History Franchise / StarTrekNovelVerse

27th Jul '16 2:02:33 PM Morgenthaler
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* DangerouslyGenreSavvy: One of the most triumphant examples is Weyoun, in ''Literature/StarTrekMillennium''.
23rd Jul '16 7:38:43 PM StarSword
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* ''Literature/{{Rihannsu}}'': Five books begun before the TNG era. Though heavily {{jossed}} by ENT and ''Film/StarTrekNemesis'', some of the worldbuilding and language was borrowed for later books, including the ''Romulan War'' sub-series of the ENT Relaunch.
18th Jul '16 8:00:45 AM longWriter
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* VestigialEmpire: Back and forth with the Romulans, post ''Film/StarTrekNemesis''. In the immediate aftermath, the Romulan Star Empire [[BalkaniseMe fragmented into factions]]. Praetor Tal'aura and Proconsul Tomalak ''were'' able to reunite most of them, as the Federation sought to maintain peace along the borders (the Klingons [[StopHelpingMe "helped"]] by making Remus a protectorate). Commander Donatra, however, declared the worlds and fleets loyal to her independent. Between losing territory to Donatra, uprisings on the outworlds, and the damage from the [[Literature/StarTrekDestiny Borg Invasion]], the Empire was less than half its former size. It was explicitly stated in ''Literature/StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation'' that the Romulans were no longer a superpower. However, they bounced back thanks to [[VillainTeamUp membership in]] [[Literature/StarTrekTyphonPact the Typhon Pact]]. That said, the empire will presumably collapse again when Romulus is destroyed (though we're still a few years short of that in the current timeframe...)

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* VestigialEmpire: Back and forth with the Romulans, post ''Film/StarTrekNemesis''. In the immediate aftermath, the Romulan Star Empire [[BalkaniseMe fragmented into factions]]. Praetor Tal'aura and Proconsul Tomalak ''were'' able to reunite most of them, as the Federation sought to maintain peace along the borders (the Klingons [[StopHelpingMe [[UnwantedAssistance "helped"]] by making Remus a protectorate). Commander Donatra, however, declared the worlds and fleets loyal to her independent. Between losing territory to Donatra, uprisings on the outworlds, and the damage from the [[Literature/StarTrekDestiny Borg Invasion]], the Empire was less than half its former size. It was explicitly stated in ''Literature/StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation'' that the Romulans were no longer a superpower. However, they bounced back thanks to [[VillainTeamUp membership in]] [[Literature/StarTrekTyphonPact the Typhon Pact]]. That said, the empire will presumably collapse again when Romulus is destroyed (though we're still a few years short of that in the current timeframe...)
8th Mar '16 6:27:22 AM Synch
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* ''Literature/StarTrekDepartmentOfTemporalInvestigations'' (DTI): Two books, plus a novella.

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* ''Literature/StarTrekDepartmentOfTemporalInvestigations'' (DTI): Two books, plus a novella.books followed by two novellas.
17th Jan '16 8:06:10 PM nombretomado
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* BigCreepyCrawlies: Several insectoid species, which tend to be intelligent, civilized beings as opposed to monsters or simple animals. Most are highly conservative cultures, and range from the peaceful Nasat, who resemble giant pillbugs and are known for their desire to avoid conflict (see ''StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers'' in particular), through the Orishans, to the hostile Cheka, who resemble spiders. Voloczin from ''[=TNG=]: Indistinguishable from Magic'' is described by La Forge as being like a mixture of spider and octopus, his initial reaction is atavistic but he swallows it the moment he realises that Scotty and Voloczin are trading typical engineer banter.

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* BigCreepyCrawlies: Several insectoid species, which tend to be intelligent, civilized beings as opposed to monsters or simple animals. Most are highly conservative cultures, and range from the peaceful Nasat, who resemble giant pillbugs and are known for their desire to avoid conflict (see ''StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers'' ''Literature/StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers'' in particular), through the Orishans, to the hostile Cheka, who resemble spiders. Voloczin from ''[=TNG=]: Indistinguishable from Magic'' is described by La Forge as being like a mixture of spider and octopus, his initial reaction is atavistic but he swallows it the moment he realises that Scotty and Voloczin are trading typical engineer banter.



* CorruptCorporateExecutive: Rod Portlyn, who becomes a recurring villain in ''StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers''.

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* CorruptCorporateExecutive: Rod Portlyn, who becomes a recurring villain in ''StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers''.''Literature/StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers''.



* HeWhoMustNotBeSeen: Overseer Biron's sponsor in StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers.

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* HeWhoMustNotBeSeen: Overseer Biron's sponsor in StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers.Literature/StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers.



* InsufferableGenius: Mor glasch Tev in ''StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers''. Also, the most intelligent members of the Tiburonian race are sometimes said to be particularly likely to fall into this category - "brilliant but difficult", to use one character's phrasing.

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* InsufferableGenius: Mor glasch Tev in ''StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers''.''Literature/StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers''. Also, the most intelligent members of the Tiburonian race are sometimes said to be particularly likely to fall into this category - "brilliant but difficult", to use one character's phrasing.



* NoodleIncident: The Tellarite Story in the ''StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers'' series (though we do get a reasonable number of details, much remains nebulous). Also, in homage to the original Noodle Incident, T'Ryssa Chen of the Literature/StarTrekTheNextGenerationRelaunch has the Tubegrub Incident.

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* NoodleIncident: The Tellarite Story in the ''StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers'' ''Literature/StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers'' series (though we do get a reasonable number of details, much remains nebulous). Also, in homage to the original Noodle Incident, T'Ryssa Chen of the Literature/StarTrekTheNextGenerationRelaunch has the Tubegrub Incident.



** On TV, "Tellarites do not argue for a reason, they simply argue". In the novels, Tellarites are quite diverse, and differ hugely in how they express themselves; Thur chim Gliv in [[Literature/StarTrekTheNextGenerationRelaunch ''Losing the Peace'']] is hugely different from [[StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers Mor glasch Tev]]. Of course, in one story Tev claims pride is the Tellarite hat. It's a valued trait to them, not a vice. And to be fair, the "loves to argue" hat is still largely intact - it's canonically a feature of their mainstream culture.

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** On TV, "Tellarites do not argue for a reason, they simply argue". In the novels, Tellarites are quite diverse, and differ hugely in how they express themselves; Thur chim Gliv in [[Literature/StarTrekTheNextGenerationRelaunch ''Losing the Peace'']] is hugely different from [[StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers [[Literature/StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers Mor glasch Tev]]. Of course, in one story Tev claims pride is the Tellarite hat. It's a valued trait to them, not a vice. And to be fair, the "loves to argue" hat is still largely intact - it's canonically a feature of their mainstream culture.



