History Film / MiracleOnThirtyFourthStreet

29th Jan '17 9:18:06 PM Kirayoshi
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* EvilCannotComprehendGood: Sawyer openly believes that the only reason Alfred likes playing Santa, or that Kris claims to be Santa, is because they are both delusional. As far as he's concerned, anyone who's that nice has be harboring a severe guilt complex.


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* EvilCannotComprehendGood: Sawyer openly believes that the only reason Alfred likes playing Santa, or that Kris claims to be Santa, is because they are both delusional. As far as he's concerned, anyone who's that nice has be harboring a severe guilt complex.
29th Jan '17 9:16:13 PM Kirayoshi
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Added DiffLines:

* EvilCannotComprehendGood: Sawyer openly believes that the only reason Alfred likes playing Santa, or that Kris claims to be Santa, is because they are both delusional. As far as he's concerned, anyone who's that nice has be harboring a severe guilt complex.
25th Dec '16 7:14:12 PM BadWolf21
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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The film never really addresses if Cole's financial situation was resolved or not. One good Christmas would hardly be enough to save it, and Kris not going to Bellevue wouldn't save the store. It would, at best, delay a hostile takeover from Shopper's Express.

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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The film never really addresses if Cole's financial situation was resolved or not. One good Christmas would hardly be enough to save it, and Kris not going to Bellevue wouldn't save the store. It would, at best, delay a hostile takeover from Shopper's Express. Although, the woman who first alerts store staff to their Santa sending parents elsewhere for toys does state that she will be shopping at Cole's for everything she needs from now on. Presumably, others feel the same kind of store loyalty.
23rd Dec '16 10:54:09 PM Mdumas43073
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The original film version, released in 1947, was directed by George Seaton and starred Edmund Gwenn as Kris Kringle, Creator/MaureenOHara as Doris Walker, Creator/NatalieWood as her daughter Susan, and John Payne as lawyer Fred Galley. It was a box office success, won three [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscars]] (for Gwenn's supporting role, Seaton's screenplay, and Valentine Davies' original story), and is shown on television every year.

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The original film version, released in 1947, was directed by George Seaton and starred Edmund Gwenn as Kris Kringle, Creator/MaureenOHara as Doris Walker, Creator/NatalieWood as her daughter Susan, and John Payne as lawyer Fred Galley.Gailey. It was a box office success, won three [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscars]] (for Gwenn's supporting role, Seaton's screenplay, and Valentine Davies' original story), and is shown on television every year.
23rd Dec '16 10:52:27 PM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:325:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/miracle_on_34th_st.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:325:http://static.[[quoteright:330:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/miracle_on_34th_st.jpg]]
20th Dec '16 4:36:58 PM MrChips2301
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* FreezeFrameBonus: The card with Kris's employee details would probably be this in a modern film, but it's averted. The shot showing what's written on the card is held for a few seconds so that the audience can easily read it all, even though it is mostly gags that aren't necessary to the plot. Freeze framing was, of course, impossible for viewers in 1947.
16th Dec '16 8:03:04 PM ElatedReynard
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** The store executive is always portrayed as money-hungry, but good at heart. While the 1994 movie's C.F. Cole barely appears, he's portrayed as good person going up against the ''evil'' Victor Landbergh. The R.H. Macy characters of the 1947 and 1973 versions are always motivated to go along with goodwill campaigns when they realize they're making money hand over fist, and they both stick up for Kris in court.

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** The store executive is always portrayed as money-hungry, but good at heart. While the 1994 movie's C.F. Cole barely appears, he's portrayed as good person going up against the ''evil'' evil Victor Landbergh. The R.H. Macy characters of the 1947 and 1973 versions are always motivated to go along with goodwill campaigns when they realize they're making money hand over fist, and they both stick up for Kris in court.



* AmoralAttorney: Unlike the original, the prosecutor in this film is blatantly evil and in the pocket of Victor Landberg. Thus he spends all of his time openly belittling Kris, to the point where he causes Susan to have an outburst in the middle of the courtroom over his over the top nastiness.

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* AmoralAttorney: Unlike the original, the prosecutor in this film is blatantly evil and in the pocket of Victor Landberg. Thus he spends all of his time openly belittling Kris, to the point where he causes Susan to have an outburst in the middle of the courtroom over his over the top nastiness.



* CorruptCorporateExecutive: Unlike the original film and its remakes, in which Kris was really up against the cynicism of modern society, this movie drops that entirely and provides this type of character as a straight-forward villain. Here, the Lex Luthor-esque chief executive of Shopper's Express, Victor Landberg, wants nothing more than to buy out his rival Cole's and close them down and will stop at nothing to crush all who oppose him. This includes such evil acts as...giving children toys for free! Oh, and staging a ridiculously elaborate plan to have Kris framed for assault and committed. He even tries to buy the court off by bribing the (now completely evil) prosecutor and implying that he tries to buy off the judge.

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* CorruptCorporateExecutive: Unlike the original film and its remakes, in which Kris was really up against the cynicism of modern society, this movie drops that entirely and provides this type of character as a straight-forward villain. Here, the Lex Luthor-esque chief executive of Shopper's Express, Victor Landberg, wants nothing more than to buy out his rival Cole's and close them down and will stop at nothing to crush all who oppose him. This includes such evil acts as...giving children toys for free! Oh, and staging a ridiculously elaborate plan to have Kris framed for assault and committed. He even tries to buy the court off by bribing the (now completely evil) prosecutor and implying that he tries to buy off the judge.
7th Dec '16 7:34:00 PM 9thDoctor
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* NiceJobFixingItVillain: Mr. Sawyer's insistence that Macy's avoid bad publicity for committing Kris to the insane asylum gives Fred Gailey the idea to rally public opinion behind his client.
27th Nov '16 8:48:50 PM Mdumas43073
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Due to the success of the 1947 original, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was released in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was a theatrically-released remake in 1994 written by Creator/JohnHughes. Richard Attenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.

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Due to the success of the 1947 original, original film, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was released in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was also a theatrically-released remake in 1994 written by Creator/JohnHughes. Richard Attenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.
27th Nov '16 8:47:08 PM Mdumas43073
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It's December in New York, and Macy's hires a quiet but charming old man named Kris Kringle to be their [[MallSanta Department Store Santa]]. Thing is, Kris clearly sees himself as far more than just some seasonal employee: he tells customers where to find a better price on a toy (even if it means sending them to competing stores), talks to the children in their own languages, and even claims to be the real Santa! R. H. Macy is incensed -- until he sees how much goodwill Macy's is building with its customer base. Everyone becomes content to let Kris have his harmless fantasies; everyone, that is, except the company's resentful psychologist, who attempts to get him committed to a mental asylum. Things come to a head in a big showy trial, where the defense decides to argue that Kris is not insane even though he claims to be Santa Claus -- because he ''is'' Santa Claus.

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It's December in New York, and Macy's hires a quiet but charming old man named Kris Kringle to be their [[MallSanta Department Store Santa]]. Thing is, Kris clearly sees himself as far more than just some seasonal employee: he tells customers where to find a better price on a toy (even if it means sending them to competing stores), talks to the children in their own languages, and even claims to be the real Santa! Santa Claus! R. H. Macy is incensed -- until he sees how much goodwill Macy's is building with its customer base. Everyone becomes content to let Kris have his harmless fantasies; everyone, that is, except the company's store's resentful psychologist, who attempts to get him committed to a mental asylum. Things come to a head in a big showy trial, where the defense decides to argue that Kris is not insane even though he claims to be Santa Claus -- because he ''is'' Santa Claus.
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