History Film / MontyPythonsLifeOfBrian

17th Apr '17 9:09:34 PM Josef5678
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** The title theme is quite similar to the one for ''Film/{{Goldfinger}}''.
17th Apr '17 9:09:04 PM Josef5678
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*** They weren't '''always''' that provocative. Every now and then, there'd be a governor, emperor, or senator(s) who would try to avoid grabbing the VillainBall due to believing that dealing with a revolt would be more trouble than it was worth. Ironically, this is what led to Pilate's dismissal from his governorship of Judea: a number of senators feared that his HangingJudge tendencies would provoke a revolt, which would lead to their deaths since they had narrowly avoided being purged following the downfall of their "mutual friend", Praetorian commander Lucius Aelius Sejanus[[note]]The guy played by Creator/PatrickStewart in Series/IClaudius.[[/note]], and Tiberius was chomping at the bit for them to give him an excuse to have them killed. Another example was [[UsefulNotes/{{Nero}} Nero's]] response to a huge and destructive revolt in Briton: after the rebellion was suppressed, he had all the Roman politicians involved recalled to Rome (he feared that their continued presence in Briton would lead to another revolt that would be too powerful to suppress) and replaced them with [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure Reasonable Authority Figures]] who got the locals to submit to Roman rule [[PetTheDog by treating them better]]. Future Roman governors of Briton took a page from that book and behaved more or less the same way, resulting in Briton becoming one of Rome's most loyal provinces.
17th Apr '17 9:08:23 PM Josef5678
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* AccidentalHero: Brian

to:

* %%* AccidentalHero: Brian



* TheCatCameBack: Brian's followers.

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* %%* TheCatCameBack: Brian's followers.



* ExactWords: How Brian's followers interpret his instructions.

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* %%* ExactWords: How Brian's followers interpret his instructions.



* IKnowWhatWeCanDoCut: The kidnapping plan.

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* %%* IKnowWhatWeCanDoCut: The kidnapping plan.



* SonOfAWhore: Brian.

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* %%* SonOfAWhore: Brian.
17th Apr '17 9:06:43 PM Josef5678
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Upon its release, this film drew a lot of controversy, mainly in the form of criticism from various religious groups and orders due to what was perceived as a disrespectful mockery of JesusChrist (which in turn was frequently based on the erroneous belief that Brian was intended to be/actually was Jesus, rather than just someone whose life paralleled him in several ways). Rather than mocking Jesus, however, the film actually treats the source material with a lot of respect. It just points out that UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}} may have missed the point on some of what Jesus taught. It is not unheard of for the movie to be regarded as an AffectionateParody by actual ministers.

to:

Upon its release, this film drew a lot of controversy, mainly in the form of criticism from various religious groups and orders due to what was perceived as a disrespectful mockery of JesusChrist UsefulNotes/JesusChrist (which in turn was frequently based on the erroneous belief that Brian was intended to be/actually was Jesus, rather than just someone whose life paralleled him in several ways). Rather than mocking Jesus, however, the film actually treats the source material with a lot of respect. It just points out that UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}} may have missed the point on some of what Jesus taught. It is not unheard of for the movie to be regarded as an AffectionateParody by actual ministers.



* TheCameo: The man who rents out the mountain for sermons is Music/GeorgeHarrison.
** He was essential in funding the film, by the way.

to:

* TheCameo: The man who rents out the mountain for sermons is Music/GeorgeHarrison.
** He
Music/GeorgeHarrison.[[note]]He was essential in funding the film, by the way. film.[[/note]]



** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2K8_jgiNqUc Naughtius Maximus, Biggus Dickus, Incontinentia Buttocks]].
*** (The combinations "ck", "gg," and "gh" do not occur in Latin. It should be Nautius Maximus, Bigus Diccus and Incontinentia Buttox.)

to:

** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2K8_jgiNqUc Naughtius Maximus, Biggus Dickus, Incontinentia Buttocks]]. \n*** (The [[note]](The combinations "ck", "gg," and "gh" do not occur in Latin. It should be Nautius Maximus, Bigus Diccus and Incontinentia Buttox.))[[/note]]



* TheMusical: ''Not the Messiah (He's a Very Naughty Boy)'', a comic oratorio written by Creator/EricIdle and John du Prez (the same team of ''Theatre/{{Spamalot}}''). Besides many original compositions are Python mainstays "Always Look On The Bright Side of Life" and "The Lumberjack Song".

to:

* TheMusical: TheMusical:
**
''Not the Messiah (He's a Very Naughty Boy)'', a comic oratorio written by Creator/EricIdle and John du Prez (the same team of ''Theatre/{{Spamalot}}''). Besides many original compositions are Python mainstays "Always Look On The Bright Side of Life" and "The Lumberjack Song".



