History Fridge / BuffyTheVampireSlayer

4th Sep '16 3:22:06 AM heimdall2061
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* In 'Witch' all the way back in season 1, Giles mentions that removing a witch's head undoes all the spells they've cast. So if someone were to decapitate Willow, Buffy would die

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* In 'Witch' all the way back in season 1, Giles mentions that removing a witch's head undoes all the spells they've cast. So if someone were to decapitate Willow, Buffy would diedie.
* Also in 'Witch,' the spell used by the evil witch ended up leaving her trapped, conscious and unable to move, inside a cheerleading trophy on display in a school hallway. She presumably either died in that figurine, or worse, never died, living at least until the school is destroyed. Horror indeed.
4th Aug '16 4:57:16 PM surgoshan
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\n* A better explanation of Warren's continued presence in Season Eight and the First's mimicry of him in Season Seven: he actually died, but Amy was able to bring him back. She's not as powerful as Willow, but Osiris made it easy because he had a grudge against Willow after she hurt him in "Villains", at the end of season six.

14th Jul '16 12:45:45 AM PaulA
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** It isn't quite the same thing; Jonathan really was smart, witty, strong, famous, and rich while a superstar. The RealityWarper thing at the heart of the spell made him exactly what they were attracted to. On the other hand, there's evidence that what it didn't change in Jonathan, the spell changed in others; Jonathan was still a short guy, so Riley found himself "too tall." The wimpy Buffy we see at the beginning of the episode is something else; it's not clear if this version of Buffy never needed to grow into a real slayer because Jonathan was around, or if the spell befuddled her to make Jonathan look better. It doesn't help that the spell blurs the lines between [[AlternateReality Alternate Reality By Design]] and straight up RealityWarper.

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** It isn't quite the same thing; Jonathan really was smart, witty, strong, famous, and rich while a superstar. The RealityWarper thing at the heart of the spell made him exactly what they were attracted to. On the other hand, there's evidence that what it didn't change in Jonathan, the spell changed in others; Jonathan was still a short guy, so Riley found himself "too tall." The wimpy Buffy we see at the beginning of the episode is something else; it's not clear if this version of Buffy never needed to grow into a real slayer because Jonathan was around, or if the spell befuddled her to make Jonathan look better. It doesn't help that the spell blurs the lines between [[AlternateReality [[AlternateUniverse Alternate Reality By Design]] and straight up RealityWarper.
11th Jun '16 6:26:48 AM ApeAccount
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* The beginning of Season 6 starts with Buffy fighting her way out of her own grave. The catatonic stumbling around makes a lot mroe sense when you recall the episode earlier that delves into the characters' deepest fears. The first on touched upon for Buffy? BEING BURIED ALIVE.

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** Not necessarily, the spell in Dopplegangland was designed to retrieve the amulet from the TIME and place when it was lost. Whether or not the Wishverse still existed, the amulet couldn't be retrieved from the Wishverse in the present since the amulet had already been destroyed. It had to be retrieved from the time before it was destroyed. Instead, they got Vampire Willow before she was killed (which she was at the end of the original episode at the same time the amulet was destroyed). That's also why when she was sent back, she wasn't sent back to the Wishverse after the amulet's destruction, she was sent back to the time she left which was seconds before the amulet was destroyed. In other words, there were no scenes in Dopplegangland which showed the Wishverse as still existing after the destruction of the amulet and so nothing that would contradict the idea that the universe did cease to exist.
* The beginning of Season 6 starts with Buffy fighting her way out of her own grave. The catatonic stumbling around makes a lot mroe more sense when you recall the episode earlier that delves into the characters' deepest fears. The first on touched upon for Buffy? BEING BURIED ALIVE.
1st Jun '16 6:43:16 PM Archangel12
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* In 'Witch' all the way back in season 1, Giles mentions that removing a witch's head undoes all the spells they've cast. So if someone were to decapitate Willow, Buffy would die
1st Jun '16 12:53:08 PM Archangel12
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* Think about the first episode of Season 6. Giles leaves for England, and then that night the Scoobies are attacked by the Hellions, who are obviously planning on raping Willow, Tara and Anya (and would have if Buffy had not intervened). Now for them, that is straight up nightmare fuel, but imagine Giles hearing about the rape and possible death of his friends that he might have been able to avert, while he himself is in England by choice.
23rd May '16 5:37:13 AM windleopard
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*In Consequences, Giles mentions that Faith's killing of the Deputy Mayor is not the first time civilians were collateral damage in a Slayer's battle. Let that sink in
27th Jan '16 7:42:03 PM bwburke94
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** Debatable on just how risky it is to the vampire. There's no risk to the vampire if he's smart enough to just stand far enough away from the burning building. The vampire in question is not '''inside''' the blazing inferno; if he was, there would have been no reason to set it on fire to begin with. The point about immolating the victims also specifically only matters if the vampire is trying to ''feed''. If he's just trying to get them to leave the house or kill them, that's another story entirely. Doyle actually brings up this very possibility when Cordelia assumes that being inside his apartment means they're safe from Spike.

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** Debatable on just how risky it is to the vampire. There's no risk to the vampire if he's smart enough to just stand far enough away from the burning building. The vampire in question is not '''inside''' the blazing inferno; if he was, there would have been no reason to set it on fire to begin with. The point about immolating the victims also specifically only matters if the vampire is trying to ''feed''. If he's just trying to get them to leave the house or kill them, that's another story entirely. Doyle actually brings up this very possibility when Cordelia assumes that being inside his apartment means they're safe from Spike. [[note]]Doyle's half-demon anyway, but Spike would assume he needed an invite.[[/note]]
28th Oct '15 9:34:16 PM LauraColette
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*In "Blood Ties", Dawn refuses to go to school. On the surface, this seems like typical teenage whining about her finding out she's the key, but in "The Real Me", Dawn said that "(Willow's) the only person who likes school as much as me." Dawn loves school. So when she was refusing to go to school, she was actually avoiding doing something she liked because she was so depressed!
22nd Oct '15 5:44:17 PM LongLiveHumour
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* Why is the student body so blasé about the weird and often humiliating things that happen to other students? Forget the deaths and disappearances; in any normal school, eating the school pig raw would make you an instant pariah. One explanation is that Sunnydale's WeirdnessCensor also extends to social embarrassment; but unlike vampires and demons, "Xander showed up to class naked" is actually plausible. Why then would anyone forget? Because weirdness is so common that the next victim, the next person to run screaming through the halls pursued by invisible goblins, ''might be you''.
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