History Fridge / AvatarTheLastAirbender

14th Feb '18 3:13:30 PM ANewEnigma
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** An even more horrifying thought: What if Kuzon had ended up being slowly indoctrinated by his nation until he not only came to believe it as necessary, but outright embraced it in the belief that what the Fire Nation was doing was a GOOD thing? And what if he happened to know one of Aang's other friends like Bumi, who could have ended up bearing witness to Kuzon being turned into a xenophobic patriot of a murderous empire, maybe even being forced to fight him? What if that friend had to live with the knowledge that one of Aang's own friends has turned to the dark side, likely to never be redeemed due to probably dying out before the end of the war?
8th Feb '18 7:26:31 AM silentdrew
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*** That's not really Frdige Logic, the episode makes that part really obvious.


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** Just like how she dealt with Chin the Conquerer, she waited until just the right moment to strike. Bumi would be proud.


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** Of course Kyoshi did nothing to stop him, that is the way of the Master Earthbender. In this case, she had to wait until he had unified the Earth Kingdom (minus Ba Sing Se) under his banner in order to bring peace. Killing him sooner would have just fractured the Earth Kingdom even more.
4th Feb '18 1:16:20 AM WingedNightbringer
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** If you look at Zuko's movements carefully, you can see him using some of the steps of the Dancing Dragon.
4th Feb '18 1:08:46 AM WingedNightbringer
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**If you look at Zuko's movements carefully, you can see him using some of the steps of the Dancing Dragon.
2nd Feb '18 3:54:33 AM BrightLight
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* Bare feet can be symbolic of childhood innocence. This episode pretty much concluded Sokka's coming-of-age arc from foolish young boy to stalwart young man. Notice how Aang, Toph and Katara spend the day barefoot - and lazing around like children would (they ''still are'' children), without a caretaker watching over them - while Sokka is undergoing his apprenticeship? When Sokka returns, dressed in formal robes and boots, the other three kids are still barefoot as they greet him cheerfully. Symbolically, they are still children - underaged and reliant on the caretaker and the only adult in their group - Sokka.

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* Bare feet can be symbolic of childhood innocence. This episode pretty much concluded Sokka's coming-of-age arc from foolish young boy to stalwart young man. Notice how Aang, Toph and Katara spend the day barefoot - and lazing around like children would (they ''still are'' children), without a caretaker watching over them - while Sokka is undergoing his apprenticeship? When Sokka returns, dressed in formal robes and boots, the other three kids are still barefoot as they greet him cheerfully. Symbolically, they They are still children - underaged and reliant on the caretaker and the only adult in their group - Sokka.
2nd Feb '18 3:52:36 AM BrightLight
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* Bare feet can be symbolic of childhood innocence. This episode pretty much concluded Sokka's coming-of-age arc from foolish young boy to stalwart young man. Notice how Aang, Toph and Katara spend the day barefoot - and lazing around like children would (they ''still are'' children), without a caretaker watching over them - while Sokka is undergoing his apprenticeship? When Sokka returns, dressed in formal robes and boots, the other three kids are still barefoot as they greet him cheerfully - symbolically, they are still children, under-aged and reliant on the caretaker and the only adult in their group - Sokka.

to:

* Bare feet can be symbolic of childhood innocence. This episode pretty much concluded Sokka's coming-of-age arc from foolish young boy to stalwart young man. Notice how Aang, Toph and Katara spend the day barefoot - and lazing around like children would (they ''still are'' children), without a caretaker watching over them - while Sokka is undergoing his apprenticeship? When Sokka returns, dressed in formal robes and boots, the other three kids are still barefoot as they greet him cheerfully - symbolically, cheerfully. Symbolically, they are still children, under-aged children - underaged and reliant on the caretaker and the only adult in their group - Sokka.
2nd Feb '18 3:49:36 AM BrightLight
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* Bare feet can be symbolic of childhood innocence. This episode pretty much concluded Sokka's coming-of-age arc from foolish young boy to stalwart young man. Notice how Aang, Toph and Katara spend the day barefoot - and lazing around like children would, without a caretaker watching over them - while Sokka is undergoing his apprenticeship? When Sokka returns, dressed in formal robes and boots, the other three kids are still barefoot as they greet him cheerfully - symbolically, they are still children, under-aged and reliant on the caretaker and the only adult in their group - Sokka.

to:

* Bare feet can be symbolic of childhood innocence. This episode pretty much concluded Sokka's coming-of-age arc from foolish young boy to stalwart young man. Notice how Aang, Toph and Katara spend the day barefoot - and lazing around like children would, would (they ''still are'' children), without a caretaker watching over them - while Sokka is undergoing his apprenticeship? When Sokka returns, dressed in formal robes and boots, the other three kids are still barefoot as they greet him cheerfully - symbolically, they are still children, under-aged and reliant on the caretaker and the only adult in their group - Sokka.
2nd Feb '18 3:48:00 AM BrightLight
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to:

* Bare feet can be symbolic of childhood innocence. This episode pretty much concluded Sokka's coming-of-age arc from foolish young boy to stalwart young man. Notice how Aang, Toph and Katara spend the day barefoot - and lazing around like children would, without a caretaker watching over them - while Sokka is undergoing his apprenticeship? When Sokka returns, dressed in formal robes and boots, the other three kids are still barefoot as they greet him cheerfully - symbolically, they are still children, under-aged and reliant on the caretaker and the only adult in their group - Sokka.


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* Katara acting "confused" when Aang confronts her on whether or not she loves him? More like fear about getting close to Aang and losing him all over again. The last time she was open about her love for him before a big battle, he [[DiedInYourArmsTonight died in her arms]] (''The Day of Black Sun'' notwithstanding, because Aang was the more open one about their romance there, while Katara was trying to keep him and herself focused on the task at hand). If either Aang or her dies in the fight against Ozai, Katara doesn't want a) to be emotionally destroyed by Aang's very possible death, or b) if she dies, then she doesn't want Aang to be emotionally destroyed by her death.
2nd Feb '18 3:30:57 AM BrightLight
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** The cultures in Avatar are a mix of religions. Now let's take a look at Catholicism - most evident in the way that Aang is a MessianicArchetype. At first, gaining complete control of the Avatar State may seem cheap that Aang was basically jabbed by a rock, but if that rock impaled a vital organ something else that was important to the body, Aang would have been killed. Ozai could've killed Aang, but no matter what, Aang still stuck with his pacifistic, idealistic beliefs - the kind of thinking that allowed Jesus to triumph over the powers of Hell.
*** And then there's the complaint that Aang unlocked the Avatar State without letting go of Katara... except that he was able to prove that he could let go of her back in "The Crossroads of Destiny", only that Azula shot him down before he could act any further. Aang's lightning scar on his back was probably ''literally'' just a physical block that [[NiceJobFixingItVillain Ozai fixed]].
**** And going back to Catholicism one last time, if one still feels that Aang didn't and couldn't let go of Katara during Season 3, remember that in Catholicism, choosing what's right over what your friends and family want for you is ''letting go'' of earthly attachments for the greater good. Now, remember how Katara agreed with all of Aang's allies and friends that he should kill the Fire Lord? Aang refusing to take Ozai's life was just putting the hammer down over the fact that, yes, if ever need be, Aang ''can'' let go of Katara to do what is right.
1st Feb '18 7:25:45 PM silentdrew
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[[AC:The Headband]]
* Sokka and Katara manage to convince a Fire Nation school's headmaster that they have a twelve year old son, and that Katara is pregnant. Seriously how common is teen pregnancy in the Fire Nation?
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.AvatarTheLastAirbender