* PassionPlay: PlayedForLaughs and PlayedWith. ''Monty Python's Life of Brian'' is a comedy, so it shifts focus away from the brutal execution of Christ to a more humorous character who named Brian, who was born in the manger next to Jesus's. Because of their proximity, Brian ends up being mistaken for the real Messiah and gets sentenced to crucifixion by the Romans. [[spoiler:Only for those being crucified next to Brian begin whistling and singing "Always Look On the Bright Side of Life" to cheer him up.]]

to:

* PassionPlay: PlayedForLaughs and PlayedWith. ''Monty Python's Life of Brian'' is a comedy, so it shifts focus away from the brutal execution of Christ to a more humorous character who named Brian, who was born in the manger next to Jesus's. Because of their proximity, Brian ends up being mistaken for the real Messiah and gets sentenced to crucifixion by the Romans. [[spoiler:Only for those being crucified next to Brian begin whistling and singing "Always Look On the Bright Side of Life" to cheer him up.]]



* ShownTheirWork: They managed to get a lot of historical details right in the film, not surprising since a historian (Creator/TerryJones) directed it. For instance, Brian being the bastard son of a Roman soldier in fact mirrors an ancient anti-Christian claim about Jesus, as found in the writings of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celsus Celsus]] and others.

to:

* ShownTheirWork: They managed to get a lot of historical details right in the film, not surprising since a historian (Creator/TerryJones) directed it. For instance,
**
Brian being the bastard son of a Roman soldier in fact mirrors an ancient anti-Christian claim about Jesus, as found in the writings of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celsus Celsus]] and others.
16th Apr '17 2:11:20 PM Bissek
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* CavalryBetrayal: Multiple times during the crucifixion.
** The Centurion shows up to release Brian, but [[spoiler:accidentally frees the Cheeky Bloke instead]].
** The People's Front of Judea show up, [[spoiler:give Brian a statement of thanks for his impending martyrdom, and then leave]].
** The [[spoiler:Judean's People's Front]] sends a suicide squad to rescue him, which [[spoiler:promptly [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin commits suicide]]]].
** Judith arrives, only to [[spoiler:give her own thanks for his impending martyrdom.]]
** And finally Brian's mother stops by to [[spoiler:guilt trip him about leaving his mother alone without any support in her old age.]]



* DoWrongRight: The above-mentioned scene with the centurion making Brian change his (treasonous) graffiti to be correct Latin.

to:

* DoWrongRight: The above-mentioned scene with the centurion making Brian change his (treasonous) graffiti to be grammatically correct Latin.
16th Apr '17 12:17:52 PM Bissek
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Added DiffLines:

* ComplainingAboutRescuesTheyDontLike: The ex-leper, who objects to Jesus' healing miracles because they ruined his career as a beggar.
13th Apr '17 7:01:20 AM Jhonny
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** The argument that they "brought peace" is also laughable: Rome, despite claiming to be in an age of ''[[IronicName Pax Romana]]'' ("Roman Peace"), was almost always at war, be it an aggressive campaign of expansion or suppressing a needlessly provoked revolt. Typically, "Roman peace" meant "butcher the enemy to the last child and then roast them in the tabloids".

to:

** The argument that they "brought peace" is also laughable: Rome, despite claiming to be in an age of ''[[IronicName Pax Romana]]'' ("Roman Peace"), was almost always at war, be it an aggressive campaign of expansion or suppressing a needlessly provoked revolt. Typically, "Roman peace" meant "butcher the enemy to the last child and then roast them in the tabloids". That said, once a province was "pacified" it was usually a pretty good place to live for speakers of Latin or Greek of some wealth.
12th Apr '17 5:59:59 PM Cheapsunglasses
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*** They weren't '''always''' that provocative. Every now and then, there'd be a governor, emperor, or senator(s) who would try to avoid grabbing the VillainBall due to believing that dealing with a revolt would be more trouble than it was worth. Ironically, this is what led to Pilate's dismissal from his governorship of Judea: a number of senators feared that his HangingJudge tendencies would provoke a revolt, which would lead to their "mutual friend", Praetorian commander Lucius Aelius Sejanus[[note]]The guy played by Creator/PatrickStewart in Series/IClaudius.[[/note]], having them arrested and executed on trumped up charges to avoid landing in hot water with Emperor Tiberius. Another example was [[UsefulNotes/{{Nero}} Nero's]] response to a huge and destructive revolt in Briton: after the rebellion was suppressed, he had all the Roman politicians involved recalled to Rome (he feared that their continued presence in Briton would lead to another revolt) and replaced them with [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure Reasonable Authority Figures]] who got the locals to submit to Roman rule [[PetTheDog by treating them better]], and future governors of Briton took notes from this experience and behaved more or less the same way, resulting in Briton becoming one of Rome's most loyal provinces.
** The argument that they "brought peace" is also laughable: Rome, despite claiming to be in an age of ''[[IronicName Pax Romana]]'' ("Roman Peace"), was almost always at war, be it an aggressive campaign of expansion or suppressing a needlessly provoked revolt.

