History Fridge / Discworld

22nd Jun '16 8:09:55 PM loracarol
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* Ankh-Morpork has traits from so many cities because it is TheCity- not an example of that trope, just... that trope. Same with Howandaland, which is so many different [[JungleJapes jungle-based]] {{FantasyCounterpartCulture}}s, or the Ramtops, which are every mountain range from Appalachia to Scotland to the Himalayas, because they're the ideas associated with geography, not simply geography. Discworld is literally made of ideas.

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* Ankh-Morpork has traits from so many cities because it is TheCity- not an example of that trope, just... that trope. Same with Howandaland, which is so many different [[JungleJapes jungle-based]] {{FantasyCounterpartCulture}}s, {{Fantasy Counterpart Culture}}s, or the Ramtops, which are every mountain range from Appalachia to Scotland to the Himalayas, because they're the ideas associated with geography, not simply geography. Discworld is literally made of ideas.
18th Nov '15 9:58:07 AM RookEncounte
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** On a larger level, before Reaper Man Death has taken the time to raise Ysabell, and enough love for her that he was willing to spare Mort. His creation of the field of wheat at the end is showing Death's strength enough to build a ''home'' not merely a residence.
13th Nov '15 5:34:31 PM Sharlee
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* Trolls are said to believe that the past is in front of you, because you can see it. This seems odd to humans, as we think of the future as something we're moving towards, so it should be up ahead. But it also makes perfect sense if you recall that, as per ''The Light Fantastic'', senior trolls are the ones most prone to philosophical musings, and when they get caught up in them they tend to sit down and stay put for ages, slowly reverting to inanimate stone. Of ''course'' they'd think about time's progress in terms of what they see, not where they're going, because they're not going anywhere!
10th Nov '15 12:14:25 AM meitah
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** This also continues with Vimes' theme of having the best vengeance against someone who feels the law doesn't apply to them be lawful justice. The antagonists of Snuff don't think they've done anything outright illegal, which is technically true because they've manipulated the law to be whatever they say it is. They made themselves above the law, which lasted right up until real law enforcement came to visit.
3rd Nov '15 6:13:58 AM MattStriker
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* So why, in the climax of ''Discworld/MenAtArms'', can Carrot thrust his sword clean through first a villain and then a marble pillar without apparent effort? On one hand, narrative...Carrot is an IdealHero, so certain special rules apply here. But there's also the sword itself. In ''Guards, Guards'', we learn that the sword is utterly nonmagical. Less magical than the natural background field of the Disc, in fact. Which, by Discworld rules, means it is more ''real'' than the rest of the Disc. It therefore gets to abuse the same logical loophole as Death (the Ultimate Reality) does to walk through walls: From its point of view, whatever it cuts is barely there at all.

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* So why, in the climax of ''Discworld/MenAtArms'', can Carrot thrust his sword clean through first a villain and then a marble pillar without apparent effort? On one hand, narrative...Carrot is an IdealHero, so certain special rules apply here. But there's also the sword itself. In ''Guards, Guards'', we learn that the sword is utterly nonmagical. Less magical than the natural background field of the Disc, in fact. Which, by Discworld rules, means it is more ''real'' than the rest of the Disc. It therefore gets to abuse the same logical loophole as that Death (the Ultimate Reality) does to walk through walls: From its point of view, whatever it cuts is barely there at all.
3rd Nov '15 6:13:17 AM MattStriker
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* So why, in the climax of ''Discworld/MenAtArms'', can Carrot thrust his sword clean through first a villain and then a marble pillar without apparent effort? On one hand, narrative...Carrot is an IdealHero, so certain special rules apply here. But there's also the sword itself. In ''Guards, Guards'', we learn that the sword is utterly nonmagical. Less magical than the natural background field of the Disc, in fact. Which, by Discworld rules, means it is more ''real'' than the rest of the Disc. It therefore gets to abuse the same logical loophole as Death (the Ultimate Reality) does to walk through walls: From its point of view, whatever it cuts is barely there at all.
3rd Oct '15 2:32:03 PM SteelEdge
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* Granny Weatherwax's hatred of the theater is explained as her disliking magic that isn't hers, but there's a bit more to it than that. The actors are very close to elves in a sense. Elves are described as cats that eat mice, but the mice say that the cats have style. The actors who play villains get away with evil (albeit pretend) deeds, but a good actor would be applauded. When Granny rebukes the actors in the plays, she's protesting the idea of applauding any evil deed, no matter how much style is put into it.
11th Jul '15 5:55:22 AM MattII
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** Lady Margalotta's group has presumably been going since before this, so it's probably only loosely related.
11th Jul '15 5:53:16 AM MattII
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*** Sybil is also probably rich enough to take out contracts on the entire guild council, and there's only one person besides Vimes on the exclusion list.
4th Jun '15 4:29:47 PM SharleeD
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* From "Discworld/Wintersmith" Tiffany recites the last three lines to the "Making of a Man" poem. Strength enough to build a home, time enough to hold a child, and love enough to break a heart. Then remember that these are three qualities that Death presents in "Discworld/ReaperMan". Strength enough to build a home, when he helps Miss Flitworth on her farm. Time enough to hold a child, when he sacrifices some of his own time to save Sal from the fire. Love enough to break a heart, when he takes Miss Flitworth back to the death of her husband out of love, in order to allow them to travel together to the afterlife. In a way, Death has become very human by the end of the book, in spirit if not in substance.

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* From "Discworld/Wintersmith" ''Discworld/{{Wintersmith}}'': Tiffany recites the last three lines to the "Making of a Man" poem. Strength enough to build a home, time enough to hold a child, and love enough to break a heart. Then remember that these are three qualities that Death presents in "Discworld/ReaperMan".''Discworld/ReaperMan''. Strength enough to build a home, when he helps Miss Flitworth on her farm. Time enough to hold a child, when he sacrifices some of his own time to save Sal from the fire. Love enough to break a heart, when he takes Miss Flitworth back to the death of her husband out of love, in order to allow them to travel together to the afterlife. In a way, Death has become very human by the end of the book, in spirit if not in substance.
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