History Franchise / NoonUniverse

6th Nov '17 7:33:24 AM Black_Diesel
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21st Aug '17 1:49:49 AM permeakra
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The setting is a [[TheFuture future]] {{Utopia}} that gets gradually [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstructed]] as the authors [[RealLifeWritesThePlot become disillusioned with the Soviet Union]]. Intellectuals suffer from free time and idle hands [[MadScientist turn to dangerous experiments]], the {{Precursors}} may be guiding the course of events on Earth and it's driving the security services justifiably paranoid, attempts to help out [[TheDungAges primitive alien civilizations]] frequently end in tragedy, and a general "Golden Age feeling the premonitions of its own decay" atmosphere pervades. The utopia is never truly deconstructed to the point of destruction (though WordOfGod says only Arkady's AuthorExistenceFailure prevented it). There are rumors that their works suffered from massive censorship in early development, censoring away from text (but not background lore) many darker parts, like apocalyptic brutal wars and world-scale disasters that led to the post-scarcity society they depicted.

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The setting is a [[TheFuture future]] Communist/Socialist {{Utopia}} that gets gradually [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstructed]] as the authors [[RealLifeWritesThePlot become disillusioned with the Soviet Union]]. Intellectuals suffer from free time and idle hands [[MadScientist turn to dangerous experiments]], the {{Precursors}} may be guiding the course of events on Earth and it's driving the security services justifiably paranoid, attempts to help out [[TheDungAges primitive alien civilizations]] frequently end in tragedy, and a general "Golden Age feeling the premonitions of its own decay" atmosphere pervades. The utopia is never truly deconstructed to the point of destruction (though WordOfGod says only Arkady's AuthorExistenceFailure prevented it). There are rumors that their works suffered from massive censorship in early development, censoring away from text (but not background lore) many darker parts, like apocalyptic brutal wars and world-scale disasters that led to the post-scarcity society they depicted. \n
21st Aug '17 1:44:27 AM permeakra
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The setting is a [[TheFuture future]] {{Utopia}} that gets gradually [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstructed]] as the authors [[RealLifeWritesThePlot become disillusioned with the Soviet Union]]. Intellectuals suffer from free time and idle hands [[MadScientist turn to dangerous experiments]], the {{Precursors}} may be guiding the course of events on Earth and it's driving the security services justifiably paranoid, attempts to help out [[TheDungAges primitive alien civilizations]] frequently end in tragedy, and a general "Golden Age feeling the premonitions of its own decay" atmosphere pervades. The utopia is never truly deconstructed to the point of destruction (though WordOfGod says only Arkady's AuthorExistenceFailure prevented it).

to:

The setting is a [[TheFuture future]] {{Utopia}} that gets gradually [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstructed]] as the authors [[RealLifeWritesThePlot become disillusioned with the Soviet Union]]. Intellectuals suffer from free time and idle hands [[MadScientist turn to dangerous experiments]], the {{Precursors}} may be guiding the course of events on Earth and it's driving the security services justifiably paranoid, attempts to help out [[TheDungAges primitive alien civilizations]] frequently end in tragedy, and a general "Golden Age feeling the premonitions of its own decay" atmosphere pervades. The utopia is never truly deconstructed to the point of destruction (though WordOfGod says only Arkady's AuthorExistenceFailure prevented it).
it). There are rumors that their works suffered from massive censorship in early development, censoring away from text (but not background lore) many darker parts, like apocalyptic brutal wars and world-scale disasters that led to the post-scarcity society they depicted.
12th Aug '17 4:32:25 PM nombretomado
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* XMeetsY : The series is essentially something like a DarkerAndEdgier DeconstructorFleet version of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' in literary form. With occasional FilmNoir overtones...
** The very early prequel novels to the series (''The Land of Crimson Clouds'' and ''Space Apprentice'') as well as the titular first novel are actually very idealistic, celebrating a sort of Communist Federation (to keep the ''Trek'' analogue). However, afterwards, the mood rapidly darkens more and more with each passing novel. In spite of this, it's been shown that when characters do toss their preconceptions about right and wrong aside and act in accordance with simple, universally understandable ethics, they are generally in the right. It's their disillusionment and questioning their own intentions that prevents them from taking this option. Leonid Gorbovsky, serving as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure in many late novels, has been often compared to [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Jean-Luc Picard]], in his advocacy that "When faced with two options, [[TakeAThirdOption always choose kindness]]."
** An even closer comparison would be the ''[[{{Literature/TheCulture}} Culture]]'' series by Creator/IainBanks (which came much later than the Noon Universe), to which DarkerAndEdgier and RealityEnsues have been applied. Take a perfect communist/liberal socialist utopia as the initial model, place it in a science fiction setting, essentially obtaining something like the Culture (it fits down to the page quote of the latter). Then deconstruct it thoroughly and mercilessly while [[{{SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism}} progressively yanking the slider more and more to the cynical side]], and you have the Noon Universe.
19th Jun '17 3:11:06 PM GrammarNavi
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* FantasyCounterpartCulture / PuttingOnTheReich : When Strugatskys introduce civilizations notable for extreme, but cold-blooded violence, they make them vaguely resembling Imperial Japan. This happens with the Island Empire in ''Literature/PrisonersOfPower'' and the aboriginal civilization in ''Literature/EscapeAttempt''. This is largely a WriteWhatYouKnow, as Arkady was a Japanese translator and a notable figure in Moscow School of Japanese linguistics. He also did his military service shortly after [[UsefulNotes/{{WWII}} the war]] as a military translator for the Border Guards in the Far East, at the time when still not all Japanese [=POWs=] were repatriated yet and the UsefulNotes/ColdWar tensions ran high, so he knew the KatanasOfTheRisingSun firsthand, and didn't have the very high opinion of the UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan.