* YouHaveFailedMe: The Klingons often execute underlings for making errors; even the protagonist Klingons like Captain Klag are known to do it. Also there's the Androssi, a race invented for the novels, who punish their workers' failings with instant disintegration. The trope is actually averted with Androssi Overseer Biron's Sponsor in ''StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers'', who is quite understanding on those occasions where Biron fails in his task. Biron himself, on the other hand...

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* YouHaveFailedMe: The Klingons often execute underlings for making errors; even the protagonist Klingons like Captain Klag are known to do it. Also there's the Androssi, a race invented for the novels, who punish their workers' failings with instant disintegration. The trope is actually averted with Androssi Overseer Biron's Sponsor in ''StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers'', ''Literature/StarfleetCorpsOfEngineers'', who is quite understanding on those occasions where Biron fails in his task. Biron himself, on the other hand...
27th Aug '15 10:50:31 PM galekarens
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* Literature/StarTrekVoyagerRelaunch: Ten books so far, another upcoming.

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* Literature/StarTrekVoyagerRelaunch: Ten Eleven books so far, another upcoming.
16th Jun '15 12:49:32 PM StarSword
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''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' is in an AlternateContinuity: it borrows some elements from the novelverse, but discards others, and goes completely OffTheRails when ''Literature/StarTrekDestiny'' hits.
20th Feb '15 7:46:09 PM jormis29
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* ''StarTrekATimeTo'': Nine books, the characters of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' after ''Insurrection'' but before ''Nemesis''.
* ''Literature/StarTrekTitan'': Seven books in the series proper, so far, plus the CrisisCrossover ''StarTrekDestiny'' trilogy, which is essentially part of the series, along with a ''Literature/StarTrekTyphonPact'' entry and a ''Literature/StarTrekTheFall'' entry. Another novel announced.

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* ''StarTrekATimeTo'': ''Literature/StarTrekATimeTo'': Nine books, the characters of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' after ''Insurrection'' but before ''Nemesis''.
* ''Literature/StarTrekTitan'': Seven books in the series proper, so far, plus the CrisisCrossover ''StarTrekDestiny'' ''Literature/StarTrekDestiny'' trilogy, which is essentially part of the series, along with a ''Literature/StarTrekTyphonPact'' entry and a ''Literature/StarTrekTheFall'' entry. Another novel announced.



* ''StarTrekKlingonEmpire'': Four books, plus several short stories.

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* ''StarTrekKlingonEmpire'': ''Literature/StarTrekKlingonEmpire'': Four books, plus several short stories.



* ''StarTrekDestiny'': Consists of three novels: ''Gods of Night'', ''Mere Mortals'', and ''Lost Souls'' - This trilogy [[ArcWelding weaves together elements from]] ''[[Franchise/StarTrek Trek]]'''s past and future and completely changes the scope of the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' universe. Begins with the discovery of one of Earth's [[Series/StarTrekEnterprise first generation of starships]], lost for centuries and now found deep in the Gamma Quadrant. Focuses mostly on four captains, [[Literature/StarTrekTitan William Riker]], [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Jean-Luc Picard]], [[Literature/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineRelaunch Ezri Dax]], and [[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Erika Hernandez]], as the secrets of the origin of the Borg are brought into the light and a battle looms that will profoundly alter the future of the Federation... and the galaxy.

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* ''StarTrekDestiny'': ''Literature/StarTrekDestiny'': Consists of three novels: ''Gods of Night'', ''Mere Mortals'', and ''Lost Souls'' - This trilogy [[ArcWelding weaves together elements from]] ''[[Franchise/StarTrek Trek]]'''s past and future and completely changes the scope of the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' universe. Begins with the discovery of one of Earth's [[Series/StarTrekEnterprise first generation of starships]], lost for centuries and now found deep in the Gamma Quadrant. Focuses mostly on four captains, [[Literature/StarTrekTitan William Riker]], [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Jean-Luc Picard]], [[Literature/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineRelaunch Ezri Dax]], and [[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Erika Hernandez]], as the secrets of the origin of the Borg are brought into the light and a battle looms that will profoundly alter the future of the Federation... and the galaxy.



* ''StarTrekGemworld'': Two books.

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* ''StarTrekGemworld'': ''Literature/StarTrekGemworld'': Two books.



* ''StarTrekMillennium'': Trilogy.
* ''StarTrekMirrorUniverse'': Anthologies set in the Mirror Universe, showing us the gaps between Mirror Universe episodes.
* ''StarTrekMyriadUniverses'': Series set in alternate realities, though they overlap with the main continuity on occasion.

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* ''StarTrekMillennium'': ''Literature/StarTrekMillennium'': Trilogy.
* ''StarTrekMirrorUniverse'': ''Literature/StarTrekMirrorUniverse'': Anthologies set in the Mirror Universe, showing us the gaps between Mirror Universe episodes.
* ''StarTrekMyriadUniverses'': ''Literature/StarTrekMyriadUniverses'': Series set in alternate realities, though they overlap with the main continuity on occasion.



* AlienArtsAreAppreciated: Very frequent. The Andorian Art Academy, Betazed Institute of Art, Keorga; all are known and admired by humans for their artistic outputs. Then there's the RunningGag about Sinnravian drad music, which is appreciated by ''some''. On occasion, humans are the aliens in question; Enabran Tain, a Cardassian, approves of human stained-glassed windows, while Klingon Councilor Kopek also has human art displayed in his office. Some planets seem to prefer alien art to their own. In ''Literature/StarTrekExMachina'', the government of Lorina has decorated its public buildings in a wide variety of alien art forms, most of them from the Federation. The public speakers even play Andorian music. This is probably significant, as the planet's rulers are somewhat obsessive in their distaste for their own people's traditions. One of the art styles on display is Tellarite Erotic Abstract (introduced as part of a CrowningMomentOfFunny in ''StarTrekMillennium'').

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* AlienArtsAreAppreciated: Very frequent. The Andorian Art Academy, Betazed Institute of Art, Keorga; all are known and admired by humans for their artistic outputs. Then there's the RunningGag about Sinnravian drad music, which is appreciated by ''some''. On occasion, humans are the aliens in question; Enabran Tain, a Cardassian, approves of human stained-glassed windows, while Klingon Councilor Kopek also has human art displayed in his office. Some planets seem to prefer alien art to their own. In ''Literature/StarTrekExMachina'', the government of Lorina has decorated its public buildings in a wide variety of alien art forms, most of them from the Federation. The public speakers even play Andorian music. This is probably significant, as the planet's rulers are somewhat obsessive in their distaste for their own people's traditions. One of the art styles on display is Tellarite Erotic Abstract (introduced as part of a CrowningMomentOfFunny in ''StarTrekMillennium'').''Literature/StarTrekMillennium'').



