History Fridge / Discworld

11th Nov '17 12:34:44 PM TropeRoper
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* To elaborate on the above theory, much of Discworld is based on the theory of narrative casuality, ie any story, myth, narrative creates a world and the people inside must follow the rules/tropes it abides by. Thus, Discworld saga is a story made out of stories (it has been described as a mirror of worlds).

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* To elaborate on the above theory, much of Discworld is based on the theory of narrative casuality, causality, ie any story, myth, narrative creates a world and the people inside must follow the rules/tropes it abides by. Thus, Discworld saga is a story made out of stories (it has been described as a mirror of worlds).
7th Oct '17 6:58:48 AM Sylviethecochin
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* In Discworld/{{Snuff}}, Fred Colon finds, in his cigar, a pot [[spoiler: called "Soul of Tears," a pot made by a mother goblin when, out of necessity, she must kill and eat her baby. It is later revealed that goblins are being used as a slave workforce to harvest tobacco cheaply and that the pot came from that plantation. The really horrible thing about this is not that the mother, working on a plantation, had so little food that she had to eat her baby. No, the horrible thing is that that pot, probably the mother goblin's most precious possession, somehow ended up in a cigar.]]
29th Jul '17 12:53:20 PM TropeRoper
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* To elaborate on the above theory, much of Discworld is based on the theory of narrative casuality, ie any story, myth, narrative creates a world and the people inside must follow the rules/tropes it abides by. Thus, Discworld saga is a story made out of stories (it has been described as a mirror of worlds).
** The saga also explains the ways stories are told (plays, opera, movies, heraldry, paintings, sacred words, books, newspapers) and show off their power to change history and perception of things. Itís not surprising that people on the Discworld would use this power for both good and evil purposes.
** Not just stories, but words. Terry Pratchett uses a lot of puns in the narrative, which means that the power of words on the Discworld makes things come alive. A bunch of cusswords turned into a swarm of hideous insects, for instance.


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* The Discworld being absolutely stuffed with magic, it would be the equivalent of a lightning storm (sparks and tension, anything could go off at any moment). Thus, such a world would need a protagonist with a strong, stubborn, maybe cynical but grounded personality to keep it under control: this practical character type fits Rincewind (a coward, but smart and reasonable), Granny Weatherwax, Susan Sto-Helit, Vetinari, and the Watch members (Vimes, Carrot, Angua).
27th Jul '17 12:35:53 PM Sharlee
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** Indeed, if he was anything like his colleagues as a man, he'd have been pretty obese ''before'' his transformation. So he changed from a fat man to a fat orangutan. The occasional workout on the rings in the UU gym hasn't been enough to burn off the excess flab, since.
27th Jun '17 5:44:20 PM nombretomado
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*** Rather than delete the above and just have it come back: The two street name entries in TheOtherWiki do not connect the two, and the etymologies for both go back to Old English--i.e., over a millennium. From the few other sites where the two names are connected, this seems to be a case of wishing it were so and/or simple error. See, e.g., [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Featured_article_candidates/Gropecunt_Lane/archive1 a Featured Wikipedia article candidate discussion]]. And anyway, they wouldn't be '''precisely''' the same meaning--gropin' ain't 'zackly pokin'!

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*** Rather than delete the above and just have it come back: The two street name entries in TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki do not connect the two, and the etymologies for both go back to Old English--i.e., over a millennium. From the few other sites where the two names are connected, this seems to be a case of wishing it were so and/or simple error. See, e.g., [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Featured_article_candidates/Gropecunt_Lane/archive1 a Featured Wikipedia article candidate discussion]]. And anyway, they wouldn't be '''precisely''' the same meaning--gropin' ain't 'zackly pokin'!
11th Jun '17 8:04:57 PM nombretomado
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* It took me a while to understand the logic behind a couple of the characters' voices in the Stephen Briggs audiobooks. I had trouble with Vena the Raven-Haired until I realised that he was going for [[XenaWarriorPrincess New Zealand]]. Reacher Gilt was also a puzzler: the point of the character is that he's a pirate, but that's not a West Country accent, and quite right too because that wouldn't fit the character at all. He's speaking quite fast but leaving weird pauses, and slurring a bit almost like he's drunk... ''[[Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean Ohhhhh]]''.

