History Film / TheHobbit

22nd Oct '17 1:20:24 PM Connor2107
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* AdaptationalJerkass: Thranduil.In the book, he's relatively isolationist, but he doesn't restrict his people's movements, he keeps ties to the nearby men, and he willingly comes to their aid. In the movie, he's [[EstablishingCharacterMoment first seen]] abandoning Erebor at Smaug's initial attack, and in ''Desolation of Smaug'' he orders his people not to leave the keep once the forest gets dangerous. In the book he is reluctant to fight the dwarves ( "Long may I tarry, ere I begin a war for gold,"), while in the movie, he is eager to fight.



** Regarding characters: Azog, from PosthumousCharacter in the book to main villain of the first film.

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** Regarding characters: Azog, from PosthumousCharacter in the book to main villain of the first film.and third films.



* TookALevelInJerkass: Thranduil, compared to his [[Literature/TheHobbit book counterpart]]. In the book, he's relatively isolationist, but he doesn't restrict his people's movements, he keeps ties to the nearby men, and he willingly comes to their aid. In the movie, he's [[EstablishingCharacterMoment first seen]] abandoning Erebor at Smaug's initial attack, and in ''Desolation of Smaug'' he orders his people not to leave the keep once the forest gets dangerous. In the book he is reluctant to fight the dwarves ( "Long may I tarry, ere I begin a war for gold,"), while in the movie, he is eager to fight.
18th Oct '17 8:58:50 PM Brigid
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* RealIsBrown: The first movie is more saturated than the ''LOTR'' trilogy. The saturation dies down in the next two as the story becomes more serious.

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* RealIsBrown: The first movie is more saturated than the ''LOTR'' trilogy. The saturation dies down in the next two as the story becomes more serious.serious and autumn draws to a close.
19th Sep '17 7:57:02 PM DustSnitch
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* TheVoiceless: Of all the dwarves, only Bombur doesn't speak (constantly having food in his mouth may have something to do with it).
15th Jul '17 11:27:54 PM Epicazeroth
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Added DiffLines:

* FiveManBand: The Council of the Wise
** TheLeader Saruman. The most powerful of the Wizards, and their designated leader. These films show him as a well-intentioned if abrasive AntiHero, before his fall from grace into the straight villain of Film/TheLordOfTheRings.
** TheLancer Gandalf. The most active member of the Council, and the polar opposite of Saruman. Where Saruman is aloof and believes that great power is the only way to defeat evil, Gandalf directly influences many events in Middle-Earth and believes that even small folk and small deeds can have great impact.
** TheSmartGuy Radagast. While Gandalf and Saruman use flashier magics, Radagast uses potions and incantations and is far more knowledgeable about the nature of the darkness they face, as he lives right near it. He also is the first one to figure out the true identity of the Necromancer.
** TheBigGuy Elrond. By far the most physically able of the Council, he possesses less raw magical power than the others. Notably he is the only one to wear armor, as he is the only warrior by trade of the group.
** TheChick Galadriel. Acts as a stabilizing influence between Gandalf and Saruman, and [[Film/TheLordOfTheRings later]] as a mellowing influence on Elrond. She also does the least actual fighting, even though she is implied to be possibly the most powerful (in Middle-Earth at least).
15th Jul '17 8:45:16 PM nombretomado
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** Smaug as well. Being voiced by [[BenedictCumberbatch this guy]] certainly doesn't hurt.

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** Smaug as well. Being voiced by [[BenedictCumberbatch [[Creator/BenedictCumberbatch this guy]] certainly doesn't hurt.



** Gollum (performed once again by the TropeNamer himself) and Smaug as well by BenedictCumberbatch. Jackson must be really impressed by Serkis, because he also appointed him Second Unit Director.

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** Gollum (performed once again by the TropeNamer himself) and Smaug as well by BenedictCumberbatch.Creator/BenedictCumberbatch. Jackson must be really impressed by Serkis, because he also appointed him Second Unit Director.
9th Jul '17 2:19:40 AM ShadictheHedgehog
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** Radagast the Brown gets an expanded role in the films despite not showing up in the book.

