History Fridge / BoardwalkEmpire

3rd Dec '16 5:12:59 PM dmcreif
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* Many people misinterpret the scene where Nucky kills the thief Roland Smith. What they tend not to realize is that Nucky killed Roland because Roland was bullshitting him. Nucky saw he had potential, but also knew he was being lied to. Nucky was testing Roland the whole time. When it was revealed Roland lied about not smoking and lied about his age, Nucky knew he was lying about the services he'd offer Nucky as his worker. He knew that Roland would betray him at the first opportunity, and Nucky wasn't ready to deal with another Jimmy-type. Likewise, Nucky knew Owen was hiding something (sleeping with Margaret), but he didn't know exactly what it was at the time. He'd asked Owen in the basement why he was sticking around, and neither of the answers that Owen gave to Nucky satisfied him. So killing Roland was as much about preemptively eliminating a potential liability as it was to send Owen a message: "don't lie to me, or next time, it will be you with a bullet in your head."
5th Nov '16 12:10:31 PM dmcreif
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* When [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCAI3iAuxDY Masseria confronts Gyp]] in "Margate Sands", he's unimpressed by Rosetti's actions. At the end of the conversation, Masseria adjusts the clock, then says to Gyp, "''Now'' you know what time it is." Adjusting the clock allows Masseria to convey a few things:
**First, it's his way of telling Gyp that he doesn't have a clue what he's doing.
**Second, he's conveying that Gyp is on borrowed time now, and it won't be long before Masseria pulls his men and abandons Gyp, which is what happens later in the episode when Masseria makes the deal with Rothstein.
**Third, by adjusting the clock, Masseria is reminding Gyp just who ''really'' is in charge. Gyp's crew may have taken over Atlantic City, but even then, he's still one of Masseria's capos and not his own, independent entity like Nucky was.
4th Nov '16 3:03:18 PM dmcreif
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** The assassins who kill O'Banion are John Scalise and Albert Anselmi. Just five years later, on May 8, 1929, these two men were found beaten and shot to death on a lonely road near Hammond, Indiana. Hitmen like them had a very short lifespan.

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** The assassins who kill O'Banion are **A side one for Mafia history buffs: All three of O'Banion's killers were killed within six years of the hit. Frankie Yale was killed in a drive-by shooting in New York City on July 1, 1928, while the two guys depicted as actually doing the shooting, John Scalise and Albert Anselmi. Just five years later, on May 8, 1929, these two men Anselmi, were found beaten and shot to death on a lonely road near Hammond, Indiana.Indiana on May 8, 1929. Hitmen like them had a very short lifespan.
2nd Nov '16 10:08:31 AM dmcreif
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* Richard is from [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Party_1924_(United_States)#Wisconsin_Progressives Wisconsin]], a state with a long history of local liberalism. It shouldn't be a surprise then that he knows the difference between a socialist and a communist, even though he himself has not much interest in politics.
* Gyp is in a lot of ways an EvilCounterpart of Chalky (this is noted explicitly in "Two Impostors" wherein Gyp tries to pull NotSoDifferent on Chalky to gain his loyalty). Both come from "poor but honest" backgrounds and have little to nil formal education, and don't like it when people look down on them for these features. They're also both feared and respected by the men they work with, but dominated ([[BondageIsBad literally, in Gyp's case...]]) by strong women at home. However, whereas Chalky ultimately respects education and is only involved in crime to provide a good life/social mobility for his family, Gyp loves being a gangster, and plays out his resentment by sadistically toying with other people.

