History FollowTheLeader / Other

2nd Jan '17 11:10:48 AM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* When KFC pioneered fast-food chicken in TheSixties, many other chains began pursuing fried chicken as well. Many burger chains such as Hardee's and Red Barn began selling it, and flash-in-the-pan chains such as Minnie Pearl's Fried Chicken sprang to life. Perhaps the most notable competitor to spring out of the fried chicken boom is Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, which is still the second largest chicken chain after KFC.
21st Nov '16 9:44:28 PM Kartoonkid95
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* When Creator/CartoonNetwork achieved ratings success in the early 200s with their ''Creator/CartoonCartoonFridays'' block, CCreator/{{Nickelodeon}} tried to compete with them by launching ''Friday Night Nicktoons'' in 2002.
9th Nov '16 12:59:37 PM Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The popularity of Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} caused a glut of smaller wikis across the Internet, [[TheWikiRule mostly focused on specific topics of interest to the community they are set up in]].''[[Wiki/{{TVTropes}} * cough* ]]''

to:

* The popularity of Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} caused a glut of smaller wikis across the Internet, [[TheWikiRule mostly focused on specific topics of interest to the community they are set up in]].''[[Wiki/{{TVTropes}} * cough* *cough* ]]''
11th Oct '16 9:40:13 AM Mullon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Reddit has been bastardizing memes from [[ImageBoards The Image Board That Shall Not Be Named]], most infamously, though not limited to, rage comics. It's everything now that 4Chan makes that they steal and proclaim is original, and that they made it up, despite some of them having existed since long before the site's creation. Most infamously is that they ''love'' to claim they invented the [[MemeticMutation Trollface]], despite it coming from [[http://whynne.deviantart.com/art/Comic-Trolls-98357844 this comic]] by Website/DeviantArt user [[http://whynne.deviantart.com/ Whynne]].

to:

* Reddit has been bastardizing memes from [[ImageBoards The Image Board That Shall Not Be Named]], Website/FourChan, most infamously, though not limited to, rage comics. It's everything now that 4Chan makes that they steal and proclaim is original, and that they made it up, despite some of them having existed since long before the site's creation. Most infamously is that they ''love'' to claim they invented the [[MemeticMutation Trollface]], despite it coming from [[http://whynne.deviantart.com/art/Comic-Trolls-98357844 this comic]] by Website/DeviantArt user [[http://whynne.deviantart.com/ Whynne]].
2nd Oct '16 3:08:42 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The "streamliner" craze of the 1920s-1940s. After UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, TheRoaringTwenties became fascinated by airplanes and their speed. The railroads developed new ArtDeco trains, initially steam and later diesel, with streamlined bodies to not only go fast but also look fast, and keep the passenger train competitive against the airplane and the highway. Some streamliner designs, such as the Super Chief, the Mallard, the Hiawatha, the Daylight, and the Dreyfuss Hudson, are legendary. But other designs such as the Alco P/F-series diesels, the Union Pacific steam streamliners, or the streamliners of the minor railroads were seen as FollowTheLeader and are not so well celebrated.[[note]]Although the Alco PA/FA are often considered some of the most beautiful streamliners ever built.[[/note]]

to:

** The "streamliner" craze of the 1920s-1940s. After UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, people in TheRoaringTwenties became fascinated by airplanes and their speed. The railroads developed new ArtDeco trains, initially steam and later diesel, with streamlined bodies to not only go fast but also look fast, and keep the passenger train competitive against the airplane and the highway. Some streamliner designs, such as the Super Chief, the Mallard, the Hiawatha, the Daylight, and the Dreyfuss Hudson, are legendary. But other designs such as the Alco P/F-series diesels, the Union Pacific steam streamliners, or the streamliners of the minor railroads were seen as FollowTheLeader and are not so well celebrated.[[note]]Although the Alco PA/FA are often considered some of the most beautiful streamliners ever built.[[/note]]



* The reason why chevron is prevalent in space agency insignias is due to [[UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} one little agency]] winning the UsefulNotes/SpaceRace.

to:

* The reason why the chevron is prevalent in space agency insignias is due to [[UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} one little agency]] winning the UsefulNotes/SpaceRace.



* Many common practices of [[UsefulNotes/ThePresidents Presidents]] in the UsefulNotes/{{American political system}}, which are simply taken for granted today, can ultimately be traced back to the example set by UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington when the office was still new. The President of the United States is still always addressed as "Mister President" (or "Madame President"), a term of address that Washington devised for himself in order to avoid a more aristocratic title like "Your Excellency". Likewise, the two-term limit for American Presidents became standard because Washington voluntarily stepped down after two terms in office; it wasn't until UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt unexpectedly won ''four'' terms (almost 150 years after Washington's tenure) that it occurred to anyone to finally make the term limit a law).

to:

* Many common practices of [[UsefulNotes/ThePresidents Presidents]] in the UsefulNotes/{{American political system}}, which are simply taken for granted today, can ultimately be traced back to the example set by UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington when the office was still new. The President of the United States is still always addressed as "Mister President" (or "Madame President"), a term of address that Washington devised for himself in order to avoid a more aristocratic title like "Your Excellency". Likewise, the two-term limit for American Presidents became standard because Washington voluntarily stepped down after two terms in office; it wasn't until UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt unexpectedly won ''four'' terms (almost 150 years after Washington's tenure) that it occurred to anyone to finally make the term limit a law).law.
22nd Sep '16 9:00:07 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Two whole networks owe their existence to this. When the Creator/{{Fox}} network became successful in the early 1990s (mostly due to ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''BeverlyHills90210'', ''Series/MelrosePlace'', winning the rights to the National Football League's National Football Conference in 1993, and signing a deal in 1994 with television station owner New World Communications -­­ which Fox would buy in 1997 from Ronald Perelman), Time Warner and Paramount started Creator/TheWB Television Network and the [[Creator/{{UPN}} United Paramount Network]], respectively, in early 1995. The two even have similar origins to Fox, as all three had their roots in a group of independent stations (Fox had the six Metromedia independents[[note]]in UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}, [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas-Fort Worth]], UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC and UsefulNotes/{{Houston}}[[/note]], Creator/TheWB had the seven Tribune Broadcasting independents[[note]]in UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} (this station, WGN, was a huge boon, as it was [[Creator/WGNAmerica broadcast nationally]]), UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}}, UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}, UsefulNotes/{{Denver}}, and UsefulNotes/NewOrleans[[/note]], and UPN had the independents of Chris-Craft/United Television[[note]]in [=New Jersey/=]UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco, Phoenix, [[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minneapolis-St. Paul]] and UsefulNotes/{{Portland}}, OR[[/note]] and Paramount Stations Group[[note]]in [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas-Fort Worth]], UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC, UsefulNotes/{{Houston}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} and San Antonio (which was a Creator/{{Fox}} station before UPN knocked it off)[[/note]]. Both networks are gone now, as they missed that Fox had grown so quickly because of chance-taking (something the Big Three were not big on) and investing in popular, profitable sports programming (most of Tribune's WB stations dropped their sports programming roughly midway through the network's run, ironically to boost the network), though they live on as Creator/TheCW, which may head in the same direction as its forebears.

to:

* Two whole networks owe their existence to this. When the Creator/{{Fox}} network became successful in the early 1990s (mostly due to ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''BeverlyHills90210'', ''Series/BeverlyHills90210'', ''Series/MelrosePlace'', winning the rights to the National Football League's National Football Conference in 1993, and signing a deal in 1994 with television station owner New World Communications -­­ which Fox would buy in 1997 from Ronald Perelman), Time Warner and Paramount started Creator/TheWB Television Network and the [[Creator/{{UPN}} United Paramount Network]], respectively, in early 1995. The two even have similar origins to Fox, as all three had their roots in a group of independent stations (Fox had the six Metromedia independents[[note]]in UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}, [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas-Fort Worth]], UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC and UsefulNotes/{{Houston}}[[/note]], Creator/TheWB had the seven Tribune Broadcasting independents[[note]]in UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} (this station, WGN, was a huge boon, as it was [[Creator/WGNAmerica broadcast nationally]]), UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}}, UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}, UsefulNotes/{{Denver}}, and UsefulNotes/NewOrleans[[/note]], and UPN had the independents of Chris-Craft/United Television[[note]]in [=New Jersey/=]UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, UsefulNotes/LosAngeles, UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco, Phoenix, [[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minneapolis-St. Paul]] and UsefulNotes/{{Portland}}, OR[[/note]] and Paramount Stations Group[[note]]in [[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Dallas-Fort Worth]], UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC, UsefulNotes/{{Houston}}, UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} and San Antonio (which was a Creator/{{Fox}} station before UPN knocked it off)[[/note]]. Both networks are gone now, as they missed that Fox had grown so quickly because of chance-taking (something the Big Three were not big on) and investing in popular, profitable sports programming (most of Tribune's WB stations dropped their sports programming roughly midway through the network's run, ironically to boost the network), though they live on as Creator/TheCW, which may head in the same direction as its forebears.
17th Aug '16 7:53:56 PM JudasZala
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball American football]] coaches are notorious copycats, even at the [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague NFL]] or elite collegiate level. Whenever an innovative offensive or defensive scheme is unveiled, it will quickly be adopted by other teams... until someone figures out how to stop it. The spread offense is king at the moment, as well as the read option offense (as of the 2012 season); past trends (most of which still exist in some form) include the following: on the offensive side, there's the West Coast Offense, Air Coryell, the Run-and-Shoot, the hurry-up/no-huddle offense (and its variant, the two-minute drill), the shotgun formation, the wishbone, the T-formation, and ''especially'' in the 2008 NFL season, the Wildcat formation. On the defensive side, there's the 46 Defense, the zone blitz, and the Tampa 2. There's a reason why the NFL is often called a "copycat league".

to:

** [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball American football]] coaches are notorious copycats, even at the [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague NFL]] or elite collegiate level. Whenever an innovative offensive or defensive scheme is unveiled, it will quickly be adopted by other teams... until someone figures out how to stop it. The spread offense is king at the moment, as well as was the read option offense (as of the 2012 season); season) and the hurry-up/no-huddle offense (and its variant, the two-minute drill); past trends (most of which still exist in some form) include the following: on the offensive side, there's the West Coast Offense, Air Coryell, the Run-and-Shoot, the hurry-up/no-huddle offense (and its variant, the two-minute drill), the shotgun formation, the wishbone, the T-formation, and ''especially'' in the 2008 NFL season, the Wildcat formation. On the defensive side, there's the 46 Defense, the zone blitz, and the Tampa 2. There's a reason why the NFL is often called a "copycat league".
3rd May '16 1:19:42 PM JudasZala
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball American football]] coaches are notorious copycats, even at the [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague NFL]] or elite collegiate level. Whenever an innovative offensive or defensive scheme is unveiled, it will quickly be adopted by other teams... until someone figures out how to stop it. The spread offense is king at the moment, as well as the read option offense (as of the 2012 season); past trends (most of which still exist in some form) include the following: on the offensive side, there's the West Coast Offense, Air Coryell, the Run-and-Shoot, the hurry-up/two minute offense, the shotgun formation, the wishbone, the T-formation, and ''especially'' in the 2008 NFL season, the Wildcat formation. On the defensive side, there's the 46 Defense, the zone blitz, and the Tampa 2. There's a reason why the NFL is often called a "copycat league".

to:

** [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball American football]] coaches are notorious copycats, even at the [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague NFL]] or elite collegiate level. Whenever an innovative offensive or defensive scheme is unveiled, it will quickly be adopted by other teams... until someone figures out how to stop it. The spread offense is king at the moment, as well as the read option offense (as of the 2012 season); past trends (most of which still exist in some form) include the following: on the offensive side, there's the West Coast Offense, Air Coryell, the Run-and-Shoot, the hurry-up/two minute offense, hurry-up/no-huddle offense (and its variant, the two-minute drill), the shotgun formation, the wishbone, the T-formation, and ''especially'' in the 2008 NFL season, the Wildcat formation. On the defensive side, there's the 46 Defense, the zone blitz, and the Tampa 2. There's a reason why the NFL is often called a "copycat league".
21st Apr '16 1:53:37 PM JudasZala
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball American football]] coaches are notorious copycats, even at the [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague NFL]] or elite collegiate level. Whenever an innovative offensive or defensive scheme is unveiled, it will quickly be adopted by other teams... until someone figures out how to stop it. The spread offense is king at the moment, as well as the read option offense (as of the 2012 season); past trends (most of which still exist in some form) include the Run-and-Shoot, the shotgun formation, the West Coast Offense, the hurry-up offense, the 46 Defense, the zone blitz, the wishbone, the T-formation, and ''especially'' in the 2008 NFL season, the Wildcat formation. There's a reason why the NFL is often called a "copycat league".

to:

** [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball American football]] coaches are notorious copycats, even at the [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague NFL]] or elite collegiate level. Whenever an innovative offensive or defensive scheme is unveiled, it will quickly be adopted by other teams... until someone figures out how to stop it. The spread offense is king at the moment, as well as the read option offense (as of the 2012 season); past trends (most of which still exist in some form) include the Run-and-Shoot, following: on the shotgun formation, offensive side, there's the West Coast Offense, Air Coryell, the hurry-up Run-and-Shoot, the hurry-up/two minute offense, the 46 Defense, the zone blitz, shotgun formation, the wishbone, the T-formation, and ''especially'' in the 2008 NFL season, the Wildcat formation.formation. On the defensive side, there's the 46 Defense, the zone blitz, and the Tampa 2. There's a reason why the NFL is often called a "copycat league".
28th Mar '16 3:36:20 PM JudasZala
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball American football]] coaches are notorious copycats, even at the NFL or elite collegiate level. Whenever an innovative offensive or defensive scheme is unveiled, it will quickly be adopted by other teams... until someone figures out how to stop it. The spread offense is king at the moment, as well as the read option offense (as of the 2012 season); past trends (most of which still exist in some form) include the Run-and-Shoot, the shotgun formation, the West Coast Offense, the 46 Defense, the wishbone, the T-formation, and ''especially'' in the 2008 NFL season, the Wildcat formation. There's a reason why the NFL is often called a "copycat league".

to:

** [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball American football]] coaches are notorious copycats, even at the NFL [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague NFL]] or elite collegiate level. Whenever an innovative offensive or defensive scheme is unveiled, it will quickly be adopted by other teams... until someone figures out how to stop it. The spread offense is king at the moment, as well as the read option offense (as of the 2012 season); past trends (most of which still exist in some form) include the Run-and-Shoot, the shotgun formation, the West Coast Offense, the hurry-up offense, the 46 Defense, the zone blitz, the wishbone, the T-formation, and ''especially'' in the 2008 NFL season, the Wildcat formation. There's a reason why the NFL is often called a "copycat league".
This list shows the last 10 events of 135. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=FollowTheLeader.Other