History Film / Troy

17th Mar '16 4:45:01 PM theLibrarian
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Added DiffLines:

* HeroAntagonist: The Greeks are the protagonists, but they're led by an expansionist power-hungry tyrant while the Trojans are simply defending their land and paying for the rash actions of one of their own, and their leaders are far more noble.
2nd Mar '16 3:47:32 AM JulianLapostat
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* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either. He wants to conquer Troy and annex it to his Kingdom and sees Helen's abduction as an ExcusePlot to mount an invasion. In the poem, Agamemnon never really expresses any true desire to conquer Troy, his plan is to defeat the army and avenge his brother's humiliation. Hence why he and the Achaeans sack the city and level it to the ground and [[CrushThePopulation kill, exile and enslave the population]] rather than establish a new government (as every conqueror would rationally do).

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* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either. He wants to conquer Troy and annex it to his Kingdom and sees Helen's abduction as an ExcusePlot to mount an invasion. In the poem, Agamemnon never really expresses any true desire to conquer Troy, his plan is to defeat the army and avenge his brother's humiliation. Hence why he and the Achaeans sack the city and level it to the ground and [[CrushThePopulation [[RapePillageAndBurn kill, exile and enslave the population]] rather than establish a new government (as every conqueror would rationally do).
2nd Mar '16 3:47:00 AM JulianLapostat
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* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either. He wants to conquer Troy and annex it to his Kingdom and sees Helen's abduction as an ExcusePlot to mount an invasion. In the poem, Agamemnon never really expresses any true desire to conquer Troy, his plan is to defeat the army and avenge his brother's humiliation. Hence why he and the Achaeans sack the city and level it to the ground and [[CrushThePopulace kill, exile and enslave the population]] rather than establish a new government (as every conqueror would rationally do).

to:

* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either. He wants to conquer Troy and annex it to his Kingdom and sees Helen's abduction as an ExcusePlot to mount an invasion. In the poem, Agamemnon never really expresses any true desire to conquer Troy, his plan is to defeat the army and avenge his brother's humiliation. Hence why he and the Achaeans sack the city and level it to the ground and [[CrushThePopulace [[CrushThePopulation kill, exile and enslave the population]] rather than establish a new government (as every conqueror would rationally do).
2nd Mar '16 3:46:33 AM JulianLapostat
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** On the whole, as per the title, this film openly sides with the Trojans over the Achaeans. The Trojans, except Paris, are painted as more or less innocent countrymen whose land and city is defending against an army of conquering barbarians. This reading is not at all inconsistent with the narrative in the original Iliad, but it is definitely a more modern perspective of the events than that of the original Greek readers.



* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either.

to:

* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either. He wants to conquer Troy and annex it to his Kingdom and sees Helen's abduction as an ExcusePlot to mount an invasion. In the poem, Agamemnon never really expresses any true desire to conquer Troy, his plan is to defeat the army and avenge his brother's humiliation. Hence why he and the Achaeans sack the city and level it to the ground and [[CrushThePopulace kill, exile and enslave the population]] rather than establish a new government (as every conqueror would rationally do).



* TheFilmOfTheBook

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* TheFilmOfTheBookTheFilmOfTheBook: A loose adaptation and expansion of the Trojan Cycle.



* {{Hubris}}

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* {{Hubris}}{{Hubris}}: Shown by the Trojans when they welcome the Trojan Horse into the city.
23rd Feb '16 6:37:23 AM poi99
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The 2004 movie version of the legend of UsefulNotes/TheTrojanWar, starring Creator/BradPitt as [[GlorySeeker Achilles]], Creator/EricBana as [[WarriorPrince Hector]], Creator/OrlandoBloom as [[RecklessSidekick Paris]], Creator/DianeKruger as [[LivingMacGuffin Helen]], Creator/BrianCox as [[TheGeneralissimo Agamemnon]], Creator/PeterOToole as [[TheGoodKing Priam]], Creator/RoseByrne as [[StockholmSyndrome Briseis]], and Creator/SeanBean as [[HeroOfAnotherStory Odysseus]] in one of his [[PlayingAgainstType rare not-dying roles]].

