History Film / TheLifeAndDeathOfColonelBlimp

8th Jul '16 9:29:22 AM Mdumas43073
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Opening in 1943 in the midst of the war, a group of British Army soldiers think they are ''very'' clever when they set out to capture the commanders of the local Home Guard units so that they can easily defeat their leaderless forces in a wargame that starts later that day. They capture the Home Guard commander, Major General Clive Wynne-Candy (Roger Livesey), while he's in a Turkish bath - mocking his outrage at their invalidation of the exercise, his fatness, and his moustache. An enraged Candy begins beating the stuffing out the British Army commander, the young Lieutenant Wilson, and segues into the story of his life. Flashing back 41 years to 1902, we see a young Clive Candy, newly returned from the [[UsefulNotes/TheSecondBoerWar Boer War]] and wearing his new Victoria Cross. A visit to Germany at the behest of Miss Edith Hunter (Creator/DeborahKerr), ostensibly to 'refute anti-British propaganda', and a duel with Prussian officer Theodore Kretschmar-Schuldorff (Anton Walbrook) ensues. Over the next forty years Clive and Theodore meet several more times, including in WorldWarOne, and Clive will always be on the lookout for other women like his idol, Edith.

to:

Opening in 1943 in In the midst of the war, a group of British Army soldiers think they are ''very'' clever when they set out to capture the commanders of the local Home Guard units so that they can easily defeat their leaderless forces in a wargame that starts later that day. They capture the Home Guard commander, Major General Clive Wynne-Candy (Roger Livesey), while he's in a Turkish bath - mocking his outrage at their invalidation of the exercise, his fatness, and his moustache. An enraged Candy begins beating the stuffing out the British Army commander, the young Lieutenant Wilson, and segues into the story of his life. Flashing back 41 years to 1902, we see a young Clive Candy, newly returned from the [[UsefulNotes/TheSecondBoerWar Boer War]] and wearing his new Victoria Cross. A visit to Germany at the behest of Miss Edith Hunter (Creator/DeborahKerr), ostensibly to 'refute anti-British propaganda', and a duel with Prussian officer Theodore Kretschmar-Schuldorff (Anton Walbrook) ensues. Over the next forty years Clive and Theodore meet several more times, including in WorldWarOne, and Clive will always be on the lookout for other women like his idol, Edith.
8th Jul '16 9:28:46 AM Mdumas43073
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A (subtle) 1943 British propaganda film whose protagonist does not die during the film, is not a colonel, and is not surnamed "Blimp". Despite this triple deception, it is very good.

Opening in 1943 in the midst of WorldWarTwo, a group of British Army soldiers think they are ''very'' clever when they set out to capture the commanders of the local Home Guard units so that they can easily defeat their leaderless forces in a wargame that starts later that day. They capture the Home Guard commander, Major General Clive Wynne-Candy (Roger Livesey), while he's in a Turkish bath - mocking his outrage at their invalidation of the exercise, his fatness, and his moustache. An enraged Candy begins beating the stuffing out the British Army commander, the young Lieutenant Wilson, and segues into the story of his life. Flashing back 41 years to 1902, we see a young Clive Candy, newly returned from the [[UsefulNotes/TheSecondBoerWar Boer War]] and wearing his new Victoria Cross. A visit to Germany at the behest of Miss Edith Hunter (Creator/DeborahKerr), ostensibly to 'refute anti-British propaganda', and a duel with Prussian officer Theodore Kretschmar-Schuldorff (Anton Walbrook) ensues. Over the next forty years Clive and Theodore meet several more times, including in WorldWarOne, and Clive will always be on the lookout for other women like his idol, Edith.

to:

A (subtle) 1943 British WorldWarII propaganda film whose protagonist does not die during the film, is not a colonel, and is not surnamed "Blimp". Despite this triple deception, it is very good.

