History Franchise / Metroid

10th May '16 10:31:28 PM Phediuk
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** Believe it or not, SamusIsAGirl was itself considered a plot twist at the beginning of the series, to the point where the original game's manual either strenuously avoided mentioning Samus' gender (in the Japanese text) or outright referred to her as male (in the English text). At this point it's [[AllThereIsToKnowAboutTheCryingGame the only thing some people know about the series]], and crossover media such as ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' don't even try to hide it.

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** Believe it or not, SamusIsAGirl was itself considered a plot twist at the beginning of the series, to the point where the original game's manual either strenuously avoided mentioning Samus' gender (in the Japanese text) or outright referred to her as male (in male, in both the Japanese and English text).versions. At this point it's [[AllThereIsToKnowAboutTheCryingGame the only thing some people know about the series]], and crossover media such as ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' don't even try to hide it.
12th Apr '16 5:49:11 PM Tightwire
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* TheReveal: In the first game, at the end the super-tough merc you've saved the galaxy with takes off his helmet and... ''he'' is a ''she.'' Yes, Samus is a woman. Now it's common knowledge.
30th Mar '16 4:20:26 PM MyFinalEdits
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* BeePeople: The Zebesian Space Pirates in the manga comics will follow anyone with enough strength or charisma. In a bit of a subversion, their species can't produce "queens", so they look to other species to lead them. On their own, they're TooDumbToLive. A fan theory even says that the Zebesians are Super soldiers bred by the smarter Space Pirates in Prime, and are MADE to be stupid and not question anything.

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* BeePeople: BeePeople:
**
The Zebesian Space Pirates in the manga comics will follow anyone with enough strength or charisma. In a bit of a subversion, their species can't produce "queens", so they look to other species to lead them. On their own, they're TooDumbToLive. A fan theory even says that the Zebesians are Super soldiers bred by the smarter Space Pirates in Prime, and are MADE to be stupid and not question anything.



* BerserkButton: If Samus is pointing her arm cannon at you and you just happen to be a member of a race of intergalactic bloodthirsty aliens, ''don't beg for mercy.''
** No, seriously. A space pirate tries this in the manga, and an already enraged Samus [[RantInducingSlight goes ballistic]], reminding him that he was about to ignore the pleas of a little girl they marked for execution.
** What's that? You just killed someone [[MamaBear Samus cares for?]] We'll miss you. She won't.

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* BerserkButton: If Samus is pointing her arm cannon at you and you just happen to be a member of a race of intergalactic bloodthirsty aliens, ''don't beg for mercy.''
** No, seriously.
'' A space pirate tries this in the manga, and an already enraged Samus [[RantInducingSlight goes ballistic]], reminding him that he was about to ignore the pleas of a little girl they marked for execution.
** What's that? You just killed someone [[MamaBear Samus cares for?]] We'll miss you. She won't.
execution.



* BodyHorror: The X Parasites in ''Fusion''; Phazon in ''Prime.'' Metroids themselves might count, given their habit of turning their victims into desiccated gray husks that turn to powder when touched. In ''Prime'' as well, a vague reference to Space Pirate attempts to replicate the Morph Ball that went horribly, horribly wrong.
** Special mention goes to ''Prime 3,'' where you can actually see the gradual effects of Phazon corruption on Samus with each Leviathan destroyed. Those eyes could curdle milk.
** Don't forget ''Prime 2'' which featured the Ing, a transdimensional species of dark-matter aliens that can possess and mutate other beings.

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* BodyHorror: BodyHorror:
**
The X Parasites in ''Fusion''; Phazon in ''Prime.'' Metroids themselves might count, given their habit of turning their victims into desiccated gray husks that turn to powder when touched. In ''Prime'' as well, a vague reference to Space Pirate attempts to replicate the Morph Ball that went horribly, horribly wrong.
**
wrong. Special mention goes to ''Prime 3,'' where you can actually see the gradual effects of Phazon corruption on Samus with each Leviathan destroyed. Those eyes could curdle milk.
** Don't forget ''Prime 2'' which featured has the Ing, a transdimensional species of dark-matter aliens that can possess and mutate other beings.



** Also in ''Fusion'', [[spoiler: both the very first boss (Arachnus) and very last boss (Omega Metroid) are from ''Metroid 2''.]]
*** Those two bosses also have the same basic design. Sharp teeth, huge claws, only susceptible to attacks on its belly. The only real exception is that Arachnus can turn into a spiky ball or shoot fireballs, while Omega Metroid is just big enough to stomp you flat.

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** Also in ''Fusion'', [[spoiler: both the very first boss (Arachnus) and very last boss (Omega Metroid) are from ''Metroid 2''.]]
***
]] Those two bosses also have the same basic design. Sharp teeth, huge claws, only susceptible to attacks on its belly. The only real exception is that Arachnus can turn into a spiky ball or shoot fireballs, while Omega Metroid is just big enough to stomp you flat.



* BrokenBridge: Sometimes intentional to, [[http://www.metroid2002.com at least try to]], prevent SequenceBreaking.

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* BrokenBridge: BrokenBridge:
**
Sometimes intentional to, [[http://www.metroid2002.com at least try to]], prevent SequenceBreaking.



* TheCavalry: Two times, one in ''Super Metroid'' and another in ''Fusion''. In ''Super'', [[spoiler:Samus was losing in a CurbStompBattle with a OneWingedAngel Mother Brain, after taking a blow from her ultimate attack. Before the job can be finished, the huge Baby Metroid zooms in, drains her energy, and then gives it to Samus, restoring her to full health and granting her the [[EleventhHourSuperpower Hyper Beam.]] Then, it dies [[HeroicSacrifice while shielding Samus from Mother Brain's attacks.]] Cue Samus curbstomping Mother Brain.]]

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* TheCavalry: TheCavalry:
**
Two times, one in ''Super Metroid'' and another in ''Fusion''. In ''Super'', [[spoiler:Samus was losing in a CurbStompBattle with a OneWingedAngel Mother Brain, after taking a blow from her ultimate attack. Before the job can be finished, the huge Baby Metroid zooms in, drains her energy, and then gives it to Samus, restoring her to full health and granting her the [[EleventhHourSuperpower Hyper Beam.]] Then, it dies [[HeroicSacrifice while shielding Samus from Mother Brain's attacks.]] Cue Samus curbstomping Mother Brain.]]



* CanonImmigrant: several characters from Benjamin Itoh's Super Metroid comic (published in Nintendo Power) appear in Nintendo's canon manga. Also as in the old comic, Ridley appears to speak English, though this isn't reflected in-game.

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* CanonImmigrant: several CanonImmigrant:
** Several
characters from Benjamin Itoh's Super Metroid comic (published in Nintendo Power) appear in Nintendo's canon manga. Also as in the old comic, Ridley appears to speak English, though this isn't reflected in-game.



** ChargeMeter: In the ''Prime'' games, discounting ''Hunters'', the arm cannon has a meter to build up when holding down fire. It even has practical purpose when using seeker missiles.

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** * ChargeMeter: In the ''Prime'' games, discounting ''Hunters'', the arm cannon has a meter to build up when holding down fire. It even has practical purpose when using seeker missiles.



* ColorCodedForYourConvenience: Doors are colored depending on what weapon the player needs to shoot them with to open. ''Return of Samus'' and ''Fusion'' are the exceptions. (Return of Samus only has Missile Doors, which would be red if the game had color)

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* ColorCodedForYourConvenience: ColorCodedForYourConvenience:
**
Doors are colored depending on what weapon the player needs to shoot them with to open. ''Return of Samus'' and ''Fusion'' are the exceptions. (Return (''Return of Samus Samus'' only has Missile Doors, which would be red if the game had color)



* ContinuityNod: The remixed music in the latest installments, plus pieces of the original Brinstar and Tourian in ''Super Metroid''. Possibly also parts of Kraid and Ridley's lairs, although Kraid's "Lair" (especially the piece in question) is very far from where it ought to be. ''Super Metroid'''s "Item Room Ambience" is a (particularly odd/creepy) remake of the original ''Metroid'' item room theme.
** Something of a Call Forward: The lower Yellow Door connecting Crateria and Chozodia? Turns out it's part of the Wrecked Ship From ''Super''.
* ConvectionSchmonvection: Averted, in a rare video game example. Without her Varia Suit, Samus can't even get near lava without being burned, and walking into superheated rooms will cause her to take continuous, non-trivial damage. Most Metroid games make the lava dangerous to touch even when the Varia Suit provides resistance to convection; only more powerful armors like the Gravity Suit (in the 2D games) allow her to walk in lava without getting hurt. In ''Fusion,'' she gains a vulnerability to extreme ''cold'' as well, as a side-effect of the Metroids DNA she was injected with, which can be overcome with the Varia.
** And in ''Other M'', her commander sends Samus into a lava area without letting her use the Varia upgrade. Fans did not take that well.
** It should be noted that the only two games to play ConvectionSchmonvection straight are the original ''Metroid'' (hey, it was 1986...) and ''Metroid II: Return of Samus'', in which most players couldn't even tell it *was* lava until they explored a section of ''Metroid Fusion'' built to simulate the game... ...or [[AllThereInTheManual saw a picture in ''Metroid II'''s manual]].

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* ContinuityNod: ContinuityNod:
**
The remixed music in the latest installments, plus pieces of the original Brinstar and Tourian in ''Super Metroid''. Possibly also parts of Kraid and Ridley's lairs, although Kraid's "Lair" (especially the piece in question) is very far from where it ought to be. ''Super Metroid'''s "Item Room Ambience" is a (particularly odd/creepy) remake of the original ''Metroid'' item room theme.
** Something of a Call Forward: The lower Yellow Door connecting Crateria and Chozodia? Turns out it's part of the Wrecked Ship From ''Super''.
* ConvectionSchmonvection: Averted, in a rare video game example. example.
**
Without her Varia Suit, Samus can't even get near lava without being burned, and walking into superheated rooms will cause her to take continuous, non-trivial damage. Most Metroid games make the lava dangerous to touch even when the Varia Suit provides resistance to convection; only more powerful armors like the Gravity Suit (in the 2D games) allow her to walk in lava without getting hurt. In ''Fusion,'' she gains a vulnerability to extreme ''cold'' as well, as a side-effect of the Metroids DNA she was injected with, which can be overcome with the Varia.
** And in ''Other M'', her commander sends Samus into a lava area without letting her use the Varia upgrade. Fans did not take that well.
** It should be noted that the only
Only two games to play ConvectionSchmonvection straight are the straight: The original ''Metroid'' (hey, it was 1986...) and ''Metroid II: Return of Samus'', in which most players couldn't even can't tell it *was* ''is'' lava until they explored explore a section of ''Metroid Fusion'' built to simulate the game... ...or [[AllThereInTheManual saw a picture in ''Metroid II'''s manual]].game.



* CyberneticsEatYourSoul: For the most part averted, as most characters get along just fine with their cybernetically-enhanced PoweredArmor.

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* CyberneticsEatYourSoul: CyberneticsEatYourSoul:
**
For the most part averted, as most characters get along just fine with their cybernetically-enhanced PoweredArmor.



