History Film / TheBigSleep

11th Jan '17 10:35:52 PM PaulA
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* AdaptationalModesty: The book has Phillip Marlowe interrupting a porn shoot and finding a naked girl. Obviously this wouldn't fly on film in the 1940s, so the movie gets as daring as it could by putting her in a nightgown.

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* AdaptationalModesty: AdaptationalModesty:
**
The book has Phillip Marlowe interrupting a porn shoot and finding a naked girl. Obviously this wouldn't fly on film in the 1940s, so the movie gets as daring as it could by putting her in a nightgown.nightgown.
** Similarly, the scene where Carmen shows up uninvited in Marlowe's bedroom features more clothing than in the novel.



* AdaptationExplanationExtrication: In the book, Carmen notes how tall Marlowe is and follows up by asking if he's some kind of prize fighter. In the film, she notes how ''short'' he is but still asks if he's a prize fighter, so it comes out of nowhere.

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* AdaptationExplanationExtrication: AdaptationExplanationExtrication:
**
In the book, Carmen notes how tall Marlowe is and follows up by asking if he's some kind of prize fighter. In the film, she notes how ''short'' he is but still asks if he's a prize fighter, so it comes out of nowhere. nowhere.
** General Sternwood simply says that Vivian's marriage "didn't work out." This is because in the original book she had been married to Regan and this had to be changed.



* ExpectingSomeoneTaller: Several cracks are made at the expense of Marlowe's height. This is inverted in the book, where the same scenes comment on his tall stature.
* FemmeFatale: Vivian is set up to be the typical Femme Fatale, such as being involved in several shady deals, gambling, and [[spoiler:admitting to help cover up a murder]] all while trying to manipulate detective Marlowe into doing what she wants. Where the novel plays the trope completely straight, the film changes up the game by making her turn heroic halfway through the picture instead.

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* ExpectingSomeoneTaller: Several cracks are made at the expense of Marlowe's height. This is inverted in the book, where the same scenes comment on his tall stature.
height.
* FemmeFatale: Vivian is set up to be the typical Femme Fatale, such as being involved in several shady deals, gambling, and [[spoiler:admitting to help cover up a murder]] all while trying to manipulate detective Marlowe into doing what she wants. Where the novel plays the trope completely straight, the The film changes up the game by making her turn heroic halfway through the picture instead.



* HandWave: General simply says that Vivian's marriage "didn't work out." This is because in the original book she had been married to Regan and this had to be changed.



* HotLibrarian: The rare-books shop girl who whips off her glasses, lets her hair down and closes up the shop suggestively (with Marlowe still in it) at the end of her scene. Oddly enough, this scene, and the one with the taxi driver offering Marlowe her number, don't happen in the book, where Marlowe's [[ChasteHero ability to control his sexual desires]] is a big part of his character. However, even in the book, Marlowe notes that the bookshop clerk is [[MatzoFever very good-looking for a Jewish girl]], so the trope stands. Marlowe is very much in control in the movie as well; he's just luckier.

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* HotLibrarian: The rare-books shop girl who whips off her glasses, lets her hair down and closes up the shop suggestively (with Marlowe still in it) at the end of her scene. Oddly enough, this scene, and the one with the taxi driver offering Marlowe her number, don't happen in the book, where Marlowe's [[ChasteHero ability to control his sexual desires]] is a big part of his character. However, even in the book, Marlowe notes that the bookshop clerk is [[MatzoFever very good-looking for a Jewish girl]], so the trope stands. Marlowe is very much in control in the movie as well; he's just luckier.



* ReadyForLovemaking: Marlowe comes back to his apartment to find Carmen Sternwood waiting for him though because of the Production Code she's still dressed. (In the novel, she's naked.)

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* PromotedToLoveInterest: Vivian -- in the book, she and Marlowe have BelligerentSexualTension but it doesn't go anywhere (in the book, she's still married, in the eye of the law if not in practice). Marlowe's flirtations with the book seller and the taxi driver are also original to the movie (the taxi driver isn't even female in the book).
* ReadyForLovemaking: Marlowe comes back to his apartment to find Carmen Sternwood waiting for him though because of the Production Code she's still dressed. (In the novel, she's naked.)
11th Jan '17 9:54:42 AM CumbersomeTercel
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* SmokingIsCool: And never as cool as when Humphrey Bogart lights up.

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* SmokingIsCool: And never as cool as when Humphrey Bogart Creator/HumphreyBogart lights up.