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* Richard Harrow is from [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Party_1924_(United_States)#Wisconsin_Progressives Wisconsin]], a state with a long history of local liberalism. It shouldn't be a surprise then that he knows the difference between a socialist and a communist, even though he himself has not much interest in politics.
* Gyp Rosetti is in a lot of ways an EvilCounterpart of Chalky (this is noted explicitly in "Two Impostors" wherein Gyp tries to pull NotSoDifferent on Chalky to gain his loyalty). Both come from "poor but honest" backgrounds and have little to nil formal education, and don't like it when people look down on them for these features. They're also both feared and respected by the men they work with, but dominated ([[BondageIsBad literally, in Gyp's case...]]) by strong women at home. However, whereas Chalky ultimately respects education and is only involved in crime to provide a good life/social mobility for his family, Gyp loves being a gangster, and plays out his resentment by sadistically toying with other people.
30th Oct '16 10:53:59 AM dmcreif
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* Richard comparing himself to the Tin Woodsman works more than one level. Like the Tin Woodsman, he has a prosthetic. But furthermore, the Woodsman claimed that now that he has no heart, he doesn't feel emotions. Richard similarly claims to be emotionless after his injury; he says he felt nothing towards his sister anymore, and that people cannot be really connected to each other. But the Woodsman wasn't really without emotion; he was actually the kindest character in the book. Richard too finds his humanity again during the series.

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* Richard comparing Harrow compares himself to the Tin Woodsman works more than one level. Like the Tin Woodsman, he has a prosthetic. But furthermore, the Woodsman claimed that now that he has no heart, he doesn't feel emotions. Richard similarly claims to be emotionless after his injury; he says he felt nothing towards his sister anymore, and that people cannot be really connected to each other. But the Woodsman wasn't really without emotion; he was actually the kindest character in the book. Richard too finds his humanity again during the series.




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*The assassins sent to kill Salvatore Maranzano do so by stabbing him repeatedly. Once he falls to the floor, Eli finishes him off by shooting him in the head. It's actually quite fitting that they stabbed him as opposed to just shoot him: Marazano was always preaching about running his organization using old-style Roman methods. And during one his conversations with Nucky, there was mention of Julius Caesar's assassination. It is thus a deliberate irony that an admirer of Caesar went out in an identical fashion - betrayed and stabbed to death by his own partners.



* Two things from Dean O'Banion's murder are noticeable in hindsight and they're somewhat disturbing:
** When Frankie Yale walks in, he says, "What do you got that says 'you're sorry, and won't ever do it again'?" Yale is talking about murdering O'Banion here. To O'Banion himself. And it means two things: for one, Yale is a ProfessionalKiller who has no personal beef with O'Banion, and won't ever do it again because he can't murder the same person twice. Two, in real life, O'Banion was killed after overstepping his bounds, pissing off the wrong people and alienating too many of his friends/allies. So Yale's basically mocking O'Banion's own situation and saying that no apologies are going to get O'Banion out of it, all without O'Banion realizing it.
** Chrysanthemums would mean [[ValuesDissonance something completely different]] to O'Banion and Yale. To Illinois native O'Banion, chrysanthemums are cheerful flowers, so he offers them for Yale's wife. To someone born in southern Europe[[note]]Longobucco, Italy to be specific, in Yale's case[[/note]], like Yale, chrysanthemums mean ''death''. Fittingly, Yale deposits a chrysanthemum [[DueToTheDead over O'Banion's body]] after killing him.