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** Radagast the Brown gets an expanded role in the films despite not showing up in the book.book and only having one scene in ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''.
2nd Jul '17 3:13:34 AM DariusAngel
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* RoleReprisal: A good number of 'em from the LOTR trilogy. Sir Ian Holm as Bilbo, Elijah Wood as Frodo, Sir Creator/IanMcKellen as Gandalf, Creator/HugoWeaving as Elrond, Creator/AndySerkis as Gollum, Creator/ChristopherLee as Saruman and Creator/CateBlanchett as Galadriel.

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* RoleReprisal: A good number of 'em from the LOTR trilogy. Sir Ian Holm as Bilbo, Elijah Wood as Frodo, Sir Creator/IanMcKellen as Gandalf, Creator/HugoWeaving as Elrond, Creator/AndySerkis as Gollum, Sir Creator/ChristopherLee as Saruman and Creator/CateBlanchett as Galadriel.
2nd Jul '17 2:13:15 AM DariusAngel
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** The Elves even have this towards ''each other:'' Thranduil tells Tauriel not to get her hopes up as regards to Legolas, since she's just a lowly Silvan Elf. (The film's not exaggerating with this; a lot of Tolkien's Elves are notoriously bigoted and snobbish. However, concerning this particular case of disdain towards Silvan elves, according to Tolkien lore, Thranduil's (Sindarin) royal house is actually one of the few who "went native", adopting Silvan custom and culture -- possibly intermarrying.)

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** The Elves even have this towards ''each other:'' Thranduil tells Tauriel not to get her hopes up as in regards to Legolas, since she's just a lowly Silvan Elf. (The film's not exaggerating with this; a lot of Tolkien's Elves are notoriously bigoted and snobbish. However, concerning this particular case of disdain towards Silvan elves, according to Tolkien lore, Thranduil's (Sindarin) royal house is actually one of the few who "went native", adopting Silvan custom and culture -- possibly intermarrying.)
2nd Jul '17 2:02:31 AM DariusAngel
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* DarkerAndEdgier: Than the book it's based on. But Tolkien himself had planned to write a DarkerAndEdgier version of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' to fit better with the tone of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' and feature more [[CallForward Call Forwards]] to it, having completed two chapters of it before a friend advised him that what he had written was "excellent, but not ''The Hobbit'' an ymore" for fans of the original.

to:

* DarkerAndEdgier: Than the book it's based on. But Tolkien himself had planned to write a DarkerAndEdgier version of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' to fit better with the tone of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' and feature more [[CallForward Call Forwards]] to it, having completed two chapters of it before a friend advised him that what he had written was "excellent, but not ''The Hobbit'' an ymore" anymore" for fans of the original.
2nd Jul '17 2:01:16 AM DariusAngel
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* CosmeticallyAdvancedPrequel: While the LOTR films estblished much of the aesthetics of the modern high fantasy settings, these aesthetics have been built upon over the years in a variety of works. Thus, to appear more spectacular, the structures are more grandiose and detailed (Erebor, Thranduil's halls, Dol Guldur), weapons and armor are more elaborate (noticeably in the case of dwarves and elves, but men and orcs as well) and the character designs are more diverse (all 13 dwarves, Radagast, as well as Azog and Bolg who are very distinct in appearance from any other orc). It also makes sense from an in-universe standpoint, as the world in ''The Hobbit'' is portrayed as distinctly magical and wondrous, while in ''Lord Of The Rings'' the sentiment is that TheMagicGoesAway.

to:

* CosmeticallyAdvancedPrequel: While the LOTR films estblished established much of the aesthetics of the modern high fantasy settings, these aesthetics have been built upon over the years in a variety of works. Thus, to appear more spectacular, the structures are more grandiose and detailed (Erebor, Thranduil's halls, Dol Guldur), weapons and armor are more elaborate (noticeably in the case of dwarves and elves, but men and orcs as well) and the character designs are more diverse (all 13 dwarves, Radagast, as well as Azog and Bolg who are very distinct in appearance from any other orc). It also makes sense from an in-universe standpoint, as the world in ''The Hobbit'' is portrayed as distinctly magical and wondrous, while in ''Lord Of The Rings'' the sentiment is that TheMagicGoesAway.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.TheHobbit