History FollowTheLeader / Other

14th Sep '17 8:56:39 PM JackTheHammer
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* In 1982, the handgun industry was changed forever when Gaston Glock created the Glock 17. While it took a while for the shooting public to move away from the standard of metal-framed, hammer-fired handguns, the Glock series pistols eventually became the most widely used personal sidearm for civilians, law enforcement, and many militaries around the world. Competition for the Glock was slow to materialize; in the 1990s, Smith & Wesson had its Sigma series and Ruger had the P series pistols to compete, but both of them eventually faded out. In the 2000s, the Springfield XD series and the Smith & Wesson M&P series were the chief competitors (along with the Sigma's successor, the SW VE and later the SD VE lineup, which are essentially economy versions of the M&P). But it wasn't until [[TheNewTens the late 2010s]] when the rest of the gun industry finally entered the market for polymer-framed striker-fired handguns. SHOT Show 2017 featured many, ''many'' major manufacturers rolling out their versions of black polymer guns, all aiming to dethrone Glock's dominant position in the industry. These include the CZ P10 C, the Beretta APX, the Remington RP9, the Ruger American, the Fabrique Nationale FNS9, the Walther PPQ, the H&K VP series, and [[UpToEleven more]].

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* In 1982, the handgun industry was changed forever when Gaston Glock created the Glock 17. While it took a while for the shooting public to move away from the standard of metal-framed, hammer-fired handguns, the Glock series pistols eventually became the most widely used personal sidearm for civilians, law enforcement, and many militaries around the world. Competition for the Glock was slow to materialize; in the 1990s, Smith & Wesson had its Sigma series and Ruger had the P series pistols to compete, but both of them eventually faded out. In the 2000s, the Springfield XD series and the Smith & Wesson M&P series were the chief competitors (along with the Sigma's successor, the SW VE and later the SD VE lineup, which are essentially economy versions of the M&P). But it wasn't until [[TheNewTens the late 2010s]] when the rest of the gun industry finally entered the market for polymer-framed striker-fired handguns. SHOT Show 2017 featured many, ''many'' major manufacturers rolling out their versions of black polymer guns, all aiming to dethrone Glock's dominant position in the industry. These include the CZ P10 C, the Beretta APX, the Remington RP9, [=RP9=], the Ruger American, the Fabrique Nationale FNS9, [=FNS9=], the Walther PPQ, the H&K VP series, and [[UpToEleven more]].
14th Sep '17 8:56:07 PM JackTheHammer
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Added DiffLines:

* In 1982, the handgun industry was changed forever when Gaston Glock created the Glock 17. While it took a while for the shooting public to move away from the standard of metal-framed, hammer-fired handguns, the Glock series pistols eventually became the most widely used personal sidearm for civilians, law enforcement, and many militaries around the world. Competition for the Glock was slow to materialize; in the 1990s, Smith & Wesson had its Sigma series and Ruger had the P series pistols to compete, but both of them eventually faded out. In the 2000s, the Springfield XD series and the Smith & Wesson M&P series were the chief competitors (along with the Sigma's successor, the SW VE and later the SD VE lineup, which are essentially economy versions of the M&P). But it wasn't until [[TheNewTens the late 2010s]] when the rest of the gun industry finally entered the market for polymer-framed striker-fired handguns. SHOT Show 2017 featured many, ''many'' major manufacturers rolling out their versions of black polymer guns, all aiming to dethrone Glock's dominant position in the industry. These include the CZ P10 C, the Beretta APX, the Remington RP9, the Ruger American, the Fabrique Nationale FNS9, the Walther PPQ, the H&K VP series, and [[UpToEleven more]].
8th Aug '17 6:10:56 PM Millenia
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** Motorsport is rife with this at the top levels. A skilled engineer/aerodynamicist develops a new device. Said device results in their car utterly destroying the rest of the field. Cue each other team developing/copying the new device, sometimes failing to get it to work, other times refining it. Assuming they aren't petitioning the governing body to ban it, if it isn't already. The list of examples could fill it's own page.