* DamnYouMuscleMemory: Most gamers familiar with platformers go from left to right out of habit, but the original ''Metroid'' forces you to go ''left'' in the first area to get the Morph Ball and continue... which is FridgeBrilliance, as Metroid was one of the first games featuring a sprawling open ended world. Making players go left was a way to make players realize that this wasn't just some sort of sci-fi ''Mario''/''Pitfall''/Whatever game.
** Perhaps in homage to this, the path to the right is blocked off entirely at the start of ''Super Metroid'' (until you get the speed booster and/or power bombs) and for the entirety of ''Fusion'', as the only path out of the docking bay is to the left.
* DarkerAndEdgier: While ''Metroid'' itself is already kind of the DarkerAndEdgier alternative to Nintendo's other franchises, the earliest version of ''Metroid Fusion'' (then just called "Metroid IV") was... [[http://www.unseen64.net/2008/04/08/metroid-iv-fusion-gba-proto-beta/ very unusual.]] It sported a "bladed" logo, a number that looked like it was torn from a claw, a darker color scheme, and a new suit that made Samus look hyper-muscled.
** More evidence can be found in ''Metroid Prime 3.'' Nintendo are rather famous for making kid-friendly games. This usually amounts to no overt sexual themes, no swearing, no religion, etc. Prime 3? One of the major characters swears. Granted, it's a "light" swear, but it remains the only instance of swearing in a Nintendo game to date.
* DeathIsCheap: Ridley has evaded death every time Samus encounters him, from NeverFoundtheBody to sneakily flying away while the camera isn't looking (we saw your shadow sneaky) to getting a robo upgrade. He never actually dies until ''Super'', but when he does [[spoiler:some TooDumbToLive reasearchers in ''Other M'' unwittingly CLONE the bastard]].
** He even appears as a boss in ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros. Brawl]]'' [[spoiler:FOUR TIMES. As Ridley, as Meta-Ridley, and then again for each form in the Great Maze]].

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* DamnYouMuscleMemory: Most gamers familiar with platformers go from left to right out of habit, but the original ''Metroid'' forces you to go ''left'' in the first area to get the Morph Ball and continue... which is FridgeBrilliance, as Metroid was one of the first games featuring a sprawling open ended world. Making players go left was a way to make players realize that this wasn't just some sort of sci-fi ''Mario''/''Pitfall''/Whatever game.
**
game. Perhaps in homage to this, the path to the right is blocked off entirely at the start of ''Super Metroid'' (until you get the speed booster and/or power bombs) and for the entirety of ''Fusion'', as the only path out of the docking bay is to the left.
* DarkerAndEdgier: While ''Metroid'' itself is already kind of the DarkerAndEdgier alternative to Nintendo's other franchises, the earliest version of ''Metroid Fusion'' (then just called "Metroid IV") was... [[http://www.unseen64.net/2008/04/08/metroid-iv-fusion-gba-proto-beta/ very unusual.]] It sported a "bladed" logo, a number that looked like it was torn from a claw, a darker color scheme, and a new suit that made Samus look hyper-muscled.
** More evidence can be found
hyper-muscled. The final version is lighthearted in ''Metroid Prime 3.'' Nintendo are rather famous for making kid-friendly games. This usually amounts to no overt sexual themes, no swearing, no religion, etc. Prime 3? One of the major characters swears. Granted, it's a "light" swear, comparison, but it remains still retains many elements of survival horror due to the only instance ongoing threat of swearing in a Nintendo game to date.
SA-X.
* DeathIsCheap: Ridley has evaded death every time Samus encounters him, from NeverFoundtheBody to sneakily flying away while the camera isn't looking (we saw your shadow sneaky) to getting a robo upgrade. He never actually dies until ''Super'', but when he does [[spoiler:some TooDumbToLive reasearchers in ''Other M'' unwittingly CLONE the bastard]].
**
bastard]]. He even appears as a boss in ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros. Brawl]]'' [[spoiler:FOUR TIMES. As Ridley, as Meta-Ridley, and then again for each form in the Great Maze]].



* {{Determinator}}: Nothing will stop Samus Aran.
** And nothing will stop Ridley from trying to take her down. Well, except for his remains being on an exploding planet. Even when [[spoiler: he's cloned, he gets to go after Samus twice before the clone dies.]]

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* {{Determinator}}: {{Determinator}}:
**
Nothing will stop Samus Aran.
**
Aran. And nothing will stop Ridley from trying to take her down. Well, except for his remains being on an exploding planet. Even when [[spoiler: he's cloned, he gets to go after Samus twice before the clone dies.]]



** Heartwarmingly averted with Tallon IV and Aether. You can scan the planets via satellite in ''Prime 3'', and learn that both are recovering from the events of the first two games. The Luminoth are rebuilding their civilization and Tallon IV's native life is thriving again.



* DumbMuscle: The original Japanese strategy guide was also a manga; Samus was depicted as a trigger-happy [[TheDitz ditz]] with far more strength than smarts.
** Although the humor here is that the reader never knows she is a female at this point, and the strategy guide never reveals it either, just basically saying at the end that you can "meet the true Samus if you beat the game quick enough." in hindsight it's hilarious.
* DummiedOut: Two very interesting things were removed at some point from ''Zero Mission''. One was the ability to turn suit upgrades on and off from the pause menu, as in ''Super Metroid''; fans are still wondering why this much-missed feature was taken out. (Cheat codes can turn it back on.) The second was... [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iKvTYQSc_VA Crocomire]]! This Super Metroid boss was found in the ROM, with a full set of sprites and some movement code, but nothing else. It's possible to hack him into various rooms.

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* DumbMuscle: The original Japanese strategy guide was also a manga; Samus was depicted as a trigger-happy [[TheDitz ditz]] with far more strength than smarts.
**
smarts. Although the humor here is that the reader never knows she is a female at this point, and the strategy guide never reveals it either, just basically saying at the end that you can "meet the true Samus if you beat the game quick enough." in hindsight it's hilarious.
* DummiedOut: DummiedOut:
**
Two very interesting things were removed at some point from ''Zero Mission''. One was the ability to turn suit upgrades on and off from the pause menu, as in ''Super Metroid''; fans are still wondering why this much-missed feature was taken out. (Cheat codes can turn it back on.) The second was... [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iKvTYQSc_VA Crocomire]]! This Super Metroid boss was found in the ROM, with a full set of sprites and some movement code, but nothing else. It's possible to hack him into various rooms.



* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: By the truckload. The 1986 design for Samus Aran gave "his" suit a large red barrel chest, tubes under both arms, a more "ray gun" barrel on the cannon, a red glove, and red boots. In addition, the artwork for enemies in the NES version of the game differed considerably from the Famicom version. In both, Kraid was a stout, yellow lizard with long green hair. Ridley, however, resembled a cute baby dragon in the Famicom art, and a bizarre horse-mouthed creature with five eyes (three down the forehead) in the NES art.) We can see why this game [[WordOfGod no longer exists]].
** And that's just for artwork. The gameplay lacks many of the refinements found in the latter ones (maps, shooting kneeled/[[DenialOfDiagonalAttack diagonally]]), and put it straight into NintendoHard territory.

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: By the truckload. EarlyInstallmentWeirdness:
**
The 1986 design for Samus Aran gave "his" suit a large red barrel chest, tubes under both arms, a more "ray gun" barrel on the cannon, a red glove, and red boots. In addition, the artwork for enemies in the NES version of the game differed considerably from the Famicom version. In both, Kraid was a stout, yellow lizard with long green hair. Ridley, however, resembled a cute baby dragon in the Famicom art, and a bizarre horse-mouthed creature with five eyes (three down the forehead) in the NES art.) We can see why this game [[WordOfGod no longer exists]].
**
exists]]. And that's just for artwork. The gameplay lacks many of the refinements found in the latter ones (maps, shooting kneeled/[[DenialOfDiagonalAttack diagonally]]), and put it straight into NintendoHard territory.



* EvilIsVisceral: Mother Brain and the Aurora Units are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin big brains in jars]] that do not look very pretty. [[SubvertedTrope The latter aren't evil on their own though]]. Starting from the first game, the Metroids themselves have visible blood vessels of some sort. In the second game, they were given an insectoid life cycle. In the third game, one of them grows really big, letting you see even more organic bits inside of the body.
** Same goes for Dark Samus in the ''Prime'' series: the more beat-up she gets, the more glowy Phazon innards start showing. And then the same thing starts happening to Samus herself in ''Corruption.'' The leviathan insides are visceral too.

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* EvilIsVisceral: Mother Brain and the Aurora Units are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin big brains in jars]] that do not look very pretty. [[SubvertedTrope The latter aren't evil on their own though]]. Starting from the first game, the Metroids themselves have visible blood vessels of some sort. In the second game, they were given an insectoid life cycle. In the third game, one of them grows really big, letting you see even more organic bits inside of the body.
**
body. Same goes for Dark Samus in the ''Prime'' series: the more beat-up she gets, the more glowy Phazon innards start showing. And then the same thing starts happening to Samus herself in ''Corruption.'' The leviathan insides are visceral too.



* ForegoneConclusion: Adam Malkovich [[spoiler:sacrificed himself]] in ''Other M''. [[spoiler:Also, Ridley reappeared in that game and died.]] This was known as far back as ''Fusion''.
** ''Other M'' also explains why [[spoiler:Ridley fell apart so easily when you encounter the body in the freezer in ''Fusion'' and the X Parasite escapes his body. The last we of see Ridley in ''Other M'', is a dried, gray husk after having his life sucked out of him by the Queen Metroid.]]

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* ForegoneConclusion: Adam Malkovich [[spoiler:sacrificed himself]] in ''Other M''. [[spoiler:Also, Ridley reappeared in that game and died.]] This was known as far back as ''Fusion''.
**
''Fusion''. ''Other M'' also explains why [[spoiler:Ridley fell apart so easily when you encounter the body in the freezer in ''Fusion'' and the X Parasite escapes his body. The last we of see Ridley in ''Other M'', is a dried, gray husk after having his life sucked out of him by the Queen Metroid.]]



* FungusHumongous: found in a few corridors of Crateria in ''Super Metroid'', yet noticeably absent in Brinstar. Also, the Phazon-irradiated mushrooms in ''Prime'''s Phazon Mines.