Opening in 1943 in the midst of WorldWarTwo, the war, a group of British Army soldiers think they are ''very'' clever when they set out to capture the commanders of the local Home Guard units so that they can easily defeat their leaderless forces in a wargame that starts later that day. They capture the Home Guard commander, Major General Clive Wynne-Candy (Roger Livesey), while he's in a Turkish bath - mocking his outrage at their invalidation of the exercise, his fatness, and his moustache. An enraged Candy begins beating the stuffing out the British Army commander, the young Lieutenant Wilson, and segues into the story of his life. Flashing back 41 years to 1902, we see a young Clive Candy, newly returned from the [[UsefulNotes/TheSecondBoerWar Boer War]] and wearing his new Victoria Cross. A visit to Germany at the behest of Miss Edith Hunter (Creator/DeborahKerr), ostensibly to 'refute anti-British propaganda', and a duel with Prussian officer Theodore Kretschmar-Schuldorff (Anton Walbrook) ensues. Over the next forty years Clive and Theodore meet several more times, including in WorldWarOne, and Clive will always be on the lookout for other women like his idol, Edith.


Added DiffLines:

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8th Jul '16 9:28:11 AM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:348:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/life_and_death_of_col_blimp_2946.png]]

to:

[[quoteright:348:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/life_and_death_of_col_blimp_2946.png]]



A (subtle) mid-1943 propaganda film whose protagonist does not die during the film, is not a colonel, and is not surnamed "Blimp". Despite this triple deception, it is very good.

to:

A (subtle) mid-1943 1943 British propaganda film whose protagonist does not die during the film, is not a colonel, and is not surnamed "Blimp". Despite this triple deception, it is very good.
5th May '16 5:45:08 PM MAI742
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A (subtle) propaganda film whose protagonist does not die during the film, is not a colonel, and is not surnamed "Blimp". Despite this triple deception, it is very good.

to:

A (subtle) mid-1943 propaganda film whose protagonist does not die during the film, is not a colonel, and is not surnamed "Blimp". Despite this triple deception, it is very good.



Upon examining the script, they continued to obstruct its production out of fears that it would might instill doubts about whether all Germans were inherently thuggish and brutal, as in all the propaganda produced during the war so far and in WorldWarOne. This was done because it was not felt that ordinary British people were capable of understanding nuance. Together they successfully prevented Powell & Pressburger from hiring Creator/SirLawrenceOlivier for the role of Blimp and legally using military equipment and vehicles (which had to be stolen). At the time of its release it was attacked by many for being "pro-German". It has subsequently been considered one of the finest British films, and to have taken anti-Nazi wartime propaganda to much subtler and more ethical level, which was arguably more effective for those very reasons. It was the fourth collaboration between writer-directors Creator/MichaelPowell and Emeric Pressburger in their production company, The Archers. The duo would go on to make several more films, including ''[[Film/TheRedShoes1948 The Red Shoes]]'' and ''Film/BlackNarcissus''. Also notable for being the breakout part for British actress Creator/DeborahKerr, who was only 21 when the film was made.

to:

Upon examining the script, they continued to obstruct its production out of fears that it would might instill doubts about whether all Germans were inherently thuggish and brutal, as in all the propaganda produced during the war so far and in WorldWarOne. This was done because it was not felt that ordinary British people were capable of understanding nuance. Together they successfully prevented Powell & Pressburger from hiring Creator/SirLawrenceOlivier Creator/LaurenceOlivier for the role of Blimp and legally using military equipment and vehicles (which had to be stolen). At the time of its release it was critics also attacked by many it for mocking the British Army and/or being "pro-German". "pro-German".

It has subsequently been considered one of the finest British films, and to have taken anti-Nazi wartime propaganda to much subtler and more ethical level, which was arguably more effective for those very reasons. It was the fourth collaboration between writer-directors Creator/MichaelPowell and Emeric Pressburger in their production company, The Archers. The duo would go on to make several more films, including ''[[Film/TheRedShoes1948 The Red Shoes]]'' and ''Film/BlackNarcissus''. Also notable for being the breakout part for British actress Creator/DeborahKerr, who was only 21 when the film was made.



