History Franchise / NoonUniverse

29th Feb '16 1:50:33 AM Koveras
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ChromosomeCasting: Downplayed. While the women of the Noon Universe appear by all accounts to be fully emancipated, at least on Earth, there is a distinct lack of prominent female characters in Strugatskys' plots. In most novels, there is at most one recurring female character, who usually falls under the "faithful GirlNextDoor" archetype: Tanya in ''Far Rainbow'', Kira in ''Hard to Be a God'', Rada in ''Prisoners of Power'', and Maya Glumova in ''Space Mowgly'', ''Beetle in the Anthill'', and ''The Time Wanderers''. ''Escape Attempt'' doesn't feature any women at all (justified by its main setting, which is a HumanAlien male penal colony), and ''The Kid from Hell'' has only brief cameos.
19th Apr '15 11:00:38 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HumanAliens : Most of the alien species explored in the books, the most notable being the {{Cold War}}-esque Sarakshans, SpaceAmish Leoniders and {{Ruritania}}n FeudalFuture Gigandans. All of them also subvert this trope by having lots of cultural and philosophical traditions that would seem pretty alien to Earth humans.

to:

* HumanAliens : Most of the alien species explored in the books, the most notable being the {{Cold UsefulNotes/{{Cold War}}-esque Sarakshans, SpaceAmish Leoniders and {{Ruritania}}n FeudalFuture Gigandans. All of them also subvert this trope by having lots of cultural and philosophical traditions that would seem pretty alien to Earth humans.
19th Apr '15 11:00:27 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FantasyCounterpartCulture / PuttingOnTheReich : When Strugatskys introduce civilizations notable for extreme, but cold-blooded violence, they make them vaguely resembling Imperial Japan. This happens with the Island Empire in ''Literature/PrisonersOfPower'' and the aboriginal civilization in ''Literature/EscapeAttempt''. This is largely a WriteWhatYouKnow, as Arkady was a Japanese translator and a notable figure in Moscow School of Japanese linguistics. He also did his military service shortly after [[{{WWII}} the war]] as a military translator for the Border Guards in the Far East, at the time when still not all Japanese [=POWs=] were repatriated yet and the ColdWar tensions ran high, so he knew the KatanasOfTheRisingSun firsthand, and didn't have the very high opinion of the ImperialJapan.

to:

* FantasyCounterpartCulture / PuttingOnTheReich : When Strugatskys introduce civilizations notable for extreme, but cold-blooded violence, they make them vaguely resembling Imperial Japan. This happens with the Island Empire in ''Literature/PrisonersOfPower'' and the aboriginal civilization in ''Literature/EscapeAttempt''. This is largely a WriteWhatYouKnow, as Arkady was a Japanese translator and a notable figure in Moscow School of Japanese linguistics. He also did his military service shortly after [[{{WWII}} the war]] as a military translator for the Border Guards in the Far East, at the time when still not all Japanese [=POWs=] were repatriated yet and the ColdWar UsefulNotes/ColdWar tensions ran high, so he knew the KatanasOfTheRisingSun firsthand, and didn't have the very high opinion of the ImperialJapan.
28th Jan '15 11:38:54 AM TheUnsquished
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The very early prequel novels to the series (''The Land of Crimson Clouds'' and ''Space Apprentice'') as well as the titular first novel are actually very idealistic, celebrating a sort of Communist Federation (to keep the ''Trek'' analogue). However, afterwards, the mood rapidly darkens more and more with each passing novel. In spite of this, it's been shown that when characters do toss their preconceptions about right and wrong aside and act in accordance with simple, universally understandable ethics, they are generally in the right. It's their disillusionment and questioning their own intentions that prevents them from taking this option. Leonid Gorbovsky, serving as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure in many late novels, has been often compared to [[StarTrekTheNextGeneration Jean-Luc Picard]], in his advocacy that "When faced with two options, [[TakeAThirdOption always choose kindness]]."

to:

** The very early prequel novels to the series (''The Land of Crimson Clouds'' and ''Space Apprentice'') as well as the titular first novel are actually very idealistic, celebrating a sort of Communist Federation (to keep the ''Trek'' analogue). However, afterwards, the mood rapidly darkens more and more with each passing novel. In spite of this, it's been shown that when characters do toss their preconceptions about right and wrong aside and act in accordance with simple, universally understandable ethics, they are generally in the right. It's their disillusionment and questioning their own intentions that prevents them from taking this option. Leonid Gorbovsky, serving as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure in many late novels, has been often compared to [[StarTrekTheNextGeneration [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Jean-Luc Picard]], in his advocacy that "When faced with two options, [[TakeAThirdOption always choose kindness]]."
4th Jul '14 1:36:42 PM EryliaStarheart
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[FridgeLogic If we treat the entire cycle as a treatise on ethics of contact between civilizations on different levels of development]], then the only explanation fitting the overall message is that the Wanderers have, indeed, been trying to advance humanity - according to their own concept of progress. The primitive cultures of ''Hard to be a God'' and ''Escape Attempt'' could not meaningfully appreciate what the Progressors from Earth were doing for their sake. Slightly more advanced dieselpunk societies of ''Prisoners of Power'' and ''The Kid from Hell'' ended up understanding but largely rejecting the message with the exception of a few intellectuals, and even those said that while they appreciate the desire to help, there is no way to make their societies less savage by coercion. Now, with the Wanderers, Earth is on the receiving end of this and we see the entire spectrum of behavior: some protagonists reject the Wanderers' plans because they do not understand them, others understand they are well-meaning but doubt whether humanity should develop according to the ideals determined for it by aliens, or it should choose its own path, likely making many, many mistakes in the process.