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* FungusHumongous: found FungusHumongous:
** Found
in a few corridors of Crateria in ''Super Metroid'', yet noticeably absent in Brinstar. Also, the Phazon-irradiated mushrooms in ''Prime'''s Phazon Mines.
29th Mar '16 10:01:22 PM McJeff
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Added DiffLines:

* AlwaysChaoticEvil: Cruelly averted by the space pirates. Samus never encounters one that isn't evil, but she does find a piece of data that says there are in fact space pirates who have non-evil tendencies... but since space pirates are a hive-mind, they are immediately found out and then executed.
26th Mar '16 3:45:22 AM LEDbullet
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** No, seriously. A space pirate tries this in the manga, and an already enraged Samus [[RantInducingSlight goes ballistic]], reminding him that he was about to ignore the pleas of a little girl they marked for execution.
14th Mar '16 9:27:11 AM DragonRanger
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** Subverted in ''Zero Mission'', where you find a few upgrades incompatible with your suit. [[spoiler:You need the Fully-Powered Suit to use them.]] May be double subverted in that the suit you need is the

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** Subverted in ''Zero Mission'', where you find a few upgrades incompatible with your suit. [[spoiler:You need the Fully-Powered Suit to use them.]] May be double subverted in that the suit you need is thethe one with Plug 'n' Play tech to begin with.
* PosthumousCharacter: Adam Malkovich is technically this, although ''Fusion'' puts an odd spin on it. ''Other M'', which takes place before ''Fusion'', shows him before his death.
* PowerCrystal: The ''Literature/{{Lensman}}''-like hand crystal on the back of her left hand. Originally just a visual effect, ''Zero Mission'' made it integral to use of the Power Grip, and the first ''Prime'' game made it the source of the Grapple lasso.
* PoweredArmor: Samus' suit.
* PrivateMilitaryContractor: What Samus actually is. Despite being referred to as a "bounty hunter" she doesn't actually take on bounties, most often serving this function to the Federation instead. (Worth noting, the one game that actually considered a bounty system, ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3'', had the idea shot down by Nintendo themselves while it was still in pre-production.)
* PuzzleBoss: Many, including Crocomire and Flaahgra.
* PuzzlePan: All 3D games but ''Echoes'' especially. Sometimes accompanied by weather patterns or fauna movements to smack where you need to go over your head.
* RaisedByNatives: Samus.
* RasputinianDeath: Crocomire in ''Super Metroid''.
* RecurringBoss: SA-X in ''Fusion'', though it's not really a boss until near the end of the game. Ridley may be a better example, considering he appears in almost every game, twice in ''Super'' and ''Corruption''. Also, [[spoiler:The final boss and title antagonist of ''Metroid Prime'' comes back as Dark Samus for the second and third games of the trilogy]].
* RidiculouslyCuteCritter: In the manga, Samus' pet Pyonchi appears to be about half squirrel, half rabbit, and ''all'' adorable. Also, the Etecoons [[note]]monkey-koala hybrids[[/note]] and the Dachoras [[note]]ostrich-style creatures[[/note]] in ''Super'' and ''Fusion''. Maybe the "little birdie" of ''Other M'' as well, al least until you learn [[spoiler:it's actually Ridley's clone]]
* RoarBeforeBeating: Some of the bosses do this.
* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: In ''Super Metroid''.
** Revenge on the space pirates could be seen as one of Samus' main motivations, especially against [[ArchEnemy Ridley]], who personally killed her mother right in front of her when she was four years old.
** The last bits of ''Zero Mission'': [[spoiler:The defeat of Mother Brain is spoiled by space pirates shooting you down. And your suit is lost. Then you get a better one which is followed by the annihilation of every Space Pirate on the Mothership.]]
* SavageSetpiece: Multiple non-hostile indigenous creatures will turn into this if you attack them.
* SavePoint: The second type is a common sight in the series. With the exception of Chozodia save points in ''Zero Mission'' and Samus's [[CoolStarship gunship]], they never refill health. The Save Stations in the ''Prime'' series, however, save and heal.
* SceneryGorn: Old Tourian in ''Super'' and post-Mother Brain ''Zero Mission'', [[spoiler:Sector 5 (ARC)]] in ''Metroid Fusion''.
* SchematizedProp: Many of the more recent games have taken up this trope, most notably using a Power Suit schematic as the item/weapon status screen (''Zero Mission'', ''Prime'', ''Prime 3'', ''Super'', ''Fusion''; the schematized suit was also seen in the instruction manual for ''Metroid II'').
* ScifiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale: Very few of Samus's weapons have numbers behind them, but those that do are absurdly powerful -- like "fully automatic nuclear explosion launcher" powerful.
* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: In the 3rd chapter of the manga, Samus - a newly recruited Galactic Federation Police Officer - and two fellow officers Mauk and Kreatz, are sent to planet of Jigrad on a recon mission to monitor the Space Pirates' activities there. Finding the Pirates are using human children as slave labor, Samus jumps in and massacres the Pirates before they can execute a child for being "unfit" for labor instead of reporting the find and waiting for orders. She and her team are later scolded by [[DaChief Chief Hardy]], but Samus is praised by the Jigradian people for her help.
** The finale of ''Fusion'' has [[spoiler:the Federation ordering Samus to stand down so that they can capture the SA-X for study (also Samus just blew up their top-secret Metroid cloning facility, so they're a bit ticked about that). Samus knows firsthand just how dangerous the SA-X is, so she proceeds to crash the space station into nearby planet [=SR388=], destroying both and eradicating the X for good.]] Given how much the Federation had invested into that, the general thought among fans is that Samus is no longer on their good side after this.
* SeaMonster: The boss Serris is a sea serpent with SuperSpeed. Before Serris, there was ''Super'' miniboss Botwoon, who was a serpent like Serris who sped up as he took damage, and could spit acid spread-shots. Also Draygon, the boss of Maridia.
* SequelHook: ''Fusion'' sure seemed to leave one hell of a sequel hook, what with [[spoiler:Samus having ''illegally blown up a Federation outpost'' and become something way other than human. Sure, Samus had her reasons, but all the implications in-game are that the Fed will be ''pissed as shit'' with her now.]]
** A sequel on the DS with 2-D gameplay, ''Metroid Dread'', was supposed to have been shown at [[UsefulNotes/ElectronicEntertainmentExpo E3]] 2006, but was mysteriously dropped. Potentially hinted at again in ''Corruption'', however.
* SequenceBreaking: The ''Metroid'' fandom coined this term from their extensive experience with this trope. ''Zero Mission'' was made with this in mind, pretty much the only thing set in stone is that Kraid must be beaten before Ridley[[note]]Until you learn to perform an Infinite Bomb Jump and find out what to use to break a certain block in a certain room's ceiling, and which block it is, at least.[[/note]], Ridley must be beaten before Mother Brain, and Mother Brain must be beaten before Chozodia.
* SequentialBoss:
** The final boss of ''{{Metroid}} Prime'' has two phases: the first phase is basically the same thing with increasing shifts to different weaknesses, and the second phase requires you to switch visors to locate the phasing Prime and blast it with the Phazon Beam.
** The final boss of ''Metroid Prime 2: Echoes'' features all three forms of the Emperor Ing, followed by a final battle against Dark Samus.
** In ''Metroid Prime 3: Corruption'', you [[spoiler:fight Aurora 313 right after putting down Dark Samus. 313 itself has two forms: complete and floating severed head]].
** Mother Brain from ''Super Metroid'' has 3 different phases. First you fight her like in the first game, as just the brain protected by turrets and zeebetite barriers. After you beat her and examine the body, she rises out of the floor on a robotic body. After dealing enough damage to her, she'll use an extremely powerful attack to reduce you to low health, after which the Metroid hatchling shows up to save the day. But then she comes back to life again and you have to beat the crap out of her again, this time armed with the Hyper Beam. And then you have to escape the planet before it blows up.
** ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' has the SA-X when you finally get to fight it. First there's the regular Varia Suit-sized version you've been avoiding the entire time. Hit that with your charged up Wave Beam, and you get a giant monstrosity that can't shoot you but can somehow jump anywhere in the room incredibly fast... Fortunately it stands still for a second every now and then and Screw Attack does work too (although it's a double-edged sword since it also hurts yourself...).
* ShapeShifterBaggage: Samus herself with the Morph Ball but the shape shifting is not actually the worst thing about it (the issue of vision is) nor is it the most glaring example; that goes to the X Parasites. They not only multiply impossibly fast but they can take on new, often large, forms nearly instantly.
* SharkTunnel: These are a common feature, starting with the tunnel between Brinstar and Maridia in ''Super Metroid'', to the underwater tunnel in Sector 4 in ''Fusion,'' the skywalk between Chozodia and the Pirate Mothership in ''Zero Mission,'' and the skywalk from Magmoor to Phazon Mines in ''Prime.'' All of them can be shattered with power bombs to allow free travel between the two areas.
* ShiftingSandLand: Sector 3 - PYR in ''Fusion'', the Agon Wastes in ''Echoes'', and the Experimental Simulated Desert in ''Other M''.
* ShoutOut: Several to the ''Franchise/{{Alien}}'' franchise. Ridley is named after director Ridley Scott, and the opening shot of ''Prime'' is almost identical to that of the first film. Even the title logos have similarities (ALIEN - メトロイド).
** A non-enemy creature in ''Super Metroid'' has a turtle like shell that flies around while spinning. Likely a nod to {{Gamera}}. Or possibly Bowser. Its offspring look strikingly similar to [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Buzzy Beetles]].
** A blink-and-you'll-miss-it example is the name of the planet that houses one Federation shipyard, where the GFS Olympus and Samus' gunship (the one used in ''Prime 2''; she goes through gunships like other people go through tissues) were built: [[{{Film/Alien 3}} Aliehs III]].
** And then there's the fact that, as of ''Super Metroid'', Samus can [[Manga/GetterRobo SHIIIIINESPAAAAAAAARK]]!
** Houston from the ''Super Metroid'' Comic in ''Magazine/NintendoPower'' seems to refer to Captain Dallas from the first ''Film/{{Alien}}'' film.
** The original Famicom Disk System version of the first game's Escape theme and subsequent arrangements in future games don't have it, but the NES version features a slight expansion that includes [[RecurringRiff a recurring six-note melody]] from the ''VideoGame/KidIcarus'' soundtrack.
** [[Music/MichaelJackson Moonwalking]] in ''Super Metroid''.
** The Restricted Area in ''Fusion'' looks and acts a hell of a lot like Tourian.
** Outside the actual series, in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', one of Zero Suit Samus' air-attacks is the Inazuma Kick from ''Anime/GunBuster''.
** In the Wanpakku manga[=/=]strategy guide for the original game, there's a sequence where Samus comes across a door for the first time, but doesn't know how to open it. She tries saying "OpenSesame!", followed by "Bamble, bomble, bambopp!" and "Pastel, popple, poppinpa!". (Neither of them worked.) The latter two phrases are incantations from MagicalGirl shows (specifically ''Anime/MagicalAngelCreamyMami'' and ''Anime/MagicalIdolPastelYumi'', respectfully).
** The Zero Suit is one to the datasuit of ''Manga/{{Appleseed}}'' that Deunan wears in her landmate.
** The mentioned in VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption "Horus Rebellion" is a reference to the "Literature/HorusHeresy" event from [[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer40000}} Warhammer 40,000]], another rebellion that was indeed some "nasty business," enough to cause a schism within the Imperium of Man. Said rebellion was led by the eponymous Horus, who was corrupted by the Chaos Gods, much like how Dark Samus in this game brainwashes the Space Pirates for her own ends. Coincidentally one of the daemons from early in Warhammer was named "Samus".
* SlippySlideyIceWorld: Sector 5 - ARC in ''Fusion'', the Cryosphere in ''Other M'', and the Phendrana Drifts in ''Prime''.