* HonorBeforeReason: Candy would rather lose the war than win by stooping to "dirty" methods. Theo points out that if the British did that, the only methods left in the world would be Nazi methods. The fact that the government doesn't share Candy's view leads to his being retired from service again.

to:

* HonorBeforeReason: Candy would rather lose the war than win by stooping to "dirty" methods. Theo points out states his views that if the British did are so close to losing that, if they do use these ill-defined "dirty" methods, then the only methods left in the world would be Nazi methods. Nazis will win. The fact that the government doesn't share Candy's view views leads to his him being forcibly retired from service again.again. When the film was made the Ministry of Information was not just trying to convince the British public that [[BelievingTheirOwnLies the Strategic Bombing campaign was effective]], but that [[BlatantLies it was so effective that the Soviet Union would lose the war without it]]. As they say, go hard or go home.
4th May '16 4:42:45 AM MAI742
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* RealLifeWritesThePlot : Emeric Pressburger the screenwriter, a Hungarian Jew who lived in Berlin, modeled Theo's speech at the immigration bureau on his own experience entering Britain. Anton Walbrook the actor who played Theo likewise exiled himself from Austria (and changed his EmbarrassingFirstName Adolph to Anton) on the rise of Nazism and both had ImmigrantPatriotism for England.

to:

* RealLifeWritesThePlot : Emeric Pressburger the screenwriter, a Hungarian Jew who lived in Berlin, modeled Theo's speech at the immigration bureau on his own experience entering Britain. The unfortunately-named Austian emigre Adolph Anton Walbrook the actor Wilhelm Wahlbruecke (stage name Anton Walbrook), who played Theo Theo, likewise exiled himself from Austria (and changed his EmbarrassingFirstName Adolph to Anton) on when it became a right-wing dictatorship in the rise of Nazism and both '20s. Both had ImmigrantPatriotism for England.
3rd May '16 9:56:59 PM MAI742
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The film was commissioned by the Ministry of Information to influence British public opinion, and was part of their general efforts to persuade the British public that the [[UsefulNotes TheAirWar RAF's 'Strategic Bombing' campaign]] was effective and morally justified. The film's underlying message is that [[GodzillaThreshold the British military's use of deeply immoral methods is both morally justified by the nature of the enemy and necessary to actually win]]. [[ShaggyDogStory Unfortunately, after the war it transpired that the campaign's slight reduction in the increase of German industrial output in the final months of the war had at best been a poor return on Britain's massive investments of aircraft production and lives.]]

to:

The film was commissioned by the Ministry of Information to influence British public opinion, and was part of their general efforts to persuade the British public that the [[UsefulNotes TheAirWar [[UsefulNotes/TheAirWar RAF's 'Strategic Bombing' campaign]] was effective and morally justified. The film's underlying message is that [[GodzillaThreshold the British military's use of deeply immoral methods is both morally justified by the nature of the enemy and necessary to actually win]]. [[ShaggyDogStory Unfortunately, after the war it transpired that the campaign's slight reduction in the increase of German industrial output in the final months of the war had at best been a poor return on Britain's massive investments of aircraft production and lives.]]
3rd May '16 9:56:25 PM MAI742
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The film was released in 1943 in the United Kingdom, at the height of WorldWarTwo, and two years later in the United States ([[ExecutiveMeddling in heavily edited form]]). When they got wind of the script the Ministry of War and even UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill himself tried to prevent the film from being made. This was initially because they feared that it would mock the leadership of the British Army, as Colonel Blimp was a well-known satirical newspaper-cartoon character who expressed reactionary, jingoistic, ignorant, and frankly moronic views:

to:

The film was released in 1943 in the United Kingdom, at the height of WorldWarTwo, and two years later in the United States ([[ExecutiveMeddling in heavily edited form]]). When

The film was commissioned by the Ministry of Information to influence British public opinion, and was part of their general efforts to persuade the British public that the [[UsefulNotes TheAirWar RAF's 'Strategic Bombing' campaign]] was effective and morally justified. The film's underlying message is that [[GodzillaThreshold the British military's use of deeply immoral methods is both morally justified by the nature of the enemy and necessary to actually win]]. [[ShaggyDogStory Unfortunately, after the war it transpired that the campaign's slight reduction in the increase of German industrial output in the final months of the war had at best been a poor return on Britain's massive investments of aircraft production and lives.]]

