn't arrived right then. Why? Because it was only Kristoff's presence that made Anna's act of willing self-sacrifice a ''genuine'' self-sacrifice, not just a case of DefiantToTheEnd. Until Anna saw Kristoff coming to save her, she'd been doomed ''for sure'', and saving Elsa under those circumstances would've rated more as an attempt to make her own imminent death count for something than a genuine forfeiture of life. But because Anna'd come to believe that ''Kristoff's'' kiss could save her, her decision to shield Elsa rather than go to her own potential savior became a genuine HeroicSacrifice - a willing surrender of a life she thought could yet be preserved - rather than merely a DoNotGoGentle attempt to make her last seconds count. We'll never know if the latter would've rated as a sufficient ActOfTrueLove to heal her heart or not, but thanks to Kristoff, it became a sure thing.
10th Dec '17 1:15:54 AM Sharlee
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Added DiffLines:

** At the same time, Kristoff's presence isn't ''entirely'' superfluous to the climax: if you think about it, everything might have gone wrong if Sven hadn't convinced him to return or he hadn't arrived right then. Why? Because it was only Kristoff's presence that made Anna's act of willing self-sacrifice a ''genuine'' self-sacrifice, not just a case of DefiantToTheEnd. Until Anna saw Kristoff coming to save her, she'd been doomed ''for sure'', and saving Elsa under those circumstances would've rated more as an attempt to make her own imminent death count for something than a genuine forfeiture of life. But because Anna'd come to believe that ''Kristoff's'' kiss could save her, her decision to shield Elsa rather than go to her own potential savior became a genuine HeroicSacrifice - a willing surrender of a life she thought could yet be preserved - rather than merely a DoNotGoGentle attempt to make her last seconds count.
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