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* FantasyCounterpartCulture / PuttingOnTheReich : When Strugatskys introduce civilizations notable for extreme, but cold-blooded violence, they make them vaguely resembling Imperial Japan. This happens with the Island Empire in ''Literature/PrisonersOfPower'' and the aboriginal civilization in ''Literature/EscapeAttempt''. This is largely a WriteWhatYouKnow, as Arkady was a Japanese translator and a notable figure in Moscow School of Japanese linguistics. He also did his military service shortly after [[UsefulNotes/{{WWII}} [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII the war]] as a military translator for the Border Guards in the Far East, at the time when still not all Japanese [=POWs=] were repatriated yet and the UsefulNotes/ColdWar tensions ran high, so he knew the KatanasOfTheRisingSun firsthand, and didn't have the very high opinion of the UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan.
10th Jun '17 4:45:30 AM jormis29
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* FantasyCounterpartCulture / PuttingOnTheReich : When Strugatskys introduce civilizations notable for extreme, but cold-blooded violence, they make them vaguely resembling Imperial Japan. This happens with the Island Empire in ''Literature/PrisonersOfPower'' and the aboriginal civilization in ''Literature/EscapeAttempt''. This is largely a WriteWhatYouKnow, as Arkady was a Japanese translator and a notable figure in Moscow School of Japanese linguistics. He also did his military service shortly after [[{{WWII}} the war]] as a military translator for the Border Guards in the Far East, at the time when still not all Japanese [=POWs=] were repatriated yet and the UsefulNotes/ColdWar tensions ran high, so he knew the KatanasOfTheRisingSun firsthand, and didn't have the very high opinion of the UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan.

to:

* FantasyCounterpartCulture / PuttingOnTheReich : When Strugatskys introduce civilizations notable for extreme, but cold-blooded violence, they make them vaguely resembling Imperial Japan. This happens with the Island Empire in ''Literature/PrisonersOfPower'' and the aboriginal civilization in ''Literature/EscapeAttempt''. This is largely a WriteWhatYouKnow, as Arkady was a Japanese translator and a notable figure in Moscow School of Japanese linguistics. He also did his military service shortly after [[{{WWII}} [[UsefulNotes/{{WWII}} the war]] as a military translator for the Border Guards in the Far East, at the time when still not all Japanese [=POWs=] were repatriated yet and the UsefulNotes/ColdWar tensions ran high, so he knew the KatanasOfTheRisingSun firsthand, and didn't have the very high opinion of the UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan.
16th Jan '17 12:26:21 PM Morgenthaler
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* FantasyCounterpartCulture / PuttingOnTheReich : When Strugatskys introduce civilizations notable for extreme, but cold-blooded violence, they make them vaguely resembling Imperial Japan. This happens with the Island Empire in ''Literature/PrisonersOfPower'' and the aboriginal civilization in ''Literature/EscapeAttempt''. This is largely a WriteWhatYouKnow, as Arkady was a Japanese translator and a notable figure in Moscow School of Japanese linguistics. He also did his military service shortly after [[{{WWII}} the war]] as a military translator for the Border Guards in the Far East, at the time when still not all Japanese [=POWs=] were repatriated yet and the UsefulNotes/ColdWar tensions ran high, so he knew the KatanasOfTheRisingSun firsthand, and didn't have the very high opinion of the ImperialJapan.

