History Film / TheMadnessOfKingGeorge

16th Jan '16 7:41:35 PM Anddrix
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* ViewersAreMorons: NOT an example, despite what many will tell you. There is persistent rumour that the title was changed from ''The Madness of George III'' to ''The Madness of King George'' because they thought American audiences would think it was a sequel. The change was for American eyes, but the intent was merely to make it clear to a country that's never had royalty that the movie was about a king. When English audiences see a first name followed by a Roman numeral, they immediately think 'king'. Americans have no such coding. Also, George III is the single person who Americans are most likely to think of if you mention "King George", for [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution obvious reasons]].
18th Oct '15 6:17:32 AM Ciara25
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Added DiffLines:
* EstablishingCharacterMoment: The first time we see the king proper, he's all done up in his ceremonial robes, the very picture of royalty...and then he picks up, comforts and kisses one of his young daughters, before turning to face the day with a huffing breath and saying ''"Right."''
3rd Sep '15 2:06:10 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:

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* SpitShine: Some servants do it with the ''royal crown''.
5th Jul '15 5:05:59 AM Ciara25
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* SecretRelationship: The Prince of Wales' marriage to Mrs. Fitzherbert, which has to be kept secret because [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Marriages_Act_1772 royals can't get married without permission from the Crown]], and there's no chance of permission being given in this case because Mrs. Fitzherbert is both a commoner and a devoted Catholic. (For an heir to the British throne, marrying a commoner was obviously frowned upon, and [[http://www.britroyals.com/succession.htm marrying a Catholic was actually forbidden by law between 1701 and 2013]].)
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* SecretRelationship: The Prince of Wales' marriage to Mrs. Fitzherbert, which has to be kept secret because [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Marriages_Act_1772 British royals can't get married without permission from the Crown]], and there's no chance in hell of permission being given in this ''this'' case because Mrs. Fitzherbert is both a commoner and a devoted Catholic. (For an heir to the British throne, marrying a commoner was obviously frowned upon, and [[http://www.britroyals.com/succession.htm marrying a Catholic was actually forbidden by law between 1701 and 2013]].)
24th May '15 5:09:14 PM nombretomado
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Contemporary audiences noted some obvious similarities between the film's [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfHanover House of Hanover]] and the twentieth-century [[TheHouseOfWindsor House of Windsor]], especially when it came to frustrated Princes of Wales. However, the film is as much a response to ''Theatre/KingLear'' as to modern royal foibles.
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Contemporary audiences noted some obvious similarities between the film's [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfHanover House of Hanover]] and the twentieth-century [[TheHouseOfWindsor [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfWindsor House of Windsor]], especially when it came to frustrated Princes of Wales. However, the film is as much a response to ''Theatre/KingLear'' as to modern royal foibles.
17th May '15 11:08:22 PM nombretomado
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Contemporary audiences noted some obvious similarities between the film's [[TheHouseOfHanover House of Hanover]] and the twentieth-century [[TheHouseOfWindsor House of Windsor]], especially when it came to frustrated Princes of Wales. However, the film is as much a response to ''Theatre/KingLear'' as to modern royal foibles.
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Contemporary audiences noted some obvious similarities between the film's [[TheHouseOfHanover [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfHanover House of Hanover]] and the twentieth-century [[TheHouseOfWindsor House of Windsor]], especially when it came to frustrated Princes of Wales. However, the film is as much a response to ''Theatre/KingLear'' as to modern royal foibles.
3rd May '15 8:17:43 PM PaulA
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example indentation
* AdiposeRex: Prince George. He just gets bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger throughout this film. ** The Duke of York puts on weight during the film too.
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* AdiposeRex: AdiposeRex: ** Prince George. He just gets bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger throughout this film. bigger. ** The Duke of York puts on weight during the film too.

* OhCrap: The Prince of Wales' response when the King shows up again, defusing the crisis.
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* OhCrap: OhCrap: ** The Prince of Wales' response when the King shows up again, defusing the crisis.

