History Franchise / CharlieChan

15th Jan '16 6:12:01 AM Anddrix
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** First, as a NewspaperComic that ran from 1938-42 (it was cancelled because the white readers didn't want an Asian in the funnies... even though during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[ViewersAreMorons the Chinese were on the Allied side]]).
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** First, as a NewspaperComic that ran from 1938-42 (it was cancelled because the white readers didn't want an Asian in the funnies... even though during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII [[ViewersAreMorons the Chinese were on the Allied side]]).side).
28th Dec '15 2:22:04 AM morenohijazo
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!!!Tropes Associated With This Character Include:
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!!!Tropes !!Tropes Associated With This Character Include:

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!!!Tropes Associated With This Character Include:* InvisibleWriting: One mystery ''Charlie Chan in Shanghai'' has some writing on a piece of linen. The glyphs appear to be Chinese, but Chan declares them as gibberish. He then points out that, despite plenty of writing paper available, the marks were made on cloth. Chan rinses the linen in a bowl of water, which washes away some of the ink, but leaves the true message in broken Roman letters intact.
22nd Nov '15 2:06:24 AM JustTroper
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* HurricaneOfAphorisms: Charlie often speaks like this.
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* HurricaneOfAphorisms: Charlie often always speaks like this.
22nd Nov '15 2:05:57 AM JustTroper
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Added DiffLines:
* HurricaneOfAphorisms: Charlie often speaks like this.
26th Sep '15 3:46:01 PM nombretomado
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It was, oddly, a Swede, Warner Oland, who became in the opinion of Biggers and of most fans the ideal embodiment of the character. (Oland had already played FuManchu in the movies, and always claimed to be of Mongolian descent himself; he would continue to be in demand throughout the Thirties to play various Asian characters, such as Dr. Yogami in 1935's ''Film/WerewolfOfLondon''.) Oland played the detective in a series of 15 films for TwentiethCenturyFox, starting with ''Charlie Chan Carries On'' (1931), though many fans believe that his characterization really hit its stride in ''Charlie Chan in London'' (1934). Here Charlie assumed his archetypical form: the unassuming, heavily accented but brilliant detective, spouting pseudo-Oriental aphorisms (a {{Flanderization}} which Biggers himself cordially disliked), kindly and devoted to his fractious and multifarious family, and often having to endure the feckless co-detecting effort of his thoroughly Americanized Number One Son, Lee, or others of the clan. Chan became a globe-trotter: He rarely remained home in Honolulu, but appeared against a number of glamorous and exotic backgrounds: at the racetrack, at the opera, on Broadway, in London, in Paris, in the Pyramids of Egypt, at the 1936 Berlin OlympicGames. By the time of Oland's death in 1938, Charlie Chan was one of Fox's most popular and successful film series.
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It was, oddly, a Swede, Warner Oland, who became in the opinion of Biggers and of most fans the ideal embodiment of the character. (Oland had already played FuManchu in the movies, and always claimed to be of Mongolian descent himself; he would continue to be in demand throughout the Thirties to play various Asian characters, such as Dr. Yogami in 1935's ''Film/WerewolfOfLondon''.) Oland played the detective in a series of 15 films for TwentiethCenturyFox, starting with ''Charlie Chan Carries On'' (1931), though many fans believe that his characterization really hit its stride in ''Charlie Chan in London'' (1934). Here Charlie assumed his archetypical form: the unassuming, heavily accented but brilliant detective, spouting pseudo-Oriental aphorisms (a {{Flanderization}} which Biggers himself cordially disliked), kindly and devoted to his fractious and multifarious family, and often having to endure the feckless co-detecting effort of his thoroughly Americanized Number One Son, Lee, or others of the clan. Chan became a globe-trotter: He rarely remained home in Honolulu, but appeared against a number of glamorous and exotic backgrounds: at the racetrack, at the opera, on Broadway, in London, in Paris, in the Pyramids of Egypt, at the 1936 Berlin OlympicGames.UsefulNotes/OlympicGames. By the time of Oland's death in 1938, Charlie Chan was one of Fox's most popular and successful film series.
9th Sep '15 9:45:22 PM Cindylover1969
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* TheShelfOfMovieLanguishment: The MadeForTVMovie ''Happiness Is A Warm Clue'' was shot in 1970, but had its premiere on British television in 1973... and didn't get shown on American TV until ''1979''.
16th May '15 10:32:44 PM nombretomado
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* AnimatedAdaptation: Not only the 1972 HannaBarbera [[TheAmazingChanAndTheChanClan series]], but also the 1970 {{Creator/Filmation}} series (''See'' LawyerFriendlyCameo'', below.'')
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* AnimatedAdaptation: Not only the 1972 HannaBarbera Creator/HannaBarbera [[TheAmazingChanAndTheChanClan series]], but also the 1970 {{Creator/Filmation}} series (''See'' LawyerFriendlyCameo'', below.'')
14th May '15 4:48:52 PM MarkLungo
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Moved The Other Darrin to new Trivia page, then deleted it.
* TheOtherDarrin: After three films in which Chan was played by George Kuwa, S˘jin, and E.L. Park, Chan was played in a series of 15 films by Warner Oland until his death in 1938. The series continued with Sidney Toler playing Chan in 22 films, and when he died in 1947, Roland Winters took over the role for 6 films.

* ShoutOut: In ''Charlie Chan in Shanghai'', Oland sings a song making reference to "the Emperor FuManchu", a part he had [[ActorAllusion played himself]] in previous films. In the same film he asks son Lee Chan (Keye Luke) whether he is selling "Oil for the Lamps of China" -- the title of a popular TwentiethCenturyFox film in which Luke had just appeared.
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* ShoutOut: ShoutOut: ** In ''Charlie Chan in Shanghai'', Oland sings a song making reference to "the Emperor FuManchu", a part he had [[ActorAllusion played himself]] in previous films. In the same film he asks son Lee Chan (Keye Luke) whether he is selling "Oil for the Lamps of China" -- the title of a popular TwentiethCenturyFox film in which Luke had just appeared.
14th May '15 4:47:33 PM MarkLungo
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Moved Missing Episode to new Trivia page, then deleted it.
* MissingEpisode: Four of the Chan movies from the 1930s, ''Charlie Chan Carries On, Charlie Chan's Chance, Charlie Chan's Greatest Case'', and'' Charlie Chan's Courage'', are lost (though ''Charlie Chan Carries On'' survives in a Spanish-language version, ''Eran Trece'').
14th May '15 4:44:50 PM MarkLungo
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Moved Fake Nationality to new Trivia page, then deleted it.
* FakeNationality: While remaining Chinese, the character has only once in the Western media been portrayed by a Chinese actor. The animated version was voiced by Keye Luke. Live action versions have been played by Japanese, Korean, and (for the most notable versions) white actors.
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