History Film / TheToweringInferno

1st Jan '16 8:21:58 AM Dr_Zero
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** For the couple of lovers Bigelow and Lorrie. Bigelow thinks he can pull a HeroicSacrifice off, running trough the flames to search for the firemen to save Lorrie. He [[GoOutWithASMile gives her a last smile, too, before going]]. We start to think he might really do it. And then RealityEnsues, the aforementioned aversion of ConvectionSchmonvection happens and he burns alive in a matter of seconds. She follows quickly. Doubles as TearJerker.
26th Nov '15 8:22:10 PM nombretomado
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In the film, a red-carpet party is being held in SanFrancisco to celebrate the opening of the world's tallest skyscraper, the 138-story Glass Tower. One of the few not celebrating is [[TheHero the architect]], Doug Roberts (Paul Newman), who's still upset that developer/builder Jim Duncan (Creator/WilliamHolden) made significant changes to the design during construction in the name of saving money. He's particularly annoyed at electrical contractor Roger Simmons (Richard Chamberlain) who has shaved so much from the budget that the building's wiring is already showing signs of overload. It doesn't help that he's also [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections Duncan's son-in-law]].
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In the film, a red-carpet party is being held in SanFrancisco UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco to celebrate the opening of the world's tallest skyscraper, the 138-story Glass Tower. One of the few not celebrating is [[TheHero the architect]], Doug Roberts (Paul Newman), who's still upset that developer/builder Jim Duncan (Creator/WilliamHolden) made significant changes to the design during construction in the name of saving money. He's particularly annoyed at electrical contractor Roger Simmons (Richard Chamberlain) who has shaved so much from the budget that the building's wiring is already showing signs of overload. It doesn't help that he's also [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections Duncan's son-in-law]].
15th Oct '15 2:43:21 AM 69BookWorM69
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* SuitWithVestedInterests: The developer James Duncan tries to thwart both the architect and the city's fire chief when they urge the top floor be evacuated during the opening gala due to the fire some stories below (it would clearly and embarrassingly undercut his previous public assertions that this record-breaking building was safe). Duncan even tries to pull rank on the fire chief by mentioning the presence of a U.S. senator; the chief retorts that in an emergency, he outranks everyone there.
31st Jul '15 6:22:09 PM jamespolk
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In the film, a red-carpet party is being held in SanFrancisco to celebrate the opening of the world's tallest skyscraper, the 138-story Glass Tower. One of the few not celebrating is [[TheHero the architect]], Doug Roberts (Paul Newman), who's still upset that developer/builder Jim Duncan (William Holden) made significant changes to the design during construction in the name of saving money. He's particularly annoyed at electrical contractor Roger Simmons (Richard Chamberlain) who has shaved so much from the budget that the building's wiring is already showing signs of overload. It doesn't help that he's also [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections Duncan's son-in-law]].
to:
In the film, a red-carpet party is being held in SanFrancisco to celebrate the opening of the world's tallest skyscraper, the 138-story Glass Tower. One of the few not celebrating is [[TheHero the architect]], Doug Roberts (Paul Newman), who's still upset that developer/builder Jim Duncan (William Holden) (Creator/WilliamHolden) made significant changes to the design during construction in the name of saving money. He's particularly annoyed at electrical contractor Roger Simmons (Richard Chamberlain) who has shaved so much from the budget that the building's wiring is already showing signs of overload. It doesn't help that he's also [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections Duncan's son-in-law]].
19th Apr '15 10:47:44 PM cernex
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** In a real high-rise fire, smoke and heat will travel upwards in a "chimney effect" aided by the building envelope. The fires in this movie do not generate the dense smoke that most real building fires do. The movie subverts this sometimes when it comes to smoke (but not always heat) when the plot necessitates characters recognizing the fire. Of course, virtually 90% of the action in the movie would be invisible if fire were treated fully realistically.
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** In a real high-rise fire, smoke and heat will travel upwards in a "chimney effect" aided by the building envelope. The fires in this movie do not generate the dense smoke that most real building fires do. The movie subverts this sometimes when it comes to smoke (but not always heat) when the plot necessitates characters recognizing the fire. Of course, virtually 90% of the action in the movie would be invisible if fire were treated fully realistically.[[note]] In later interviews the special effects and production crew admitted they knew about it and was pretty much the first thing they were told, but for the said reasons as stated before, simply couldn't do it. [[/note]]
15th Mar '15 4:13:19 AM Morgenthaler
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'''''The Towering Inferno''''' was the first Hollywood movie to come from ''two'' major studios -- it was a co-production between TwentiethCenturyFox and WarnerBros The movie was based on two similarly-plotted novels, ''The Tower'' and ''The Glass Inferno''. Warner had purchased the film rights to the former, and Fox the latter; then someone realized that two DuelingMovies about a skyscraper on fire would basically cannibalize the audience for both films (as would happen a couple decades later, when the aforementioned 20th Century Fox released ''{{Volcano}}'' not long after {{Universal}} released ''Film/DantesPeak'', two films about sudden volcano eruptions). To prevent this from happening it was decided it would be better for both studios to combine resources to make one BIG picture. (On a side note, ''The Glass Inferno'' was co-written by Thomas N. Scortia, who tends to write a lot of books about fires.)
