History Film / TheMadnessOfKingGeorge

30th Jul '17 9:52:51 PM PaulA
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A little over two centuries later, the playwright Alan Bennett turned this material into ''Theatre/TheMadnessOfGeorgeIII'' (1991), which proved to be an international hit. Bennett and director Nicholas Hytner adapted it to film as ''The Madness of King George'' (1994); the film had a successful art house run and earned an Oscar nomination (not to mention some very belated recognition) for its star, Nigel Hawthorne. Creator/HelenMirren was also nominated for an Oscar as "Best Actress in a Supporting Role", for her portrayal of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, George III's Queen consort.

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A little over two centuries later, the playwright Alan Bennett turned this material into ''Theatre/TheMadnessOfGeorgeIII'' (1991), which proved to be an international hit. Bennett and director Nicholas Hytner adapted it to film as ''The Madness of King George'' (1994); the film had a successful art house run and earned an Oscar nomination (not to mention some very belated recognition) for its star, Nigel Hawthorne.Creator/NigelHawthorne. Creator/HelenMirren was also nominated for an Oscar as "Best Actress in a Supporting Role", for her portrayal of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, George III's Queen consort.
30th Jul '17 6:29:08 PM WaterBlap
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* AssassinationAttempt:An early scene scene depicts the King descending from a podium, where he s set upon by a madwoman, who attempts to stab him. His Majesty is remarkably composed during this affront, and is unhurt by it. He mentions to a minister that a butter knife is a poor weapon, which is what the dotty widow used. The scene establishes that King George was observant and rational during the early stages of his affliction; this lucidity is slowly eroded as his condition worsens.

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* AssassinationAttempt:An AssassinationAttempt: An early scene scene depicts the King descending from a podium, where he s is set upon by a madwoman, who attempts to stab him. His Majesty is remarkably composed during this affront, and is unhurt by it. He mentions to a minister that a butter knife is a poor weapon, which is what the dotty widow used. The scene establishes that King George was observant and rational during the early stages of his affliction; this lucidity is slowly eroded as his condition worsens.
30th Oct '16 9:03:42 AM DustSnitch
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A little over two centuries later, the playwright Alan Bennett turned this material into ''Theatre/TheMadnessOfGeorgeIII'' (1991), which proved to be an international hit. Bennett and director Nicholas Hytner adapted it to film as ''The Madness of King George'' (1994); the film had a successful art house run and earned an Oscar nomination (not to mention some very belated recognition) for its star, Nigel Hawthorne. Creator/HelenMirren was also nominated for an Oscar as "Best Actress in a Supporting Role", for her portayal of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, George III's Queen consort.

to:

A little over two centuries later, the playwright Alan Bennett turned this material into ''Theatre/TheMadnessOfGeorgeIII'' (1991), which proved to be an international hit. Bennett and director Nicholas Hytner adapted it to film as ''The Madness of King George'' (1994); the film had a successful art house run and earned an Oscar nomination (not to mention some very belated recognition) for its star, Nigel Hawthorne. Creator/HelenMirren was also nominated for an Oscar as "Best Actress in a Supporting Role", for her portayal portrayal of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, George III's Queen consort.


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* AssassinationAttempt:An early scene scene depicts the King descending from a podium, where he s set upon by a madwoman, who attempts to stab him. His Majesty is remarkably composed during this affront, and is unhurt by it. He mentions to a minister that a butter knife is a poor weapon, which is what the dotty widow used. The scene establishes that King George was observant and rational during the early stages of his affliction; this lucidity is slowly eroded as his condition worsens.
14th Oct '16 9:12:37 PM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:333:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/MadnessofKingGeorge_6098.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:333:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/MadnessofKingGeorge_6098.jpg]]
17th Aug '16 3:33:17 AM Ciara25
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* WhiteAndGreyMorality: The Prince of Wales and Charles Fox want to get the king out of the way and create a new regime, but they're doing for understandable reasons: the prince wants to be able to marry his Catholic mistress which would otherwise ''never'' be allowed, and Fox wants to form friendlier relations with America and abolish the slave trade.

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* WhiteAndGreyMorality: The Prince of Wales and Charles Fox want to get the king out of the way and create a new regime, but they're doing it for understandable reasons: the prince wants to be able to marry his Catholic mistress which would otherwise ''never'' be allowed, and Fox wants to form friendlier relations with America and abolish the slave trade.
17th Aug '16 3:31:28 AM Ciara25
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* WhiteAndGreyMorality: The Prince of Wales and Charles Fox want to get the king out of the way and create a new regime, but they're doing for understandable reasons: the prince wants to be able to marry his Catholic mistress which would otherwise ''never'' be allowed, and Fox wants to form friendlier relations with America and abolish the slave trade.
21st Mar '16 7:40:43 PM bombadil211
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* FriendToAllChildren: George dotes on his younger children (the older ones turned out to be disappointments and receive nothing but scorn) and cheerfully joins in a game of cricket with some children and frolics around with them with no regard to his rank.
16th Jan '16 7:41:35 PM Anddrix
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* ViewersAreMorons: NOT an example, despite what many will tell you. There is persistent rumour that the title was changed from ''The Madness of George III'' to ''The Madness of King George'' because they thought American audiences would think it was a sequel. The change was for American eyes, but the intent was merely to make it clear to a country that's never had royalty that the movie was about a king. When English audiences see a first name followed by a Roman numeral, they immediately think 'king'. Americans have no such coding. Also, George III is the single person who Americans are most likely to think of if you mention "King George", for [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution obvious reasons]].
18th Oct '15 6:17:32 AM Ciara25
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* EstablishingCharacterMoment: The first time we see the king proper, he's all done up in his ceremonial robes, the very picture of royalty...and then he picks up, comforts and kisses one of his young daughters, before turning to face the day with a huffing breath and saying ''"Right."''
3rd Sep '15 2:06:10 PM morenohijazo
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* SpitShine: Some servants do it with the ''royal crown''.
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