History Film / TheDambusters

17th Sep '16 4:11:21 AM blatster
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* StiffUpperLip: Taken as read - it is a British war film after all. Particularly notable in the climactic attack scenes though, particularly with Wallis' subversion of it, being easily the most tense and the most euphoric.
** One of the more heartbreaking examples, in the final line of the movie. Wallis and Gibson discuss the deaths of the crews in the night's mission (see MyGodWhatHaveIDone above), and as they part ways Wallis asks Gibson if he's going to go and get some sleep. His answer? "No. I... I have to write some letters first". That little crack in his voice is about the only indication you have of his grief over the death of 56 of his men.
*** The letters he has to write, of course, are to the wives and parents of those men telling them of the death of their loved ones. He didn't [b]have[/b] to do it, especially not right at that moment, the War Office would inform them by telegram - but he wanted to ensure that the families got something more personal as soon as possible.
11th Jul '16 4:15:43 AM aishwarya
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* {{Adorkable}}: Barnes Wallis, whose nerdiness is nicely offset by his earnestness, good-hearted nature and inability to hide how queasy he becomes in tense moments.

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* {{Adorkable}}: Barnes Wallis, whose nerdiness is nicely offset by his earnestness, good-hearted nature childlike earnestness and inability to hide how queasy he becomes in tense moments.



--> '''Wallis''': ''[his voice unsteady]'' Fifty-six men. If I'd known it was going to be like this I'd never have started.

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--> '''Wallis''': ''[his voice ''[voice unsteady]'' Fifty-six men. If I'd known it was going to be like this I'd never have started.
28th Jun '16 10:00:59 PM aishwarya
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--> '''Wallis''': ''[his voice unsteady]'' Fifty-six men. If I'd known it was going to be like this I'd never have started.
27th Jun '16 2:02:00 AM aishwarya
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* {{Adorkable}}: Barnes Wallis, whose nerdiness is nicely offset by his earnestness, good-hearted nature and inability to hide how queasy he becomes in tense moments.
25th Jun '16 8:41:56 AM Jake
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At the beginning of WW2, the great engineer (then not yet Sir) Barnes Wallis (played by [[Creator/MichaelRedgrave Redgrave]]) pointed out that bombs rarely did much damage to hardened military installations unless they hit them right on the button (and often not much even then). What you needed was a way of transmitting ALL of the bomb's energy into the target rather than spending most of it on the air. Barnes Wallis proposed that bombs should be designed so that they penetrated the ground AROUND the target rather than hitting it directly, and then went off UNDER it, causing a local earthquake and hole, into which the target would fall. The idea was brilliant and would work perfectly, so it was ignored by all the Air Ministry officials he took it to. Of course the fact his proposal called for a new six-engined monster bomber built specifically to carry the bomb and useless for anything else could have had something to do with it.

to:

At the beginning of WW2, the great engineer (then not yet Sir) Barnes Wallis (played by [[Creator/MichaelRedgrave Redgrave]]) pointed out that bombs rarely did much damage to hardened military installations unless they hit them right on the button (and often not much even then). What you needed was a way of transmitting ALL of the bomb's energy into the target rather than spending most of it on the air. Barnes Wallis proposed that bombs should be designed so that they penetrated the ground AROUND the target rather than hitting it directly, and then went off UNDER it, causing a local earthquake and hole, into which the target would fall. The idea was brilliant and would work have worked perfectly, so it was ignored by all the Air Ministry officials he took it to. Of course the fact but his initial proposal called for a new bomb so large that no aircraft then in existence could carry it and the six-engined monster "Victory" bomber built specifically Wallis designed to carry do the bomb and useless job would have been little use for anything else could have had something to do with it.
and hideously expensive besides, so the Air Ministry were less than enthusiastic.



Barnes Wallis came up with the idea of making a 5-ton spinning bomb which would skip across the water, hit the dam wall, then sink to the bottom before exploding. Thus the water itself would focus the force of the blast against the dam's wall, in much the same way that a good torpedo hit causes more damage to a ship's hull than would an equivalent amount of explosives in a bomb or artillery shell. These were duly made in a tearing hurry and delivered by a crack team flying Lancasters in pitch darkness 60ft over water, nearly half of whom did not come back. The bombs worked, though the most important dam survived.

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Barnes Wallis came up with the idea of making a 5-ton spinning bomb which would skip across the water, hit the dam wall, then sink to the bottom before exploding. Thus the water itself would focus the force of the blast against the dam's wall, in much the same way that a good torpedo hit causes more damage to a ship's hull than would an equivalent amount of explosives in a bomb or artillery shell. These were duly made in a tearing hurry and delivered by a crack team flying Lancasters in pitch darkness 60ft over water, nearly half of whom did not come back. The bombs worked, though the most important dam survived.
survived and the impact on the German war effort from destroying the others was somewhat underwhelming.



* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Barnes is visibly shaken, in a very StiffUpperLip fashion, when he hears how many men were lost during the raid.
** but note that he appears unconcerned by the unknown civilian casualties
--> '''Barnes Wallis:''' If I'd known it was going to be like this, I'd never have started.