* SoleSurvivor: Samus, twice over: first when the K-2L colony was slaughtered by the Space Pirates, and again when the Space Pirates, under Mother Brain's direction, invaded Zebes and killed the remaining Chozo. Well, on Zebes, anyway. And then there's the last remaining Metroid from ''Metroid II''.
** The only Space Pirate who actually survived ''Super Metroid'' [[spoiler: without being cloned or remade was Phantoon.]]
* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: ''Metroid Prime Pinball'' qualifies.
* SomethingOnlyTheyWouldSay: How Samus discovers the identity of her AI CO in ''Metroid Fusion''.
** Many fans realized what the mysterious trailer for ''Other M'' was as soon as Adam said "Any objections, lady?" Prior to this, it was intentionally unclear what the game in question was.
* SoundOfNoDamage: In the 2D games, it sounds something like a beep.
* SpacePirates: The primary antagonists for most of the series; only three games didn't have them as the main attackers, and in two of the three, they made cameo appearances anyways.
* SpaceMarines: From ''Super'' and ''Prime'', Space Army in ''[[MetroidOtherM Other M]]''. Both are [[BadassArmy okay]], just not as good as Samus.
** Samus herself had once been a Space Marine when she was serving under Commander Adam Malkovitch.
* SpeedRun: ''Super Metroid'' and the following sequels have their maps designed so that you can solve them in a fraction of the expected solving time by using special techniques like wall jumping, bomb jumping, mock ball, etc. to get key items ahead of time.
* SprintShoes: Speed Booster.
* StarFishAliens: The main ones are X Parasites, the Ing, and Metroids, but others tend to pop up.
* StatuesqueStunner: Samus. Gandrayda is even taller.
* SteamVentObstacle:
** In the intro level for ''Super Metroid'', Samus needs to escape a space station, while avoiding gushes of steam coming out from practically everywhere. Getting hit by the steam doesn't cost you energy, but you lose precious time to escape.
** Happens again during the escape from planet Zebes, only the steam's escaping ''from the ground'' itself.
* SubBoss: ''Return of Samus'' is the only game that doesn't have at least one, if tougher Metroids don't qualify. (Although one might argue that Arachnus - even if being optional - can be considered to be one.)
* SuddenlyBlonde: In the original game, the Samus unmasked sprites gave her brown eyes, reddish brown hair, and a pink leotard (or bikini for the quick players). Come Super Metroid, Samus is blue/green eyed, blonde, and is wearing a dark blue leotard.
* SuddenlyVoiced: In ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', Samus finally spoke her taunts. However, they sounded rather... [[FetishFuel odd]]. In ''Other M'', she speaks for the first time in her own series.
* SuperweaponSurprise: Don't mess with Chozo statues... just, don't: ''"Those who defile [our statues] shall know our wrath, unfettered and raw."''
** In addition to that: do you know what you get when the peaceful, spiritual race bird race actually trains someone to fight, and gives them the technology to do so? You get ''[[OneManArmy Samus Aran]].''
*** And there used to be many more just like her (albeit Chozo). Samus is referred to as the first "Chozo" in many generations to choose the path of the warrior.
* SuspiciousVideogameGenerosity: If there is a save station -- and possibly recharge room -- next to a huge room, expect a boss to be nearby...
* SwissArmyWeapon: Samus' cannon shoots various beams, including power, ice, plasma, and wave, and also missiles. The whole power suit kind of qualifies.
* SympathyForTheDevil: As the series goes on, you realize the Metroids aren't so bad -- this culminates with Samus becoming part-Metroid in ''Fusion.''
** In ''Other M'', [[spoiler:MB when you know her past and the reason of her rampage.]]
* ThemeMusicPowerUp: This occurs in every ''Metroid'', but perhaps the most gratifying moment is in ''Zero Mission'' when, after running for your life from Space Pirates with nothing but your [[EmergencyWeapon Emergency Pistol]] and defeating the Chozo Ghost, Samus' unknown items transform into the Plasma Beam, Gravity Suit, and Space Jump. At this point, you can finally kill the Space Pirates... with ease.
* TomatoSurprise: SamusIsAGirl: [[TropeNamer Duh.]]
* TookALevelInBadass: In ''Super Metroid'', Samus' surrogate Metroid child returns. [[spoiler:It's gone from tiny to around four times as big as Samus. It later holds off Mother Brain.]]
** In most games, the Ice Beam is a useful weapon, but not that powerful. In ''Fusion'', Samus develops a weakness to cold and loses the Ice Beam. It becomes a weapon of pure murder when used against her, and [[spoiler:it's the last weapon she gets in the game.]]
* TraumaInducedAmnesia: [[spoiler:Happens to Samus in the manga. The trauma of watching her homeworld being destroyed and watching her parents die is essentially forgotten until Ridley forces Samus to remember what happened in their first encounter many years later. After remembering the event, Samus suffers a horrendous HeroicBSOD and begs her comrades to kill her.]]
* TheUndead: Coverns (Three skulls stuck together), Phantoon (Huge malevolent spirit allied with the Pirates), Chozo Ghosts, Dark Troopers, and Skeleton Crocomire.
* UndergroundLevel: The setting of a good majority of ''Super Metroid''. All of the action in ''Metroid II'' takes place in the caverns of [=SR388=]. The only part of the surface the player sees is the immediate area around Samus' ship, and the hills behind it at the end of the game. The first ''Metroid'' is entirely underground as well.
* UniqueEnemy: Used frequently beginning with, and especially in, ''Super Metroid''.
* TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon: The FinalBoss is always in an impressive location:
** The original puts Samus in [[spoiler:Mother Brain's subterranean lair, where you fight the Metroids for the first time.]]
** ''Metroid II'' has [[spoiler:the nest of the Metroid Queen.]]
** ''Super Metroid'' takes us [[spoiler:even deeper into planet Zebes, to fight Mother Brain again.]]
** ''Fusion'' ends things [[spoiler:WhereItAllBegan: the final boss is faced in the docking bay.]]
** ''Prime'' ends in [[spoiler:an impact crater from a Phazon meteor.]]
** ''Zero Mission'' has Samus infiltrate [[spoiler:the pirate mothership.]]
** ''Echoes'' finishes up in [[spoiler:the collapsing, Phazon-filled gateway of the Sky Temple -- the holy structure of the Ing.]]
** ''Hunters'' gives us [[spoiler:the [[TailorMadePrison Oubliette]], a ship constructed for one purpose: to house an EldritchAbomination.]]
** In what may be the most over-the-top instance of this trope in the series, ''Corruption'' [[spoiler:ends on a '''''sentient planet'''''.]]
** And to finish things off, ''Other M'' [[spoiler:brings a cloned Metroid Queen back for a showdown in a secure room aboard the Bottle Ship. At the end of the epilogue, Phantoon is fought in a giant, wide open room with glass Phantoon attacks from.]]
* VictorGainsLosersPowers:
** Samus in ''Metroid Fusion'' had all [[PowerCopying her abilities copied by X]]. After killing X-infected bosses (which tend to be able to produce similar attacks), she can absorb the X-parasite to regain that power.
** ''Metroid Prime 2'' does something similar, where, after losing most of her starting abilities to a mob of Ing, she has to regain them in one-on-one boss battles where they're used against her.
** The Phazon Suit from the Omega Pirate in the first Prime. ''Metroid Prime 3'' has Samus gain the Ice Missiles, Plasma Beam, Grapple Voltage, and all the Phazon upgrades this way.
* VideoGameRemake: ''Zero Mission''.
** A dedicated fan is remaking ''Metroid 2'', but with an engine similar to that found in ''Fusion'' and ''Zero Mission''. Curiously enough, it's named ''[[http://metroid2remake.blogspot.com.br/ Another Metroid 2 Remake]]''.
* VillainBasedFranchise: ''Fusion'' more or less {{Invert|edTrope}}s this, giving Samus herself Metroid-DNA.
* WallJump: Starting with ''Super Metroid'', Samus quickly became one of the most notable employers of this technique. It also is the primary tool of sequence breakers.
** ''Prime 2'' was the first game that explicitly informed the player that this was one of Samus' abilities; in all previous games, it was a secret, and admittedly optional, technique.
* WeirdWeather: Acid rain is a recurring hazard on the surface areas of planets:
** In the original ''VideoGame/Metroid1'' and ''VideoGame/MetroidZeroMission'' it appears on Zebes. The varia suit is enough to protect against it.
** In ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'', it appears on the Space Pirate Homeworld. Unlike the first game, you need a specific acid-proof "hazard shield" item to protect Samus from it. The {{Space Pirate}}s themselves seem immune to it.
* WhatMeasureIsANonHuman: Averted in ''Metroid II''. Samus couldn't bring herself to kill a child, even if said child was a parasitic monster and a potential threat to the galaxy. It certainly helped matters that she felt an attachment to the creature.
* WolverinePublicity: The Varia Suit is used in almost all of the series' covers and promotional images, even though it's typically only the middle of three suits.
* WombLevel: The innards of the Leviathans in ''Prime 3'', though that's more of a case of 'Womb Boss Chamber'. Phaaze is a living planet, too, though only a few parts of what we see of Phaaze is definitely organic.
** The Impact Crater in ''Prime'' and a couple of the rooms in Red Brinstar in ''Super'' also qualify.
* YouDontLookLikeYou: Samus suffered this problem until about ''Metroid Zero Mission.'' She was usually a blonde -- except when her hair was brown, green, or [[DarkSkinnedRedhead Dark Skinned Purple]] -- and her various facial features and overall style of rendering fluctuated. However, once ''Zero Mission/Prime 2'' hit, her appearance seemed to standardize. Her ''Fusion'' appearance could be explained by the surgery, or her altered DNA.
** Her armor also changed drastically between Metroid 1 and 2, and all flashbacks to the first game depict the redesigned armor. It got a further redesign in ''Other M'', which is also depicted in flashbacks to ''Metroid 2'' and ''Super Metroid''.
* YourPrincessIsInAnotherCastle: You've defeated [[BigBad Mother Brain]] and escaped Zebes in ''Zero Mission''... the game is over, right? Though, you never did find out what those mysterious power-ups were for... [[spoiler:Your ship gets shot down and you must [[UnexpectedGameplayChange sneak through the Space Pirate mothership to get your suit back.]]]]
* {{Zeerust}}: It's not really apparent in-game, given the low graphical capabilities of the console and the general lack of technology aside from Samus' suit, the doors, and the elevators, but the artwork of Samus for the original NES game makes it very apparent that ''Metroid'' was made in TheEighties. It has a rather boxier look than later portrayals, for one thing. Later games aged much better in this regard: even the immediate sequel to the first game, which was released only a few years later, features an artwork design for Samus that still looks pretty good even after twenty years.
* ZipMode: Samus' Speed Boost could be considered this if having to trek along a long straight path; she will travel fast enough to kill all normal enemies in the way.
----
-->''See You Next Mission!''
----
12th Mar '16 9:36:22 PM Prime32
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* ''ComicBook/SuperMetroidComic'' (1994, a loose adaptation of ''Super Metroid'' released in ''Nintendo Power'' magazine; while the story itself is non-canon, [[CanonImmigrant some of its characters were integrated into later portrayals]])