Interestingly, when
they got wind of the script the Ministry of War and even UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill himself tried to prevent the film from being made. This was initially because they feared that it would mock the leadership of the British Army, as Colonel Blimp was a well-known satirical newspaper-cartoon character who expressed reactionary, jingoistic, ignorant, and frankly moronic views:



* GoodIsOldFashioned: Candy thinks of war as a gentleman's game with rules, but he lives into the age of Total War, where this is outmoded.

to:

* GoodIsOldFashioned: Candy thinks of war as a gentleman's game with rules, that attacking innocents and torturing POW is deeply immoral and unjustifiable, but he lives into the age of Total War, where this is outmoded.War wherein both become common practices.



* PropagandaPiece: but subtle about it. The underlying message is that [[GodzillaThreshhold British people must accept the British military's use of the most immoral methods possible to win this war, because Britain cannot win any other way]]. This chiefly refers to the [[TheAirWar 'Strategic Bombing' campaign]], the Royal Air Force's costly but propagandised-and-believed-to-be-successful attempt to reduce German industrial production and morale by burning Germany's cities to the ground. [[ShaggyDogStory Unfortunately, after the war it transpired that the campaign's slight reduction in the increase of German industrial output in the final months of the war had not justified the massive opportunity costs and loss of life which Britain had incurred in the campaign.]]

to:

* PropagandaPiece: what the Ministry of Information wanted and paid for. They got one, but subtle about it. The underlying message is that [[GodzillaThreshhold British people must accept (as with so many other Powell & Pressburger films) one with subversive implications regarding German culture and the British military's use of the most immoral methods possible to win this war, because Britain cannot win any other way]]. This chiefly refers to by the [[TheAirWar 'Strategic Bombing' campaign]], the Royal Air Force's costly but propagandised-and-believed-to-be-successful attempt to reduce German industrial production and morale by burning Germany's cities to the ground. [[ShaggyDogStory Unfortunately, after the war it transpired that the campaign's slight reduction in the increase of German industrial output in the final months of the war had not justified the massive opportunity costs and loss of life which Britain had incurred in the campaign.]] British military.
3rd May '16 9:41:18 PM MAI742
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Upon examining the script, they continued to obstruct its production out of fears that it would might instill doubts about whether all Germans were inherently thuggish and brutal, as in all the propaganda produced during the war so far and in WorldWarOne. This was done because it was not felt that ordinary British people were capable of understanding nuance. Together they successfully prevented Powell & Pressburger from hiring Creator/SirLawrenceOlivier for the role of (young) Blimp and legally using military equipment and vehicles (which had to be stolen). At the time of its release it was attacked by many for being "pro-German". It has subsequently been considered one of the finest British films, and to have taken anti-Nazi wartime propaganda to much subtler and more ethical level, which was arguably more effective for those very reasons. It was the fourth collaboration between writer-directors Creator/MichaelPowell and Emeric Pressburger in their production company, The Archers. The duo would go on to make several more films, including ''[[Film/TheRedShoes1948 The Red Shoes]]'' and ''Film/BlackNarcissus''. Also notable for being the breakout part for British actress Creator/DeborahKerr, who was only 21 when the film was made.

to:

Upon examining the script, they continued to obstruct its production out of fears that it would might instill doubts about whether all Germans were inherently thuggish and brutal, as in all the propaganda produced during the war so far and in WorldWarOne. This was done because it was not felt that ordinary British people were capable of understanding nuance. Together they successfully prevented Powell & Pressburger from hiring Creator/SirLawrenceOlivier for the role of (young) Blimp and legally using military equipment and vehicles (which had to be stolen). At the time of its release it was attacked by many for being "pro-German". It has subsequently been considered one of the finest British films, and to have taken anti-Nazi wartime propaganda to much subtler and more ethical level, which was arguably more effective for those very reasons. It was the fourth collaboration between writer-directors Creator/MichaelPowell and Emeric Pressburger in their production company, The Archers. The duo would go on to make several more films, including ''[[Film/TheRedShoes1948 The Red Shoes]]'' and ''Film/BlackNarcissus''. Also notable for being the breakout part for British actress Creator/DeborahKerr, who was only 21 when the film was made.



* AFatherToHisMen: Candy. It is implied that he hires his Great War batman, Murdock, as his Butler to ensure him steady work.



