History Film / TheBigSleep

7th Aug '16 2:40:04 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* AdaptationExplanationExtrication: In the book, Carmen notes how tall Marlowe is and follows up by asking if he's some kind of prize fighter. In the film, she notes how ''short'' he is but still asks if he's a prize fighter, so it comes out of nowhere. Interestingly enough, it turns the exchange in the film into [[spoiler: one of the first hints that something is not quite right with Carmen.]]

to:

* AdaptationExplanationExtrication: In the book, Carmen notes how tall Marlowe is and follows up by asking if he's some kind of prize fighter. In the film, she notes how ''short'' he is but still asks if he's a prize fighter, so it comes out of nowhere. Interestingly enough, it turns the exchange in the film into [[spoiler: one of the first hints that something is not quite right with Carmen.]]
5th Jan '16 10:38:50 AM PaulA
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* HidingTheHandicap: Invoked by her sister rather than Carmen herself in both versions, but the principle still stands: in order to avoid social repercussions and upsetting their father, the full extent of Carmen's eccentricities are kept under wraps. In the novel, it's clear that most of Carmen's troubles stem from very serious psychological problems - she has a full-blown seizure at one point and [[spoiler: winds up committed to an asylum]] at the end. In the film, however, the darker elements of her childish behavior are only vaguely hinted at due to Carmen's reduced role.

to:

* HidingTheHandicap: Invoked by her sister rather than Carmen herself in both versions, herself, but the principle still stands: in order to avoid social repercussions and upsetting their father, the full extent of Carmen's eccentricities are kept under wraps. In the novel, it's clear that most of Carmen's troubles stem from very serious psychological problems - she has a full-blown seizure at one point and [[spoiler: winds up committed to an asylum]] at the end. In the film, however, the darker elements of her childish behavior are only vaguely hinted at due to Carmen's reduced role.wraps.
25th Dec '15 10:59:00 AM Exagge
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* HidingTheHandicap: In the novel, most of Carmen's troubles stem from very serious psychological problems - she goes into a full-blown seizure at one point and winds up committed to an asylum at the end of the book. With her greatly reduced role in the film, there's no need to mention any of this, leaving her merely capricious and childish rather than mentally disturbed.

to:

* HidingTheHandicap: Invoked by her sister rather than Carmen herself in both versions, but the principle still stands: in order to avoid social repercussions and upsetting their father, the full extent of Carmen's eccentricities are kept under wraps. In the novel, it's clear that most of Carmen's troubles stem from very serious psychological problems - she goes into has a full-blown seizure at one point and [[spoiler: winds up committed to an asylum asylum]] at the end of the book. With her greatly reduced role in end. In the film, there's no need to mention any however, the darker elements of this, leaving her merely capricious and childish rather than mentally disturbed.behavior are only vaguely hinted at due to Carmen's reduced role.
22nd Dec '15 6:36:24 AM Thranx
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Added DiffLines:

* HidingTheHandicap: In the novel, most of Carmen's troubles stem from very serious psychological problems - she goes into a full-blown seizure at one point and winds up committed to an asylum at the end of the book. With her greatly reduced role in the film, there's no need to mention any of this, leaving her merely capricious and childish rather than mentally disturbed.
14th Nov '15 11:48:38 PM nombretomado
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As film critic RogerEbert writes, "It is typical of this most puzzling of films that no one agrees even on why it is so puzzling. Yet that has never affected ''The Big Sleep'''s enduring popularity, because the movie is about the process of a criminal investigation, not its results."

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As film critic RogerEbert Creator/RogerEbert writes, "It is typical of this most puzzling of films that no one agrees even on why it is so puzzling. Yet that has never affected ''The Big Sleep'''s enduring popularity, because the movie is about the process of a criminal investigation, not its results."
2nd Nov '15 3:22:12 PM NinjaLore
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* AllThereInTheManual: The book sheds some light on a few of the little mysteries in the film, such as the code book Marlowe finds (it's Geiger's ledger of clients), the exact nature of the blackmail photos (Carmen wasn't wearing her robe when they were taken) and all that weird business in the back of Geiger's [[UnusualEuphemism rare book shop]] (the back room is selling pornography, which is one of the reasons Eddie Mars cleans it out the next morning).

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* AllThereInTheManual: The movie censors out some of the book's details. Reading the book sheds some light on a few of the little mysteries in the film, such as the code book Marlowe finds (it's Geiger's ledger of clients), the exact nature of the blackmail photos (Carmen wasn't wearing her robe when they were taken) and all that weird business in the back of Geiger's [[UnusualEuphemism rare book shop]] (the back room is selling pornography, which is one of the reasons Eddie Mars cleans it out the next morning).
3rd Jul '15 8:12:47 PM RushLimborg
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* AllThereInTheManual: The book sheds some light on a few of the little mysteries in the film, such as the exact nature of the blackmail photos (Carmen wasn't wearing her robe when they were taken) and all that weird business in the back of Geiger's [[UnusualEuphemism rare book shop]] (the back room is selling pornography, which is one of the reasons Eddie Mars cleans it out the next morning).

to:

* AllThereInTheManual: The book sheds some light on a few of the little mysteries in the film, such as the code book Marlowe finds (it's Geiger's ledger of clients), the exact nature of the blackmail photos (Carmen wasn't wearing her robe when they were taken) and all that weird business in the back of Geiger's [[UnusualEuphemism rare book shop]] (the back room is selling pornography, which is one of the reasons Eddie Mars cleans it out the next morning).
1st Jul '15 12:21:34 AM Exagge
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* AdaptationExplanationExtrication: In the book, Carmen notes how tall Marlowe is and follows up by asking if he's some kind of prize fighter. In the film, she notes how ''short'' he is but still asks if he's a prize fighter, so it comes out of nowhere.

to:

* AdaptationExplanationExtrication: In the book, Carmen notes how tall Marlowe is and follows up by asking if he's some kind of prize fighter. In the film, she notes how ''short'' he is but still asks if he's a prize fighter, so it comes out of nowhere. Interestingly enough, it turns the exchange in the film into [[spoiler: one of the first hints that something is not quite right with Carmen.]]
20th Jun '15 10:58:27 AM lipranzer
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Added DiffLines:

* PopCulturalOsmosisFailure: When Marlowe asks Carmen if she floated into his room through the keyhole like Literature/PeterPan, she asks, "Who's he?"
7th Jun '15 5:04:38 PM gallium
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** Carmen's ultra-short shorts in her first scene, which by 1945 standards was the equivalent of someone appearing in a 2010 film wearing a thong bikini.



** When Vivian visits Marlowe's office for the first time, she tries not to scratch an itch on her thigh. Marlowe tells her to scratch it and we get a brief above-the-knee flash which, by 1945 standards, was almost the equivalent of Bacall mooning the camera.
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