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** Motorsport is rife with this at the top levels. A skilled engineer/aerodynamicist develops a new device. Said device results in their car utterly destroying the rest of the field. Cue each other team developing/copying the new device, sometimes failing to get it to work, other times refining it. Assuming they aren't petitioning the governing body to ban it, if it isn't already. The list of examples could fill it's its own page.
5th May '17 5:28:49 AM Cryoclaste
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*** The success and popularity of ''WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries'' inspired a number of imitators, making {{Gag Dub}}s for other popular series, such as ''WebVideo/{{Naruto|TheAbridgedSeries}}'', ''WebVideo/{{Avatar|TheAbridgedSeries}}'', ''{{Pokemon}}'', ''WebVideo/{{Sailor Moon|Abridged}}'', ''WebVideo/{{YuYu Hakusho|Abridged}}'', ''WebVideo/{{Higurashi|ParodyFanDub}}'', and ''WebVideo/{{Tokyo Mew Mew|InANutshell}}''. Out of all of TheAbridgedSeries on Website/YouTube or any other site, only a handful are actually worth watching. Related to that is the rise of the "[=MENT=]" style of abridging, which involves a ton of rapid-fire, non-sequitur humor, base off of the success of ''WebVideo/CodeMENT''.

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*** The success and popularity of ''WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries'' inspired a number of imitators, making {{Gag Dub}}s for other popular series, such as ''WebVideo/{{Naruto|TheAbridgedSeries}}'', ''WebVideo/{{Avatar|TheAbridgedSeries}}'', ''{{Pokemon}}'', ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', ''WebVideo/{{Sailor Moon|Abridged}}'', ''WebVideo/{{YuYu Hakusho|Abridged}}'', ''WebVideo/{{Higurashi|ParodyFanDub}}'', and ''WebVideo/{{Tokyo Mew Mew|InANutshell}}''. Out of all of TheAbridgedSeries on Website/YouTube or any other site, only a handful are actually worth watching. Related to that is the rise of the "[=MENT=]" style of abridging, which involves a ton of rapid-fire, non-sequitur humor, base off of the success of ''WebVideo/CodeMENT''.
30th Mar '17 12:04:04 AM DastardlyDemolition
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** Likewise with Tommy's Hamburgers in Los Angeles. A glut of Tommie's, Tomi's, and similar wannabe-clones came and (mostly) went.

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** Likewise with (Original) Tommy's Hamburgers in Los Angeles.Angeles, a fast food joint known and loved for its greasy chili burgers. A glut of Tommie's, Tomi's, and similar wannabe-clones came and (mostly) went.
2nd Jan '17 11:10:48 AM Twentington
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* When KFC pioneered fast-food chicken in TheSixties, many other chains began pursuing fried chicken as well. Many burger chains such as Hardee's and Red Barn began selling it, and flash-in-the-pan chains such as Minnie Pearl's Fried Chicken sprang to life. Perhaps the most notable competitor to spring out of the fried chicken boom is Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, which is still the second largest chicken chain after KFC.
21st Nov '16 9:44:28 PM Kartoonkid95
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* When Creator/CartoonNetwork achieved ratings success in the early 200s with their ''Creator/CartoonCartoonFridays'' block, CCreator/{{Nickelodeon}} tried to compete with them by launching ''Friday Night Nicktoons'' in 2002.
9th Nov '16 12:59:37 PM Kid
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* The popularity of Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} caused a glut of smaller wikis across the Internet, [[TheWikiRule mostly focused on specific topics of interest to the community they are set up in]].''[[Wiki/{{TVTropes}} * cough* ]]''

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* The popularity of Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} caused a glut of smaller wikis across the Internet, [[TheWikiRule mostly focused on specific topics of interest to the community they are set up in]].''[[Wiki/{{TVTropes}} * cough* *cough* ]]''
11th Oct '16 9:40:13 AM Mullon
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* Reddit has been bastardizing memes from [[ImageBoards The Image Board That Shall Not Be Named]], most infamously, though not limited to, rage comics. It's everything now that 4Chan makes that they steal and proclaim is original, and that they made it up, despite some of them having existed since long before the site's creation. Most infamously is that they ''love'' to claim they invented the [[MemeticMutation Trollface]], despite it coming from [[http://whynne.deviantart.com/art/Comic-Trolls-98357844 this comic]] by Website/DeviantArt user [[http://whynne.deviantart.com/ Whynne]].