to:

* ''ComicBook/SuperMetroidComic'' ''ComicBook/SuperMetroid'' (1994, a loose adaptation of ''Super Metroid'' released in ''Nintendo Power'' magazine; while the story itself is non-canon, [[CanonImmigrant some of its characters were integrated into later portrayals]])
12th Mar '16 9:35:32 PM Prime32
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* ''ComicBook/SuperMetroid'' (1994, a loose adaptation of ''Super Metroid'' released in ''Nintendo Power'' magazine; while the story itself is non-canon, [[CanonImmigrant some of its characters were integrated into later portrayals]])

to:

* ''ComicBook/SuperMetroid'' ''ComicBook/SuperMetroidComic'' (1994, a loose adaptation of ''Super Metroid'' released in ''Nintendo Power'' magazine; while the story itself is non-canon, [[CanonImmigrant some of its characters were integrated into later portrayals]])
12th Mar '16 9:13:34 PM Prime32
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11th Mar '16 3:17:20 PM Prime32
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!!! Also see:

to:

!!! !!Comics and Manga:
[[index]]
* ''ComicBook/SuperMetroid'' (1994, a loose adaptation of ''Super Metroid'' released in ''Nintendo Power'' magazine; while the story itself is non-canon, [[CanonImmigrant some of its characters were integrated into later portrayals]])
* ''[[Manga/MetroidManga Metroid]]'' (2002, Samus's official BackStory, which ties directly into ''Fusion'' and ''Zero Mission'')
* ''ComicBook/MetroidPrime'' (2002, a 24-page depiction of the events of ''Metroid Prime'')
* ''Manga/MetroidSamusAndJoey'' (2003-2005, depicts Samus as a reluctant {{Mentor}} to a boy named Joey, who wants to be a hero like his father; changed its title to ''Metroid EX: Samus and Joey'' for the final arc)
** ''Rebirth of Samus'' (A one-shot manga which depicts the beginning of ''Fusion'' in manga form)
* ''Manga/MetroidPrimeEpisodeOfAether'' (2005-2006, a retelling of ''Metroid Prime 2'' in which survivors of the doomed Galactic Federation expedition team up with Samus)
[[/index]]

!!
Also see:



** Subverted in ''Zero Mission'', where you find a few upgrades incompatible with your suit. [[spoiler:You need the Fully-Powered Suit to use them.]] May be double subverted in that the suit you need is the one with Plug 'n' Play tech to begin with.
* PosthumousCharacter: Adam Malkovich is technically this, although ''Fusion'' puts an odd spin on it. ''Other M'', which takes place before ''Fusion'', shows him before his death.
* PowerCrystal: The ''Literature/{{Lensman}}''-like hand crystal on the back of her left hand. Originally just a visual effect, ''Zero Mission'' made it integral to use of the Power Grip, and the first ''Prime'' game made it the source of the Grapple lasso.
* PoweredArmor: Samus' suit.
* PrivateMilitaryContractor: What Samus actually is. Despite being referred to as a "bounty hunter" she doesn't actually take on bounties, most often serving this function to the Federation instead. (Worth noting, the one game that actually considered a bounty system, ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3'', had the idea shot down by Nintendo themselves while it was still in pre-production.)
* PuzzleBoss: Many, including Crocomire and Flaahgra.
* PuzzlePan: All 3D games but ''Echoes'' especially. Sometimes accompanied by weather patterns or fauna movements to smack where you need to go over your head.
* RaisedByNatives: Samus.
* RasputinianDeath: Crocomire in ''Super Metroid''.
* RecurringBoss: SA-X in ''Fusion'', though it's not really a boss until near the end of the game. Ridley may be a better example, considering he appears in almost every game, twice in ''Super'' and ''Corruption''. Also, [[spoiler:The final boss and title antagonist of ''Metroid Prime'' comes back as Dark Samus for the second and third games of the trilogy]].
* RidiculouslyCuteCritter: In the manga, Samus' pet Pyonchi appears to be about half squirrel, half rabbit, and ''all'' adorable. Also, the Etecoons [[note]]monkey-koala hybrids[[/note]] and the Dachoras [[note]]ostrich-style creatures[[/note]] in ''Super'' and ''Fusion''. Maybe the "little birdie" of ''Other M'' as well, al least until you learn [[spoiler:it's actually Ridley's clone]]
* RoarBeforeBeating: Some of the bosses do this.
* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: In ''Super Metroid''.
** Revenge on the space pirates could be seen as one of Samus' main motivations, especially against [[ArchEnemy Ridley]], who personally killed her mother right in front of her when she was four years old.
** The last bits of ''Zero Mission'': [[spoiler:The defeat of Mother Brain is spoiled by space pirates shooting you down. And your suit is lost. Then you get a better one which is followed by the annihilation of every Space Pirate on the Mothership.]]
* SavageSetpiece: Multiple non-hostile indigenous creatures will turn into this if you attack them.
* SavePoint: The second type is a common sight in the series. With the exception of Chozodia save points in ''Zero Mission'' and Samus's [[CoolStarship gunship]], they never refill health. The Save Stations in the ''Prime'' series, however, save and heal.
* SceneryGorn: Old Tourian in ''Super'' and post-Mother Brain ''Zero Mission'', [[spoiler:Sector 5 (ARC)]] in ''Metroid Fusion''.
* SchematizedProp: Many of the more recent games have taken up this trope, most notably using a Power Suit schematic as the item/weapon status screen (''Zero Mission'', ''Prime'', ''Prime 3'', ''Super'', ''Fusion''; the schematized suit was also seen in the instruction manual for ''Metroid II'').
* ScifiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale: Very few of Samus's weapons have numbers behind them, but those that do are absurdly powerful -- like "fully automatic nuclear explosion launcher" powerful.
* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: In the 3rd chapter of the manga, Samus - a newly recruited Galactic Federation Police Officer - and two fellow officers Mauk and Kreatz, are sent to planet of Jigrad on a recon mission to monitor the Space Pirates' activities there. Finding the Pirates are using human children as slave labor, Samus jumps in and massacres the Pirates before they can execute a child for being "unfit" for labor instead of reporting the find and waiting for orders. She and her team are later scolded by [[DaChief Chief Hardy]], but Samus is praised by the Jigradian people for her help.
** The finale of ''Fusion'' has [[spoiler:the Federation ordering Samus to stand down so that they can capture the SA-X for study (also Samus just blew up their top-secret Metroid cloning facility, so they're a bit ticked about that). Samus knows firsthand just how dangerous the SA-X is, so she proceeds to crash the space station into nearby planet [=SR388=], destroying both and eradicating the X for good.]] Given how much the Federation had invested into that, the general thought among fans is that Samus is no longer on their good side after this.
* SeaMonster: The boss Serris is a sea serpent with SuperSpeed. Before Serris, there was ''Super'' miniboss Botwoon, who was a serpent like Serris who sped up as he took damage, and could spit acid spread-shots. Also Draygon, the boss of Maridia.
* SequelHook: ''Fusion'' sure seemed to leave one hell of a sequel hook, what with [[spoiler:Samus having ''illegally blown up a Federation outpost'' and become something way other than human. Sure, Samus had her reasons, but all the implications in-game are that the Fed will be ''pissed as shit'' with her now.]]
** A sequel on the DS with 2-D gameplay, ''Metroid Dread'', was supposed to have been shown at [[UsefulNotes/ElectronicEntertainmentExpo E3]] 2006, but was mysteriously dropped. Potentially hinted at again in ''Corruption'', however.
* SequenceBreaking: The ''Metroid'' fandom coined this term from their extensive experience with this trope. ''Zero Mission'' was made with this in mind, pretty much the only thing set in stone is that Kraid must be beaten before Ridley[[note]]Until you learn to perform an Infinite Bomb Jump and find out what to use to break a certain block in a certain room's ceiling, and which block it is, at least.[[/note]], Ridley must be beaten before Mother Brain, and Mother Brain must be beaten before Chozodia.
* SequentialBoss:
** The final boss of ''{{Metroid}} Prime'' has two phases: the first phase is basically the same thing with increasing shifts to different weaknesses, and the second phase requires you to switch visors to locate the phasing Prime and blast it with the Phazon Beam.
** The final boss of ''Metroid Prime 2: Echoes'' features all three forms of the Emperor Ing, followed by a final battle against Dark Samus.
** In ''Metroid Prime 3: Corruption'', you [[spoiler:fight Aurora 313 right after putting down Dark Samus. 313 itself has two forms: complete and floating severed head]].
** Mother Brain from ''Super Metroid'' has 3 different phases. First you fight her like in the first game, as just the brain protected by turrets and zeebetite barriers. After you beat her and examine the body, she rises out of the floor on a robotic body. After dealing enough damage to her, she'll use an extremely powerful attack to reduce you to low health, after which the Metroid hatchling shows up to save the day. But then she comes back to life again and you have to beat the crap out of her again, this time armed with the Hyper Beam. And then you have to escape the planet before it blows up.
** ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' has the SA-X when you finally get to fight it. First there's the regular Varia Suit-sized version you've been avoiding the entire time. Hit that with your charged up Wave Beam, and you get a giant monstrosity that can't shoot you but can somehow jump anywhere in the room incredibly fast... Fortunately it stands still for a second every now and then and Screw Attack does work too (although it's a double-edged sword since it also hurts yourself...).
* ShapeShifterBaggage: Samus herself with the Morph Ball but the shape shifting is not actually the worst thing about it (the issue of vision is) nor is it the most glaring example; that goes to the X Parasites. They not only multiply impossibly fast but they can take on new, often large, forms nearly instantly.
* SharkTunnel: These are a common feature, starting with the tunnel between Brinstar and Maridia in ''Super Metroid'', to the underwater tunnel in Sector 4 in ''Fusion,'' the skywalk between Chozodia and the Pirate Mothership in ''Zero Mission,'' and the skywalk from Magmoor to Phazon Mines in ''Prime.'' All of them can be shattered with power bombs to allow free travel between the two areas.
* ShiftingSandLand: Sector 3 - PYR in ''Fusion'', the Agon Wastes in ''Echoes'', and the Experimental Simulated Desert in ''Other M''.
* ShoutOut: Several to the ''Franchise/{{Alien}}'' franchise. Ridley is named after director Ridley Scott, and the opening shot of ''Prime'' is almost identical to that of the first film. Even the title logos have similarities (ALIEN - メトロイド).
** A non-enemy creature in ''Super Metroid'' has a turtle like shell that flies around while spinning. Likely a nod to {{Gamera}}. Or possibly Bowser. Its offspring look strikingly similar to [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Buzzy Beetles]].
** A blink-and-you'll-miss-it example is the name of the planet that houses one Federation shipyard, where the GFS Olympus and Samus' gunship (the one used in ''Prime 2''; she goes through gunships like other people go through tissues) were built: [[{{Film/Alien 3}} Aliehs III]].
** And then there's the fact that, as of ''Super Metroid'', Samus can [[Manga/GetterRobo SHIIIIINESPAAAAAAAARK]]!
** Houston from the ''Super Metroid'' Comic in ''Magazine/NintendoPower'' seems to refer to Captain Dallas from the first ''Film/{{Alien}}'' film.
** The original Famicom Disk System version of the first game's Escape theme and subsequent arrangements in future games don't have it, but the NES version features a slight expansion that includes [[RecurringRiff a recurring six-note melody]] from the ''VideoGame/KidIcarus'' soundtrack.
** [[Music/MichaelJackson Moonwalking]] in ''Super Metroid''.
** The Restricted Area in ''Fusion'' looks and acts a hell of a lot like Tourian.
** Outside the actual series, in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', one of Zero Suit Samus' air-attacks is the Inazuma Kick from ''Anime/GunBuster''.
** In the Wanpakku manga[=/=]strategy guide for the original game, there's a sequence where Samus comes across a door for the first time, but doesn't know how to open it. She tries saying "OpenSesame!", followed by "Bamble, bomble, bambopp!" and "Pastel, popple, poppinpa!". (Neither of them worked.) The latter two phrases are incantations from MagicalGirl shows (specifically ''Anime/MagicalAngelCreamyMami'' and ''Anime/MagicalIdolPastelYumi'', respectfully).
** The Zero Suit is one to the datasuit of ''Manga/{{Appleseed}}'' that Deunan wears in her landmate.
** The mentioned in VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption "Horus Rebellion" is a reference to the "Literature/HorusHeresy" event from [[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer40000}} Warhammer 40,000]], another rebellion that was indeed some "nasty business," enough to cause a schism within the Imperium of Man. Said rebellion was led by the eponymous Horus, who was corrupted by the Chaos Gods, much like how Dark Samus in this game brainwashes the Space Pirates for her own ends. Coincidentally one of the daemons from early in Warhammer was named "Samus".
* SlippySlideyIceWorld: Sector 5 - ARC in ''Fusion'', the Cryosphere in ''Other M'', and the Phendrana Drifts in ''Prime''.
* SoleSurvivor: Samus, twice over: first when the K-2L colony was slaughtered by the Space Pirates, and again when the Space Pirates, under Mother Brain's direction, invaded Zebes and killed the remaining Chozo. Well, on Zebes, anyway. And then there's the last remaining Metroid from ''Metroid II''.
** The only Space Pirate who actually survived ''Super Metroid'' [[spoiler: without being cloned or remade was Phantoon.]]
* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: ''Metroid Prime Pinball'' qualifies.
* SomethingOnlyTheyWouldSay: How Samus discovers the identity of her AI CO in ''Metroid Fusion''.
** Many fans realized what the mysterious trailer for ''Other M'' was as soon as Adam said "Any objections, lady?" Prior to this, it was intentionally unclear what the game in question was.
* SoundOfNoDamage: In the 2D games, it sounds something like a beep.
* SpacePirates: The primary antagonists for most of the series; only three games didn't have them as the main attackers, and in two of the three, they made cameo appearances anyways.
* SpaceMarines: From ''Super'' and ''Prime'', Space Army in ''[[MetroidOtherM Other M]]''. Both are [[BadassArmy okay]], just not as good as Samus.
** Samus herself had once been a Space Marine when she was serving under Commander Adam Malkovitch.
* SpeedRun: ''Super Metroid'' and the following sequels have their maps designed so that you can solve them in a fraction of the expected solving time by using special techniques like wall jumping, bomb jumping, mock ball, etc. to get key items ahead of time.
* SprintShoes: Speed Booster.
* StarFishAliens: The main ones are X Parasites, the Ing, and Metroids, but others tend to pop up.
* StatuesqueStunner: Samus. Gandrayda is even taller.
* SteamVentObstacle:
** In the intro level for ''Super Metroid'', Samus needs to escape a space station, while avoiding gushes of steam coming out from practically everywhere. Getting hit by the steam doesn't cost you energy, but you lose precious time to escape.
** Happens again during the escape from planet Zebes, only the steam's escaping ''from the ground'' itself.
* SubBoss: ''Return of Samus'' is the only game that doesn't have at least one, if tougher Metroids don't qualify. (Although one might argue that Arachnus - even if being optional - can be considered to be one.)
* SuddenlyBlonde: In the original game, the Samus unmasked sprites gave her brown eyes, reddish brown hair, and a pink leotard (or bikini for the quick players). Come Super Metroid, Samus is blue/green eyed, blonde, and is wearing a dark blue leotard.
* SuddenlyVoiced: In ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', Samus finally spoke her taunts. However, they sounded rather... [[FetishFuel odd]]. In ''Other M'', she speaks for the first time in her own series.
* SuperweaponSurprise: Don't mess with Chozo statues... just, don't: ''"Those who defile [our statues] shall know our wrath, unfettered and raw."''
** In addition to that: do you know what you get when the peaceful, spiritual race bird race actually trains someone to fight, and gives them the technology to do so? You get ''[[OneManArmy Samus Aran]].''
*** And there used to be many more just like her (albeit Chozo). Samus is referred to as the first "Chozo" in many generations to choose the path of the warrior.
* SuspiciousVideogameGenerosity: If there is a save station -- and possibly recharge room -- next to a huge room, expect a boss to be nearby...
* SwissArmyWeapon: Samus' cannon shoots various beams, including power, ice, plasma, and wave, and also missiles. The whole power suit kind of qualifies.
* SympathyForTheDevil: As the series goes on, you realize the Metroids aren't so bad -- this culminates with Samus becoming part-Metroid in ''Fusion.''
** In ''Other M'', [[spoiler:MB when you know her past and the reason of her rampage.]]
* ThemeMusicPowerUp: This occurs in every ''Metroid'', but perhaps the most gratifying moment is in ''Zero Mission'' when, after running for your life from Space Pirates with nothing but your [[EmergencyWeapon Emergency Pistol]] and defeating the Chozo Ghost, Samus' unknown items transform into the Plasma Beam, Gravity Suit, and Space Jump. At this point, you can finally kill the Space Pirates... with ease.
* TomatoSurprise: SamusIsAGirl: [[TropeNamer Duh.]]
* TookALevelInBadass: In ''Super Metroid'', Samus' surrogate Metroid child returns. [[spoiler:It's gone from tiny to around four times as big as Samus. It later holds off Mother Brain.]]
** In most games, the Ice Beam is a useful weapon, but not that powerful. In ''Fusion'', Samus develops a weakness to cold and loses the Ice Beam. It becomes a weapon of pure murder when used against her, and [[spoiler:it's the last weapon she gets in the game.]]
* TraumaInducedAmnesia: [[spoiler:Happens to Samus in the manga. The trauma of watching her homeworld being destroyed and watching her parents die is essentially forgotten until Ridley forces Samus to remember what happened in their first encounter many years later. After remembering the event, Samus suffers a horrendous HeroicBSOD and begs her comrades to kill her.]]
* TheUndead: Coverns (Three skulls stuck together), Phantoon (Huge malevolent spirit allied with the Pirates), Chozo Ghosts, Dark Troopers, and Skeleton Crocomire.
* UndergroundLevel: The setting of a good majority of ''Super Metroid''. All of the action in ''Metroid II'' takes place in the caverns of [=SR388=]. The only part of the surface the player sees is the immediate area around Samus' ship, and the hills behind it at the end of the game. The first ''Metroid'' is entirely underground as well.
* UniqueEnemy: Used frequently beginning with, and especially in, ''Super Metroid''.
* TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon: The FinalBoss is always in an impressive location:
** The original puts Samus in [[spoiler:Mother Brain's subterranean lair, where you fight the Metroids for the first time.]]
** ''Metroid II'' has [[spoiler:the nest of the Metroid Queen.]]
** ''Super Metroid'' takes us [[spoiler:even deeper into planet Zebes, to fight Mother Brain again.]]
** ''Fusion'' ends things [[spoiler:WhereItAllBegan: the final boss is faced in the docking bay.]]
** ''Prime'' ends in [[spoiler:an impact crater from a Phazon meteor.]]
** ''Zero Mission'' has Samus infiltrate [[spoiler:the pirate mothership.]]
** ''Echoes'' finishes up in [[spoiler:the collapsing, Phazon-filled gateway of the Sky Temple -- the holy structure of the Ing.]]
** ''Hunters'' gives us [[spoiler:the [[TailorMadePrison Oubliette]], a ship constructed for one purpose: to house an EldritchAbomination.]]
** In what may be the most over-the-top instance of this trope in the series, ''Corruption'' [[spoiler:ends on a '''''sentient planet'''''.]]
** And to finish things off, ''Other M'' [[spoiler:brings a cloned Metroid Queen back for a showdown in a secure room aboard the Bottle Ship. At the end of the epilogue, Phantoon is fought in a giant, wide open room with glass Phantoon attacks from.]]
* VictorGainsLosersPowers:
** Samus in ''Metroid Fusion'' had all [[PowerCopying her abilities copied by X]]. After killing X-infected bosses (which tend to be able to produce similar attacks), she can absorb the X-parasite to regain that power.
** ''Metroid Prime 2'' does something similar, where, after losing most of her starting abilities to a mob of Ing, she has to regain them in one-on-one boss battles where they're used against her.
** The Phazon Suit from the Omega Pirate in the first Prime. ''Metroid Prime 3'' has Samus gain the Ice Missiles, Plasma Beam, Grapple Voltage, and all the Phazon upgrades this way.
* VideoGameRemake: ''Zero Mission''.
** A dedicated fan is remaking ''Metroid 2'', but with an engine similar to that found in ''Fusion'' and ''Zero Mission''. Curiously enough, it's named ''[[http://metroid2remake.blogspot.com.br/ Another Metroid 2 Remake]]''.
* VillainBasedFranchise: ''Fusion'' more or less {{Invert|edTrope}}s this, giving Samus herself Metroid-DNA.
* WallJump: Starting with ''Super Metroid'', Samus quickly became one of the most notable employers of this technique. It also is the primary tool of sequence breakers.
** ''Prime 2'' was the first game that explicitly informed the player that this was one of Samus' abilities; in all previous games, it was a secret, and admittedly optional, technique.
* WeirdWeather: Acid rain is a recurring hazard on the surface areas of planets:
** In the original ''VideoGame/Metroid1'' and ''VideoGame/MetroidZeroMission'' it appears on Zebes. The varia suit is enough to protect against it.
** In ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'', it appears on the Space Pirate Homeworld. Unlike the first game, you need a specific acid-proof "hazard shield" item to protect Samus from it. The {{Space Pirate}}s themselves seem immune to it.
* WhatMeasureIsANonHuman: Averted in ''Metroid II''. Samus couldn't bring herself to kill a child, even if said child was a parasitic monster and a potential threat to the galaxy. It certainly helped matters that she felt an attachment to the creature.
* WolverinePublicity: The Varia Suit is used in almost all of the series' covers and promotional images, even though it's typically only the middle of three suits.
* WombLevel: The innards of the Leviathans in ''Prime 3'', though that's more of a case of 'Womb Boss Chamber'. Phaaze is a living planet, too, though only a few parts of what we see of Phaaze is definitely organic.
** The Impact Crater in ''Prime'' and a couple of the rooms in Red Brinstar in ''Super'' also qualify.
* YouDontLookLikeYou: Samus suffered this problem until about ''Metroid Zero Mission.'' She was usually a blonde -- except when her hair was brown, green, or [[DarkSkinnedRedhead Dark Skinned Purple]] -- and her various facial features and overall style of rendering fluctuated. However, once ''Zero Mission/Prime 2'' hit, her appearance seemed to standardize. Her ''Fusion'' appearance could be explained by the surgery, or her altered DNA.
** Her armor also changed drastically between Metroid 1 and 2, and all flashbacks to the first game depict the redesigned armor. It got a further redesign in ''Other M'', which is also depicted in flashbacks to ''Metroid 2'' and ''Super Metroid''.
* YourPrincessIsInAnotherCastle: You've defeated [[BigBad Mother Brain]] and escaped Zebes in ''Zero Mission''... the game is over, right? Though, you never did find out what those mysterious power-ups were for... [[spoiler:Your ship gets shot down and you must [[UnexpectedGameplayChange sneak through the Space Pirate mothership to get your suit back.]]]]
* {{Zeerust}}: It's not really apparent in-game, given the low graphical capabilities of the console and the general lack of technology aside from Samus' suit, the doors, and the elevators, but the artwork of Samus for the original NES game makes it very apparent that ''Metroid'' was made in TheEighties. It has a rather boxier look than later portrayals, for one thing. Later games aged much better in this regard: even the immediate sequel to the first game, which was released only a few years later, features an artwork design for Samus that still looks pretty good even after twenty years.
* ZipMode: Samus' Speed Boost could be considered this if having to trek along a long straight path; she will travel fast enough to kill all normal enemies in the way.
----
-->''See You Next Mission!''
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to:

** Subverted in ''Zero Mission'', where you find a few upgrades incompatible with your suit. [[spoiler:You need the Fully-Powered Suit to use them.]] May be double subverted in that the suit you need is the one with Plug 'n' Play tech to begin with.
* PosthumousCharacter: Adam Malkovich is technically this, although ''Fusion'' puts an odd spin on it. ''Other M'', which takes place before ''Fusion'', shows him before his death.
* PowerCrystal: The ''Literature/{{Lensman}}''-like hand crystal on the back of her left hand. Originally just a visual effect, ''Zero Mission'' made it integral to use of the Power Grip, and the first ''Prime'' game made it the source of the Grapple lasso.
* PoweredArmor: Samus' suit.
* PrivateMilitaryContractor: What Samus actually is. Despite being referred to as a "bounty hunter" she doesn't actually take on bounties, most often serving this function to the Federation instead. (Worth noting, the one game that actually considered a bounty system, ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3'', had the idea shot down by Nintendo themselves while it was still in pre-production.)
* PuzzleBoss: Many, including Crocomire and Flaahgra.
* PuzzlePan: All 3D games but ''Echoes'' especially. Sometimes accompanied by weather patterns or fauna movements to smack where you need to go over your head.
* RaisedByNatives: Samus.
* RasputinianDeath: Crocomire in ''Super Metroid''.
* RecurringBoss: SA-X in ''Fusion'', though it's not really a boss until near the end of the game. Ridley may be a better example, considering he appears in almost every game, twice in ''Super'' and ''Corruption''. Also, [[spoiler:The final boss and title antagonist of ''Metroid Prime'' comes back as Dark Samus for the second and third games of the trilogy]].
* RidiculouslyCuteCritter: In the manga, Samus' pet Pyonchi appears to be about half squirrel, half rabbit, and ''all'' adorable. Also, the Etecoons [[note]]monkey-koala hybrids[[/note]] and the Dachoras [[note]]ostrich-style creatures[[/note]] in ''Super'' and ''Fusion''. Maybe the "little birdie" of ''Other M'' as well, al least until you learn [[spoiler:it's actually Ridley's clone]]
* RoarBeforeBeating: Some of the bosses do this.
* RoaringRampageOfRevenge: In ''Super Metroid''.
** Revenge on the space pirates could be seen as one of Samus' main motivations, especially against [[ArchEnemy Ridley]], who personally killed her mother right in front of her when she was four years old.
** The last bits of ''Zero Mission'': [[spoiler:The defeat of Mother Brain is spoiled by space pirates shooting you down. And your suit is lost. Then you get a better one which is followed by the annihilation of every Space Pirate on the Mothership.]]
* SavageSetpiece: Multiple non-hostile indigenous creatures will turn into this if you attack them.
* SavePoint: The second type is a common sight in the series. With the exception of Chozodia save points in ''Zero Mission'' and Samus's [[CoolStarship gunship]], they never refill health. The Save Stations in the ''Prime'' series, however, save and heal.
* SceneryGorn: Old Tourian in ''Super'' and post-Mother Brain ''Zero Mission'', [[spoiler:Sector 5 (ARC)]] in ''Metroid Fusion''.
* SchematizedProp: Many of the more recent games have taken up this trope, most notably using a Power Suit schematic as the item/weapon status screen (''Zero Mission'', ''Prime'', ''Prime 3'', ''Super'', ''Fusion''; the schematized suit was also seen in the instruction manual for ''Metroid II'').
* ScifiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale: Very few of Samus's weapons have numbers behind them, but those that do are absurdly powerful -- like "fully automatic nuclear explosion launcher" powerful.
* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: In the 3rd chapter of the manga, Samus - a newly recruited Galactic Federation Police Officer - and two fellow officers Mauk and Kreatz, are sent to planet of Jigrad on a recon mission to monitor the Space Pirates' activities there. Finding the Pirates are using human children as slave labor, Samus jumps in and massacres the Pirates before they can execute a child for being "unfit" for labor instead of reporting the find and waiting for orders. She and her team are later scolded by [[DaChief Chief Hardy]], but Samus is praised by the Jigradian people for her help.
** The finale of ''Fusion'' has [[spoiler:the Federation ordering Samus to stand down so that they can capture the SA-X for study (also Samus just blew up their top-secret Metroid cloning facility, so they're a bit ticked about that). Samus knows firsthand just how dangerous the SA-X is, so she proceeds to crash the space station into nearby planet [=SR388=], destroying both and eradicating the X for good.]] Given how much the Federation had invested into that, the general thought among fans is that Samus is no longer on their good side after this.
* SeaMonster: The boss Serris is a sea serpent with SuperSpeed. Before Serris, there was ''Super'' miniboss Botwoon, who was a serpent like Serris who sped up as he took damage, and could spit acid spread-shots. Also Draygon, the boss of Maridia.
* SequelHook: ''Fusion'' sure seemed to leave one hell of a sequel hook, what with [[spoiler:Samus having ''illegally blown up a Federation outpost'' and become something way other than human. Sure, Samus had her reasons, but all the implications in-game are that the Fed will be ''pissed as shit'' with her now.]]
** A sequel on the DS with 2-D gameplay, ''Metroid Dread'', was supposed to have been shown at [[UsefulNotes/ElectronicEntertainmentExpo E3]] 2006, but was mysteriously dropped. Potentially hinted at again in ''Corruption'', however.
* SequenceBreaking: The ''Metroid'' fandom coined this term from their extensive experience with this trope. ''Zero Mission'' was made with this in mind, pretty much the only thing set in stone is that Kraid must be beaten before Ridley[[note]]Until you learn to perform an Infinite Bomb Jump and find out what to use to break a certain block in a certain room's ceiling, and which block it is, at least.[[/note]], Ridley must be beaten before Mother Brain, and Mother Brain must be beaten before Chozodia.
* SequentialBoss:
** The final boss of ''{{Metroid}} Prime'' has two phases: the first phase is basically the same thing with increasing shifts to different weaknesses, and the second phase requires you to switch visors to locate the phasing Prime and blast it with the Phazon Beam.
** The final boss of ''Metroid Prime 2: Echoes'' features all three forms of the Emperor Ing, followed by a final battle against Dark Samus.
** In ''Metroid Prime 3: Corruption'', you [[spoiler:fight Aurora 313 right after putting down Dark Samus. 313 itself has two forms: complete and floating severed head]].
** Mother Brain from ''Super Metroid'' has 3 different phases. First you fight her like in the first game, as just the brain protected by turrets and zeebetite barriers. After you beat her and examine the body, she rises out of the floor on a robotic body. After dealing enough damage to her, she'll use an extremely powerful attack to reduce you to low health, after which the Metroid hatchling shows up to save the day. But then she comes back to life again and you have to beat the crap out of her again, this time armed with the Hyper Beam. And then you have to escape the planet before it blows up.
** ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' has the SA-X when you finally get to fight it. First there's the regular Varia Suit-sized version you've been avoiding the entire time. Hit that with your charged up Wave Beam, and you get a giant monstrosity that can't shoot you but can somehow jump anywhere in the room incredibly fast... Fortunately it stands still for a second every now and then and Screw Attack does work too (although it's a double-edged sword since it also hurts yourself...).
* ShapeShifterBaggage: Samus herself with the Morph Ball but the shape shifting is not actually the worst thing about it (the issue of vision is) nor is it the most glaring example; that goes to the X Parasites. They not only multiply impossibly fast but they can take on new, often large, forms nearly instantly.
* SharkTunnel: These are a common feature, starting with the tunnel between Brinstar and Maridia in ''Super Metroid'', to the underwater tunnel in Sector 4 in ''Fusion,'' the skywalk between Chozodia and the Pirate Mothership in ''Zero Mission,'' and the skywalk from Magmoor to Phazon Mines in ''Prime.'' All of them can be shattered with power bombs to allow free travel between the two areas.
* ShiftingSandLand: Sector 3 - PYR in ''Fusion'', the Agon Wastes in ''Echoes'', and the Experimental Simulated Desert in ''Other M''.
* ShoutOut: Several to the ''Franchise/{{Alien}}'' franchise. Ridley is named after director Ridley Scott, and the opening shot of ''Prime'' is almost identical to that of the first film. Even the title logos have similarities (ALIEN - メトロイド).
** A non-enemy creature in ''Super Metroid'' has a turtle like shell that flies around while spinning. Likely a nod to {{Gamera}}. Or possibly Bowser. Its offspring look strikingly similar to [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Buzzy Beetles]].
** A blink-and-you'll-miss-it example is the name of the planet that houses one Federation shipyard, where the GFS Olympus and Samus' gunship (the one used in ''Prime 2''; she goes through gunships like other people go through tissues) were built: [[{{Film/Alien 3}} Aliehs III]].
** And then there's the fact that, as of ''Super Metroid'', Samus can [[Manga/GetterRobo SHIIIIINESPAAAAAAAARK]]!
** Houston from the ''Super Metroid'' Comic in ''Magazine/NintendoPower'' seems to refer to Captain Dallas from the first ''Film/{{Alien}}'' film.
** The original Famicom Disk System version of the first game's Escape theme and subsequent arrangements in future games don't have it, but the NES version features a slight expansion that includes [[RecurringRiff a recurring six-note melody]] from the ''VideoGame/KidIcarus'' soundtrack.
** [[Music/MichaelJackson Moonwalking]] in ''Super Metroid''.
** The Restricted Area in ''Fusion'' looks and acts a hell of a lot like Tourian.
** Outside the actual series, in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', one of Zero Suit Samus' air-attacks is the Inazuma Kick from ''Anime/GunBuster''.
** In the Wanpakku manga[=/=]strategy guide for the original game, there's a sequence where Samus comes across a door for the first time, but doesn't know how to open it. She tries saying "OpenSesame!", followed by "Bamble, bomble, bambopp!" and "Pastel, popple, poppinpa!". (Neither of them worked.) The latter two phrases are incantations from MagicalGirl shows (specifically ''Anime/MagicalAngelCreamyMami'' and ''Anime/MagicalIdolPastelYumi'', respectfully).
** The Zero Suit is one to the datasuit of ''Manga/{{Appleseed}}'' that Deunan wears in her landmate.
** The mentioned in VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption "Horus Rebellion" is a reference to the "Literature/HorusHeresy" event from [[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer40000}} Warhammer 40,000]], another rebellion that was indeed some "nasty business," enough to cause a schism within the Imperium of Man. Said rebellion was led by the eponymous Horus, who was corrupted by the Chaos Gods, much like how Dark Samus in this game brainwashes the Space Pirates for her own ends. Coincidentally one of the daemons from early in Warhammer was named "Samus".
* SlippySlideyIceWorld: Sector 5 - ARC in ''Fusion'', the Cryosphere in ''Other M'', and the Phendrana Drifts in ''Prime''.