* {{UST}}: Marlowe and Vivian. Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall don't tear off any clothes - in fact, they barely touch each other - and and yet the sexual tension between them crackles more than any pair of Hollywood-lovers on the screens today.

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* {{UST}}: Marlowe and Vivian. Humphrey Bogart Creator/HumphreyBogart and Lauren Bacall Creator/LaurenBacall don't tear off any clothes - in fact, they barely touch each other - and and yet the sexual tension between them crackles more than any pair of Hollywood-lovers on the screens today.today.
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: It's never explained who killed the chauffeur. During filming, Howard Hawks and screenwriters Creator/WilliamFaulkner, Creator/LeighBrackett and Jules Furthman sent a cable to Creator/RaymondChandler, who later told a friend in a letter: "They sent me a wire... asking me, and dammit I didn't know either."
11th Jan '17 9:43:11 AM CumbersomeTercel
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Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalModesty: The book has Phillip Marlowe interrupting a porn shoot and finding a naked girl. Obviously this wouldn't fly on film in the 1940s, so the movie gets as daring as it could by putting her in a nightgown.


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* ArchEnemy: Eddie Mars to Phillip Marlowe.


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* BeautifulAllAlong: Marlowe "transforms" the lady bookseller by removing her glasses.


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* BettyAndVeronica: Vivian is the Betty, and Carmen is the Veronica to Philip Marlowe's Archie.
* BigBad: Eddie Mars.


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* CharacterTics: Philip Marlowe rubs his earlobe when his concentrating. Carmen also bites her thumb, which irritates Marlowe.


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* FemmeFatale: Vivian is set up to be the typical Femme Fatale, such as being involved in several shady deals, gambling, and [[spoiler:admitting to help cover up a murder]] all while trying to manipulate detective Marlowe into doing what she wants. Where the novel plays the trope completely straight, the film changes up the game by making her turn heroic halfway through the picture instead.


Added DiffLines:

* HotLibrarian: The rare-books shop girl who whips off her glasses, lets her hair down and closes up the shop suggestively (with Marlowe still in it) at the end of her scene. Oddly enough, this scene, and the one with the taxi driver offering Marlowe her number, don't happen in the book, where Marlowe's [[ChasteHero ability to control his sexual desires]] is a big part of his character. However, even in the book, Marlowe notes that the bookshop clerk is [[MatzoFever very good-looking for a Jewish girl]], so the trope stands. Marlowe is very much in control in the movie as well; he's just luckier.


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* IdeaBulb: Marlowe is sitting on a couch with a lamp behind him, and someone turns it on just after making an off-hand comment that brings half the plot into focus (for Marlowe, anyway, if not the viewer).
* IgnoreTheFanservice:
** Carmen turns up in Marlowe's bed, but he gets her dressed and drags her home. She's homicidally angry with him for turning her down.
--->'''Marlowe:''' She tried to sit in my lap while I was still standing up.
** Vivian puts the moves on Marlowe too, but less blatantly. She also gets upset when turned down, but she's not as histrionic as her sister.


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* KnightInSourArmour:


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* LettingHerHairDown: The bookseller woman has her hair all tied up. After the detective chats to her a while, she closes the shop, lets down her hair, takes off her glasses, and ...apparently, helps him pass the time until the person he's seeking turns up across the street.


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* NerdsAreSexy: Marlowe spends an afternoon in an antiquarian bookshop with the clerk (Dorothy Malone). An unexpected rainstorm, a bottle of rye, and the line "I'd rather get wet in here", transforms Malone from book-worm to babe, who closes the shop an hour early (and the film fades to black).


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* PrivateDetective: Philip Marlowe is one of the best examples in fiction.
* ReadyForLovemaking: Marlowe comes back to his apartment to find Carmen Sternwood waiting for him though because of the Production Code she's still dressed. (In the novel, she's naked.)


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* ThinkingTic: Philip Marlowe tugs on his earlobe when he's concentrating.
21st Dec '16 2:23:32 PM Discar
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* AManIsNotAVirgin: In the books Marlowe was a knight-like man who never slept with any woman whilst on a case (he has two, possibly three, sexual encounters throughout the series). Somehow, even back then, Warner Bros had the idea that a tough-guy like Marlowe wouldn't be believable if women didn't go to bed with him so to spice things up they added in the infamous Librarian scene and to a lesser extent the Cab girl scene.
7th Aug '16 2:40:04 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* AdaptationExplanationExtrication: In the book, Carmen notes how tall Marlowe is and follows up by asking if he's some kind of prize fighter. In the film, she notes how ''short'' he is but still asks if he's a prize fighter, so it comes out of nowhere. Interestingly enough, it turns the exchange in the film into [[spoiler: one of the first hints that something is not quite right with Carmen.]]

