History Film / MiracleOnThirtyFourthStreet

15th Oct '17 12:23:40 PM Mdumas43073
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An important subplot revolves around Doris, the Macy's PR manager who hired Kris, and her young daughter Susan. Susan has never believed in Santa Claus because her [[BrokenBird bitter divorced mother]] doesn't want her to indulge in fantasies, but meeting Kris causes both of them to start wondering. There's also a romance subplot between Doris and Fred, Kris's defense attorney.

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An important subplot revolves around Doris, the Macy's store PR manager who hired Kris, and her young daughter Susan. Susan has never believed in Santa Claus because her [[BrokenBird bitter divorced mother]] doesn't want her to indulge in fantasies, but meeting Kris causes both of them to start wondering. There's also a romance subplot between Doris and Fred, Kris's defense attorney.
15th Oct '17 12:20:39 PM Mdumas43073
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An important subplot revolves around Doris, the PR manager who hired Kris, and her young daughter Susan. Susan has never believed in Santa Claus because her [[BrokenBird bitter divorced mother]] doesn't want her to indulge in fantasies, but meeting Kris causes both of them to start wondering. There's also a romance subplot between Doris and Fred, Kris' defense attorney.

to:

An important subplot revolves around Doris, the Macy's PR manager who hired Kris, and her young daughter Susan. Susan has never believed in Santa Claus because her [[BrokenBird bitter divorced mother]] doesn't want her to indulge in fantasies, but meeting Kris causes both of them to start wondering. There's also a romance subplot between Doris and Fred, Kris' Kris's defense attorney.
15th Oct '17 12:19:23 PM Mdumas43073
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The original film version, released in 1947, was directed by George Seaton and starred Edmund Gwenn as Kris Kringle, Creator/MaureenOHara as Doris Walker, Creator/NatalieWood as her daughter Susan, and John Payne as lawyer Fred Gailey. It was a box office success, won three UsefulNotes/{{Academy Award}}s (for Gwenn's supporting role, Seaton's screenplay, and Valentine Davies' original story), and is shown on television every year.

to:

The original film version, released in 1947, was directed by George Seaton and starred Edmund Gwenn as Kris Kringle, Creator/MaureenOHara as Doris Walker, Creator/NatalieWood as her daughter Susan, and John Payne as lawyer Fred Gailey. It was a box office success, won three UsefulNotes/{{Academy Award}}s (for Gwenn's supporting role, Seaton's screenplay, and Valentine Davies' original story), and is shown on television around Christmas each and every year.
15th Oct '17 12:16:41 PM Mdumas43073
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The original film version, released in 1947, was directed by George Seaton and starred Edmund Gwenn as Kris Kringle, Creator/MaureenOHara as Doris Walker, Creator/NatalieWood as her daughter Susan, and John Payne as lawyer Fred Gailey. It was a box office success, won three [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscars]] (for Gwenn's supporting role, Seaton's screenplay, and Valentine Davies' original story), and is shown on television every year.

to:

The original film version, released in 1947, was directed by George Seaton and starred Edmund Gwenn as Kris Kringle, Creator/MaureenOHara as Doris Walker, Creator/NatalieWood as her daughter Susan, and John Payne as lawyer Fred Gailey. It was a box office success, won three [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscars]] UsefulNotes/{{Academy Award}}s (for Gwenn's supporting role, Seaton's screenplay, and Valentine Davies' original story), and is shown on television every year.
15th Oct '17 12:15:12 PM Mdumas43073
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Due to the success of the original film, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was released in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was also a theatrically-released remake in 1994, written by Creator/JohnHughes; Creator/RichardAttenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.

to:

Due to the success of the original film, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was released in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was also a theatrically-released remake in 1994, written by Creator/JohnHughes; Creator/RichardAttenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, with Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.
15th Oct '17 12:14:51 PM Mdumas43073
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Due to the success of the original film, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was released in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was also a theatrically-released remake in 1994 written by Creator/JohnHughes. Creator/RichardAttenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.

to:

Due to the success of the original film, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was released in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was also a theatrically-released remake in 1994 1994, written by Creator/JohnHughes. Creator/JohnHughes; Creator/RichardAttenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.
20th Sep '17 3:38:47 PM Pamina
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* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: None of the adaptations ever explicitly declare Kris to be Santa, though the 1947 and 1973 versions hint at some truth to it via TheStinger when [[spoiler: Kris' cane appears in the new house that he shouldn't have ever been able to visit.]] The 1973 happy couple just laughs it off, but in 1947, Fred about has a heart attack. The 1994 version is much more leaning towards the "magic" than the "mundane", and also delivers a line from Kris to the prosecutor at the end of the trial that is basically an admission of it ([[spoiler: he asks if the prosecutor did anything about his TV antenna since the previous year Kris tore his pants on it last Christmas]].)