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* It took me a while to understand the logic behind a couple of the characters' voices in the Stephen Briggs audiobooks. I had trouble with Vena the Raven-Haired until I realised that he was going for [[XenaWarriorPrincess [[Series/XenaWarriorPrincess New Zealand]]. Reacher Gilt was also a puzzler: the point of the character is that he's a pirate, but that's not a West Country accent, and quite right too because that wouldn't fit the character at all. He's speaking quite fast but leaving weird pauses, and slurring a bit almost like he's drunk... ''[[Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean Ohhhhh]]''.
5th Apr '17 6:31:54 PM Lullabee
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* The Librarian is often mentioned to weigh 300 lbs, which is actually almost twice the size of your average wild male orangutan. ArtisticLicenseBiology? No, because orangutans are known to get fat in captivity. [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bornean_orangutan#Physical_description The heaviest recorded captive orangutan weighed 450 lbs]], or about as much as the Librarian and an average wild orangutan put together. Since the Librarian's human colleagues tend distinctly toward podginess, it's not surprising he is too.

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* The Librarian is often mentioned to weigh 300 lbs, which is actually almost twice the size of your average wild male orangutan. ArtisticLicenseBiology? No, because orangutans are known to get fat in captivity. [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bornean_orangutan#Physical_description The heaviest recorded captive orangutan weighed 450 lbs]], or about as much as the Librarian and an average wild orangutan put together. Since the Librarian's human colleagues tend distinctly toward podginess, it's not surprising he is too.he's big for an orangutan.
5th Apr '17 6:28:46 PM Lullabee
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* The Librarian is often mentioned to weigh 300 lbs, which is actually almost twice the size of your average wild male orangutan. ArtisticLicenseBiology? No, because orangutans are known to get fat in captivity. [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bornean_orangutan#Physical_description The heaviest recorded captive orangutan weighed 450 lbs]], or about as much as the Librarian and an average wild orangutan put together. Since the Librarian's human colleagues tend distinctly toward podginess, it's not surprising he is too.
30th Mar '17 8:20:09 AM SteelEdge
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* Granny Weatherwax's hatred of the theater is explained as her disliking magic that isn't hers, but there's a bit more to it than that. The actors are very close to elves in a sense. Elves are described as cats that eat mice, but the mice say that the cats have style. The actors who play villains get away with evil (albeit pretend) deeds, but a good actor would be applauded. When Granny rebukes the actors in the plays, she's protesting the idea of applauding any evil deed, no matter how much style is put into it.

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* Granny Weatherwax's hatred of the theater is explained as her disliking magic that isn't hers, but there's a bit more to it than that. The actors are very close to elves in a sense. Elves are described as cats that eat mice, but make it so that the mice say that the cats have style. The actors who play villains get away with evil (albeit pretend) deeds, but a good actor would be applauded. When Granny rebukes the actors in the plays, she's protesting the idea of applauding any evil deed, no matter how much style is put into it.


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* The end of ''Wintersmith'' states that the Wintersmith and Summer Lady are NotSoDifferent. The Wintersmith's eternal winter and the Summer Lady's summer are both equally barren. Roland lampshades the fact that the Summer Lady's OrpheanRescue is an analogy for the coming of spring, and one well known example is the story of Persephone. However, the Greek barren season is summer, when it's too hot to grow anything. Persephone is more like the Wintersmith emerging from the underworld than the Summer Lady.
19th Jan '17 5:49:26 AM LordofUzkulak
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* Something I noticed on a recent rereading of some of the books, each one ends with 'The End'; okay nothing odd about that, but those two words are written in the same all caps font that Death speaks in - the words are not just a standard ending, they're Death speaking the final line of each book, sort of symbolically showing that the book's own 'life' has reached its end. So not only does Death show up for the death of characters within the book, but he also shows up for the book's own 'death'.
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