to:

* FantasyCounterpartCulture / PuttingOnTheReich : When Strugatskys introduce civilizations notable for extreme, but cold-blooded violence, they make them vaguely resembling Imperial Japan. This happens with the Island Empire in ''Literature/PrisonersOfPower'' and the aboriginal civilization in ''Literature/EscapeAttempt''. This is largely a WriteWhatYouKnow, as Arkady was a Japanese translator and a notable figure in Moscow School of Japanese linguistics. He also did his military service shortly after [[{{WWII}} the war]] as a military translator for the Border Guards in the Far East, at the time when still not all Japanese [=POWs=] were repatriated yet and the UsefulNotes/ColdWar tensions ran high, so he knew the KatanasOfTheRisingSun firsthand, and didn't have the very high opinion of the ImperialJapan.UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan.
2nd Jun '16 2:21:23 PM nombretomado
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** A good example occurs in ''Beetle In An Anthill'', in the [[{{ShowWithinAShow}} story within the novel]] where the exploration mission on Hope is described. The alien member of the expedition, who seems to possess psychic powers, freaks out when the team approaches a Wanderer artifact (which is inert and fully inconspicuous to his human partner). He's terrified to such an extent and it is described in such a way that the scene could have been taken straight out of a [[HPLovecraft Lovecraft]] story--complete with vivid descriptions that make no sense but creep the hell out of the reader ("a staircase made of holes"). Interestingly, the exact function of the object is not made clear, although it's hinted that it's some sort of [[{{HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace}} interdimensional/subspace gateway]].

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** A good example occurs in ''Beetle In An Anthill'', in the [[{{ShowWithinAShow}} story within the novel]] where the exploration mission on Hope is described. The alien member of the expedition, who seems to possess psychic powers, freaks out when the team approaches a Wanderer artifact (which is inert and fully inconspicuous to his human partner). He's terrified to such an extent and it is described in such a way that the scene could have been taken straight out of a [[HPLovecraft [[Creator/HPLovecraft Lovecraft]] story--complete with vivid descriptions that make no sense but creep the hell out of the reader ("a staircase made of holes"). Interestingly, the exact function of the object is not made clear, although it's hinted that it's some sort of [[{{HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace}} interdimensional/subspace gateway]].
31st May '16 5:47:42 AM Koveras
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* CosmicHorrorStory: Although this is hardly the series' main point, all instances where human characters have close encounters with the Wanderers' legacy are downright bone-chilling in their inscrutability. The encounters with Ark Megaforms also qualify. As you'd expect from them, the Strugatskys made good use of their signature RuleOfCreepy writing style during the more horror-esque parts of the narrative.

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* CosmicHorrorStory: Although this is hardly the series' main point, all instances where human characters have close encounters with the Wanderers' legacy are downright bone-chilling in their inscrutability. The encounters with Ark Megaforms also qualify. As you'd expect from them, the Strugatskys made good use of their signature RuleOfCreepy RuleOfScary writing style during the more horror-esque parts of the narrative.
31st May '16 4:25:20 AM Doug86
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The Noon Universe is TheVerse where many of the Creator/StrugatskyBrothers' works are set. The name comes from the first novel's title and refers to the "noon" (as in, "the high point") of human civilization in the 22nd century, which the novels describe, and its [[{{Deconstruction}} looming dusk]]. Also, the title was a slight TakeThat at ''Daybreak 2250'', a post-apocalyptic sci-fi novel by AndreNorton that the brothers read and disliked with a passion.

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The Noon Universe is TheVerse where many of the Creator/StrugatskyBrothers' works are set. The name comes from the first novel's title and refers to the "noon" (as in, "the high point") of human civilization in the 22nd century, which the novels describe, and its [[{{Deconstruction}} looming dusk]]. Also, the title was a slight TakeThat at ''Daybreak 2250'', a post-apocalyptic sci-fi novel by AndreNorton Creator/AndreNorton that the brothers read and disliked with a passion.
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