History Film / Troy

14th Aug '16 5:00:21 AM CaellachTigerEye
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** Justified though in that Achilles shows signs of being a NayTheist, if not outright irreligious and even if one assumes the Greek Gods have a play in the movie's event, it should be remembered Achilles is supposedly the daughter of a river deity and thus have Olympian blood in him.

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** Justified though in that Achilles shows signs of being a NayTheist, if not outright irreligious and even if one assumes the Greek Gods have a play in the movie's event, it should be remembered Achilles is supposedly the daughter son of a river deity and thus have Olympian blood in him.
17th Mar '16 4:45:01 PM theLibrarian
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Added DiffLines:

* HeroAntagonist: The Greeks are the protagonists, but they're led by an expansionist power-hungry tyrant while the Trojans are simply defending their land and paying for the rash actions of one of their own, and their leaders are far more noble.
2nd Mar '16 3:47:32 AM JulianLapostat
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* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either. He wants to conquer Troy and annex it to his Kingdom and sees Helen's abduction as an ExcusePlot to mount an invasion. In the poem, Agamemnon never really expresses any true desire to conquer Troy, his plan is to defeat the army and avenge his brother's humiliation. Hence why he and the Achaeans sack the city and level it to the ground and [[CrushThePopulation kill, exile and enslave the population]] rather than establish a new government (as every conqueror would rationally do).

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* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either. He wants to conquer Troy and annex it to his Kingdom and sees Helen's abduction as an ExcusePlot to mount an invasion. In the poem, Agamemnon never really expresses any true desire to conquer Troy, his plan is to defeat the army and avenge his brother's humiliation. Hence why he and the Achaeans sack the city and level it to the ground and [[CrushThePopulation [[RapePillageAndBurn kill, exile and enslave the population]] rather than establish a new government (as every conqueror would rationally do).
2nd Mar '16 3:47:00 AM JulianLapostat
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* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either. He wants to conquer Troy and annex it to his Kingdom and sees Helen's abduction as an ExcusePlot to mount an invasion. In the poem, Agamemnon never really expresses any true desire to conquer Troy, his plan is to defeat the army and avenge his brother's humiliation. Hence why he and the Achaeans sack the city and level it to the ground and [[CrushThePopulace kill, exile and enslave the population]] rather than establish a new government (as every conqueror would rationally do).

to:

* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either. He wants to conquer Troy and annex it to his Kingdom and sees Helen's abduction as an ExcusePlot to mount an invasion. In the poem, Agamemnon never really expresses any true desire to conquer Troy, his plan is to defeat the army and avenge his brother's humiliation. Hence why he and the Achaeans sack the city and level it to the ground and [[CrushThePopulace [[CrushThePopulation kill, exile and enslave the population]] rather than establish a new government (as every conqueror would rationally do).
2nd Mar '16 3:46:33 AM JulianLapostat
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** On the whole, as per the title, this film openly sides with the Trojans over the Achaeans. The Trojans, except Paris, are painted as more or less innocent countrymen whose land and city is defending against an army of conquering barbarians. This reading is not at all inconsistent with the narrative in the original Iliad, but it is definitely a more modern perspective of the events than that of the original Greek readers.



* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either.

to:

* AdaptationalVillainy: While not exactly a NiceGuy in the original poem, the film goes to great lengths to portray Agamemnon as little more than a pure evil, mustache twirling tyrant with no redeeming qualities beyond a genuine love for his brother Menelaus, who is not portrayed in the best light either. He wants to conquer Troy and annex it to his Kingdom and sees Helen's abduction as an ExcusePlot to mount an invasion. In the poem, Agamemnon never really expresses any true desire to conquer Troy, his plan is to defeat the army and avenge his brother's humiliation. Hence why he and the Achaeans sack the city and level it to the ground and [[CrushThePopulace kill, exile and enslave the population]] rather than establish a new government (as every conqueror would rationally do).



* TheFilmOfTheBook

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* TheFilmOfTheBookTheFilmOfTheBook: A loose adaptation and expansion of the Trojan Cycle.