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* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Barnes is visibly shaken, in a very StiffUpperLip fashion, when he hears how many men were lost during the raid.
** but note
raid... although ''not'' the German civilians who perished when the dams burst. [[DeliberateValuesDissonance It was that he appears unconcerned by the unknown civilian casualties
--> '''Barnes Wallis:''' If I'd known it was going
sort of war]], and numerous British civilians were undoubtedly dying to be like this, I'd never have started. German bombs that same night.
9th Jun '16 10:53:09 PM aishwarya
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At the beginning of WW2, the great engineer (then not yet Sir) Barnes Wallis (played by [[Creator/MichaelRedgrave Redgrave ]] pointed out that bombs rarely did much damage to hardened military installations unless they hit them right on the button (and often not much even then). What you needed was a way of transmitting ALL of the bomb's energy into the target rather than spending most of it on the air. Barnes Wallis proposed that bombs should be designed so that they penetrated the ground AROUND the target rather than hitting it directly, and then went off UNDER it, causing a local earthquake and hole, into which the target would fall. The idea was brilliant and would work perfectly, so it was ignored by all the Air Ministry officials he took it to. Of course the fact his proposal called for a new six-engined monster bomber built specifically to carry the bomb and useless for anything else could have had something to do with it.

to:

At the beginning of WW2, the great engineer (then not yet Sir) Barnes Wallis (played by [[Creator/MichaelRedgrave Redgrave ]] Redgrave]]) pointed out that bombs rarely did much damage to hardened military installations unless they hit them right on the button (and often not much even then). What you needed was a way of transmitting ALL of the bomb's energy into the target rather than spending most of it on the air. Barnes Wallis proposed that bombs should be designed so that they penetrated the ground AROUND the target rather than hitting it directly, and then went off UNDER it, causing a local earthquake and hole, into which the target would fall. The idea was brilliant and would work perfectly, so it was ignored by all the Air Ministry officials he took it to. Of course the fact his proposal called for a new six-engined monster bomber built specifically to carry the bomb and useless for anything else could have had something to do with it.
9th Jun '16 10:52:38 PM aishwarya
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The story of the Dam Busters is one which brings out several features of the British -- the sophistication of their engineering innovation, the bravery of their armed forces, the incompetence of their leaders and their unerring ability to be first in a technical field and then leave it to others to make money out of it (for example, see Babbage and Turing...or Whittle...)

At the beginning of WW2, the great engineer (then not yet Sir) Barnes Wallis pointed out that bombs rarely did much damage to hardened military installations unless they hit them right on the button (and often not much even then). What you needed was a way of transmitting ALL of the bomb's energy into the target rather than spending most of it on the air. Barnes Wallis proposed that bombs should be designed so that they penetrated the ground AROUND the target rather than hitting it directly, and then went off UNDER it, causing a local earthquake and hole, into which the target would fall. The idea was brilliant and would work perfectly, so it was ignored by all the Air Ministry officials he took it to. Of course the fact his proposal called for a new six-engined monster bomber built specifically to carry the bomb and useless for anything else could have had something to do with it.

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''The Dam Busters'' is a 1955 British film starring Richard Todd and Creator/MichaelRedgrave. The story of the Dam Busters is one which brings out several features of the British -- the sophistication of their engineering innovation, the bravery of their armed forces, the incompetence of their leaders and their unerring ability to be first in a technical field and then leave it to others to make money out of it (for example, see Babbage and Turing...or Whittle...)

At the beginning of WW2, the great engineer (then not yet Sir) Barnes Wallis (played by [[Creator/MichaelRedgrave Redgrave ]] pointed out that bombs rarely did much damage to hardened military installations unless they hit them right on the button (and often not much even then). What you needed was a way of transmitting ALL of the bomb's energy into the target rather than spending most of it on the air. Barnes Wallis proposed that bombs should be designed so that they penetrated the ground AROUND the target rather than hitting it directly, and then went off UNDER it, causing a local earthquake and hole, into which the target would fall. The idea was brilliant and would work perfectly, so it was ignored by all the Air Ministry officials he took it to. Of course the fact his proposal called for a new six-engined monster bomber built specifically to carry the bomb and useless for anything else could have had something to do with it.
20th May '16 10:36:19 AM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dambustersposter_7801.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Calling T for Troper!]]

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dambustersposter_7801.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Calling [[caption-width-right:300:Calling T for Troper!]]
2nd Jan '16 12:34:58 PM BillWoods
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The story of the Dam Busters is one which brings out several features of the British - the sophistication of their engineering innovation, the bravery of their armed forces, the incompetence of their leaders and their unerring ability to be first in a technical field and then leave it to others to make money out of it (for example, see Babbage and Turing...or Whittle...)

to:

The story of the Dam Busters is one which brings out several features of the British - -- the sophistication of their engineering innovation, the bravery of their armed forces, the incompetence of their leaders and their unerring ability to be first in a technical field and then leave it to others to make money out of it (for example, see Babbage and Turing...or Whittle...)



