History Fridge / Frozen

14th Sep '17 8:12:24 AM Sharlee
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* Dropping the cloak is just as iconic: for most of her life, Elsa has been dressing in warm clothes that wall her in and make her look like everyone else, clothes made to ''shut out the cold'' that she fears unleashing. But now, as she finally admits that she doesn't ''need'' warm clothes, either to shield herself from low temperatures or to "pass" as an ordinary girl, she can accept that the cold is part of ''who she is'' - one with the wind and sky - and finally stop being afraid of that fact. And suddenly she's ''enjoying herself'' for the first time as a grown woman.
14th Sep '17 8:04:48 AM Sharlee
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** For that matter, ''inverting'' the line makes it work perfectly [[spoiler: for Anna, whose snap decision to defend her sister from Hans showed that love is worth ''freezing'' for, too.]] The inversion is perfectly justified too, under the circumstances: when Olaf says the line, the very heat that's melting him is restoring Anna, because their relationship to freezing and melting temperatures are opposites.


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** She may also be unconsciously shaping the ice under her feet, adding microscopic traction-ridges to it with each step.


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** Also (FridgeHorror) because she ''hasn't actually felt'' Love '''or''' Happiness since her parents died, and precious little of the latter even before that. It was only when she was in her parents' presence that she could give or receive love, and she'd have suppressed her powers then to avoid disappointing them.
13th Sep '17 8:47:35 PM Sharlee
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* Elsa repeatedly uses the metaphor of "the storm" for her own inner turmoil and its connection to her powers. This gets a lot more somber if you consider that a storm at sea was what ''capsized her parents' ship''. Even when she's speaking in metaphors, Elsa can't help but associate her own ice powers with the tragic deaths of her loved ones.
1st Aug '17 2:55:27 PM koltai91
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**On a meta level Olaf was probably based on a lesser known Andersen tale in which a snowman falls in love with a fireplace.
18th Jul '17 10:14:43 AM Njein
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* Anna has trouble iceskating at the end because she hasn't done it since she was five. Elsa could have had some practice moving around her room, but her powers would also instinctively activate to provide her secure footing.

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* Anna has trouble iceskating ice skating at the end because she hasn't done it since she was five. Elsa could have had some practice moving around her room, but her powers would also instinctively activate to provide her secure footing.



* [[spoiler: Hans' brothers may have had a darn good reason for ignoring him for two years. When a child is consistently being an extreme brat or bully, other children are taught that it's best to just ignore them, which leads to the silent treatment. "My brothers pretended I was invisible for two years" probably says far more about Hans than it does about his brothers.]]

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* [[spoiler: Hans' [[spoiler:Hans' brothers may have had a darn good reason for ignoring him for two years. When a child is consistently being an extreme brat or bully, other children are taught that it's best to just ignore them, which leads to the silent treatment. "My brothers pretended I was invisible for two years" probably says far more about Hans than it does about his brothers.]]



** The ''A Frozen Heart'' novelization goes into detail [[spoiler: (for example Hans was glad it was a piece of bread that got thrown at his head instead of a glass like last time), including some lines that sound suspiciously like descriptions of self-harm. He's also been thrown off a moving cart more than once and suffered cruel practical jokes from an early age. His father is a cold and unfeeling tyrant who uses his sons to brutally and violently suppress any criticism and although his mother cares for Hans, giving birth and raising 13 sons has weakened her greatly and left her unable to intervene. Hans has also been sent to do some horrible, horrible things in the past, such as a hint that he was ordered to help execute villagers who were bad-mouthing the king or were behind on their taxes. The book also states that Hans was never a sociopath from childhood, but being forced to commit atrocities and being bullied year after year by his brothers made him desperate and filled with rage. He originally goes to Arendelle with the fairly mild goal of marrying Elsa and leaving, but once he meets Anna, his sociopathy apparently starts running in full force. From that point onwards, we see Hans becoming more and more of a sociopath and seeing everyone as pawns. Leaving him in charge of Arendelle makes his state even worse, with power going right to his head and Hans becoming determined to hang onto it at all costs, even though he is genuinely nice to the population. This drives him to become more cold until he has zero issues leaving Anna to die and killing Elsa. Only at the end, when he's imprisoned and in disgrace, does he start to [[HeelRealization realize what]] [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone he's done wrong]]. But by that point, [[HateSink no one is willing to trust him thanks to the damage he caused]].]]