* AloneInACrowd: A very effective example in the ''StarTrekDestiny'' trilogy, with Erika Hernandez among the Caeliar.

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* AloneInACrowd: A very effective example in the ''StarTrekDestiny'' ''Literature/StarTrekDestiny'' trilogy, with Erika Hernandez among the Caeliar.



* AmplifierArtifact: Several. In ''StarTrekTheLostEra'' there are the masks upon which Oralian recitation masks are based. The mask in ''Well of Souls'' is the best example. Useless to those who are not psi-sensitive, it enhances and focuses the talents of empaths and latent telepaths. It is designed to allow members of its planet's ruling family to enhance their psi talents to the degree that their mind can serve as a vessel for the spirit lifeform Uramtali. Without the mask, these talents would no longer be adequate, as the ruler's genes were diluted by centuries of inbreeding. In the ''Literature/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineRelaunch'', there's the pagh'varam (Bajoran for "soul key") which also serves to boost latent telepathy. It's actually a fragment of a Bajoran Orb of the Prophets.
* ArcWelding: A rather pleasing example with the exploits of Kahless, linking the Klingon saga to the ''Voyager'' relaunch in interesting ways. In ''StarTrekATimeTo'', Kahless had replaced himself with a hologram (equipped with a mobile emitter) and wandered off to Cygnet IV, supposedly to "do whatever (he) felt like". It was also a test, allowing him to give his usual HurricaneOfAphorisms when the ruse was discovered. In the Literature/StarTrekVoyagerRelaunch, though, it's revealed why he was on Cygnet IV specifically. [[spoiler: The secret headquarters of the qawHaq'hoch are located there, and he's keeping the plates spinning in the plan to keep Miral (B'Elanna and Tom's daughter) safe from the fanatics trying to kill her. Further, the mobile emitter for his holographic replacement was created by B'Elanna herself.]]
** The novel ''Paths of Disharmony'' made the Shedai Meta-Genome from ''StarTrekVanguard'' essential to the Andorian Crisis arc from the 24th Century novels.

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* AmplifierArtifact: Several. In ''StarTrekTheLostEra'' ''Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra'' there are the masks upon which Oralian recitation masks are based. The mask in ''Well of Souls'' is the best example. Useless to those who are not psi-sensitive, it enhances and focuses the talents of empaths and latent telepaths. It is designed to allow members of its planet's ruling family to enhance their psi talents to the degree that their mind can serve as a vessel for the spirit lifeform Uramtali. Without the mask, these talents would no longer be adequate, as the ruler's genes were diluted by centuries of inbreeding. In the ''Literature/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineRelaunch'', there's the pagh'varam (Bajoran for "soul key") which also serves to boost latent telepathy. It's actually a fragment of a Bajoran Orb of the Prophets.
* ArcWelding: A rather pleasing example with the exploits of Kahless, linking the Klingon saga to the ''Voyager'' relaunch in interesting ways. In ''StarTrekATimeTo'', ''Literature/StarTrekATimeTo'', Kahless had replaced himself with a hologram (equipped with a mobile emitter) and wandered off to Cygnet IV, supposedly to "do whatever (he) felt like". It was also a test, allowing him to give his usual HurricaneOfAphorisms when the ruse was discovered. In the Literature/StarTrekVoyagerRelaunch, though, it's revealed why he was on Cygnet IV specifically. [[spoiler: The secret headquarters of the qawHaq'hoch are located there, and he's keeping the plates spinning in the plan to keep Miral (B'Elanna and Tom's daughter) safe from the fanatics trying to kill her. Further, the mobile emitter for his holographic replacement was created by B'Elanna herself.]]
** The novel ''Paths of Disharmony'' made the Shedai Meta-Genome from ''StarTrekVanguard'' ''Literature/StarTrekVanguard'' essential to the Andorian Crisis arc from the 24th Century novels.



* CapturedSuperentity: The Mirdonyae artifacts and their ability to contain the powerful Shedai in ''StarTrekVanguard''.

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* CapturedSuperentity: The Mirdonyae artifacts and their ability to contain the powerful Shedai in ''StarTrekVanguard''.''Literature/StarTrekVanguard''.



* ChekhovsBoomerang: The Shedai Meta-Genome is central to the plot of ''StarTrekVanguard''. It later becomes essential to the conclusion of the long-running Andorian Crisis arc, from the novels set a century later.

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* ChekhovsBoomerang: The Shedai Meta-Genome is central to the plot of ''StarTrekVanguard''.''Literature/StarTrekVanguard''. It later becomes essential to the conclusion of the long-running Andorian Crisis arc, from the novels set a century later.



* ContinuitySnarl: A deliberate, in-universe example that the Q have to sort out, showing how complex reality truly is. If the Borg aren't liberated in 2381 (''StarTrekDestiny''), they'll grow too powerful to be stopped and will eventually assimilate the entire Milky Way within a few centuries. Because of this, people in the know (those uptime or those on higher dimensional planes/other continuums) want to make sure the Borg-Federation encounters happen as they happened in the timelines where the ''Destiny'' events take place. Q ensures that the Borg and the Federation meet, so Picard and Janeway both are forewarned and able to fulfil their roles. He also gives Janeway navigational information to nudge her toward the transwarp hub, with Janeway of the alternate future then allowing present Janeway to cripple the Borg ("Endgame") and provoke a full out attack a few years later - which is the key to stopping the Borg from passing the threshold of the unstoppable. Time travellers daren't mess with this because changing the events of 2381 leads to timelines where the Borg conquer the galaxy. However, because Janeway changed the past, the Omega Crisis that older alternate Janeway would have solved remains unresolved, and the universe is threatened ''that'' way, meaning there's need for a fix. In the ''Literature/StarTrekVoyagerRelaunch'', Q finds it, but it costs him.

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* ContinuitySnarl: A deliberate, in-universe example that the Q have to sort out, showing how complex reality truly is. If the Borg aren't liberated in 2381 (''StarTrekDestiny''), (''Literature/StarTrekDestiny''), they'll grow too powerful to be stopped and will eventually assimilate the entire Milky Way within a few centuries. Because of this, people in the know (those uptime or those on higher dimensional planes/other continuums) want to make sure the Borg-Federation encounters happen as they happened in the timelines where the ''Destiny'' events take place. Q ensures that the Borg and the Federation meet, so Picard and Janeway both are forewarned and able to fulfil their roles. He also gives Janeway navigational information to nudge her toward the transwarp hub, with Janeway of the alternate future then allowing present Janeway to cripple the Borg ("Endgame") and provoke a full out attack a few years later - which is the key to stopping the Borg from passing the threshold of the unstoppable. Time travellers daren't mess with this because changing the events of 2381 leads to timelines where the Borg conquer the galaxy. However, because Janeway changed the past, the Omega Crisis that older alternate Janeway would have solved remains unresolved, and the universe is threatened ''that'' way, meaning there's need for a fix. In the ''Literature/StarTrekVoyagerRelaunch'', Q finds it, but it costs him.