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'''''The ''The Towering Inferno''''' Inferno'' was the first Hollywood movie to come from ''two'' major studios -- it was a co-production between TwentiethCenturyFox and WarnerBros The movie was based on two similarly-plotted novels, ''The Tower'' and ''The Glass Inferno''. Warner had purchased the film rights to the former, and Fox the latter; then someone realized that two DuelingMovies about a skyscraper on fire would basically cannibalize the audience for both films (as would happen a couple decades later, when the aforementioned 20th Century Fox released ''{{Volcano}}'' ''Film/{{Volcano}}'' not long after {{Universal}} Creator/{{Universal}} released ''Film/DantesPeak'', two films about sudden volcano eruptions). To prevent this from happening it was decided it would be better for both studios to combine resources to make one BIG picture. (On a side note, ''The Glass Inferno'' was co-written by Thomas N. Scortia, who tends to write a lot of books about fires.)
10th Feb '15 3:48:53 PM DavidDelony
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* ConvectionSchmonvection: In a real high-rise fire, smoke and heat will travel upwards in a "chimney effect" aided by the building envelope. The fires in this movie do not generate the dense smoke that most real building fires do. The movie subverts this sometimes when it comes to smoke (but not always heat) when the plot necessitates characters recognizing the fire. Of course, virtually 90% of the action in the movie would be invisible if fire were treated fully realistically. * CuttingCorners: The whole hellish situation can be laid at Roger Simmons' feet for caring more about saving money than about keeping to safety code. ** Frightingly averted by what happens to Bigelow. He just runs into a burning room and the sheer heat causes him to burst into flames.
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* ConvectionSchmonvection: ConvectionSchmonvection: ** In a real high-rise fire, smoke and heat will travel upwards in a "chimney effect" aided by the building envelope. The fires in this movie do not generate the dense smoke that most real building fires do. The movie subverts this sometimes when it comes to smoke (but not always heat) when the plot necessitates characters recognizing the fire. Of course, virtually 90% of the action in the movie would be invisible if fire were treated fully realistically. ** Frighteningly averted by what happens to Bigelow. He just runs into a burning room and the sheer heat causes him to burst into flames * CuttingCorners: The whole hellish situation can be laid at Roger Simmons' feet for caring more about saving money than about keeping to safety code. ** Frightingly averted by what happens to Bigelow. He just runs into a burning room and the sheer heat causes him to burst into flames.code..
28th Jan '15 7:20:09 PM Mdumas43073
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'''''The Towering Inferno''''' was the first Hollywood movie to come from ''two'' major studios -- it was a co-production between TwentiethCenturyFox and WarnerBros The movie was based on two similarly-plotted novels, ''The Tower'' and ''The Glass Inferno''. Warner had purchased the film rights to the former, and Fox the latter; then someone realized that two DuelingMovies about a skyscraper on fire would basically cannibalize both films (as would happen a couple decades later, when the aforementioned 20th Century Fox released ''{{Volcano}}'' not long after {{Universal}} released ''Film/DantesPeak'', two films about sudden volcano eruptions). To prevent this from happening it was decided it would be better for both studios to combine resources to make one BIG picture. (On a side note, ''The Glass Inferno'' was co-written by Thomas N. Scortia, who tends to write a lot of books about fires.)
to:
'''''The Towering Inferno''''' was the first Hollywood movie to come from ''two'' major studios -- it was a co-production between TwentiethCenturyFox and WarnerBros The movie was based on two similarly-plotted novels, ''The Tower'' and ''The Glass Inferno''. Warner had purchased the film rights to the former, and Fox the latter; then someone realized that two DuelingMovies about a skyscraper on fire would basically cannibalize the audience for both films (as would happen a couple decades later, when the aforementioned 20th Century Fox released ''{{Volcano}}'' not long after {{Universal}} released ''Film/DantesPeak'', two films about sudden volcano eruptions). To prevent this from happening it was decided it would be better for both studios to combine resources to make one BIG picture. (On a side note, ''The Glass Inferno'' was co-written by Thomas N. Scortia, who tends to write a lot of books about fires.)
28th Jan '15 7:19:20 PM Mdumas43073
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'''''The Towering Inferno''''' was the first Hollywood movie to come from ''two'' major studios -- it was a co-production between TwentiethCenturyFox and WarnerBros The movie was based on two similarly-plotted novels, ''The Tower'' and ''The Glass Inferno''. Warner had purchased the film rights to the former, and Fox the latter; then someone realized that two DuelingMovies about a skyscraper on fire would basically cannibalize both films (as happened in the 1990s when the aforementioned 20th Century Fox released ''{{Volcano}}'' not long after {{Universal}} released ''Film/DantesPeak'', two films about sudden volcano eruptions). To prevent this from happening it was decided it would be better for both studios to combine resources to make one BIG picture. (On a side note, ''The Glass Inferno'' was co-written by Thomas N. Scortia, who tends to write a lot of books about fires.)
to:
'''''The Towering Inferno''''' was the first Hollywood movie to come from ''two'' major studios -- it was a co-production between TwentiethCenturyFox and WarnerBros The movie was based on two similarly-plotted novels, ''The Tower'' and ''The Glass Inferno''. Warner had purchased the film rights to the former, and Fox the latter; then someone realized that two DuelingMovies about a skyscraper on fire would basically cannibalize both films (as happened in the 1990s would happen a couple decades later, when the aforementioned 20th Century Fox released ''{{Volcano}}'' not long after {{Universal}} released ''Film/DantesPeak'', two films about sudden volcano eruptions). To prevent this from happening it was decided it would be better for both studios to combine resources to make one BIG picture. (On a side note, ''The Glass Inferno'' was co-written by Thomas N. Scortia, who tends to write a lot of books about fires.)
18th Jan '15 9:48:38 AM Farnham
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* TheAtoner: Duncan, by the time he realizes how badly he's screwed up. --> '''Duncan''' (To the other men): You've all got numbers, and you're going to take your turn. And if it's any consolation, I'm going to be the last one out of here, along with my son-in-law!
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