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** The ''A Frozen Heart'' novelization goes into detail [[spoiler: (for example Hans was glad it was a piece of bread that got thrown at his head instead of a glass like last time), including some lines that sound suspiciously like descriptions of self-harm. He's also been thrown off a moving cart more than once once, shoved in the mud numerous times, lost countless fights and suffered cruel practical jokes from an early age. His father is a cold and stone-cold, unfeeling tyrant and ruthless man who uses his sons to brutally and violently suppress any criticism and although coldly regards Hans as a "weakling" who refuses to fight back at the taunting his older sons do to him. So, in his view, his older sons taunting and bullying Hans is a sign of "strength", and believes it's "all good politics". Although his mother cares for Hans, giving birth and raising 13 sons has weakened her greatly and left her unable to intervene. Hans has also been sent to do some horrible, horrible things in the past, such as a hint that he was ordered to help execute kill villagers who were bad-mouthing the king or were behind on their taxes. taxes, and [[EvenEvilHasStandards he was visibly unnerved while doing such things]]. The book also states that Hans was never a sociopath from childhood, but being forced to commit atrocities and being bullied year after year by his father and brothers made him desperate and filled with rage. He originally goes to Arendelle with the fairly mild goal of marrying Elsa and leaving, but once he meets Anna, his sociopathy apparently starts running in full force. From that point onwards, we see Hans becoming more and more of a sociopath and seeing everyone as pawns. Leaving him in charge of Arendelle makes his state even worse, with power going right to his head and Hans becoming determined to hang onto it at all costs, even though he is genuinely nice to the population. This drives him to become more cold until he has zero issues leaving Anna to die and killing Elsa. Only at the end, when he's imprisoned and in disgrace, does he start to [[HeelRealization realize what]] [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone he's done wrong]]. But by that point, [[HateSink no one is willing to trust him thanks to the damage he caused]].]]
1st Jul '17 8:37:38 PM creader
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[[folder: FridgeBrilliance]]

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[[folder: FridgeBrilliance]][[folder:FridgeBrilliance]]



* ''Frozen Fever'' Fridge! Elsa's obvious assumption: that her RequiredSecondaryPowers ('a cold never bothered me anyway!') mean that she can't possibly catch a cold... are a misconception from the fact that ''like everyone else in the early 19th century'', Elsa thinks that [[CatchYourDeathOfCold colds are caused by getting cold]], and she never feels the cold and so has never caught one. Therefore, like everyone else in Arendelle would assume due to this, she doesn't know that colds are caused by airborne germs, and the reason she has no memory of ever having one is that she's been forbidding anyone to come within breathing distance of her for thirteen years. She's now getting close to people- including, as we see in the short, children- again and so is being exposed to germs. Cold germs do like a slightly cool environment (which is why they thrive in the nose) so with her underused immune system and probably still preferring to stay cool, it's no wonder Elsa's cold makes her really ill. [[FridgeLogic Though this raises the question of if Elsa had had any colds before she was eight.]]



* ''Disney/FrozenFever'' Fridge: {{Snowlem}}s that Elsa makes seem to possess a mindset depending on her current state of mind. I.e., Olaf is created when she's just playing with her powers, thus he possesses a childlike naivety. Marshmallow is made when Elsa is upset and thus has the mindset of a bouncer. And the Snowgies are made when Elsa is busy thinking about the perfect birthday party for Anna, which is why they aim for the cake... either because Elsa subconsciously wants a slice of the cake once Anna gets it, or Elsa's wish to throw the perfect birthday party for Anna causes the snowgies to try to steal the cake and bring it straight to Anna.
17th May '17 3:09:00 AM ScotieRw
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* When Elsa first hit Anna in the head with her ice powers as children, it wasn't because she couldn't control her powers. She slipped and fell on her ice while making a mountain of snow for Anna to land on and her ice magic got misdirected because she moved her hand when trying to catch herself. She may have been able to control her powers perfectly fine, until her parents told her she couldn't.
14th May '17 4:51:01 PM Njein
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** The ''A Frozen Heart'' novelization goes into detail [[spoiler: (for example Hans was glad it was a piece of bread that got thrown at his head instead of a glass like last time), including some lines that sound suspiciously like descriptions of self-harm. He's also been thrown off a moving cart more than once and suffered cruel practical jokes from an early age. His father is a cold, unfeeling tyrant who uses his sons to violently suppress any criticism and although the queen cares for Hans, giving birth and raising 13 sons has weakened her greatly and left her unable to intervene. Hans has also be sent to do some horrible, horrible things in the past, such as a hint that he was ordered to [[spoiler: help execute villagers who weren't able to pay their taxes on time. The book also states that Hans was never a sociopath from childhood, but being forced to commit atrocities and being bullied year after year by his brothers made him desperate and filled with rage. He originally goes to Arendelle with the fairly mild goal of marrying Elsa and leaving, but once he meets Anna, his sociopathy apparently starts running in full force. From that point onwards, we see Hans becoming more and more of a sociopath and seeing everyone as pawns. Leaving him in charge of Arendelle makes his state even worse, with power going right to his head and Hans becoming determined to hang onto it at all costs, even though he is genuinely nice to the population. This drives him to become more cold until he has zero issues leaving Anna to die and killing Elsa. Only at the end, when he's imprisoned and in disgrace, does he start to realize what he's done wrong. But by that point, no one is willing to trust him thanks to the damage he caused.]]