** The ''Qang''-class for the Klingons (StarTrekKlingonEmpire).

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** The ''Qang''-class for the Klingons (StarTrekKlingonEmpire).(''Literature/StarTrekKlingonEmpire'').



* DangerouslyGenreSavvy: One of the most triumphant examples is Weyoun, in ''StarTrekMillennium''.

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* DangerouslyGenreSavvy: One of the most triumphant examples is Weyoun, in ''StarTrekMillennium''.''Literature/StarTrekMillennium''.



* DyingRace: The books established the Andorians as this, at least by the 24th century. Their complex four-sex biology was failing them and their window of fertility had dropped to only four or five years. Unless their genome could be repaired, they faced extinction within fifteen generations. Note that events in later books - ''StarTrekDestiny'' most notably - made the problem even worse. As of [[Literature/StarTrekTheFall The Fall]], though, they're finally cured.

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* DyingRace: The books established the Andorians as this, at least by the 24th century. Their complex four-sex biology was failing them and their window of fertility had dropped to only four or five years. Unless their genome could be repaired, they faced extinction within fifteen generations. Note that events in later books - ''StarTrekDestiny'' ''Literature/StarTrekDestiny'' most notably - made the problem even worse. As of [[Literature/StarTrekTheFall The Fall]], though, they're finally cured.



** The Ferengi rank [=DaiMon=] (like a captain) was canonically established; StarTrekTheLostEra established [=GuiMon=] as the next rank up (similar to an admiral).

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** The Ferengi rank [=DaiMon=] (like a captain) was canonically established; StarTrekTheLostEra ''Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra'' established [=GuiMon=] as the next rank up (similar to an admiral).



* ForgottenPhlebotinum: The phase-cloak seems to go through this a lot. After its introduction (and successful use) in an episode of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', it's largely ignored. A short story in a StarTrekNewFrontier anthology eventually suggested the prototype was destroyed soon after the episode. By the time of ''Literature/StarTrekTheGenesisWave'', the Romulans are making use of the technology again, or something very much like it, but then it drops off a second time, and when ''Literature/StarTrekTitan'' comes round no-one's using it. Finally, in the recent ''Literature/StarTrekTyphonPact'' series, we're explicitly told the Romulans have finally perfected it. Let's hope it sticks this time...

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* ForgottenPhlebotinum: The phase-cloak seems to go through this a lot. After its introduction (and successful use) in an episode of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', it's largely ignored. A short story in a StarTrekNewFrontier ''Literature/StarTrekNewFrontier'' anthology eventually suggested the prototype was destroyed soon after the episode. By the time of ''Literature/StarTrekTheGenesisWave'', the Romulans are making use of the technology again, or something very much like it, but then it drops off a second time, and when ''Literature/StarTrekTitan'' comes round no-one's using it. Finally, in the recent ''Literature/StarTrekTyphonPact'' series, we're explicitly told the Romulans have finally perfected it. Let's hope it sticks this time...



* FreudianExcuse: In a sense, entire cultures have this. No culture in Trek is "evil" by nature, but the traumas of their development often forge them into unpleasant antagonistic societies (an idea that may have started in ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' as the Founders' StartOfDarkness came from their desire to impose order and safety in a galaxy that persecuted them). Fear and hurt on a civilization-wide level resulting from dark and harmful pasts, leading to a culture lashing out in aggression and conflict, is a staple theme, particularly in portrayals of the Cardassians and Klingons. In fact, whole ongoing sagas explore these two societies coming to terms with themselves and their deep-stated fears. The Tholians, Romulans and even Borg have also had their "Freudian excuses" explored. Greatly simplified, for Klingons it's the Hur'q invasion, for Cardassians the climatic catastrophe that nearly starved them, for Tholians oppression by the Shedai, for Romulans the difficulties of the exodus from Vulcan. As for the Borg, see ''StarTrekDestiny''.

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* FreudianExcuse: In a sense, entire cultures have this. No culture in Trek is "evil" by nature, but the traumas of their development often forge them into unpleasant antagonistic societies (an idea that may have started in ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' as the Founders' StartOfDarkness came from their desire to impose order and safety in a galaxy that persecuted them). Fear and hurt on a civilization-wide level resulting from dark and harmful pasts, leading to a culture lashing out in aggression and conflict, is a staple theme, particularly in portrayals of the Cardassians and Klingons. In fact, whole ongoing sagas explore these two societies coming to terms with themselves and their deep-stated fears. The Tholians, Romulans and even Borg have also had their "Freudian excuses" explored. Greatly simplified, for Klingons it's the Hur'q invasion, for Cardassians the climatic catastrophe that nearly starved them, for Tholians oppression by the Shedai, for Romulans the difficulties of the exodus from Vulcan. As for the Borg, see ''StarTrekDestiny''.''Literature/StarTrekDestiny''.



* TheGreatOffscreenWar: The Selelvian War, one of the plot threads from ''StarTrekNewFrontier'' (it was a NoodleIncident there). Apparently it did indeed happen in the "mainstream" novel 'verse (between ''Literature/StarTrekVulcansSoul'' and the early Literature/StarTrekVoyagerRelaunch), off near the Tholian border, but other than a couple of offhand mentions it's not yet been visited.

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* TheGreatOffscreenWar: The Selelvian War, one of the plot threads from ''StarTrekNewFrontier'' ''Literature/StarTrekNewFrontier'' (it was a NoodleIncident there). Apparently it did indeed happen in the "mainstream" novel 'verse (between ''Literature/StarTrekVulcansSoul'' and the early Literature/StarTrekVoyagerRelaunch), off near the Tholian border, but other than a couple of offhand mentions it's not yet been visited.



** President Bacco resorts to this to stop the Carreon messing the Deltans around and start negotiating properly. See ''StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation''.

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** President Bacco resorts to this to stop the Carreon messing the Deltans around and start negotiating properly. See ''StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation''.''Literature/StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation''.



** In the ''Literature/StarTrekEnterpriseRelaunch'', Trip Tucker's brother and his husband have adopted a son together. In ''StarTrekTheLostEra'': ''The Buried Age'', among the supporting characters, there are two female scientists who are married and raising children. In the same series, in the novel ''Serpents Among the Ruins'', one character is shown to have two male parents, and a Romulan woman with an (adult) son mentions a wife. There are probably others I'm overlooking.

