History Film / ThePassionOfTheChrist

18th Mar '17 10:03:52 AM Miracle@StOlaf
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** Unlike biblical canon, some historians believe that nails were driven through the bones of the wrist rather than through the palms, given that the soft tissue of the hand couldn't support the weight of the victim. After all, Gibson is telling a biblical story, not a historical film, so any difference that originate from Bible and Traditions will carry over.

to:

** Unlike biblical canon, some historians believe that nails were driven through the bones of the wrist rather than through the palms, given that the soft tissue of the hand couldn't support the weight of the victim. After all, Gibson is telling a biblical story, not a historical film, so any difference that originate from Bible and Traditions will carry over.over (as acknowledged by Gibson himself, who knew of this, but decided the power of imagery won out over accuracy).



* ShownTheirWork: There is nothing pretty about Roman execution methods, then or now, and you get to see it.

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* ShownTheirWork: Crucifixion was so agonizing and brutal that the word "excruciating" was coined to describe the kind of pain it caused. There is nothing ''nothing'' pretty about Roman execution methods, then or now, and you get to see it.
14th Mar '17 3:42:52 PM DustSnitch
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A film directed and produced by Creator/MelGibson about the Passion of the Christ -- the last hours of [[{{Jesus}} Jesus Christ]]'s life. All the dialogue is in the ancient languages Aramaic and Latin. The initial cut didn't even have subtitles, though they were added to the theatrical cut on the insistence of test audiences.

to:

A film directed and produced by Creator/MelGibson about the [[PassionPlay Passion of the Christ Christ]] -- the last hours of [[{{Jesus}} [[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} Jesus Christ]]'s life. All the dialogue is in the ancient languages Aramaic and Latin. The initial cut didn't even have subtitles, though they were added to the theatrical cut on the insistence of test audiences.



* PassionPlay: Naturally. One of the more famous modern examples.

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* PassionPlay: Naturally. One ''The Passion of the more famous modern examples.Christ'' separates itself from most tellings of the Passion by [[BloodierAndGorier the sheer brutality of its visuals and the emphasis on the excruciating pain]] the Christ went through during the his execution.
7th Feb '17 2:26:46 PM Aeon1337
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* KidsAreCruel: Judas gets tormented by children who mock him for his appearance, and then begin saying he's cursed. Veers ''right'' into NightmareFuel territory after that, when despite Judas running from them, they ''still'' follow him to throw more insults and mocks. It's also implied the children also killed Judas's mule. Oh! And [[CreepyChild those kids may or be demons]].

to:

* KidsAreCruel: Judas gets tormented by children who mock him for his appearance, and then begin saying he's cursed. Veers ''right'' into NightmareFuel territory after that, when despite Judas running from them, they ''still'' follow him to throw more insults and mocks. It's also implied the children also killed Judas's mule. Oh! And [[CreepyChild those kids may or may not be demons]].
6th Feb '17 1:19:28 PM Aeon1337
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* KidsAreCruel: Played with the scene involving Judas being tormented by children who mock him for his appearance, and then begin saying he's cursed. Veers ''right'' into NightmareFuel territory after that, when despite Judas running from them, they ''still'' follow him to throw more insults and mocks. It's also implied the children also killed Judas's mule.

to:

* KidsAreCruel: Played with the scene involving Judas being gets tormented by children who mock him for his appearance, and then begin saying he's cursed. Veers ''right'' into NightmareFuel territory after that, when despite Judas running from them, they ''still'' follow him to throw more insults and mocks. It's also implied the children also killed Judas's mule. Oh! And [[CreepyChild those kids may or be demons]].



** On a less serious note, Jesus, as he's being brought to the court, observes a carpenter. Cue flashback when Jesus invents the modern dinner table.

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** On a less serious note, Jesus, as he's being brought to the court, shortly after his capture, observes a carpenter. Cue flashback when Jesus invents the modern dinner table.
6th Feb '17 12:46:09 PM Aeon1337
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Added DiffLines:

** On a less serious note, Jesus, as he's being brought to the court, observes a carpenter. Cue flashback when Jesus invents the modern dinner table.
21st Dec '16 9:34:55 AM RGZReGZ
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** One of the more obvious is in regard to Jewish laws and traditions, which utilized a Orthodox understanding, in that the Seder he is eating have leaven bread instead of matza, which is one of the reason why Orthodox utilized leaven host too. Also he makes them eat while sitting upright despite a Seder is supposed to be eaten while reclining, one of the 4 questions makes this perfectly clear. (There is considerable [[http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14341a.htm dispute among Catholic theologians]] as to whether the Last Supper actually started out as a Seder meal or not. It may well be that Gibson had not intended to depict a Seder at all.)
** Unlike biblical canon, historians commonly believe that nails were driven through the bones of the wrist rather than through the palms, given that the soft tissue of the hand couldn't support the weight of the victim. A pretty straightforward case of Artistic License, since Gibson is telling a biblical story, not a historical flim.
** Similarly, unlike biblical canon, historical research shows that victims of crucifixion [[http://www.patheos.com/blogs/filmchat/2013/04/history-and-tradition-in-movie-depictions-of-the-cross.html only carried the cross-beam]], not a whole cross. Places of crucifixion like Golgotha would have had permanent standing posts where the beam would be attached as necessary. A few earlier Biblical films like ''Film/FromTheMangerToTheCross'', ''Series/JesusOfNazareth'', and ''Film/TheLastTemptationOfChrist'' already had depicted Jesus carrying only the beam. But again, Gibson favored traditional imagery over historical accuracy. (The two men crucified besides Jesus, however, carry only the beams.)
** The Gospels don't say how many strokes Jesus received when Pilate ordered him to be flogged, but it is often assumed to be 39 (as in ''Theatre/JesusChristSuperstar'' where it gets its own song). This comes from Deuteronomy chapter 25 which states that criminals may not receive more than 40 strokes, so the Jewish authorities tended to stop at 39 in order not to break the law accidentally. Thus, the Apostle Paul wrote in his letters that he had received "forty minus one" strokes five separate times -- again, showing Gibson is accurate in terms of bible. In terms of history, however, this brought about a question: Jesus was flogged by Romans not Jews, so this might be irrelevant. Needless to say, the film goes ''way'' beyond 39 strokes (with a soldier counting in Latin all the while), and both rods and scourges are used on Jesus. The beating is only halted due to an officer pointing out that they weren't ordered to flog the prisoner to death.

to:

** One of the more obvious is in regard to Jewish laws and traditions, which utilized a an Orthodox understanding, in that the Seder he is eating have leaven bread instead of matza, which is one of the reason why Orthodox utilized leaven host too. Also he Christ makes them eat while sitting upright despite a Seder is supposed to be eaten while reclining, one of the 4 questions makes this perfectly clear. (There is considerable [[http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14341a.htm dispute among Catholic theologians]] as to whether the Last Supper actually started out as a Seder meal or not. It may well be that Gibson had not intended to depict a Seder at all.)
** Unlike biblical canon, some historians commonly believe that nails were driven through the bones of the wrist rather than through the palms, given that the soft tissue of the hand couldn't support the weight of the victim. A pretty straightforward case of Artistic License, since After all, Gibson is telling a biblical story, not a historical flim.
film, so any difference that originate from Bible and Traditions will carry over.
** Similarly, unlike biblical canon, historical research shows some historians argued that victims of crucifixion [[http://www.patheos.com/blogs/filmchat/2013/04/history-and-tradition-in-movie-depictions-of-the-cross.html only carried the cross-beam]], not a whole cross. Places of crucifixion like Golgotha would have had permanent standing posts where the beam would be attached as necessary. A few earlier Biblical films like ''Film/FromTheMangerToTheCross'', ''Series/JesusOfNazareth'', and ''Film/TheLastTemptationOfChrist'' already had depicted Jesus carrying only the beam. But again, Gibson favored traditional imagery over historical accuracy. (The decide to accurately depict the biblical canon. The two men crucified besides Jesus, however, carry only the beams.)
** The Gospels don't say how many strokes only point where artistic license is taken is during the scourging of Christ. The Bible states Jesus had received "forty minus one" (39) strokes when Pilate ordered him to be flogged, but it is often assumed to be 39 (as five separate times, in ''Theatre/JesusChristSuperstar'' where it gets its own song). This comes from line with Deuteronomy chapter 25 which states that criminals may not receive more than 40 strokes, so the Jewish authorities tended to stop at 39 in order not to break the law accidentally. Thus, the Apostle Paul wrote in his letters that he had received "forty minus one" strokes five separate times accidentally -- again, showing Gibson is accurate in terms of bible. In terms of history, however, this brought about a question: Jesus was flogged by Romans not Jews, so this might be irrelevant. Needless to say, the film goes ''way'' beyond 39 strokes (with a soldier counting in Latin all the while), and both rods and scourges are used on Jesus. The beating is only halted due to an officer pointing out that they weren't ordered to flog the prisoner to death.
20th Dec '16 7:36:43 PM RGZReGZ
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* ArtisticLicenseReligion: Given that Gibson is focused on the Biblical narrative, there are a few scene that is in line with Catholic/Orthodox/Protestant tradition but disproven by historians:

to:

* ArtisticLicenseReligion: Subverted. Gibson actually follow in line with Catholic/Orthodox/Protestant tradition, but...
* ArtisticLicenseHistory:
Given that Gibson is focused on the Biblical narrative, there are a few scene that is in line with Catholic/Orthodox/Protestant tradition (no artistic license in terms of religion) but disproven questioned by historians:



** The Gospels don't say how many strokes Jesus received when Pilate ordered him to be flogged, but it is often assumed to be 39 (as in ''Theatre/JesusChristSuperstar'' where it gets its own song). This comes from Deuteronomy chapter 25 which states that criminals may not receive more than 40 strokes, so the Jewish authorities tended to stop at 39 in order not to break the law accidentally. Thus, the Apostle Paul wrote in his letters that he had received "forty minus one" strokes five separate times. However, Jesus was flogged by Romans not Jews, so this might be irrelevant. Needless to say, the film goes ''way'' beyond 39 strokes (with a soldier counting in Latin all the while), and both rods and scourges are used on Jesus. The beating is only halted due to an officer pointing out that they weren't ordered to flog the prisoner to death.