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The 2004 movie version of the legend of UsefulNotes/TheTrojanWar, starring Creator/BradPitt as [[GlorySeeker Achilles]], Creator/EricBana as [[WarriorPrince Hector]], Creator/OrlandoBloom as [[RecklessSidekick Paris]], Creator/DianeKruger as [[LivingMacGuffin Helen]], Creator/BrianCox as [[TheGeneralissimo Agamemnon]], Creator/PeterOToole as [[TheGoodKing Priam]], Creator/RoseByrne as [[StockholmSyndrome Briseis]], and Creator/SeanBean as [[HeroOfAnotherStory Odysseus]] in one of his [[PlayingAgainstType rare rare]] [[ChronicallyKilledActor not-dying roles]].
31st Jan '16 7:12:45 AM Silverblade2
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Added DiffLines:

** Achilles lives long enough to see the sack of Troy but in the mythology he dies earlier.
20th Dec '15 7:02:10 PM mkmckoy
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* ArmorPiercingQuestion: Subverted when Hector asks Achilles, “You speak of war as if it’s a game. But how many wives wait at Troy’s gates for husbands they’ll never see again?” To which [[DeadpanSnarker Achilles responds]], “[[ArmorPiercingResponse Perhaps your brother can comfort them]]. I hear [[TheCasanova he’s good at charming]] [[{{Cuckold}} other men’s wives]].” Hector is duly speechless.

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* ArmorPiercingQuestion: Subverted when ArmorPiercingResponse: Hector asks Achilles, tries an ArmorPiercingQuestion on Achilles: “You speak of war as if it’s a game. game. But how many wives wait at Troy’s gates for husbands they’ll never see again?” To which [[DeadpanSnarker again?” Achilles responds]], “[[ArmorPiercingResponse Perhaps your brother can comfort them]]. I hear responds, “Perhaps [[TheCasanova your brother]] can comfort them. I hear he’s good at charming]] [[{{Cuckold}} charming other men’s wives]].Hector is duly speechless.
30th Oct '15 10:35:16 AM TheWanderer
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* ArmorPiercingQuestion: Subverted when Hector asks Achilles, “You speak of war as if it’s a game. But how many wives wait at Troy’s gates for husbands they’ll never see again?” To which [[DeadpanSnarker Achilles responds]], “Perhaps your brother can comfort them. I hear [[TheCasanova he’s good at charming]] [[{{Cuckold}} other men’s wives]].” Hector is duly speechless.

to:

* ArmorPiercingQuestion: Subverted when Hector asks Achilles, “You speak of war as if it’s a game. But how many wives wait at Troy’s gates for husbands they’ll never see again?” To which [[DeadpanSnarker Achilles responds]], “Perhaps “[[ArmorPiercingResponse Perhaps your brother can comfort them.them]]. I hear [[TheCasanova he’s good at charming]] [[{{Cuckold}} other men’s wives]].” Hector is duly speechless.
13th Oct '15 10:27:54 PM BatmanKalEl
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* CastingGag: Sort of. Menelaus is played by Brendan Gleeson, a native of Dublin, Ireland. In the 1956 film Film/HelenOfTroy, Menelaus is played by Niall [=MacGinnis=] who is also a native of Dublin, Ireland. Both men are red haired, muscular and were in their forties when they portrayed the Spartan King. Gleeson does seem to bear quite the resemblance to [=MacGinnis=]. It seemed Wolfgang Petersen had been inspired by the Robert Wise film more than just a little.
17th Sep '15 1:30:01 AM MadSpy
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* TookALevelInBadass: Going a little bit into AdaptationalBadass territory, Paris is subject to both tropes. After Hector's death, he finally realizes things will never be the same and mans up. He is shown practising archery in his freetime rather than partying around or showing affection to Helen and by the time the Trojan Horse is introduced,he actually is far more level-headed than his father and the Trojan generals to the point he warns the Trojan Horse maybe a trap (but sadly is ignored). When Achilles meets him during the Sack of Troy and attempts to attack him, Paris stands his cool and fires arrows upon arrows (including hitting the famed heel on his first shot) until Achilles is too wounded to continue attempting to assault Paris. This may not be significant until you realize 1)Achilles had already multiple shots in vital areas and kept trying to get at Paris (which in real life would scare the crap out of even real soldiers) 2)This is Achilles the BEST WARRIOR of Greece we are talking about. Sure killing him with a bow and arrow may be as manly and taking him on with a sword but when its a man who killed much of the best Troy had to offer and could even take on 10-20 warriors single handedly you definitely have some badass points earned even if you killed the best swordsman with a projectile weapon. 3)Going hand-in-hand with AdaptationalBadass and pointer 1), most interpretations of the original story has Achilles killed upon being shot in the heel in an instant. Even earlier Greek sources where Achilles' supposed immortality was not part of the canon, a single arrow shot was enough to seriously incapacitate (and depending on what author you read, even kill) Achilles. It should be added also that in the original stories, Paris didn't even hit Achilles with his own skill but had the help of Greek Gods and their powers doe the killing. So when we have a cowardly partyboy who's done nothing but lay around with other husband's wives not only have the fortitude to stand his ground against a MemeticBadass but even continue to engage in battle despite said legendary badass receiving so many fatal wounds from multiple arrows but still running at you to hack you to pieces with his sword and WITHOUT the help of Gods but with his own skills he developed in his freetime, Paris definitely both TookALevelInBadass and receive some AdaptationalBadass points. Also sort of a TruthInTelevision as in real life it takes immense internal courage not to run away and to continue firing projectiles when enemy is just a few steps away and is about to slash your neck.

to:

* TookALevelInBadass: Going a little bit into AdaptationalBadass territory, Paris is subject to both tropes. After Hector's death, he finally realizes things will never be the same and mans up. He is shown practising archery in his freetime free time rather than partying around or showing affection to Helen and by Helen. By the time the Trojan Horse is introduced,he introduced, he actually is far more level-headed than his father and the Trojan generals to the point that he warns them that the Trojan Horse maybe a trap (but sadly is ignored). When Achilles meets him during the Sack of Troy and attempts to attack him, Paris stands his cool ground and fires arrows arrow upon arrows arrow (including hitting the famed heel on his first shot) until Achilles is too wounded to continue attempting to assault Paris. This may not be significant until you realize 1)Achilles that 1) Achilles had already multiple shots in vital areas and kept trying to get at Paris (which in real life would scare the crap out of even real soldiers) 2)This 2) This is Achilles Achilles, the BEST WARRIOR of Greece we are talking about. Sure killing Killing him with a bow and arrow may not be as manly and as taking him on with a sword but when its it's a man who killed much many of the best soldiers Troy had to offer and could even take on 10-20 warriors single handedly singlehanded, you definitely have earn some badass points earned even if you killed the best swordsman with a projectile weapon. 3)Going points. 3) Going hand-in-hand with AdaptationalBadass and pointer point 1), most interpretations of the original story has Achilles killed immediately upon being shot in the heel in an instant.heel. Even earlier Greek sources where Achilles' supposed immortality was not part of the canon, a single arrow shot was enough to seriously incapacitate (and depending on what author you read, even kill) Achilles. It should be added also that in the original stories, Paris didn't even hit Achilles with his own skill but had the help of Greek Gods and their powers doe the killing. So powers. So, when we have a cowardly partyboy who's party boy who has done nothing but lay around with other husband's wives not only have the fortitude to stand his ground against a MemeticBadass but even continue to engage in battle despite said legendary badass receiving so many fatal wounds from multiple arrows but still running at you to hack you to pieces with his sword and arrows, WITHOUT the help of Gods but with his own skills he developed in his freetime, free time, Paris definitely both TookALevelInBadass and receive some AdaptationalBadass points. Also Also, sort of a TruthInTelevision as in real life it takes immense internal courage not to run away and to continue firing projectiles when enemy is just a few steps away and is about to slash your neck.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.Troy