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* Two A few things from happen during Dean O'Banion's murder that are not noticeable in hindsight and they're somewhat disturbing:
right away:
** When Frankie Yale walks in, he says, "What do you got that says 'you're sorry, and won't ever do it again'?" Yale is talking about murdering O'Banion here. To O'Banion himself. And it means two things: for things:
***For
one, Yale is a ProfessionalKiller who has no personal beef with O'Banion, and won't ever do it again because he can't murder the same person twice. Two, twice.
***Two,
in real life, O'Banion was killed after overstepping his bounds, for basically pissing off the wrong people and alienating too many of his friends/allies. friends and allies, ranging from stealing liquor from other bootleggers, to hijacking their trucks while en route, trying to frame Torrio and Capone for a murder, or simply "trolling" the Outfit-affiliated Genna brothers [[ForTheEvulz for no apparent practical reason]]. And the final straw was when, a week before his murder, O'Banion conned Angelo Genna out of a large sum of money. So Yale's Yale is basically mocking O'Banion's own situation and saying that no apologies are going to get O'Banion out of it, won't save O'Banion's life this time, all without O'Banion realizing it.
** Chrysanthemums would mean [[ValuesDissonance something completely different]] to O'Banion and Yale. To Illinois native O'Banion, chrysanthemums are cheerful flowers, so he offers them for Yale's wife. To someone born in southern Europe[[note]]Longobucco, Italy to be specific, in Yale's case[[/note]], like Yale, chrysanthemums mean ''death''. Fittingly, And that's why Yale deposits a chrysanthemum [[DueToTheDead over O'Banion's body]] after killing him.him.
**The assassins who kill O'Banion are John Scalise and Albert Anselmi. Just five years later, on May 8, 1929, these two men were found beaten and shot to death on a lonely road near Hammond, Indiana. Hitmen like them had a very short lifespan.



* For Mafia history buffs, the fictionalized versions of real gangsters can invoke this, when one recalls specific crimes some of them were known for.
** The comical scene where Bugsy Siegel sings "My Girl's Pussy" in "Friendless Child" takes a very dark tone when you realize that by this point (1930), Bugsy Siegel has committed at least one rape (as of 1926).

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* For Mafia history buffs, the fictionalized versions of real gangsters can invoke this, when one recalls specific crimes some of them were known for. \n** The For example, the comical scene where Bugsy Siegel sings "My Girl's Pussy" in "Friendless Child" takes a very dark tone when you realize that by this point (1930), Bugsy Siegel has committed at least one rape (as of 1926).
16th Sep '16 10:22:23 AM dmcreif
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* "What do you have for something you are sorry, and won't do it again?" - Frankie Yale is talking about murdering O'Banion here. To O'Banion himself. It's true: Yale is a ProfessionalKiller who has no personal beef with O'Banion, and won't do it again because he can't murder the same person twice. Also, in real life O'Banion was killed after overstepping his bounds, pissing off the wrong people and alienating too many of his friends/allies. So Yale's bit of teasing has a double meaning, and he's basically mocking O'Banion's own situation and saying how no apologies are going to get O'Banion out of it, all without O'Banion realizing it.
* Chrysanthemums would mean [[ValuesDissonance something completely different]] to O'Banion and Yale. To American-born O'Banion, chrysanthemums are cheerful flowers, so he offers them for Yale's wife. To someone born in southern Europe, like Yale, chrysanthemums mean ''death''. Fittingly, Yale deposits a chrysanthemum [[DueToTheDead over Dean's body]] after killing him.

to:

* Two things from Dean O'Banion's murder are noticeable in hindsight and they're somewhat disturbing:
**When Frankie Yale walks in, he says,
"What do you have for something you are got that says 'you're sorry, and won't ever do it again?" - Frankie again'?" Yale is talking about murdering O'Banion here. To O'Banion himself. It's true: And it means two things: for one, Yale is a ProfessionalKiller who has no personal beef with O'Banion, and won't ever do it again because he can't murder the same person twice. Also, Two, in real life life, O'Banion was killed after overstepping his bounds, pissing off the wrong people and alienating too many of his friends/allies. So Yale's bit of teasing has a double meaning, and he's basically mocking O'Banion's own situation and saying how that no apologies are going to get O'Banion out of it, all without O'Banion realizing it.
* Chrysanthemums **Chrysanthemums would mean [[ValuesDissonance something completely different]] to O'Banion and Yale. To American-born Illinois native O'Banion, chrysanthemums are cheerful flowers, so he offers them for Yale's wife. To someone born in southern Europe, Europe[[note]]Longobucco, Italy to be specific, in Yale's case[[/note]], like Yale, chrysanthemums mean ''death''. Fittingly, Yale deposits a chrysanthemum [[DueToTheDead over Dean's O'Banion's body]] after killing him.