* {{Flanderization}}: The film is in part a Deconstruction of the process of Flanderization, showing how with each bad decision he makes (such as[[spoiler: not telling Edith that he loves her]], or failing to realise that the rules of war are constantly changing), Clive ''Flanderizes himself'', turning from a romantic and impetuous young man with zero self-awareness into a lovable but self-important old fool. Fortunately, he acquires enough self-awareness that, by the end, he realises that it's happened and that the best thing he can do is give his support to those who can fight the war better than he can.

to:

* {{Flanderization}}: The film is in part a Deconstruction of the process of Flanderization, showing how with each bad decision he makes (such as[[spoiler: not telling Edith that he loves her]], or failing to realise that the rules of war are constantly changing), warfare is becoming progressively crueler and more brutal), Clive ''Flanderizes himself'', turning from a romantic and impetuous young man with zero self-awareness into a lovable but self-important old fool. Fortunately, he acquires enough self-awareness that, by the end, he realises that it's happened and that the best thing he can do is give his support to those who can fight the war better than he can.



* RealLifeWritesThePlot : Emeric Pressburger the screenwriter, a Hungarian Jew who lived in Berlin, modeled Theo's speech at the immigration bureau on his own experience entering England. Anton Walbrook the actor who played Theo likewise exiled himself from Austria (and changed his EmbarrassingFirstName Adolph to Anton) on the rise of Nazism and both had ImmigrantPatriotism for England.

to:

* PropagandaPiece: but subtle about it. The underlying message is that [[GodzillaThreshhold British people must accept the British military's use of the most immoral methods possible to win this war, because Britain cannot win any other way]]. This chiefly refers to the [[TheAirWar 'Strategic Bombing' campaign]], the Royal Air Force's costly but propagandised-and-believed-to-be-successful attempt to reduce German industrial production and morale by burning Germany's cities to the ground. [[ShaggyDogStory Unfortunately, after the war it transpired that the campaign's slight reduction in the increase of German industrial output in the final months of the war had not justified the massive opportunity costs and loss of life which Britain had incurred in the campaign.]]
* RealLifeWritesThePlot : Emeric Pressburger the screenwriter, a Hungarian Jew who lived in Berlin, modeled Theo's speech at the immigration bureau on his own experience entering England.Britain. Anton Walbrook the actor who played Theo likewise exiled himself from Austria (and changed his EmbarrassingFirstName Adolph to Anton) on the rise of Nazism and both had ImmigrantPatriotism for England.
2nd May '16 4:40:36 PM MAI742
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A film whose protagonist does not die during the film, is not a colonel, and is not surnamed "Blimp". Despite this triple deception, it is very good.

Opening in 1943 in the midst of WorldWarTwo, a group of British Army soldiers think they are ''very'' clever when they set out to capture the commanders of the local Home Guard units so that they can easily defeat their leaderless forces in a wargame that starts later that day. They capture the Home Guard commander, Major General Clive Wynne-Candy (Roger Livesey), while he's in a Turkish bath - mocking his outrage at their invalidation of the exercise, his fatness, and his moustache. An enraged Candy begins beating the stuffing out the British Army commander, the young Lieutenant Wilson, and segues into the story of his life. Flashing back 41 years to 1902, we see a young Clive Candy, newly returned from the [[UsefulNotes/TheSecondBoerWar Boer War]] and wearing his new Victoria Cross. A visit to Germany at the behest of Miss Edith Hunter (Creator/DeborahKerr), ostensibly 'refute anti-British propaganda', and a duel with Prussian officer Theodore Kretschmar-Schuldorff (Anton Walbrook) ensues. Over the next forty years Clive and Theodore meet several more times, including in WorldWarOne, and Clive will always be on the lookout for other women like his idol, Edith.