to:

** The ''A Frozen Heart'' novelization goes into detail [[spoiler: (for example Hans was glad it was a piece of bread that got thrown at his head instead of a glass like last time), including some lines that sound suspiciously like descriptions of self-harm. He's also been thrown off a moving cart more than once and suffered cruel practical jokes from an early age. His father is a cold, cold and unfeeling tyrant who uses his sons to brutally and violently suppress any criticism and although the queen his mother cares for Hans, giving birth and raising 13 sons has weakened her greatly and left her unable to intervene. Hans has also be been sent to do some horrible, horrible things in the past, such as a hint that he was ordered to [[spoiler: help execute villagers who weren't able to pay were bad-mouthing the king or were behind on their taxes on time.taxes. The book also states that Hans was never a sociopath from childhood, but being forced to commit atrocities and being bullied year after year by his brothers made him desperate and filled with rage. He originally goes to Arendelle with the fairly mild goal of marrying Elsa and leaving, but once he meets Anna, his sociopathy apparently starts running in full force. From that point onwards, we see Hans becoming more and more of a sociopath and seeing everyone as pawns. Leaving him in charge of Arendelle makes his state even worse, with power going right to his head and Hans becoming determined to hang onto it at all costs, even though he is genuinely nice to the population. This drives him to become more cold until he has zero issues leaving Anna to die and killing Elsa. Only at the end, when he's imprisoned and in disgrace, does he start to [[HeelRealization realize what what]] [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone he's done wrong. wrong]]. But by that point, [[HateSink no one is willing to trust him thanks to the damage he caused.caused]].]]



** After the accident, Elsa would have naturally come to fear her powers, so any manifestation of her skills would have terrified her even when involuntarily inspired by a positive emotion (which, if her facial expressions in "Let It Go" mean anything, would allow her a way to explore her powers in a controllable, inspiring way). Add the emotional coaching she received from her (well-meaning but misguided) parents, and you have a young girl who would feel some happy emotion, which would make her afraid because “Oh no, I felt something, what if I create ice and hurt someone?”, and that fear would cause her powers to react negatively, which would make her more afraid, etc. etc. until she can’t control it anymore.

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** After the accident, Elsa would have naturally come to fear her powers, so any manifestation of her skills would have terrified her even when involuntarily inspired by a positive emotion (which, if her facial expressions in "Let It Go" mean anything, would allow her a way to explore her powers in a controllable, inspiring way). Add the emotional coaching she received from her (well-meaning but misguided) parents, and you have a young girl who would feel some happy emotion, which would make her afraid because “Oh “Oh no, I felt something, what if I create ice and hurt someone?”, and that fear would cause her powers to react negatively, which would make her more afraid, etc. etc. until she can’t control it anymore.
8th May '17 11:27:19 AM DreamerCynist2
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** The ''Frozen Heart'' novelization goes into detail [[spoiler: (for example Hans was glad it was a piece of bread that got thrown at his head instead of a glass like last time), including some lines that sound suspiciously like descriptions of self-harm. He's also been thrown off a moving cart more than once and suffered cruel practical jokes from an early age. His father is a cold, unfeeling tyrant who uses his sons to violently suppress any criticism and although the queen cares for Hans, giving birth and raising 13 sons has weakened her greatly and left her unable to intervene. Hans has also be sent to do some horrible, horrible things in the past, such as a hint that he was ordered to [[spoiler: help execute villagers who weren't able to pay their taxes on time. The book also states that Hans was never a sociopath from childhood, but being forced to commit atrocities and being bullied year after year by his brothers made him desperate and filled with rage. He originally goes to Arendelle with the fairly mild goal of marrying Elsa and leaving, but once he meets Anna, his sociopathy apparently starts running in full force. From that point onwards, we see Hans becoming more and more of a sociopath and seeing everyone as pawns. Leaving him in charge of Arendelle makes his state even worse, with power going right to his head and Hans becoming determined to hang onto it at all costs, even though he is genuinely nice to the population. This drives him to become more cold until he has zero issues leaving Anna to die and killing Elsa. Only at the end, when he's imprisoned and in disgrace, does he start to realize what he's done wrong. But by that point, no one is willing to trust him thanks to the damage he caused.]]