* SoleSurvivor: Samus, twice over: first when the K-2L colony was slaughtered by the Space Pirates, and again when the Space Pirates, under Mother Brain's direction, invaded Zebes and killed the remaining Chozo. Well, on Zebes, anyway. And then there's the last remaining Metroid from ''Metroid II''.
** The only Space Pirate who actually survived ''Super Metroid'' [[spoiler: without being cloned or remade was Phantoon.]]
* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: ''Metroid Prime Pinball'' qualifies.
* SomethingOnlyTheyWouldSay: How Samus discovers the identity of her AI CO in ''Metroid Fusion''.
** Many fans realized what the mysterious trailer for ''Other M'' was as soon as Adam said "Any objections, lady?" Prior to this, it was intentionally unclear what the game in question was.
* SoundOfNoDamage: In the 2D games, it sounds something like a beep.
* SpacePirates: The primary antagonists for most of the series; only three games didn't have them as the main attackers, and in two of the three, they made cameo appearances anyways.
* SpaceMarines: From ''Super'' and ''Prime'', Space Army in ''[[MetroidOtherM Other M]]''. Both are [[BadassArmy okay]], just not as good as Samus.
** Samus herself had once been a Space Marine when she was serving under Commander Adam Malkovitch.
* SpeedRun: ''Super Metroid'' and the following sequels have their maps designed so that you can solve them in a fraction of the expected solving time by using special techniques like wall jumping, bomb jumping, mock ball, etc. to get key items ahead of time.
* SprintShoes: Speed Booster.
* StarFishAliens: The main ones are X Parasites, the Ing, and Metroids, but others tend to pop up.
* StatuesqueStunner: Samus. Gandrayda is even taller.
* SteamVentObstacle:
** In the intro level for ''Super Metroid'', Samus needs to escape a space station, while avoiding gushes of steam coming out from practically everywhere. Getting hit by the steam doesn't cost you energy, but you lose precious time to escape.
** Happens again during the escape from planet Zebes, only the steam's escaping ''from the ground'' itself.
* SubBoss: ''Return of Samus'' is the only game that doesn't have at least one, if tougher Metroids don't qualify. (Although one might argue that Arachnus - even if being optional - can be considered to be one.)
* SuddenlyBlonde: In the original game, the Samus unmasked sprites gave her brown eyes, reddish brown hair, and a pink leotard (or bikini for the quick players). Come Super Metroid, Samus is blue/green eyed, blonde, and is wearing a dark blue leotard.
* SuddenlyVoiced: In ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'', Samus finally spoke her taunts. However, they sounded rather... [[FetishFuel odd]]. In ''Other M'', she speaks for the first time in her own series.
* SuperweaponSurprise: Don't mess with Chozo statues... just, don't: ''"Those who defile [our statues] shall know our wrath, unfettered and raw."''
** In addition to that: do you know what you get when the peaceful, spiritual race bird race actually trains someone to fight, and gives them the technology to do so? You get ''[[OneManArmy Samus Aran]].''
*** And there used to be many more just like her (albeit Chozo). Samus is referred to as the first "Chozo" in many generations to choose the path of the warrior.
* SuspiciousVideogameGenerosity: If there is a save station -- and possibly recharge room -- next to a huge room, expect a boss to be nearby...
* SwissArmyWeapon: Samus' cannon shoots various beams, including power, ice, plasma, and wave, and also missiles. The whole power suit kind of qualifies.
* SympathyForTheDevil: As the series goes on, you realize the Metroids aren't so bad -- this culminates with Samus becoming part-Metroid in ''Fusion.''
** In ''Other M'', [[spoiler:MB when you know her past and the reason of her rampage.]]
* ThemeMusicPowerUp: This occurs in every ''Metroid'', but perhaps the most gratifying moment is in ''Zero Mission'' when, after running for your life from Space Pirates with nothing but your [[EmergencyWeapon Emergency Pistol]] and defeating the Chozo Ghost, Samus' unknown items transform into the Plasma Beam, Gravity Suit, and Space Jump. At this point, you can finally kill the Space Pirates... with ease.
* TomatoSurprise: SamusIsAGirl: [[TropeNamer Duh.]]
* TookALevelInBadass: In ''Super Metroid'', Samus' surrogate Metroid child returns. [[spoiler:It's gone from tiny to around four times as big as Samus. It later holds off Mother Brain.]]
** In most games, the Ice Beam is a useful weapon, but not that powerful. In ''Fusion'', Samus develops a weakness to cold and loses the Ice Beam. It becomes a weapon of pure murder when used against her, and [[spoiler:it's the last weapon she gets in the game.]]
* TraumaInducedAmnesia: [[spoiler:Happens to Samus in the manga. The trauma of watching her homeworld being destroyed and watching her parents die is essentially forgotten until Ridley forces Samus to remember what happened in their first encounter many years later. After remembering the event, Samus suffers a horrendous HeroicBSOD and begs her comrades to kill her.]]
* TheUndead: Coverns (Three skulls stuck together), Phantoon (Huge malevolent spirit allied with the Pirates), Chozo Ghosts, Dark Troopers, and Skeleton Crocomire.
* UndergroundLevel: The setting of a good majority of ''Super Metroid''. All of the action in ''Metroid II'' takes place in the caverns of [=SR388=]. The only part of the surface the player sees is the immediate area around Samus' ship, and the hills behind it at the end of the game. The first ''Metroid'' is entirely underground as well.
* UniqueEnemy: Used frequently beginning with, and especially in, ''Super Metroid''.
* TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon: The FinalBoss is always in an impressive location:
** The original puts Samus in [[spoiler:Mother Brain's subterranean lair, where you fight the Metroids for the first time.]]
** ''Metroid II'' has [[spoiler:the nest of the Metroid Queen.]]
** ''Super Metroid'' takes us [[spoiler:even deeper into planet Zebes, to fight Mother Brain again.]]
** ''Fusion'' ends things [[spoiler:WhereItAllBegan: the final boss is faced in the docking bay.]]
** ''Prime'' ends in [[spoiler:an impact crater from a Phazon meteor.]]
** ''Zero Mission'' has Samus infiltrate [[spoiler:the pirate mothership.]]
** ''Echoes'' finishes up in [[spoiler:the collapsing, Phazon-filled gateway of the Sky Temple -- the holy structure of the Ing.]]
** ''Hunters'' gives us [[spoiler:the [[TailorMadePrison Oubliette]], a ship constructed for one purpose: to house an EldritchAbomination.]]
** In what may be the most over-the-top instance of this trope in the series, ''Corruption'' [[spoiler:ends on a '''''sentient planet'''''.]]
** And to finish things off, ''Other M'' [[spoiler:brings a cloned Metroid Queen back for a showdown in a secure room aboard the Bottle Ship. At the end of the epilogue, Phantoon is fought in a giant, wide open room with glass Phantoon attacks from.]]
* VictorGainsLosersPowers:
** Samus in ''Metroid Fusion'' had all [[PowerCopying her abilities copied by X]]. After killing X-infected bosses (which tend to be able to produce similar attacks), she can absorb the X-parasite to regain that power.
** ''Metroid Prime 2'' does something similar, where, after losing most of her starting abilities to a mob of Ing, she has to regain them in one-on-one boss battles where they're used against her.
** The Phazon Suit from the Omega Pirate in the first Prime. ''Metroid Prime 3'' has Samus gain the Ice Missiles, Plasma Beam, Grapple Voltage, and all the Phazon upgrades this way.
* VideoGameRemake: ''Zero Mission''.
** A dedicated fan is remaking ''Metroid 2'', but with an engine similar to that found in ''Fusion'' and ''Zero Mission''. Curiously enough, it's named ''[[http://metroid2remake.blogspot.com.br/ Another Metroid 2 Remake]]''.
* VillainBasedFranchise: ''Fusion'' more or less {{Invert|edTrope}}s this, giving Samus herself Metroid-DNA.
* WallJump: Starting with ''Super Metroid'', Samus quickly became one of the most notable employers of this technique. It also is the primary tool of sequence breakers.
** ''Prime 2'' was the first game that explicitly informed the player that this was one of Samus' abilities; in all previous games, it was a secret, and admittedly optional, technique.
* WeirdWeather: Acid rain is a recurring hazard on the surface areas of planets:
** In the original ''VideoGame/Metroid1'' and ''VideoGame/MetroidZeroMission'' it appears on Zebes. The varia suit is enough to protect against it.
** In ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'', it appears on the Space Pirate Homeworld. Unlike the first game, you need a specific acid-proof "hazard shield" item to protect Samus from it. The {{Space Pirate}}s themselves seem immune to it.
* WhatMeasureIsANonHuman: Averted in ''Metroid II''. Samus couldn't bring herself to kill a child, even if said child was a parasitic monster and a potential threat to the galaxy. It certainly helped matters that she felt an attachment to the creature.
* WolverinePublicity: The Varia Suit is used in almost all of the series' covers and promotional images, even though it's typically only the middle of three suits.
* WombLevel: The innards of the Leviathans in ''Prime 3'', though that's more of a case of 'Womb Boss Chamber'. Phaaze is a living planet, too, though only a few parts of what we see of Phaaze is definitely organic.
** The Impact Crater in ''Prime'' and a couple of the rooms in Red Brinstar in ''Super'' also qualify.
* YouDontLookLikeYou: Samus suffered this problem until about ''Metroid Zero Mission.'' She was usually a blonde -- except when her hair was brown, green, or [[DarkSkinnedRedhead Dark Skinned Purple]] -- and her various facial features and overall style of rendering fluctuated. However, once ''Zero Mission/Prime 2'' hit, her appearance seemed to standardize. Her ''Fusion'' appearance could be explained by the surgery, or her altered DNA.
** Her armor also changed drastically between Metroid 1 and 2, and all flashbacks to the first game depict the redesigned armor. It got a further redesign in ''Other M'', which is also depicted in flashbacks to ''Metroid 2'' and ''Super Metroid''.
* YourPrincessIsInAnotherCastle: You've defeated [[BigBad Mother Brain]] and escaped Zebes in ''Zero Mission''... the game is over, right? Though, you never did find out what those mysterious power-ups were for... [[spoiler:Your ship gets shot down and you must [[UnexpectedGameplayChange sneak through the Space Pirate mothership to get your suit back.]]]]
* {{Zeerust}}: It's not really apparent in-game, given the low graphical capabilities of the console and the general lack of technology aside from Samus' suit, the doors, and the elevators, but the artwork of Samus for the original NES game makes it very apparent that ''Metroid'' was made in TheEighties. It has a rather boxier look than later portrayals, for one thing. Later games aged much better in this regard: even the immediate sequel to the first game, which was released only a few years later, features an artwork design for Samus that still looks pretty good even after twenty years.
* ZipMode: Samus' Speed Boost could be considered this if having to trek along a long straight path; she will travel fast enough to kill all normal enemies in the way.
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-->''See You Next Mission!''
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