to:

*** They weren't '''always''' that provocative. Every now and then, there'd be a governor, emperor, or senator(s) who would try to avoid grabbing the VillainBall due to believing that dealing with a revolt would be more trouble than it was worth. Ironically, this is what led to Pilate's dismissal from his governorship of Judea: a number of senators feared that his HangingJudge tendencies would provoke a revolt, which would lead to their deaths since they had narrowly avoided being purged following the downfall of their "mutual friend", Praetorian commander Lucius Aelius Sejanus[[note]]The guy played by Creator/PatrickStewart in Series/IClaudius.[[/note]], having and Tiberius was chomping at the bit for them arrested and executed on trumped up charges to avoid landing in hot water with Emperor Tiberius. give him an excuse to have them killed. Another example was [[UsefulNotes/{{Nero}} Nero's]] response to a huge and destructive revolt in Briton: after the rebellion was suppressed, he had all the Roman politicians involved recalled to Rome (he feared that their continued presence in Briton would lead to another revolt) revolt that would be too powerful to suppress) and replaced them with [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure Reasonable Authority Figures]] who got the locals to submit to Roman rule [[PetTheDog by treating them better]], and future better]]. Future Roman governors of Briton took notes a page from this experience that book and behaved more or less the same way, resulting in Briton becoming one of Rome's most loyal provinces.
** The argument that they "brought peace" is also laughable: Rome, despite claiming to be in an age of ''[[IronicName Pax Romana]]'' ("Roman Peace"), was almost always at war, be it an aggressive campaign of expansion or suppressing a needlessly provoked revolt. Typically, "Roman peace" meant "butcher the enemy to the last child and then roast them in the tabloids".
11th Apr '17 9:06:37 PM darthpaul
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Added DiffLines:

* HoistByHisOwnPetard: The official at the stoning, where the criminal was guilty of saying "Jehovah" in vain:
--> "No one is to stone anyone until I blow this whistle! Even- and I want to make this ''absolutely clear''!!- even if they DO say 'Jehovah'!" (cue crowd stoning him for blasphemy)
8th Apr '17 6:16:28 AM Cheapsunglasses
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*** They weren't '''always''' that provocative. Every now and then, there'd be a governor, emperor, or senator(s) who would try to avoid grabbing the VillainBall due to believing that dealing with a revolt would be more trouble than it was worth. Ironically, this is what led to Pilate's dismissal from his governorship of Judea: a number of senators feared that his HangingJudge tendencies would provoke a revolt, which would lead to their "mutual friend", Praetorian commander Lucius Aelius Sejanus[[note]]The guy played by Creator/PatrickStewart in Series/IClaudius.[[/note]], having them arrested and executed on trumped up charges to avoid landing in hot water with Emperor Tiberius. Another example was [[UsefulNotes/Nero Nero's]] response to a huge and destructive revolt in Briton: after the rebellion was suppressed, he had all the Roman politicians involved recalled to Rome (he feared that their continued presence in Briton would lead to another revolt) and replaced them with [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure Reasonable Authority Figures]] who got the locals to submit to Roman rule [[PetTheDog by treating them better]], and future governors of Briton took notes from this experience and behaved more or less the same way, resulting in Briton becoming one of Rome's most loyal provinces.

to:

*** They weren't '''always''' that provocative. Every now and then, there'd be a governor, emperor, or senator(s) who would try to avoid grabbing the VillainBall due to believing that dealing with a revolt would be more trouble than it was worth. Ironically, this is what led to Pilate's dismissal from his governorship of Judea: a number of senators feared that his HangingJudge tendencies would provoke a revolt, which would lead to their "mutual friend", Praetorian commander Lucius Aelius Sejanus[[note]]The guy played by Creator/PatrickStewart in Series/IClaudius.[[/note]], having them arrested and executed on trumped up charges to avoid landing in hot water with Emperor Tiberius. Another example was [[UsefulNotes/Nero [[UsefulNotes/{{Nero}} Nero's]] response to a huge and destructive revolt in Briton: after the rebellion was suppressed, he had all the Roman politicians involved recalled to Rome (he feared that their continued presence in Briton would lead to another revolt) and replaced them with [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure Reasonable Authority Figures]] who got the locals to submit to Roman rule [[PetTheDog by treating them better]], and future governors of Briton took notes from this experience and behaved more or less the same way, resulting in Briton becoming one of Rome's most loyal provinces.
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