** The comical scene where Benny Siegel sings "My Girl's Pussy" in "Friendless Child" takes a very dark tone when you realize that by this point (1930), Bugsy Siegel has committed at least one rape (as of 1926).

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** The comical scene where Benny Bugsy Siegel sings "My Girl's Pussy" in "Friendless Child" takes a very dark tone when you realize that by this point (1930), Bugsy Siegel has committed at least one rape (as of 1926).
13th Apr '16 12:08:55 PM SallyShears
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** The comical scene where Benny Siegel sings "My Girl's Pussy" in "Friendless Child" takes a very dark tone when you realize that by this point (1930), Bugsy Siegel has committed at least one rape (as of 1926).
4th Aug '15 8:03:20 PM SallyShears
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* Frustrating as it is to see our favorite characters killed off, it makes sense; only the historical characters can survive long enough to make a name for themselves. This series is essentially about the gangsters who didn't make it, who vanished from history's memory.


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* For Mafia history buffs, the fictionalized versions of real gangsters can invoke this, when one recalls specific crimes some of them were known for.
6th Jun '15 4:03:07 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Nucky, polite with the one-time help and a good tipper, gets more and more jerkish to Harlan the Ritz shoe-shiner after he begins working directly for him. This shows that Nucky has a problem dealing with people on a regular basis, and that after a while he begins to take them for granted and stops being polite altogether - thus his problems with Eli, Jimmy and even Margaret.
* Nucky is a very permissive parental figure, as evidenced by his reaction to Teddy's pyromania. He gives him a little talking-to, then rewards him and sends him on his way. Since Nucky was the closest thing to a father that Jimmy had, it's no wonder why Jimmy became so undisciplined and violent.
** More FridgeBrilliance: Nucky's permissive approach to parenting is clearly stemmed from his own childhood experience with his physically abusive father. It would make sense that as a victim of child abuse in the name of discipline, Nucky took the simple route and avoided disciplining altogether.
*** Plus, the loss of his son most likely left him with a very sentimental view of children, not really seeing them as people but as precious commodities to be cherished and preserved.
** Jimmy's destructive behavior clearly has it's beginnings during college and his unhealthy relationship with his mother. Add to that the toll fighting in the war took on Jimmy's psyche. Moreover, Nucky's relationship with Margaret's children doesn't give us any clue to what his parenting skills were with Jimmy. Nucky is clearly not interested in Margaret's children. The same can't be said for Jimmy, as it was apparent he was being raised as Nucky's protege.
*** Nucky is very much interested in Margaret's children, even calling himself the only father they'll ever have. The problem is that he's almost clueless in how to show affection and prefers the easy route of being an AbsenteeFather and handing cash or buying them things, like he does with everyone else. But the interest, and the need to spend time with them is still there. It is ''Margaret'' who forbids him from interacting with the children from Season 3 and leaves for good with them in Season 4, not Nucky who decides to cut contact with them. Nucky taking Jimmy shooting when he was Tommy's age is no different from him taking Teddy to his old home or to watch Chaplin at the movies. Finally, while Nucky had been "watching over" Jimmy since he was born, he only began working for him and thus became his protegé when he was 12 (Pilot). Teddy was 8 when they left for Brooklyn and had no chance to do that. And yet, Teddy is ''already'' an entitled, disobedient and violent kid (shrugging off chores saying that "the maid will do it", spying on his mother when he had been told to go to sleep, his pyromania), and this is obviously a result of Nucky's influence, who gives everything he wants even when he misbehaves and burned down Ethan's house in his presence. While Jimmy obviously had other issues, the reality is that Nucky's influence didn't correct them. On the other hand, they could only make him worse. Just like Teddy.