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* Reddit has been bastardizing memes from [[ImageBoards The Image Board That Shall Not Be Named]], Website/FourChan, most infamously, though not limited to, rage comics. It's everything now that 4Chan makes that they steal and proclaim is original, and that they made it up, despite some of them having existed since long before the site's creation. Most infamously is that they ''love'' to claim they invented the [[MemeticMutation Trollface]], despite it coming from [[http://whynne.deviantart.com/art/Comic-Trolls-98357844 this comic]] by Website/DeviantArt user [[http://whynne.deviantart.com/ Whynne]].
2nd Oct '16 3:08:42 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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** The "streamliner" craze of the 1920s-1940s. After UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, TheRoaringTwenties became fascinated by airplanes and their speed. The railroads developed new ArtDeco trains, initially steam and later diesel, with streamlined bodies to not only go fast but also look fast, and keep the passenger train competitive against the airplane and the highway. Some streamliner designs, such as the Super Chief, the Mallard, the Hiawatha, the Daylight, and the Dreyfuss Hudson, are legendary. But other designs such as the Alco P/F-series diesels, the Union Pacific steam streamliners, or the streamliners of the minor railroads were seen as FollowTheLeader and are not so well celebrated.[[note]]Although the Alco PA/FA are often considered some of the most beautiful streamliners ever built.[[/note]]

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** The "streamliner" craze of the 1920s-1940s. After UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, people in TheRoaringTwenties became fascinated by airplanes and their speed. The railroads developed new ArtDeco trains, initially steam and later diesel, with streamlined bodies to not only go fast but also look fast, and keep the passenger train competitive against the airplane and the highway. Some streamliner designs, such as the Super Chief, the Mallard, the Hiawatha, the Daylight, and the Dreyfuss Hudson, are legendary. But other designs such as the Alco P/F-series diesels, the Union Pacific steam streamliners, or the streamliners of the minor railroads were seen as FollowTheLeader and are not so well celebrated.[[note]]Although the Alco PA/FA are often considered some of the most beautiful streamliners ever built.[[/note]]



* The reason why chevron is prevalent in space agency insignias is due to [[UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} one little agency]] winning the UsefulNotes/SpaceRace.

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* The reason why the chevron is prevalent in space agency insignias is due to [[UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} one little agency]] winning the UsefulNotes/SpaceRace.



* Many common practices of [[UsefulNotes/ThePresidents Presidents]] in the UsefulNotes/{{American political system}}, which are simply taken for granted today, can ultimately be traced back to the example set by UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington when the office was still new. The President of the United States is still always addressed as "Mister President" (or "Madame President"), a term of address that Washington devised for himself in order to avoid a more aristocratic title like "Your Excellency". Likewise, the two-term limit for American Presidents became standard because Washington voluntarily stepped down after two terms in office; it wasn't until UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt unexpectedly won ''four'' terms (almost 150 years after Washington's tenure) that it occurred to anyone to finally make the term limit a law).

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* Many common practices of [[UsefulNotes/ThePresidents Presidents]] in the UsefulNotes/{{American political system}}, which are simply taken for granted today, can ultimately be traced back to the example set by UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington when the office was still new. The President of the United States is still always addressed as "Mister President" (or "Madame President"), a term of address that Washington devised for himself in order to avoid a more aristocratic title like "Your Excellency". Likewise, the two-term limit for American Presidents became standard because Washington voluntarily stepped down after two terms in office; it wasn't until UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt unexpectedly won ''four'' terms (almost 150 years after Washington's tenure) that it occurred to anyone to finally make the term limit a law).law.
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