to:

** The Gospels don't say how many strokes Jesus received when Pilate ordered him to be flogged, but it is often assumed to be 39 (as in ''Theatre/JesusChristSuperstar'' where it gets its own song). This comes from Deuteronomy chapter 25 which states that criminals may not receive more than 40 strokes, so the Jewish authorities tended to stop at 39 in order not to break the law accidentally. Thus, the Apostle Paul wrote in his letters that he had received "forty minus one" strokes five separate times. However, times -- again, showing Gibson is accurate in terms of bible. In terms of history, however, this brought about a question: Jesus was flogged by Romans not Jews, so this might be irrelevant. Needless to say, the film goes ''way'' beyond 39 strokes (with a soldier counting in Latin all the while), and both rods and scourges are used on Jesus. The beating is only halted due to an officer pointing out that they weren't ordered to flog the prisoner to death.
20th Dec '16 7:33:10 PM RGZReGZ
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* ArtisticLicenseReligion: Gibson made several mistakes when it comes to Jewish laws and traditions. Most notable when it showed the Seder he is eating leaven bread instead of matza. Also he makes them eat while sitting upright despite a Seder is supposed to be eaten while reclining, one of the 4 questions makes this perfectly clear. (There is considerable [[http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14341a.htm dispute among Catholic theologians]] as to whether the Last Supper actually started out as a Seder meal or not. It may well be that Gibson had not intended to depict a Seder at all.)
** It's commonly accepted among historians that nails were driven through the bones of the wrist rather than through the palms, given that the soft tissue of the hand couldn't support the weight of the victim. A pretty straightforward case of Artistic License, since Gibson was aware of this, but more or less acknowledged that the power of imagery won out over historical accuracy.
** Similarly, historical research shows that victims of crucifixion [[http://www.patheos.com/blogs/filmchat/2013/04/history-and-tradition-in-movie-depictions-of-the-cross.html only carried the cross-beam]], not a whole cross - unlike most traditional Christian art of the scene. Places of crucifixion like Golgotha would have had permanent standing posts where the beam would be attached as necessary. A few earlier Biblical films like ''Film/FromTheMangerToTheCross'', ''Series/JesusOfNazareth'', and ''Film/TheLastTemptationOfChrist'' already had depicted Jesus carrying only the beam. But again, Gibson favored traditional imagery over historical accuracy. (The two men crucified besides Jesus, however, carry only the beams.)

to:

* ArtisticLicenseReligion: Given that Gibson made several mistakes when it comes is focused on the Biblical narrative, there are a few scene that is in line with Catholic/Orthodox/Protestant tradition but disproven by historians:
**One of the more obvious is in regard
to Jewish laws and traditions. Most notable when it showed traditions, which utilized a Orthodox understanding, in that the Seder he is eating have leaven bread instead of matza.matza, which is one of the reason why Orthodox utilized leaven host too. Also he makes them eat while sitting upright despite a Seder is supposed to be eaten while reclining, one of the 4 questions makes this perfectly clear. (There is considerable [[http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14341a.htm dispute among Catholic theologians]] as to whether the Last Supper actually started out as a Seder meal or not. It may well be that Gibson had not intended to depict a Seder at all.)
** It's commonly accepted among Unlike biblical canon, historians commonly believe that nails were driven through the bones of the wrist rather than through the palms, given that the soft tissue of the hand couldn't support the weight of the victim. A pretty straightforward case of Artistic License, since Gibson was aware of this, but more or less acknowledged that the power of imagery won out over is telling a biblical story, not a historical accuracy.
flim.
** Similarly, unlike biblical canon, historical research shows that victims of crucifixion [[http://www.patheos.com/blogs/filmchat/2013/04/history-and-tradition-in-movie-depictions-of-the-cross.html only carried the cross-beam]], not a whole cross - unlike most traditional Christian art of the scene.cross. Places of crucifixion like Golgotha would have had permanent standing posts where the beam would be attached as necessary. A few earlier Biblical films like ''Film/FromTheMangerToTheCross'', ''Series/JesusOfNazareth'', and ''Film/TheLastTemptationOfChrist'' already had depicted Jesus carrying only the beam. But again, Gibson favored traditional imagery over historical accuracy. (The two men crucified besides Jesus, however, carry only the beams.)
13th Dec '16 5:30:39 PM alchixinren
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** The soldier who stabs Jesus with a spear to make sure he's dead is named Cassius. He is better known in Christian tradition as Longinus (thus the spear is TheLanceOfLonginus).

to:

** The soldier who stabs Jesus with a spear to make sure he's dead is named Cassius. He is better known in Christian tradition as Longinus (thus the spear is TheLanceOfLonginus).TheLanceOfLonginus); it's not exactly impossible for his name to have been Cassius Longinus, like Brutus's BFF.
23rd Sep '16 2:06:56 AM mzytryck01
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Added DiffLines:

* VillainousBreakdown: After Jesus endures his ordeal and dies on the cross, there's a brief shot of Satan shrieking in Hell, as it realises it's lost its grip on humanity.
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