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* Nucky, polite with the one-time help and a good tipper, Nucky gets more and more jerkish rude to Harlan the Ritz shoe-shiner after he begins working directly for him. This shows that behavior highlights how Nucky has is NiceToTheWaiter but a problem dealing with BadBoss. He's friendly to people on a regular basis, and that after a while he begins who mean nothing to take them for granted and stops being polite altogether - thus him, but treats those under his problems with Eli, Jimmy and even Margaret.
power like tools.
* Nucky is a very permissive parental figure, as evidenced by his reaction to Teddy's pyromania. He gives him a little talking-to, then rewards him and sends him on his way. Since Nucky was the closest thing to a We later see how abusive his father that Jimmy had, it's no wonder why Jimmy became so undisciplined and violent.
** More FridgeBrilliance: Nucky's permissive approach to parenting is clearly stemmed from
was, making his own childhood experience with his physically abusive father. It would make sense that as a victim of child abuse in the name of discipline, Nucky took the simple route and avoided disciplining altogether.
*** Plus, the loss of his son most likely left him with a very sentimental view of children, not really seeing them as people but as precious commodities to be cherished and preserved.
** Jimmy's destructive
behavior clearly has it's beginnings during college and his unhealthy relationship with his mother. Add to that the toll fighting in the war took on Jimmy's psyche. Moreover, Nucky's relationship with Margaret's children doesn't give us any clue to what his parenting skills were with Jimmy. Nucky is clearly not interested in Margaret's children. The same can't be said for Jimmy, as it was apparent he was being raised as Nucky's protege.
*** Nucky is very much interested in Margaret's children, even calling himself the only father they'll ever have. The problem is that he's almost clueless in how to show affection and prefers the
easy route of being an AbsenteeFather and handing cash or buying them things, like he does with everyone else. But the interest, and the need to spend time with them is still there. It is ''Margaret'' who forbids him from interacting with the children from Season 3 and leaves for good with them in Season 4, not Nucky who decides to cut contact with them. Nucky taking Jimmy shooting when he was Tommy's age is no different from him taking Teddy to his old home or to watch Chaplin at the movies. Finally, while Nucky had been "watching over" Jimmy since he was born, he only began working for him and thus became his protegé when he was 12 (Pilot). Teddy was 8 when they left for Brooklyn and had no chance to do that. And yet, Teddy is ''already'' an entitled, disobedient and violent kid (shrugging off chores saying that "the maid will do it", spying on his mother when he had been told to go to sleep, his pyromania), and this is obviously a result of Nucky's influence, who gives everything he wants even when he misbehaves and burned down Ethan's house in his presence. While Jimmy obviously had other issues, the reality is that Nucky's influence didn't correct them. On the other hand, they could only make him worse. Just like Teddy.understand.



* The way Angela's last appearance mirrors her last painting (courtesy of Website/{{tumblr}}).

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* The way Angela's last appearance mirrors her last painting (courtesy of Website/{{tumblr}}).painting.



* Watch Regina during the assault to Nucky's suit in "Two Imposters". She's over the bed, barking at someone behind it and waving her tail happily. That someone is Eddie and the barking attracts Rosetti's men. But don't worry! Behind the door is hiding Nucky Thompson and he is capable of shooting the two first gunmen thanks to that. But the situation was so tense, however, that this could not have been planned. Eddie would have preferred to not have to deal with the dog at all. [[EvilDetectingDog If she's with Eddie, it's because she wants nothing to do with Nucky Thompson.]]
* There's a good reason our favorite characters keep getting killed off. So far, this show has been about the rise of organized crime in the 1920s. Naturally, part of that story must include which gangsters succeeded and made it big…and which ones were killed/arrested early on, and became nothing. The characters who are historical figures—Al Capone, Arnold Rothstein, Meyer Lansky, Lucky Luciano, etc.—will of course make history. For the show’s original characters on the other hand, FailureIsTheOnlyOption.
** What makes this so brilliant? The fact that the historical gangsters are blended into the cast, getting only as much development and [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome Crowning Moments]] as the original characters. After all, at this point in time, no one knows that which gangsters will become icons, and who will die young and be forgotten. Right now, Al Capone is just another gangster.
** The greatest irony is that Jimmy Darmody, Richard Harrow, Eddie Kessler and others have the potential to become great criminals, but fail through bad luck or bad choices. “Boardwalk Empire” isn’t just another drama where characters get killed off just for the sake of it. It’s about the rise of the Mafia, and how the great gangsters got big while other, just as good ones, failed and vanished from America’s memory.



