History Film / TheToweringInferno

19th Jan '17 12:08:17 AM TheTrailblazerCritic
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* AssholeVictim: Roger Simmons, full stop. It is his negligence and cost-cutting that causes the massive inferno, and at no point does he ever appear to lament his part in it. He tries to muscle his way to the front of the line for the breeches buoy as the fire nears the top floor, and in the struggle that ensues he deliberately kicks two men rushing to stop him to their deaths, taking a third with him when the buoy is blown off the building, causing his own death in the process.


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* HoistByHisOwnPetard: Duncan, Roberts, and Simmons all qualify for the irresponsible decisions they made in the building's construction. It is Simmons however who takes the cake when he tries to commandeer the breeches buoy for himself against everyone's protests, an act that gets him killed when the buoy finally gives way.
19th Jan '17 12:01:58 AM TheTrailblazerCritic
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* SkewedPriorities: It is Simmons' insistence on cutting back costs in the electrical installations that causes the inferno to break out, and he defends this decision even as the crisis has begun to escalate. He later tries to save his own skin ahead of the dozens of partygoers who are to evacuate ahead of him, which leads to his own death when the breeches buoy malfunctions.
** Jim Duncan refuses to evacuate the top deck when he's informed that a fire has broken out on the eighty-first floor, confident that such an incident would not come to affect the festivities. He even tells Roberts to get his dress jacket when he just got done explaining that one of their own men has been burned. When Duncan finally does act on the warnings, he continues to downplay the scale of the crisis until it is apparent that the fire is truly out of control.
24th Dec '16 3:12:46 PM PersonalPOV
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** Arguably the small scene in which Lorrie sees a plastic object with the Duncan motto "We Build For Life" being consumed by the flames foreshadows both that [[spoilers: corners were cut in the production]] and Lorrie's imminent death.
3rd Dec '16 7:34:16 AM jamespolk
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A 1974 DisasterMovie produced by Creator/IrwinAllen, directed by John Guillermin and featuring an AllStarCast headed by Creator/SteveMcQueen and Creator/PaulNewman.

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A 1974 DisasterMovie produced by Creator/IrwinAllen, directed by John Guillermin and featuring an AllStarCast headed by Creator/SteveMcQueen Creator/SteveMcQueenActor and Creator/PaulNewman.
18th Jul '16 7:53:31 AM Phrydio
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**Maureen McGovern was evacuated safely. All of the women were already evacuated from the party room before Roger Simmons [[spoiler: tried to cut in line and fell to his death with the breeches buoy.]]
13th Apr '16 2:06:40 AM Mdumas43073
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''The Towering Inferno'' was the first Hollywood movie to come from ''two'' major studios -- it was a co-production between TwentiethCenturyFox and WarnerBros The movie was based on two similarly-plotted novels, ''The Tower'' and ''The Glass Inferno''. Warner had purchased the film rights to the former, and Fox the latter; then someone realized that two DuelingMovies about a skyscraper on fire would basically cannibalize the audience for both films (as would happen a couple decades later, when the aforementioned 20th Century Fox released ''Film/{{Volcano}}'' not long after Creator/{{Universal}} released ''[[Film/DantesPeak Dante's Peak]]'', both films dealing with sudden volcano eruptions). To prevent this from happening it was decided it would be better for both studios to combine resources to make one BIG picture. (On a side note, ''The Glass Inferno'' was co-written by Thomas N. Scortia, who tends to write a lot of books about fires.)

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''The Towering Inferno'' was the first Hollywood movie to come from ''two'' major studios -- it was a co-production between TwentiethCenturyFox Creator/WarnerBros and WarnerBros Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox. The movie story was based on two similarly-plotted novels, ''The Tower'' and ''The Glass Inferno''. Warner had purchased the film rights to the former, and Fox the latter; then someone realized that two DuelingMovies about a skyscraper on fire would basically cannibalize the audience for both films (as would happen a couple decades later, when the aforementioned 20th Century Fox released ''Film/{{Volcano}}'' not long after Creator/{{Universal}} released ''[[Film/DantesPeak Dante's Peak]]'', both films dealing with sudden volcano eruptions). To prevent this from happening it was decided it would be better for both studios to combine resources to make one BIG picture. (On a side note, ''The Glass Inferno'' was co-written by Thomas N. Scortia, who tends to write a lot of books about fires.)
8th Apr '16 3:58:52 PM DavidDelony
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* RippedFromTheHeadlines: While the film was based on two novels, the events are also very similar to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joelma_fire Joelma fire]] in Sao Paulo, Brazil, earlier in 1974. As in the film, it was a fire in a skyscraper caused by an electrical fault. As in the film, the interior was furnished with substandard materials and no fire supression equipment.

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* RippedFromTheHeadlines: While the film was based on two novels, the events are also very similar to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joelma_fire Joelma fire]] in Sao Paulo, Brazil, earlier in 1974. As in the film, it was a fire in a skyscraper caused by an electrical fault. As in the film, the interior was furnished with substandard materials and no fire supression suppression equipment.
8th Apr '16 3:58:33 PM DavidDelony
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* RippedFromTheHeadlines: While the film was based on two novels, the events are also very similar to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joelma_fire Joelma fire]] in Sao Paulo, Brazil, earlier in 1974. As in the film, it was a fire in a skyscraper caused by an electrical fault. As in the film, the interior was furnished with substandard materials.

to:

* RippedFromTheHeadlines: While the film was based on two novels, the events are also very similar to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joelma_fire Joelma fire]] in Sao Paulo, Brazil, earlier in 1974. As in the film, it was a fire in a skyscraper caused by an electrical fault. As in the film, the interior was furnished with substandard materials.materials and no fire supression equipment.
8th Apr '16 3:57:34 PM DavidDelony
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* RippedFromTheHeadlines: While the film was based on two novels, the events are also very similar to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joelma_fire Joelma fire]] in Sao Paulo, Brazil, earlier in 1974. As in the film, it was a fire in a skyscraper caused by an electrical fault.

to:

* RippedFromTheHeadlines: While the film was based on two novels, the events are also very similar to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joelma_fire Joelma fire]] in Sao Paulo, Brazil, earlier in 1974. As in the film, it was a fire in a skyscraper caused by an electrical fault. As in the film, the interior was furnished with substandard materials.
8th Apr '16 3:56:34 PM DavidDelony
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Added DiffLines:

* RippedFromTheHeadlines: While the film was based on two novels, the events are also very similar to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joelma_fire Joelma fire]] in Sao Paulo, Brazil, earlier in 1974. As in the film, it was a fire in a skyscraper caused by an electrical fault.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.TheToweringInferno