The film was released in 1943 in the United Kingdom, at the height of WorldWarTwo, and two years later in the United States ([[ExecutiveMeddling in heavily edited form]]). When they got wind of the script the Ministry of War and even UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill himself tried to prevent the film from being made out of fears that it might instill doubts about whether all Germans were inherently thuggish and brutal (as it was not felt that ordinary British people were capable of understanding nuance), and they successfully prevented Powell & Pressburger from hiring Creator/SirLawrenceOlivier for the role of (young) Blimp and legally using military equipment and vehicles (which had to be stolen). At the time of its release it was attacked by many for being "pro-German". It has subsequently been considered one of the finest British films, and to have taken anti-Nazi wartime propaganda to much subtler and more ethical level, which was arguably more effective for those very reasons. It was the fourth collaboration between writer-directors Creator/MichaelPowell and Emeric Pressburger in their production company, The Archers. The duo would go on to make several more films, including ''[[Film/TheRedShoes1948 The Red Shoes]]'' and ''Film/BlackNarcissus''. Also notable for being the breakout part for British actress Creator/DeborahKerr, who was only 21 when the film was made.

to:

A (subtle) propaganda film whose protagonist does not die during the film, is not a colonel, and is not surnamed "Blimp". Despite this triple deception, it is very good.

Opening in 1943 in the midst of WorldWarTwo, a group of British Army soldiers think they are ''very'' clever when they set out to capture the commanders of the local Home Guard units so that they can easily defeat their leaderless forces in a wargame that starts later that day. They capture the Home Guard commander, Major General Clive Wynne-Candy (Roger Livesey), while he's in a Turkish bath - mocking his outrage at their invalidation of the exercise, his fatness, and his moustache. An enraged Candy begins beating the stuffing out the British Army commander, the young Lieutenant Wilson, and segues into the story of his life. Flashing back 41 years to 1902, we see a young Clive Candy, newly returned from the [[UsefulNotes/TheSecondBoerWar Boer War]] and wearing his new Victoria Cross. A visit to Germany at the behest of Miss Edith Hunter (Creator/DeborahKerr), ostensibly to 'refute anti-British propaganda', and a duel with Prussian officer Theodore Kretschmar-Schuldorff (Anton Walbrook) ensues. Over the next forty years Clive and Theodore meet several more times, including in WorldWarOne, and Clive will always be on the lookout for other women like his idol, Edith.

The film was released in 1943 in the United Kingdom, at the height of WorldWarTwo, and two years later in the United States ([[ExecutiveMeddling in heavily edited form]]). When they got wind of the script the Ministry of War and even UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill himself tried to prevent the film from being made made. This was initially because they feared that it would mock the leadership of the British Army, as Colonel Blimp was a well-known satirical newspaper-cartoon character who expressed reactionary, jingoistic, ignorant, and frankly moronic views:

->''"[[https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4e/Colonel_Blimp_cartoon.png Gad, sir! Lord Beatty is right. We must build a bigger navy than the enemy will build when he hears that we're building a bigger navy than he's building]]!"''

Upon examining the script, they continued to obstruct its production
out of fears that it would might instill doubts about whether all Germans were inherently thuggish and brutal (as brutal, as in all the propaganda produced during the war so far and in WorldWarOne. This was done because it was not felt that ordinary British people were capable of understanding nuance), and nuance. Together they successfully prevented Powell & Pressburger from hiring Creator/SirLawrenceOlivier for the role of (young) Blimp and legally using military equipment and vehicles (which had to be stolen). At the time of its release it was attacked by many for being "pro-German". It has subsequently been considered one of the finest British films, and to have taken anti-Nazi wartime propaganda to much subtler and more ethical level, which was arguably more effective for those very reasons. It was the fourth collaboration between writer-directors Creator/MichaelPowell and Emeric Pressburger in their production company, The Archers. The duo would go on to make several more films, including ''[[Film/TheRedShoes1948 The Red Shoes]]'' and ''Film/BlackNarcissus''. Also notable for being the breakout part for British actress Creator/DeborahKerr, who was only 21 when the film was made.
2nd May '16 4:30:32 PM MAI742
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->''"You laugh at my big belly but you don't know how I got it! You laugh at my mustache but you don't know why I grew it!"''

to:

->''"You ->''"Do you know how many wars I've been in? I was fighting for my country while your father was still in bum-freezers! You laugh at my big belly but you don't know how I got it! You laugh at my mustache but you don't know why I grew it!"'' it! ''How do you know what sort of fellow I was when I was as young as you are?''"''



A film whose protagonist is alive when the credits roll, is not a colonel, and is not surnamed "Blimp". Despite this triple deception, it is very good.