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** In the ''Literature/StarTrekEnterpriseRelaunch'', Trip Tucker's brother and his husband have adopted a son together. In ''StarTrekTheLostEra'': ''Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra'': ''The Buried Age'', among the supporting characters, there are two female scientists who are married and raising children. In the same series, in the novel ''Serpents Among the Ruins'', one character is shown to have two male parents, and a Romulan woman with an (adult) son mentions a wife. There are probably others I'm overlooking.



* HurricaneOfAphorisms: Emperor Kahless. Martok calls it "tiresome". See the final book of ''StarTrekATimeTo'' in particular.

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* HurricaneOfAphorisms: Emperor Kahless. Martok calls it "tiresome". See the final book of ''StarTrekATimeTo'' ''Literature/StarTrekATimeTo'' in particular.



* InformedAttribute: The Tholians are famous for being punctual. Except their diplomats are always showing up late to make a childish if effective point about how their government feels. In fact, this is lampshaded in both ''StarTrekDestiny'' and ''StarTrekVanguard''. "Tholians are punctual" is to the novel verse what "Vulcans never lie" was to the TV shows.

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* InformedAttribute: The Tholians are famous for being punctual. Except their diplomats are always showing up late to make a childish if effective point about how their government feels. In fact, this is lampshaded in both ''StarTrekDestiny'' ''Literature/StarTrekDestiny'' and ''StarTrekVanguard''.''Literature/StarTrekVanguard''. "Tholians are punctual" is to the novel verse what "Vulcans never lie" was to the TV shows.



* InterserviceRivalry: Very common. In the Klingon Empire, the Klingon Defense Force and Imperial Intelligence hold each other in considerable distaste. In particular, there's a subplot in ''StarTrekKlingonEmpire'' involving I.I's displeasure with Captain Klag, and his HonorBeforeReason tactics. Also, in the ''StarTrekTheLostEra'' novel ''The Art of the Impossible'', Captain Qaolin of the Defence Force and his Imperial Intelligence liasion really don't like each other - again, because the berserker battle-hungry tendencies of the warriors clash with I.I's "dishonourable" sneakiness and caution. The Klingons aren't the only ones; the Romulan military takes its codes of honour, and the passionate brotherhood between warriors, very seriously. The cool, passionless underhanded tactics of the Tal Shiar intelligence agency therefore offend them, as does their tendency to question a warrior's loyalty. The Tal Shiar, for their part, view the military leadership as inbred, unimaginative fools. Then there's Cardassia, where InterserviceRivalry is endemic, particularly between the Central Command and the Obsidian Order. In the first ''Literature/TerokNor'' novel, Skrain Dukat sums up Central Command's angle on the Order:

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* InterserviceRivalry: Very common. In the Klingon Empire, the Klingon Defense Force and Imperial Intelligence hold each other in considerable distaste. In particular, there's a subplot in ''StarTrekKlingonEmpire'' ''Literature/StarTrekKlingonEmpire'' involving I.I's displeasure with Captain Klag, and his HonorBeforeReason tactics. Also, in the ''StarTrekTheLostEra'' ''Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra'' novel ''The Art of the Impossible'', Captain Qaolin of the Defence Force and his Imperial Intelligence liasion really don't like each other - again, because the berserker battle-hungry tendencies of the warriors clash with I.I's "dishonourable" sneakiness and caution. The Klingons aren't the only ones; the Romulan military takes its codes of honour, and the passionate brotherhood between warriors, very seriously. The cool, passionless underhanded tactics of the Tal Shiar intelligence agency therefore offend them, as does their tendency to question a warrior's loyalty. The Tal Shiar, for their part, view the military leadership as inbred, unimaginative fools. Then there's Cardassia, where InterserviceRivalry is endemic, particularly between the Central Command and the Obsidian Order. In the first ''Literature/TerokNor'' novel, Skrain Dukat sums up Central Command's angle on the Order:



* ManipulativeBastard: Common among villains, particularly if the villain is Cardassian, Romulan, Tzenkethi or, funnily enough, Klingon. If it's possible for a manipulative bastard to be benevolent, Ariel AKA Giriaenn would be this, too...(see [[StarTrekTheLostEra ''The Buried Age'']]).

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* ManipulativeBastard: Common among villains, particularly if the villain is Cardassian, Romulan, Tzenkethi or, funnily enough, Klingon. If it's possible for a manipulative bastard to be benevolent, Ariel AKA Giriaenn would be this, too...(see [[StarTrekTheLostEra [[Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra ''The Buried Age'']]).



* MaskOfPower: The rituals of the Oralian Way (a Cardassian religion) involve masks that channel the wearer's spiritual power so as to allow one to become closer to the gods, even serve as a vessel for Oralius. The [[EvilCounterpart Dithparus']] mask is a sinister reflection of this. See StarTrekTheLostEra in particular.
* MeaningfulFuneral: Several examples: [[spoiler: Thriss, at Tower Hill on Andor. Very moving, particularly when Thia starts singing.]] Meanwhile, President Bacco feels she has a duty to make ex-president Jaresh-Inyo's funeral service memorable. Particular cultural traditions explored include Elaysian funerals such as Zuka Juno's, where the body is consumed by carnivorous citizens at the Blood Prism (See ''StarTrekGemworld'') and Tiburonian services, where the deceased person's ashes are consumed by friends and colleagues.

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* MaskOfPower: The rituals of the Oralian Way (a Cardassian religion) involve masks that channel the wearer's spiritual power so as to allow one to become closer to the gods, even serve as a vessel for Oralius. The [[EvilCounterpart Dithparus']] mask is a sinister reflection of this. See StarTrekTheLostEra ''Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra'' in particular.
* MeaningfulFuneral: Several examples: [[spoiler: Thriss, at Tower Hill on Andor. Very moving, particularly when Thia starts singing.]] Meanwhile, President Bacco feels she has a duty to make ex-president Jaresh-Inyo's funeral service memorable. Particular cultural traditions explored include Elaysian funerals such as Zuka Juno's, where the body is consumed by carnivorous citizens at the Blood Prism (See ''StarTrekGemworld'') ''Literature/StarTrekGemworld'') and Tiburonian services, where the deceased person's ashes are consumed by friends and colleagues.



* NoHoldsBarredBeatdown: The Borg in the ''StarTrekDestiny'' trilogy. The combined forces of the United Federation of Planets, Klingon Empire, Romulan Star Empire, Imperial Romulan State, Cardassian Union, Breen Confederacy, Gorn Hegemony, Talarian Republic and Ferengi Alliance are slaughtered without the Borg fleet being slowed down.
* NoSuchThingAsAlienPopCulture: While the various TV series tended to play it straight, it's usually averted in the novels. For example, ''ASingularDestiny'' features a character owning a large collection of Klingon novels and comics; most of these had been introduced in earlier books, only to be collected together here for ContinuityPorn. In the Literature/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineRelaunch, a popular joke is mentioned several times, and a subplot involves the crew of ''Defiant'' all reading their way through a melodramatic Klingon novel. The same series introduced a Bajoran children's educational series, ''The Adventures of Lin Marna''. Meanwhile, in ''StarTrekKlingonEmpire'' mention is frequently made of the NarmCharm found in the politically-charged animated series "Battlecruiser Vengeance". In one novel, Ezri Dax is distracted by her memories of a Trill nursery rhyme.