* SoundtrackDissonance: Handel's "Zadok the Priest" (traditionally used at coronations) plays when the king is first bound to the chair.
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* SoundtrackDissonance: SoundtrackDissonance: ** Handel's "Zadok the Priest" (traditionally used at coronations) plays when the king is first bound to the chair.

* VerbalTic: What, what? Hey, hey! ** The verbal tics are a sign that George is ''normal''.
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* VerbalTic: What, what? Hey, hey! ** hey! The verbal tics are a sign that George is ''normal''.
3rd May '15 8:16:19 PM PaulA
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trivia migration
* HeyItsThatGuy: You might recognize King George as his descendant Elizabeth's most loyal civil servant [[YesMinister Sir Humphrey Appleby]].
3rd May '15 8:15:10 PM PaulA
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* BoundAndGagged: In a cruel mockery of the coronation, George III is gagged and bound to a chair when he "misbehaves." ** The whole treatment of King George in the hands of Francis Willis (and other doctors) is sadly [[TruthInTelevision Truth in Television]]. Obviously Willis was the first to use straightjacketing, and it made scandal at the time because it violated the person of the King. But when George went better and was declared cured Willis was acclaimed as a hero.
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* BoundAndGagged: In a cruel mockery of the coronation, George III is gagged and bound to a chair when he "misbehaves." ** " The whole treatment of King George in the hands of Francis Willis (and other doctors) is sadly [[TruthInTelevision Truth in Television]]. Obviously Willis was the first to use straightjacketing, and it made scandal at the time because it violated the person of the King. But when George went better and was declared cured Willis was acclaimed as a hero.

* GenreBlindness: Thurlow completely fails to realize that he's in ''Theatre/KingLear''. ** Except at the end when he ''gets it'' ("If only the messenger had moved quicker!")... and rushes to Pitt and the rest of Parliament with the good news just before the Regency bill could be passed.
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* GenreBlindness: Thurlow completely fails to realize that he's in ''Theatre/KingLear''. ** ''Theatre/KingLear''. Except at the end when he ''gets it'' ("If only the messenger had moved quicker!")... and rushes to Pitt and the rest of Parliament with the good news just before the Regency bill could be passed.

* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: Of all the characters, Captain Greville is, by far, the nicest to George III; therefore, it should come as no surprise that [[spoiler: the king fires him at the end of the film.]] ** [[spoiler: To be fair, this was because the higher ranking staff get reassigned elsewhere since they've seen the king at his worst and it would make for a very awkward environment otherwise, and some are paid off handsomely.]] No, the sad thing about Greville [[spoiler: is that his 'relationship' with the Lady Pembroke ends and he figures out he'd been used by her to protect the King's reputation.]] ** As Fitzroy explains, Greville was sacked because he served the King out of personal feeling of kindness rather than duty. He went beyond his duty as the King's Squire to help him by pity and he invested himself emotionally to the King's well-being. Cue his clumsy early comment in front of the King's doctor that [[spoiler:The King is only a man]], which probably also made him suspicious to some of his superiors.
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* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: Of all the characters, Captain Greville is, by far, the nicest to George III; therefore, it should come as no surprise that [[spoiler: the king fires him at the end of the film.]] ** [[spoiler: To be fair, this was because the higher ranking staff get reassigned elsewhere since they've seen the king at his worst film and it would make for a very awkward environment otherwise, and some are paid off handsomely.]] No, the sad thing about Greville [[spoiler: is that his 'relationship' with the Lady Pembroke ends and he figures out he'd been used by her to protect the King's reputation.]] ** As Fitzroy explains, Greville was sacked because he served the King out of personal feeling of kindness rather than duty. He went beyond his duty as the King's Squire to help him by pity and he invested himself emotionally to the King's well-being. Cue his clumsy early comment in front of the King's doctor that [[spoiler:The King is only a man]], which probably also made him suspicious to some of his superiors.reputation]].