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** The ''Frozen ''A Frozen Heart'' novelization goes into detail [[spoiler: (for example Hans was glad it was a piece of bread that got thrown at his head instead of a glass like last time), including some lines that sound suspiciously like descriptions of self-harm. He's also been thrown off a moving cart more than once and suffered cruel practical jokes from an early age. His father is a cold, unfeeling tyrant who uses his sons to violently suppress any criticism and although the queen cares for Hans, giving birth and raising 13 sons has weakened her greatly and left her unable to intervene. Hans has also be sent to do some horrible, horrible things in the past, such as a hint that he was ordered to [[spoiler: help execute villagers who weren't able to pay their taxes on time. The book also states that Hans was never a sociopath from childhood, but being forced to commit atrocities and being bullied year after year by his brothers made him desperate and filled with rage. He originally goes to Arendelle with the fairly mild goal of marrying Elsa and leaving, but once he meets Anna, his sociopathy apparently starts running in full force. From that point onwards, we see Hans becoming more and more of a sociopath and seeing everyone as pawns. Leaving him in charge of Arendelle makes his state even worse, with power going right to his head and Hans becoming determined to hang onto it at all costs, even though he is genuinely nice to the population. This drives him to become more cold until he has zero issues leaving Anna to die and killing Elsa. Only at the end, when he's imprisoned and in disgrace, does he start to realize what he's done wrong. But by that point, no one is willing to trust him thanks to the damage he caused.]]
6th Apr '17 6:01:36 PM Tightwire
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* Consider that Hans has been shown to be a MagnificentBastard on a scale rarely seen in Disney canon, who expertly manipulated both the protagonist [[TheFourthWallWillNotProtectYou and the audience]] until TheReveal. It seems out of character, then, for him to immediately engage in BondVillainStupidty and simply assume Anna would be a good girl and die out of sight, as opposed to, say, [[NightmareFuel locking the door, pulling up a chair, and watching to be sure.]] This wouldn't even change the subsequent scene's script much, since Olaf's the kind of person who'd care more about chatting up Anna than fighting off a murderous Hans. Upgrading Hans to that level of evil, though, would have cost the film its G-rating.

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* Consider that Hans has been shown to be a MagnificentBastard on a scale rarely seen in Disney canon, who expertly manipulated both the protagonist [[TheFourthWallWillNotProtectYou and the audience]] until TheReveal. It seems out of character, then, for him to immediately engage in BondVillainStupidty and simply assume Anna would be a good girl and die out of sight, as opposed to, say, [[NightmareFuel locking the door, pulling up a chair, and watching to be sure.]] This wouldn't even change the subsequent scene's script much, since Olaf's the kind of person who'd care more about chatting up Anna than fighting off a murderous Hans. much. Upgrading Hans to that level of evil, though, would have cost the film its G-rating.G-rating.
** It actually makes Hans worse - he cares so little for Anna that he just walks out and doesn't think twice about leaving her to die alone in the cold when there's a kingdom to start ruling.
* If you listen to "First Time In Forever" (Reprise) When Anna and Elsa's argument really picks up, you can almost imagine Kristoff and Olaf (whose minute is up) going from admiring the ice castle to hearing them and racing up the stairs searching for them - then Anna gets hit, a second or two later Kristoff bursts in and runs to her, and it's a bit like he's thinking "If only I'd gotten here sooner..."
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