to:

** [[FridgeLogic If we treat the entire cycle as a treatise on ethics of contact between civilizations on different levels of development]], development, then the only explanation fitting the overall message is that the Wanderers have, indeed, been trying to advance humanity - according to their own concept of progress. The primitive cultures of ''Hard to be a God'' and ''Escape Attempt'' could not meaningfully appreciate what the Progressors from Earth were doing for their sake. Slightly more advanced dieselpunk societies of ''Prisoners of Power'' and ''The Kid from Hell'' ended up understanding but largely rejecting the message with the exception of a few intellectuals, and even those said that while they appreciate the desire to help, there is no way to make their societies less savage by coercion. Now, with the Wanderers, Earth is on the receiving end of this and we see the entire spectrum of behavior: behavior in the ''Beetle in an Anthill'': some protagonists reject the Wanderers' plans purely because they do not understand them, others understand they consider the main dilemma in the plot a SecretTestOfCharacter for the entire civilization, and yet others are confident the Wanderers are well-meaning but doubt whether humanity should develop according to the ideals determined for it by aliens, or it should choose its own path, likely making many, many mistakes in the process.
4th Jul '14 1:34:18 PM EryliaStarheart
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** If we treat the entire cycle as a treatise on ethics of contact between civilizations on different levels of development, then the only explanation fitting the overall message is that the Wanderers have, indeed, been trying to advance humanity - according to their own concept of progress. The primitive cultures of ''Hard to be a God'' and ''Escape Attempt'' could not meaningfully appreciate what the Progressors from Earth were doing for their sake. Slightly more advanced dieselpunk societies of ''Prisoners of Power'' and ''The Kid from Hell'' ended up understanding but largely rejecting the message with the exception of a few intellectuals, and even those said that while they appreciate the desire to help, there is no way to make their societies less savage by coercion. Now, with the Wanderers, Earth is on the receiving end of this and we see the entire spectrum of behavior: some protagonists reject the Wanderers' plans because they do not understand it, others understand they are well-meaning but doubt whether humanity should develop according the ideals determined for it by aliens, or it should choose its own path, likely making many, many mistakes in the process.

to:

** [[FridgeLogic If we treat the entire cycle as a treatise on ethics of contact between civilizations on different levels of development, development]], then the only explanation fitting the overall message is that the Wanderers have, indeed, been trying to advance humanity - according to their own concept of progress. The primitive cultures of ''Hard to be a God'' and ''Escape Attempt'' could not meaningfully appreciate what the Progressors from Earth were doing for their sake. Slightly more advanced dieselpunk societies of ''Prisoners of Power'' and ''The Kid from Hell'' ended up understanding but largely rejecting the message with the exception of a few intellectuals, and even those said that while they appreciate the desire to help, there is no way to make their societies less savage by coercion. Now, with the Wanderers, Earth is on the receiving end of this and we see the entire spectrum of behavior: some protagonists reject the Wanderers' plans because they do not understand it, them, others understand they are well-meaning but doubt whether humanity should develop according to the ideals determined for it by aliens, or it should choose its own path, likely making many, many mistakes in the process.
4th Jul '14 1:32:27 PM EryliaStarheart
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** If we treat the entire cycle as a treatise on ethics of contact between civilizations on different levels of development, then the only explanation fitting the overall message is that the Wanderers have, indeed, been trying to advance humanity - according to their own concept of progress. The primitive cultures of ''Hard to be a God'' and ''Escape Attempt'' could not meaningfully appreciate what the Progressors from Earth were doing for their sake. Slightly more advanced dieselpunk societies of ''Prisoners of Power'' and ''The Kid from Hell'' ended up understanding but largely rejecting the message with the exception of a few intellectuals, and even those said that while they appreciate the desire to help, there is no way to make their societies less savage by coercion. Now, with the Wanderers, Earth is on the receiving end of this and we see the entire spectrum of behavior: some protagonists reject the Wanderers' plans because they do not understand it, others understand they are well-meaning but doubt whether humanity should develop according the ideals determined for it by aliens, or it should choose its own path, likely making many, many mistakes in the process.
4th Jul '14 1:21:46 PM EryliaStarheart
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The very early prequel novels to the series (''The Land of Crimson Clouds'' and ''Space Apprentice'') as well as the titular first novel are actually very idealistic, celebrating a sort of Communist Federation (to keep the ''Trek'' analogue). However, afterwards, the mood rapidly darkens more and more with each passing novel. In spite of this, it's been shown that when characters do toss their preconception aside and act in accordance with simple, universally understandable ethics, they are generally in the right. It's their disillusionment that prevents them from taking this option. Leonid Gorbovsky, serving as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure in many late novels, has been often compared to [[StarTrekTheNextGeneration Jean-Luc Picard]], in his advocacy that "When faced with two options, [[TakeAThirdOption always pick kindness]]."