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* NoHoldsBarredBeatdown: The Borg in the ''StarTrekDestiny'' ''Literature/StarTrekDestiny'' trilogy. The combined forces of the United Federation of Planets, Klingon Empire, Romulan Star Empire, Imperial Romulan State, Cardassian Union, Breen Confederacy, Gorn Hegemony, Talarian Republic and Ferengi Alliance are slaughtered without the Borg fleet being slowed down.
* NoSuchThingAsAlienPopCulture: While the various TV series tended to play it straight, it's usually averted in the novels. For example, ''ASingularDestiny'' features a character owning a large collection of Klingon novels and comics; most of these had been introduced in earlier books, only to be collected together here for ContinuityPorn. In the Literature/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineRelaunch, a popular joke is mentioned several times, and a subplot involves the crew of ''Defiant'' all reading their way through a melodramatic Klingon novel. The same series introduced a Bajoran children's educational series, ''The Adventures of Lin Marna''. Meanwhile, in ''StarTrekKlingonEmpire'' ''Literature/StarTrekKlingonEmpire'' mention is frequently made of the NarmCharm found in the politically-charged animated series "Battlecruiser Vengeance". In one novel, Ezri Dax is distracted by her memories of a Trill nursery rhyme.



* OmnicidalManiac: The Borg Collective, following the loss of the transwarp network. The Borg's new goal, until they are stopped/saved is simply "destroy everything". In particular, see ''StarTrekDestiny''.

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* OmnicidalManiac: The Borg Collective, following the loss of the transwarp network. The Borg's new goal, until they are stopped/saved is simply "destroy everything". In particular, see ''StarTrekDestiny''.''Literature/StarTrekDestiny''.



** Two Tellarites with the name Teg, in [[StarTrekATimeTo ''A Time to Heal'']] and ''Literature/StarTrekColdEquations''.

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** Two Tellarites with the name Teg, in [[StarTrekATimeTo [[Literature/StarTrekATimeTo ''A Time to Heal'']] and ''Literature/StarTrekColdEquations''.



** The novels show considerable diversity in their Vulcan characters (even though the simple hat of "logic" still fits the vast majority). These include stuffy old racists who use their own brand of logic to advocate Vulcan superiority or isolationism (like Soreth in ''Literature/StarTrekExMachina''), SpaceAmish communities with strange insular customs (see ''StarTrekVanguard''), xenophile enthusiasts who experiment with other cultural norms, at least one Vulcan who supports Surakian ideology yet demonstrates emotion outwardly to better fit in with aliens (yet claims he isn't ''feeling'' the emotion), a DeadpanSnarker or two (President Bacco's secretary Sivak, Soleta in ''StarTrekNewFrontier''), individuals who play up the strereotypes as much as possible, those who reject Surakism and just show their emotions, complete pacifists and pragmatic fighters...to say nothing of the massive political divisions between those who support reunification with Romulus and those who don't, those who find Starfleet too violent and those that support/serve in it, those that are active in the Federation and those that have practically no contact with aliens. Sure, the vast majority still wear the logic hat, but there's a lot of variety in there.

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** The novels show considerable diversity in their Vulcan characters (even though the simple hat of "logic" still fits the vast majority). These include stuffy old racists who use their own brand of logic to advocate Vulcan superiority or isolationism (like Soreth in ''Literature/StarTrekExMachina''), SpaceAmish communities with strange insular customs (see ''StarTrekVanguard''), ''Literature/StarTrekVanguard''), xenophile enthusiasts who experiment with other cultural norms, at least one Vulcan who supports Surakian ideology yet demonstrates emotion outwardly to better fit in with aliens (yet claims he isn't ''feeling'' the emotion), a DeadpanSnarker or two (President Bacco's secretary Sivak, Soleta in ''StarTrekNewFrontier''), ''Literature/StarTrekNewFrontier''), individuals who play up the strereotypes as much as possible, those who reject Surakism and just show their emotions, complete pacifists and pragmatic fighters...to say nothing of the massive political divisions between those who support reunification with Romulus and those who don't, those who find Starfleet too violent and those that support/serve in it, those that are active in the Federation and those that have practically no contact with aliens. Sure, the vast majority still wear the logic hat, but there's a lot of variety in there.



** In the ''StarTrekKlingonEmpire'' series, one novel in particular (''A Burning House'') was dedicated to essentially showcasing the diversity in Klingon culture. First, the Klingon farmers were explored in some depth (one notably shrugged off the "good day to die" warrior ethos as not something she was particularly concerned with). They also had a far friendlier relationship with the various subject races, like Phebens. The labourers and workmen of the cities were also explored (in both the capital and in a run-down city where industry has packed up and left for newer pastures, leaving many out of work). There were also Klingon opera singers, lawyers, policemen, etc. Earlier books in the series, which focused on the warriors, also made a point of portraying them with much diversity, including an elderly Klingon who was previously a warrior but has since moved into farming and now "prefers fertilizer to blood". The Klingons only appear one dimensional to aliens because the political caste and the warriors (which are now the same thing anyway) are all those aliens ever get to see, unless they travel the empire itself and connect with the common people. Even the warriors show considerable diversity under that hat. In the novel ''Literature/DiplomaticImplausibility'', the warriors are presented as highly diverse; we have the whiny engineer Vall, the DeadpanSnarker Leskit, the eager young officer Toq...

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** In the ''StarTrekKlingonEmpire'' ''Literature/StarTrekKlingonEmpire'' series, one novel in particular (''A Burning House'') was dedicated to essentially showcasing the diversity in Klingon culture. First, the Klingon farmers were explored in some depth (one notably shrugged off the "good day to die" warrior ethos as not something she was particularly concerned with). They also had a far friendlier relationship with the various subject races, like Phebens. The labourers and workmen of the cities were also explored (in both the capital and in a run-down city where industry has packed up and left for newer pastures, leaving many out of work). There were also Klingon opera singers, lawyers, policemen, etc. Earlier books in the series, which focused on the warriors, also made a point of portraying them with much diversity, including an elderly Klingon who was previously a warrior but has since moved into farming and now "prefers fertilizer to blood". The Klingons only appear one dimensional to aliens because the political caste and the warriors (which are now the same thing anyway) are all those aliens ever get to see, unless they travel the empire itself and connect with the common people. Even the warriors show considerable diversity under that hat. In the novel ''Literature/DiplomaticImplausibility'', the warriors are presented as highly diverse; we have the whiny engineer Vall, the DeadpanSnarker Leskit, the eager young officer Toq...