* PragmaticAdaptation: The politicians have much more to do in the original play. Sheridan and Dundas, for example, are actual roles, not bit parts. For the film, Bennett cut back on the politics to achieve a tighter focus on the King's madness. ** Bennett actually began chopping bits and pieces out of the political plot during the play's US tour.
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* PragmaticAdaptation: The politicians have much more to do in the original play. Sheridan and Dundas, for example, are actual roles, not bit parts. For the film, Bennett cut back on the politics to achieve a tighter focus on the King's madness. ** Bennett madness. (Bennett actually began chopping bits and pieces out of the political plot during the play's US tour.)

* SecretRelationship: The Prince of Wales' marriage to Mrs. Fitzherbert. ** For those who slept through history class: Maria Fitzherbert was a commoner AND a devoted Catholic. Both points prevented a current member of the British Royals from marrying someone like her until the 21st century (well, you ''could'' marry a commoner, but the looks of scorn from the titled nobility wouldn't be worth it). Worse yet: Royals can't get married - [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Marriages_Act_1772 not then nor now]] - without permission from the Crown. *** The sad fact is that the movie hints that Mrs. Fitzherbert might have been ''the best thing'' in the prince's life, and could have been a decent queen if she'd only been given the chance. *** At least as far as the "marrying a commoner" part goes, the current second-in-line for the British throne has opted to do just that, with some [[BlatantLies small interest]] [[SarcasmMode from the]] [[http://royalwedding.yahoo.com/ international press.]] [[http://www.britroyals.com/succession.htm Those in line for the thrones still couldn't marry Catholics until 2013, though.]] *** And the Crown can get around the "marrying a commoner" bit by granting title to the bride or family. As long as they do it ''before'' the wedding...
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* SecretRelationship: The Prince of Wales' marriage to Mrs. Fitzherbert. ** For those who slept through history class: Maria Fitzherbert was a commoner AND a devoted Catholic. Both points prevented a current member of the British Royals from marrying someone like her until the 21st century (well, you ''could'' marry a commoner, but the looks of scorn from the titled nobility wouldn't Fitzherbert, which has to be worth it). Worse yet: Royals can't get married - kept secret because [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Marriages_Act_1772 not then nor now]] - royals can't get married without permission from the Crown. *** The sad fact is that the movie hints that Crown]], and there's no chance of permission being given in this case because Mrs. Fitzherbert might have been ''the best thing'' in the prince's life, is both a commoner and could have been a decent queen if she'd only been given the chance. *** At least as far as the "marrying a commoner" part goes, the current second-in-line for devoted Catholic. (For an heir to the British throne has opted to do just that, with some [[BlatantLies small interest]] [[SarcasmMode from the]] [[http://royalwedding.yahoo.com/ international press.]] throne, marrying a commoner was obviously frowned upon, and [[http://www.britroyals.com/succession.htm Those in line for the thrones still couldn't marry Catholics until 2013, though.]] *** And the Crown can get around the "marrying marrying a commoner" bit Catholic was actually forbidden by granting title to the bride or family. As long as they do it ''before'' the wedding...law between 1701 and 2013]].)

* UngratefulBastard: At the end, the King [[spoiler: fires all of the footmen, along with Captain Greville, and begrudges the annuity he has to pay Dr. Willis.]] ** He had to. The servants had seen the King at his worst, and keeping them on could have created some uncomfortable moments. It's implied most of them will get cushy jobs elsewhere.
3rd May '15 8:02:09 AM Ciara25
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* BittersweetEnding: The King is cured and the Prince of Wales is thwarted - [[spoiler:but Greville and all the loyal retainers are sacked, Greville learns Lady Pembroke was just using him,]] and anyone who knows their history will be aware that George will have another relapse and be permanently mad by 1810.
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* BittersweetEnding: The King is cured and the Prince of Wales is thwarted - [[spoiler:but Greville and all the loyal retainers are sacked, Greville learns Lady Pembroke was just using him,]] and anyone who knows their history will be aware that George will have another relapse and be permanently mad by 1810.1810, meaning his son will become Prince Regent in any case.
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