* Margaret has to be wondering if seeing Owen come back in a box was Nucky's way of telling her he knew what was ''really'' going on between them.
* "What do you have for something you are sorry, and won't do it again?" - Frankie Yale is talking about murdering O'Banion here. To O'Banion himself. It's true: Yale is a ProfessionalKiller who has no personal beef with O'Banion, and won't do it again because he can't murder the same person twice.
** Also, in real life O'Banion was killed after overstepping his bounds, pissing off the wrong people and alienating too many of his friends/allies. So Yale's bit of teasing has a double meaning, and he's basically mocking O'Banion's own situation and saying how no apologies are going to get O'Banion out of it, all without O'Banion realizing it.
* Chrysanthemums would mean [[ValuesDissonance something completely different]] to O'Banion and Yale. To American-born O'Banion, chrysanthemums are cheerful flowers, so he offers them for Yale's wife. To someone born in southern Europe like Yale, chrysanthemums mean '''death'''. Fittingly, Yale deposits a chrysanthemum [[DueToTheDead over Dean's body]] after killing him.

to:

* Margaret has to be wondering if seeing Owen come back in a box was Nucky's way of telling her he knew what was ''really'' going on between them.
* "What do you have for something you are sorry, and won't do it again?" - Frankie Yale is talking about murdering O'Banion here. To O'Banion himself. It's true: Yale is a ProfessionalKiller who has no personal beef with O'Banion, and won't do it again because he can't murder the same person twice.
**
twice. Also, in real life O'Banion was killed after overstepping his bounds, pissing off the wrong people and alienating too many of his friends/allies. So Yale's bit of teasing has a double meaning, and he's basically mocking O'Banion's own situation and saying how no apologies are going to get O'Banion out of it, all without O'Banion realizing it.
* Chrysanthemums would mean [[ValuesDissonance something completely different]] to O'Banion and Yale. To American-born O'Banion, chrysanthemums are cheerful flowers, so he offers them for Yale's wife. To someone born in southern Europe Europe, like Yale, chrysanthemums mean '''death'''.''death''. Fittingly, Yale deposits a chrysanthemum [[DueToTheDead over Dean's body]] after killing him.



* For mafia buffs, the historically-based gangster characters can invoke this. Getting to know and love the show's fictional versions of Al Capone, Benny Siegel, and so on can stir up some confusing feelings when one considered the specific crimes said people are known to have committed (like killing civilians, or [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil rape]]).
** With the fictional characters like Richard, Nucky, and Chalky, we can accept it with relief when they say they'd never beat a woman, or don't want to kill civilians. On the other hand, Lucky, Benny, and Al etc. make no such claims, and people who know their history know why.
** And from what we know of Nucky and Chalky, there is very good reason to be suspicious.
6th Jun '15 3:50:09 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Annabelle's 5-or-so years old daughter, Ruby. What to make of her? Annabelle was Nucky's mistress until 3 years before her introduction so either...
** FridgeHorror: She is Nucky's daughter, but he doesn't recognize her because he only wants to have a ''son''. Or...
** FridgeBrilliance: Annabelle had her daughter before dating Nucky, and he was precisely attracted to her because of his established obsession with "saving" unfortunate women.
This list shows the last 10 events of 55. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.BoardwalkEmpire