* PoisonousPerson: When under stress, Chelons secrete a poison through their skin. Ambassador Jetanien explains this to his Klingon diplomatic counterpart in order to warn him off; another Chelon posthumously kills a Hirogen hunter with his poison in ''StarTrekDestiny''.

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* PoisonousPerson: When under stress, Chelons secrete a poison through their skin. Ambassador Jetanien explains this to his Klingon diplomatic counterpart in order to warn him off; another Chelon posthumously kills a Hirogen hunter with his poison in ''StarTrekDestiny''.''Literature/StarTrekDestiny''.



* PronounTrouble: Many examples. In ''StarTrekNewFrontier'', hermaphrodite Hermats use s/he and hir, and there's a whole Hermat Language Council, to explain why they did away with the pronoun hish and the practice of calling a commanding Hermat officer "shir". The Hermat pronouns are later applied to other hermaphrodite or androgynous races like the Talosians. Also, a Damiani is either he, she or it, depending on sex. The four-sexed Andorians have a multitude of gender-specific words but usually accept male or female pronouns so as to avoid confusion among offworlders. A Syrath is an it, being asexual (but Damiani its are not asexual). Bynars use "this unit" in place of I or we, neither of which works well for them.

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* PronounTrouble: Many examples. In ''StarTrekNewFrontier'', ''Literature/StarTrekNewFrontier'', hermaphrodite Hermats use s/he and hir, and there's a whole Hermat Language Council, to explain why they did away with the pronoun hish and the practice of calling a commanding Hermat officer "shir". The Hermat pronouns are later applied to other hermaphrodite or androgynous races like the Talosians. Also, a Damiani is either he, she or it, depending on sex. The four-sexed Andorians have a multitude of gender-specific words but usually accept male or female pronouns so as to avoid confusion among offworlders. A Syrath is an it, being asexual (but Damiani its are not asexual). Bynars use "this unit" in place of I or we, neither of which works well for them.



* ProudWarriorRace: The Daa'Vit, and the Children of San-Tarah. See also, ''StarTrekKlingonEmpire'', which as anyone who knows anything about Klingons can guess, is essentially ''Star Trek: Proud Warrior Race: The Series''.

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* ProudWarriorRace: The Daa'Vit, and the Children of San-Tarah. See also, ''StarTrekKlingonEmpire'', ''Literature/StarTrekKlingonEmpire'', which as anyone who knows anything about Klingons can guess, is essentially ''Star Trek: Proud Warrior Race: The Series''.



* PyrrhicVictory: The Borg war, pretty much, as shown in ''StarTrekDestiny'' and its aftermath. [[spoiler: Yes, the Federation won, the Collective was liberated, there is peace, but Deneva, Risa, Coridan and several other major worlds are gone, many other major worlds are damaged, and 70 Billion people are dead]]. There isn't any mood to celebrate, and the rebuilding will take a long time.

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* PyrrhicVictory: The Borg war, pretty much, as shown in ''StarTrekDestiny'' ''Literature/StarTrekDestiny'' and its aftermath. [[spoiler: Yes, the Federation won, the Collective was liberated, there is peace, but Deneva, Risa, Coridan and several other major worlds are gone, many other major worlds are damaged, and 70 Billion people are dead]]. There isn't any mood to celebrate, and the rebuilding will take a long time.



* RousingSpeech: At times. Martok to the High Council in the ''StarTrekDestiny'' trilogy is a good example:

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* RousingSpeech: At times. Martok to the High Council in the ''StarTrekDestiny'' ''Literature/StarTrekDestiny'' trilogy is a good example:



* SharpenedToASingleAtom: The Tholians have swords like this. The edge of the blade is a single molecule thick. These weapons become important to the plot in the novels [[StarTrekTheLostEra ''The Sundered'']] and [[StarTrekVanguard ''Reap the Whirlwind'']].

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* SharpenedToASingleAtom: The Tholians have swords like this. The edge of the blade is a single molecule thick. These weapons become important to the plot in the novels [[StarTrekTheLostEra [[Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra ''The Sundered'']] and [[StarTrekVanguard [[Literature/StarTrekVanguard ''Reap the Whirlwind'']].



* SmugSnake: Klingon Councillor Kopek. A century earlier, his position as the SmugSnake on the Klingon High Council is held by Councillor Duras. There's a Duras in every era of Trek; the "original" Duras in the 24th century, who was a villain in ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', was in decline. The Duras in ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' was yet to truly ascend. The Duras of the Original Series era, seen in ''StarTrekVanguard'' and ''Star Trek: Errand of Fury'' among others, is from a House in its prime, and he knows it. What he doesn't know is that his house is soon to suffer terrible setbacks because he's underestimated his rivals.

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* SmugSnake: Klingon Councillor Kopek. A century earlier, his position as the SmugSnake on the Klingon High Council is held by Councillor Duras. There's a Duras in every era of Trek; the "original" Duras in the 24th century, who was a villain in ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', was in decline. The Duras in ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' was yet to truly ascend. The Duras of the Original Series era, seen in ''StarTrekVanguard'' ''Literature/StarTrekVanguard'' and ''Star Trek: Errand of Fury'' among others, is from a House in its prime, and he knows it. What he doesn't know is that his house is soon to suffer terrible setbacks because he's underestimated his rivals.



* SpaceStation: Naturally, quite a few. Starbase 47, a.k.a. ''Vanguard'', is probably the most memorable, being the setting of the ''StarTrekVanguard'' series.

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* SpaceStation: Naturally, quite a few. Starbase 47, a.k.a. ''Vanguard'', is probably the most memorable, being the setting of the ''StarTrekVanguard'' ''Literature/StarTrekVanguard'' series.



* StableTimeLoop: Star Trek likes this one. Examples from the novels include the history of the Caeliar race, including the destruction of their homeworld Erigol, and the history of planet Orisha. [[StarTrekMillennium The War of the Prophets]], meanwhile, is a stable time loop that connects multiple conflicting timelines together too.

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* StableTimeLoop: Star Trek likes this one. Examples from the novels include the history of the Caeliar race, including the destruction of their homeworld Erigol, and the history of planet Orisha. [[StarTrekMillennium [[Literature/StarTrekMillennium The War of the Prophets]], meanwhile, is a stable time loop that connects multiple conflicting timelines together too.