Opening in 1943 in the midst of WorldWarTwo, a group of enterprising British soldiers decide to launch planned war games early, contemptuous of the Home Guard's order that "the war starts at midnight" (they reason that the Germans wouldn't work like that). They capture the Home Guard's commander, Major General Clive Wynne-Candy (Roger Livesey), while he's in the Turkish bath, and mock his protests and his fat belly. An enraged Candy segues into the story of his life. Flashing back 41 years to 1902, we see a young Clive Candy, newly returned from the [[UsefulNotes/TheSecondBoerWar Boer War]] and wearing his new Victoria Cross. A visit to Germany to refute anti-British propaganda leads to a meeting with Miss Edith Hunter (Creator/DeborahKerr) and a duel with Prussian officer Theodore Kretschmar-Schuldorff (Anton Walbrook). Over the next forty years, Clive and Theodore will meet several more times, including in WorldWarOne, and Clive will always be on the lookout for other women like his idol, Edith.

The film was released in 1943 in the United Kingdom, at the height of WorldWarTwo, and two years later in the United States ([[ExecutiveMeddling in heavily edited form]]). At the time of its release it was attacked by many for being "pro-German". It has subsequently been considered one of the finest British films, and to have taken anti-Nazi wartime propaganda to a more subtle and ethical level. It was the fourth collaboration between writer-directors Creator/MichaelPowell and Emeric Pressburger in their production company, The Archers. The duo would go on to make several more films, including ''[[Film/TheRedShoes1948 The Red Shoes]]'' and ''Film/BlackNarcissus''. Also notable for being the breakout part for British actress Creator/DeborahKerr, who was only 21 when the film was made.

to:

A film whose protagonist is alive when does not die during the credits roll, film, is not a colonel, and is not surnamed "Blimp". Despite this triple deception, it is very good.

Opening in 1943 in the midst of WorldWarTwo, a group of enterprising British Army soldiers decide think they are ''very'' clever when they set out to launch planned war games early, contemptuous capture the commanders of the local Home Guard's order Guard units so that "the war they can easily defeat their leaderless forces in a wargame that starts at midnight" (they reason later that the Germans wouldn't work like that). day. They capture the Home Guard's Guard commander, Major General Clive Wynne-Candy (Roger Livesey), while he's in the a Turkish bath, and mock bath - mocking his protests outrage at their invalidation of the exercise, his fatness, and his fat belly. moustache. An enraged Candy begins beating the stuffing out the British Army commander, the young Lieutenant Wilson, and segues into the story of his life. Flashing back 41 years to 1902, we see a young Clive Candy, newly returned from the [[UsefulNotes/TheSecondBoerWar Boer War]] and wearing his new Victoria Cross. A visit to Germany to refute anti-British propaganda leads to a meeting with at the behest of Miss Edith Hunter (Creator/DeborahKerr) (Creator/DeborahKerr), ostensibly 'refute anti-British propaganda', and a duel with Prussian officer Theodore Kretschmar-Schuldorff (Anton Walbrook). Walbrook) ensues. Over the next forty years, years Clive and Theodore will meet several more times, including in WorldWarOne, and Clive will always be on the lookout for other women like his idol, Edith.

The film was released in 1943 in the United Kingdom, at the height of WorldWarTwo, and two years later in the United States ([[ExecutiveMeddling in heavily edited form]]). When they got wind of the script the Ministry of War and even UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill himself tried to prevent the film from being made out of fears that it might instill doubts about whether all Germans were inherently thuggish and brutal (as it was not felt that ordinary British people were capable of understanding nuance), and they successfully prevented Powell & Pressburger from hiring Creator/SirLawrenceOlivier for the role of (young) Blimp and legally using military equipment and vehicles (which had to be stolen). At the time of its release it was attacked by many for being "pro-German". It has subsequently been considered one of the finest British films, and to have taken anti-Nazi wartime propaganda to a much subtler and more subtle and ethical level.level, which was arguably more effective for those very reasons. It was the fourth collaboration between writer-directors Creator/MichaelPowell and Emeric Pressburger in their production company, The Archers. The duo would go on to make several more films, including ''[[Film/TheRedShoes1948 The Red Shoes]]'' and ''Film/BlackNarcissus''. Also notable for being the breakout part for British actress Creator/DeborahKerr, who was only 21 when the film was made.
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