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* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: None of the adaptations ever explicitly declare Kris to be Santa, though the 1947 and 1973 versions hint at some truth to it via TheStinger when [[spoiler: Kris' cane appears in the new house that he shouldn't have ever been able to visit.]] The 1973 happy couple just laughs it off, but in 1947, Fred about has a heart attack. The 1994 version is much more leaning towards the "magic" than the "mundane", and also delivers a line from Kris to the prosecutor at the end of the trial that is basically an admission of it ([[spoiler: he asks if the prosecutor did anything about his TV antenna antenna, since the previous year Kris tore his pants on it last Christmas]].)
20th Sep '17 3:38:01 PM Pamina
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* RomancingTheWidow: Or the divorcee at least. In the 1947 version, Fred Gailey admits he was spending so much time with Susan because he hoped being friendly to her would help him to meet her mother. Bill Schafner in 1973 doesn't have any ulterior motives in befriending Susan, but does start to romance her mother once they meet up. In 1994, Dorey's husband was an alcoholic who left her when she was pregnant; Bryan is not Susan's father. Though he and Dorey are already dating before the movie begins, we do get evidence that this trope is still in effect - especially given Dorey's sudden cold shoulder when Bryan proposes marriage. All three films portray the romance as necessary for the divorcee to learn to love and believe in others again.

to:

* RomancingTheWidow: Or the divorcee at least. In the 1947 version, Fred Gailey admits he was spending so much time with Susan because he hoped being friendly to her would help him to meet her mother. Bill Schafner in 1973 doesn't have any ulterior motives in befriending Susan, but does start to romance her mother once they meet up. In 1994, Dorey's husband was an alcoholic who left her when she was pregnant; although Bryan is not Susan's father. Though he and Dorey are already dating before the movie begins, we do get evidence that this trope is still in effect - especially given Dorey's sudden cold shoulder when Bryan proposes marriage. All three films portray the romance as necessary for the divorcee to learn to love and believe in others again.
12th Jul '17 6:39:29 AM Mdumas43073
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It's December in New York, and Macy's hires a quiet but charming old man named Kris Kringle to be their [[MallSanta Department Store Santa]]. Thing is, Kris clearly sees himself as far more than just some seasonal employee: he tells customers where to find a better price on a toy (even if it means sending them to competing stores), talks to the children in their own languages, and even claims to be the real Santa Claus! R. H. Macy is incensed -- until he sees how much goodwill his store is building with its customer base. Everyone soon becomes content to let Kris have his harmless fantasies; everyone, that is, except the store's resentful psychologist, who attempts to get him committed to a mental asylum. Things come to a head in a big showy trial, where the defense decides to argue that Kris is not insane even though he claims to be Santa Claus -- because he ''is'' Santa Claus.

to:

It's December in New York, and Macy's hires a quiet but charming old man named Kris Kringle to be their [[MallSanta Department Store Santa]]. Thing is, Kris clearly sees himself as far more than just some seasonal employee: he tells customers where to find a better price on a toy (even if it means sending them to competing stores), talks to the converses with immigrant children in their own languages, and even claims to be the real Santa Claus! R. H. Macy is incensed -- until he sees how much goodwill his store is building with its customer base. Everyone soon becomes content to let Kris have his harmless fantasies; everyone, that is, except the store's resentful psychologist, who attempts to get him committed to a mental asylum. Things come to a head in a big showy trial, where the defense decides to argue that Kris is not insane even though he claims to be Santa Claus -- because he ''is'' Santa Claus.
12th Jul '17 6:37:15 AM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


It's December in New York, and Macy's hires a quiet but charming old man named Kris Kringle to be their [[MallSanta Department Store Santa]]. Thing is, Kris clearly sees himself as far more than just some seasonal employee: he tells customers where to find a better price on a toy (even if it means sending them to competing stores), talks to the children in their own languages, and even claims to be the real Santa Claus! R. H. Macy is incensed -- until he sees how much goodwill Macy's is building with its customer base. Everyone becomes content to let Kris have his harmless fantasies; everyone, that is, except the store's resentful psychologist, who attempts to get him committed to a mental asylum. Things come to a head in a big showy trial, where the defense decides to argue that Kris is not insane even though he claims to be Santa Claus -- because he ''is'' Santa Claus.

to:

It's December in New York, and Macy's hires a quiet but charming old man named Kris Kringle to be their [[MallSanta Department Store Santa]]. Thing is, Kris clearly sees himself as far more than just some seasonal employee: he tells customers where to find a better price on a toy (even if it means sending them to competing stores), talks to the children in their own languages, and even claims to be the real Santa Claus! R. H. Macy is incensed -- until he sees how much goodwill Macy's his store is building with its customer base. Everyone soon becomes content to let Kris have his harmless fantasies; everyone, that is, except the store's resentful psychologist, who attempts to get him committed to a mental asylum. Things come to a head in a big showy trial, where the defense decides to argue that Kris is not insane even though he claims to be Santa Claus -- because he ''is'' Santa Claus.
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