* {{Hubris}}

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* {{Hubris}}{{Hubris}}: Shown by the Trojans when they welcome the Trojan Horse into the city.
23rd Feb '16 6:37:23 AM poi99
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The 2004 movie version of the legend of UsefulNotes/TheTrojanWar, starring Creator/BradPitt as [[GlorySeeker Achilles]], Creator/EricBana as [[WarriorPrince Hector]], Creator/OrlandoBloom as [[RecklessSidekick Paris]], Creator/DianeKruger as [[LivingMacGuffin Helen]], Creator/BrianCox as [[TheGeneralissimo Agamemnon]], Creator/PeterOToole as [[TheGoodKing Priam]], Creator/RoseByrne as [[StockholmSyndrome Briseis]], and Creator/SeanBean as [[HeroOfAnotherStory Odysseus]] in one of his [[PlayingAgainstType rare not-dying roles]].

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The 2004 movie version of the legend of UsefulNotes/TheTrojanWar, starring Creator/BradPitt as [[GlorySeeker Achilles]], Creator/EricBana as [[WarriorPrince Hector]], Creator/OrlandoBloom as [[RecklessSidekick Paris]], Creator/DianeKruger as [[LivingMacGuffin Helen]], Creator/BrianCox as [[TheGeneralissimo Agamemnon]], Creator/PeterOToole as [[TheGoodKing Priam]], Creator/RoseByrne as [[StockholmSyndrome Briseis]], and Creator/SeanBean as [[HeroOfAnotherStory Odysseus]] in one of his [[PlayingAgainstType rare rare]] [[ChronicallyKilledActor not-dying roles]].
31st Jan '16 7:12:45 AM Silverblade2
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Added DiffLines:

** Achilles lives long enough to see the sack of Troy but in the mythology he dies earlier.
20th Dec '15 7:02:10 PM mkmckoy
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* ArmorPiercingQuestion: Subverted when Hector asks Achilles, “You speak of war as if it’s a game. But how many wives wait at Troy’s gates for husbands they’ll never see again?” To which [[DeadpanSnarker Achilles responds]], “[[ArmorPiercingResponse Perhaps your brother can comfort them]]. I hear [[TheCasanova he’s good at charming]] [[{{Cuckold}} other men’s wives]].” Hector is duly speechless.

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* ArmorPiercingQuestion: Subverted when ArmorPiercingResponse: Hector asks Achilles, tries an ArmorPiercingQuestion on Achilles: “You speak of war as if it’s a game. game. But how many wives wait at Troy’s gates for husbands they’ll never see again?” To which [[DeadpanSnarker again?” Achilles responds]], “[[ArmorPiercingResponse Perhaps your brother can comfort them]]. I hear responds, “Perhaps [[TheCasanova your brother]] can comfort them. I hear he’s good at charming]] [[{{Cuckold}} charming other men’s wives]].Hector is duly speechless.
30th Oct '15 10:35:16 AM TheWanderer
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* ArmorPiercingQuestion: Subverted when Hector asks Achilles, “You speak of war as if it’s a game. But how many wives wait at Troy’s gates for husbands they’ll never see again?” To which [[DeadpanSnarker Achilles responds]], “Perhaps your brother can comfort them. I hear [[TheCasanova he’s good at charming]] [[{{Cuckold}} other men’s wives]].” Hector is duly speechless.

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* ArmorPiercingQuestion: Subverted when Hector asks Achilles, “You speak of war as if it’s a game. But how many wives wait at Troy’s gates for husbands they’ll never see again?” To which [[DeadpanSnarker Achilles responds]], “Perhaps “[[ArmorPiercingResponse Perhaps your brother can comfort them.them]]. I hear [[TheCasanova he’s good at charming]] [[{{Cuckold}} other men’s wives]].” Hector is duly speechless.
13th Oct '15 10:27:54 PM BatmanKalEl
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* CastingGag: Sort of. Menelaus is played by Brendan Gleeson, a native of Dublin, Ireland. In the 1956 film Film/HelenOfTroy, Menelaus is played by Niall [=MacGinnis=] who is also a native of Dublin, Ireland. Both men are red haired, muscular and were in their forties when they portrayed the Spartan King. Gleeson does seem to bear quite the resemblance to [=MacGinnis=]. It seemed Wolfgang Petersen had been inspired by the Robert Wise film more than just a little.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.Troy