to:

** The very early prequel novels to the series (''The Land of Crimson Clouds'' and ''Space Apprentice'') as well as the titular first novel are actually very idealistic, celebrating a sort of Communist Federation (to keep the ''Trek'' analogue). However, afterwards, the mood rapidly darkens more and more with each passing novel. In spite of this, it's been shown that when characters do toss their preconception preconceptions about right and wrong aside and act in accordance with simple, universally understandable ethics, they are generally in the right. It's their disillusionment and questioning their own intentions that prevents them from taking this option. Leonid Gorbovsky, serving as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure in many late novels, has been often compared to [[StarTrekTheNextGeneration Jean-Luc Picard]], in his advocacy that "When faced with two options, [[TakeAThirdOption always pick choose kindness]]."
4th Jul '14 1:20:24 PM EryliaStarheart
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The very early prequel novels to the series (''The Land of Crimson Clouds'' and ''Space Apprentice'') as well as the titular first novel are actually very idealistic, celebrating a sort of Communist Federation (to keep the ''Trek'' analogue). However, afterwards, the mood rapidly darkens more and more with each passing novel. In spite of this, it's been shown that when characters do toss their preconception aside and act in accordance with simple, universally understandable ethics, they are generally in the right. It's their disillusionment that prevents them from taking this option. Leonid Gorbovsky, serving as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure in many late novels, has been often compared to ''[[StarTrekTheNextGeneration Jean-Luc Picard]], in his advocacy that "When faced with two options, [[TakeAThirdOption always pick kindness]]."

to:

** The very early prequel novels to the series (''The Land of Crimson Clouds'' and ''Space Apprentice'') as well as the titular first novel are actually very idealistic, celebrating a sort of Communist Federation (to keep the ''Trek'' analogue). However, afterwards, the mood rapidly darkens more and more with each passing novel. In spite of this, it's been shown that when characters do toss their preconception aside and act in accordance with simple, universally understandable ethics, they are generally in the right. It's their disillusionment that prevents them from taking this option. Leonid Gorbovsky, serving as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure in many late novels, has been often compared to ''[[StarTrekTheNextGeneration [[StarTrekTheNextGeneration Jean-Luc Picard]], in his advocacy that "When faced with two options, [[TakeAThirdOption always pick kindness]]."
4th Jul '14 1:20:04 PM EryliaStarheart
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The very early prequel novels to the series (''The Land of Crimson Clouds'' and ''Space Apprentice'') as well as the titular first novel are actually very idealistic, celebrating a sort of Communist Federation (to keep the ''Trek'' analogue). However, afterwards, the mood rapidly darkens more and more with each passing novel. In spite of this, it's been shown that when characters do toss their preconception aside and act in accordance with simple, universally understandable ethics, they are generally in the right. It's their disillusionment that prevents them from taking this option. Leonid Gorbovsky, serving as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure in many late novels, has been often compared to ''[[Series\StarTrekTheNextGeneration Jean-Luc Picard]]'', in his advocacy that "When faced with two options, [[TakeAThirdOption always pick kindness]]."

to:

** The very early prequel novels to the series (''The Land of Crimson Clouds'' and ''Space Apprentice'') as well as the titular first novel are actually very idealistic, celebrating a sort of Communist Federation (to keep the ''Trek'' analogue). However, afterwards, the mood rapidly darkens more and more with each passing novel. In spite of this, it's been shown that when characters do toss their preconception aside and act in accordance with simple, universally understandable ethics, they are generally in the right. It's their disillusionment that prevents them from taking this option. Leonid Gorbovsky, serving as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure in many late novels, has been often compared to ''[[Series\StarTrekTheNextGeneration ''[[StarTrekTheNextGeneration Jean-Luc Picard]]'', Picard]], in his advocacy that "When faced with two options, [[TakeAThirdOption always pick kindness]]."
This list shows the last 10 events of 35. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Franchise.NoonUniverse