** The Cardassian "Fates" communicate like this. Non-corporeal creatures apparently inhabiting a mysterious dimensional plane that intersects with our own, they can telepathically influence mortals. In particular, with individuals of the right genetic makeup (or whose minds have been altered by particular artifacts), they can appear in dreams and hold "conversations" - or alternatively just plant images and desires. In the ''Literature/TerokNor'' books, their apparent leader, Oralius, uses it to find the next Astraea so as to keep the Oralian Way religion and the compassionate, noble aspect of Cardassian society alive. Her apparent EvilCounterpart Uramtali uses it to telepathically rape young boys. See ''StarTrekTheLostEra''.

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** The Cardassian "Fates" communicate like this. Non-corporeal creatures apparently inhabiting a mysterious dimensional plane that intersects with our own, they can telepathically influence mortals. In particular, with individuals of the right genetic makeup (or whose minds have been altered by particular artifacts), they can appear in dreams and hold "conversations" - or alternatively just plant images and desires. In the ''Literature/TerokNor'' books, their apparent leader, Oralius, uses it to find the next Astraea so as to keep the Oralian Way religion and the compassionate, noble aspect of Cardassian society alive. Her apparent EvilCounterpart Uramtali uses it to telepathically rape young boys. See ''StarTrekTheLostEra''.''Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra''.



** Ijuuka in ''StarTrekATimeTo'', though [[spoiler: the Satarrans]] interfere.

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** Ijuuka in ''StarTrekATimeTo'', ''Literature/StarTrekATimeTo'', though [[spoiler: the Satarrans]] interfere.



* VestigialEmpire: Back and forth with the Romulans, post ''Film/StarTrekNemesis''. In the immediate aftermath, the Romulan Star Empire [[BalkaniseMe fragmented into factions]]. Praetor Tal'aura and Proconsul Tomalak ''were'' able to reunite most of them, as the Federation sought to maintain peace along the borders (the Klingons [[StopHelpingMe "helped"]] by making Remus a protectorate). Commander Donatra, however, declared the worlds and fleets loyal to her independent. Between losing territory to Donatra, uprisings on the outworlds, and the damage from the [[StarTrekDestiny Borg Invasion]], the Empire was less than half its former size. It was explicitly stated in ''StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation'' that the Romulans were no longer a superpower. However, they bounced back thanks to [[VillainTeamUp membership in]] [[Literature/StarTrekTyphonPact the Typhon Pact]]. That said, the empire will presumably collapse again when Romulus is destroyed (though we're still a few years short of that in the current timeframe...)

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* VestigialEmpire: Back and forth with the Romulans, post ''Film/StarTrekNemesis''. In the immediate aftermath, the Romulan Star Empire [[BalkaniseMe fragmented into factions]]. Praetor Tal'aura and Proconsul Tomalak ''were'' able to reunite most of them, as the Federation sought to maintain peace along the borders (the Klingons [[StopHelpingMe "helped"]] by making Remus a protectorate). Commander Donatra, however, declared the worlds and fleets loyal to her independent. Between losing territory to Donatra, uprisings on the outworlds, and the damage from the [[StarTrekDestiny [[Literature/StarTrekDestiny Borg Invasion]], the Empire was less than half its former size. It was explicitly stated in ''StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation'' ''Literature/StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation'' that the Romulans were no longer a superpower. However, they bounced back thanks to [[VillainTeamUp membership in]] [[Literature/StarTrekTyphonPact the Typhon Pact]]. That said, the empire will presumably collapse again when Romulus is destroyed (though we're still a few years short of that in the current timeframe...)



* WeaponOfMassDestruction: The planet Tezwa's illegally acquired W.M.Ds drives one particular arc; see the final three books of ''StarTrekATimeTo''. The fallout continues into later novels. Then there's such superweapons as the Genesis Wave and whatever star-killing technique the [[ScaryDogmaticAliens Ascendants]] use. To say nothing of the ''StarTrekVanguard'' arc and the potential abuses of [[AbusivePrecursors Shedai]] technology.

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* WeaponOfMassDestruction: The planet Tezwa's illegally acquired W.M.Ds drives one particular arc; see the final three books of ''StarTrekATimeTo''.''Literature/StarTrekATimeTo''. The fallout continues into later novels. Then there's such superweapons as the Genesis Wave and whatever star-killing technique the [[ScaryDogmaticAliens Ascendants]] use. To say nothing of the ''StarTrekVanguard'' ''Literature/StarTrekVanguard'' arc and the potential abuses of [[AbusivePrecursors Shedai]] technology.



* WillingChanneler: The energy beings known as the Fates can enter into a being's mind and control their body while the person's own consciousness remains inert. The being apparently has to be a) the right sort of person with the correct genes or mental abilities, and b) willing. Astraea, the leader of a Cardassian religion based upon worship of the mysterious "good" Fates led by Oralius, is the best example of the truly WillingChanneler. See: ''Literature/TerokNor'' and ''StarTrekTheLostEra''. The apparent EvilCounterpart to Oralius, Uramtali (leader of the Night Spirits) shows up in the ''StarTrekTheLostEra'' novel ''Well of Souls''. She cheats a bit; she ensures her host is "willing" by placing him in a situation where if he refuses his child suffers.

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* WillingChanneler: The energy beings known as the Fates can enter into a being's mind and control their body while the person's own consciousness remains inert. The being apparently has to be a) the right sort of person with the correct genes or mental abilities, and b) willing. Astraea, the leader of a Cardassian religion based upon worship of the mysterious "good" Fates led by Oralius, is the best example of the truly WillingChanneler. See: ''Literature/TerokNor'' and ''StarTrekTheLostEra''. ''Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra''. The apparent EvilCounterpart to Oralius, Uramtali (leader of the Night Spirits) shows up in the ''StarTrekTheLostEra'' ''Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra'' novel ''Well of Souls''. She cheats a bit; she ensures her host is "willing" by placing him in a situation where if he refuses his child suffers.
20th Feb '15 6:15:48 PM jormis29
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* ''StarTrekForgedInFire''

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* ''StarTrekForgedInFire''''Literature/StarTrekForgedInFire''



* ''StarTrekImmortalCoil''

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* ''StarTrekImmortalCoil''''Literature/StarTrekImmortalCoil''



* ''StarTrekTheBattleOfBetazed''

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* ''StarTrekTheBattleOfBetazed''''Literature/StarTrekTheBattleOfBetazed''



* ''StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation''

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* ''StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation''''Literature/StarTrekArticlesOfTheFederation''
20th Feb '15 12:57:08 PM MarkLungo
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* ''StarTrekTheBraveAndTheBold'': Two books. Features team-ups between each of the series's regular characters and a guest crew from the continuity; the name is taken from the DC comics series of the same name.

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* ''StarTrekTheBraveAndTheBold'': ''Literature/StarTrekTheBraveAndTheBold'': Two books. Features team-ups between each of the series's regular characters and a guest crew from the continuity; the name is taken from the DC comics Creator/DCComics series of the same name.
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