Barnes Wallis came up with the idea of making a 5 ton spinning bomb which would skip across the water, hit the dam wall, then sink to the bottom before exploding. Thus the water itself would focus the force of the blast against the dam's wall, in much the same way that a good torpedo hit causes more damage to a ship's hull than would an equivalent amount of explosives in a bomb or artillery shell. These were duly made in a tearing hurry and delivered by a crack team flying Lancasters in pitch darkness 60ft over water, nearly half of whom did not come back. The bombs worked, though the most important dam survived.

Having suffered almost 50% losses for disappointing results, the British mothballed the bouncing-bomb concept and never attacked the dams again, letting the Germans rebuild them. Barnes Wallis was allowed to develop his 'earth penetrator' bombs which were staggeringly effective - taking out bridges and viaducts, sinking the Tirpitz, stopping the V2 and V3 developments, destroying U-boat pens at Brest with 33ft reinforced concrete roofs and in one attack, and blowing up a railway line which ran under a mountain by dropping the bomb THROUGH the mountain and into the tunnel beneath.

to:

Barnes Wallis came up with the idea of making a 5 ton 5-ton spinning bomb which would skip across the water, hit the dam wall, then sink to the bottom before exploding. Thus the water itself would focus the force of the blast against the dam's wall, in much the same way that a good torpedo hit causes more damage to a ship's hull than would an equivalent amount of explosives in a bomb or artillery shell. These were duly made in a tearing hurry and delivered by a crack team flying Lancasters in pitch darkness 60ft over water, nearly half of whom did not come back. The bombs worked, though the most important dam survived.

Having suffered almost 50% losses for disappointing results, the British mothballed the bouncing-bomb concept and never attacked the dams again, letting the Germans rebuild them. Barnes Wallis was allowed to develop his 'earth penetrator' bombs which were staggeringly effective - -- taking out bridges and viaducts, sinking the Tirpitz, ''Tirpitz'', stopping the V2 and V3 developments, destroying U-boat pens at Brest with 33ft reinforced concrete roofs and in one attack, and blowing up a railway line which ran under a mountain by dropping the bomb THROUGH the mountain and into the tunnel beneath.



Notable for its influence on a little movie called StarWars: the trench run was heavily inspired by the climax of the film. Several lines of dialogue are actually re-used, nearly verbatim.

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Notable for its influence on a little movie called StarWars: ''[[Film/ANewHope StarWars]]'': the trench run was heavily inspired by the climax of the film. Several lines of dialogue are actually re-used, nearly verbatim.



* MadScientist: Barnes Wallis, whilst not actually mad (even though some of his inventions were seen that way), was certainly as prolific as the archetype - he invented geodetic frames for aircraft, designed airships and aeroplanes, the bouncing and earthquake bombs, and after the war worked on swing-wing and supersonic aircraft, rocket-propelled torpedos, and even came up with designs for cargo submarines that were faster and more efficient than comparable surface ships.

to:

* MadScientist: Barnes Wallis, whilst not actually mad (even though some of his inventions were seen that way), was certainly as prolific as the archetype - -- he invented geodetic frames for aircraft, designed airships and aeroplanes, the bouncing and earthquake bombs, and after the war worked on swing-wing and supersonic aircraft, rocket-propelled torpedos, and even came up with designs for cargo submarines that were faster and more efficient than comparable surface ships.






** The original scene is in ''TheWall'' when Pink is freaking out in his hotel room.

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** The original scene is in ''TheWall'' ''Music/TheWall'' when Pink is freaking out in his hotel room.



** Referenced in ''TheOffice'' (UK).

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** Referenced in ''TheOffice'' ''[[Series/TheOfficeUK The Office]]'' (UK).



* StrollingThroughTheChaos: Gibson during the aformentioned riot. Avoids a chair, a pair of pants and several airmen (though he does stop to deck a man who's double-teaming one of his own men).

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* StrollingThroughTheChaos: Gibson during the aformentioned aforementioned riot. Avoids a chair, a pair of pants and several airmen (though he does stop to deck a man who's double-teaming one of his own men).
24th Jun '15 12:08:53 AM SSJMagus
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Barnes Wallis came up with the idea of making a 5 ton spinning bomb which would skip across the water, hit the dam wall, then sink to the bottom before exploding. These were duly made in a tearing hurry and delivered by a crack team flying Lancasters in pitch darkness 60ft over water, nearly half of whom did not come back. The bombs worked, though the most important dam survived.

to:

Barnes Wallis came up with the idea of making a 5 ton spinning bomb which would skip across the water, hit the dam wall, then sink to the bottom before exploding. Thus the water itself would focus the force of the blast against the dam's wall, in much the same way that a good torpedo hit causes more damage to a ship's hull than would an equivalent amount of explosives in a bomb or artillery shell. These were duly made in a tearing hurry and delivered by a crack team flying Lancasters in pitch darkness 60ft over water, nearly half of whom did not come back. The bombs worked, though the most important dam survived.
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