to:

* AdaptationExplanationExtrication: In the book, Carmen notes how tall Marlowe is and follows up by asking if he's some kind of prize fighter. In the film, she notes how ''short'' he is but still asks if he's a prize fighter, so it comes out of nowhere. Interestingly enough, it turns the exchange in the film into [[spoiler: one of the first hints that something is not quite right with Carmen.]]
5th Jan '16 10:38:50 AM PaulA
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* HidingTheHandicap: Invoked by her sister rather than Carmen herself in both versions, but the principle still stands: in order to avoid social repercussions and upsetting their father, the full extent of Carmen's eccentricities are kept under wraps. In the novel, it's clear that most of Carmen's troubles stem from very serious psychological problems - she has a full-blown seizure at one point and [[spoiler: winds up committed to an asylum]] at the end. In the film, however, the darker elements of her childish behavior are only vaguely hinted at due to Carmen's reduced role.

to:

* HidingTheHandicap: Invoked by her sister rather than Carmen herself in both versions, herself, but the principle still stands: in order to avoid social repercussions and upsetting their father, the full extent of Carmen's eccentricities are kept under wraps. In the novel, it's clear that most of Carmen's troubles stem from very serious psychological problems - she has a full-blown seizure at one point and [[spoiler: winds up committed to an asylum]] at the end. In the film, however, the darker elements of her childish behavior are only vaguely hinted at due to Carmen's reduced role.wraps.
25th Dec '15 10:59:00 AM Exagge
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* HidingTheHandicap: In the novel, most of Carmen's troubles stem from very serious psychological problems - she goes into a full-blown seizure at one point and winds up committed to an asylum at the end of the book. With her greatly reduced role in the film, there's no need to mention any of this, leaving her merely capricious and childish rather than mentally disturbed.

to:

* HidingTheHandicap: Invoked by her sister rather than Carmen herself in both versions, but the principle still stands: in order to avoid social repercussions and upsetting their father, the full extent of Carmen's eccentricities are kept under wraps. In the novel, it's clear that most of Carmen's troubles stem from very serious psychological problems - she goes into has a full-blown seizure at one point and [[spoiler: winds up committed to an asylum asylum]] at the end of the book. With her greatly reduced role in end. In the film, there's no need to mention any however, the darker elements of this, leaving her merely capricious and childish rather than mentally disturbed.behavior are only vaguely hinted at due to Carmen's reduced role.
22nd Dec '15 6:36:24 AM Thranx
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Added DiffLines:

* HidingTheHandicap: In the novel, most of Carmen's troubles stem from very serious psychological problems - she goes into a full-blown seizure at one point and winds up committed to an asylum at the end of the book. With her greatly reduced role in the film, there's no need to mention any of this, leaving her merely capricious and childish rather than mentally disturbed.
14th Nov '15 11:48:38 PM nombretomado
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As film critic RogerEbert writes, "It is typical of this most puzzling of films that no one agrees even on why it is so puzzling. Yet that has never affected ''The Big Sleep'''s enduring popularity, because the movie is about the process of a criminal investigation, not its results."

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As film critic RogerEbert Creator/RogerEbert writes, "It is typical of this most puzzling of films that no one agrees even on why it is so puzzling. Yet that has never affected ''The Big Sleep'''s enduring popularity, because the movie is about the process of a criminal investigation, not its results."
2nd Nov '15 3:22:12 PM NinjaLore
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* AllThereInTheManual: The book sheds some light on a few of the little mysteries in the film, such as the code book Marlowe finds (it's Geiger's ledger of clients), the exact nature of the blackmail photos (Carmen wasn't wearing her robe when they were taken) and all that weird business in the back of Geiger's [[UnusualEuphemism rare book shop]] (the back room is selling pornography, which is one of the reasons Eddie Mars cleans it out the next morning).

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* AllThereInTheManual: The movie censors out some of the book's details. Reading the book sheds some light on a few of the little mysteries in the film, such as the code book Marlowe finds (it's Geiger's ledger of clients), the exact nature of the blackmail photos (Carmen wasn't wearing her robe when they were taken) and all that weird business in the back of Geiger's [[UnusualEuphemism rare book shop]] (the back room is selling pornography, which is one of the reasons Eddie Mars cleans it out the next morning).
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