History Film / MiracleOnThirtyFourthStreet

22nd May '18 10:31:08 AM naturalironist
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* KidsPlayMatchmaker: Susan wants a father for Christmas and encourages Kris Kringle to help her get one. In the modern version, she is much more personally active in trying to set up her mother and the nice neighbor.
19th Jan '18 1:29:04 AM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:330:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/miracle_on_34th_st.jpg]]

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28th Dec '17 7:19:50 AM Julia1984
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* NoAntagonist: Sawyer is probably the closest thing to a bad guy in the movie. The Judge and the District Attorney come across more as beleaguered public servants doing something they really don't want to do: Kris Kringle, as far as the general public of New York City is concerned, ''is'' Santa Claus, and ''no one'' wants to be the Scrooge who ruins everyone's Christmas by exposing him as just a crazy old man.
21st Dec '17 6:30:52 PM ajbit26
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* ReasonableAuthorityFigure: Dr. Pierce, the geriatrician who runs the assisted-living home Chris stays in at the beginning of the movie. While he doesn't believe Chris to be Santa Claus, and is upfront about the fact that this belief is a delusion brought on by senility, he points out that this delusion doesn't make him dangerous or dysfunctional, and Chris is capable of holding down a job. Curiously, this is one of the bigger narrative hints that Chris might actually not be Santa (all other authority figures who say he's not are strawmen you're meant to disagree with) and he's absent from most other adaptations.

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* ReasonableAuthorityFigure: Dr. Pierce, the geriatrician who runs the assisted-living home Chris Kris stays in at the beginning of the movie. While he doesn't believe Chris Kris to be Santa Claus, and is upfront about the fact that this belief is a delusion brought on by senility, he points out that this delusion doesn't make him dangerous or dysfunctional, and Chris Kris is capable of holding down a job. Curiously, this is one of the bigger narrative hints that Chris Kris might actually not be Santa (all other authority figures who say he's not are strawmen you're meant to disagree with) and he's absent from most other adaptations.
21st Dec '17 9:24:21 AM jasonbres
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** Despite the film taking place around the Christmas season, Fox executive Darryl Zanuck was pushing this film for a May release due to his belief that films got better box office grosses during the summer months. As a result, the posters for the film were mainly centered around the romance between Doris and Fred, which isn't even hinted at until near the end.
18th Dec '17 7:32:22 PM Mdumas43073
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Due to the success of the original film, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was produced in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was also a theatrically-released remake in 1994, written by Creator/JohnHughes; Creator/RichardAttenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, with Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.

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Due to the success of the original film, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was produced in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, and Creator/RoddyMcDowall as the psychologist Dr. Sawyer, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was also a theatrically-released remake in 1994, written by Creator/JohnHughes; Creator/RichardAttenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, with Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.
17th Dec '17 1:59:47 AM Mdumas43073
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Due to the success of the original film, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was released in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was also a theatrically-released remake in 1994, written by Creator/JohnHughes; Creator/RichardAttenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, with Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.

to:

Due to the success of the original film, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was released produced in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was also a theatrically-released remake in 1994, written by Creator/JohnHughes; Creator/RichardAttenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, with Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.
2nd Dec '17 10:15:50 AM Mdumas43073
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It's December in New York, and Macy's hires a quiet but charming old man named Kris Kringle to be their [[MallSanta Department Store Santa]]. Thing is, Kris clearly sees himself as far more than just some seasonal employee: he tells customers where to find a better price on a toy (even if it means sending them to competing stores), converses with immigrant children in their own languages, and even claims to be the real Santa Claus! R. H. Macy is incensed -- until he sees how much goodwill his store is building with its customer base. Everyone soon becomes content to let Kris have his harmless fantasies; everyone, that is, except the store's resentful psychologist, who attempts to get him committed to a mental asylum. Things come to a head in a big showy trial, where the defense decides to argue that Kris is not insane even though he claims to be Santa Claus -- because he ''is'' Santa Claus. An important subplot revolves around Doris, the store PR manager who hired Kris, and her young daughter Susan. Susan has never believed in Santa Claus because her [[BrokenBird bitter divorced mother]] doesn't want her to indulge in fantasies, but meeting Kris causes both of them to start wondering. There's also a romance subplot between Doris and Fred, Kris's defense attorney. The original film version, released in 1947, was directed by George Seaton and starred Edmund Gwenn as Kris Kringle, Creator/MaureenOHara as Doris Walker, Creator/NatalieWood as her daughter Susan, and John Payne as lawyer Fred Gailey. It was a box office success, won three UsefulNotes/{{Academy Award}}s (for Gwenn's supporting role, Seaton's screenplay, and Valentine Davies' original story), and is shown on television around Christmas each and every year. Due to the success of the original film, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was released in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was also a theatrically-released remake in 1994, written by Creator/JohnHughes; Creator/RichardAttenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, with Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.

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It's December in New York, and Macy's hires a quiet but charming old man named Kris Kringle to be their [[MallSanta Department Store Santa]]. Thing is, Kris clearly sees himself as far more than just some seasonal employee: he tells customers where to find a better price on a toy (even if it means sending them to competing stores), converses with immigrant children in their own languages, and even claims to be the real Santa Claus! R. H. Macy is incensed -- until he sees how much goodwill his store is building with its customer base. Everyone soon becomes content to let Kris have his harmless fantasies; everyone, that is, except the store's resentful psychologist, who attempts to get him committed to a mental asylum. Things come to a head in a big showy trial, where the defense decides to argue that Kris is not insane even though he claims to be Santa Claus -- because he ''is'' Santa Claus.

An important subplot revolves around Doris, the store PR manager who hired Kris, and her young daughter Susan. Susan has never believed in Santa Claus because her [[BrokenBird bitter divorced mother]] doesn't want her to indulge in fantasies, but meeting Kris causes both of them to start wondering. There's also a romance subplot between Doris and Fred, Kris's defense attorney.

The original film version, released in 1947, was directed by George Seaton and starred Edmund Gwenn as Kris Kringle, Creator/MaureenOHara as Doris Walker, Creator/NatalieWood as her daughter Susan, and John Payne as lawyer Fred Gailey. It was a box office success, won three UsefulNotes/{{Academy Award}}s (for Gwenn's supporting role, Seaton's screenplay, and Valentine Davies' original story), and is shown on television around Christmas each and every year.

Due to the success of the original film, the story has been adapted three times for television and once as a Broadway [[TheMusical musical]] (''Here's Love''). The most notable television version was released in 1973 and starred Sebastian Cabot as Kris, Jane Alexander as Mrs. Walker, and David Hartman as the lawyer boyfriend, with a lot of smaller roles being filled by 1970s TV mainstays such as Tom Bosley playing the judge. There was also a theatrically-released remake in 1994, written by Creator/JohnHughes; Creator/RichardAttenborough was cast as Kris Kringle, with Elizabeth Perkins as Dorey Walker, Creator/MaraWilson as Susan, and Dylan [=McDermott=] as the lawyer boyfriend.









2nd Dec '17 10:14:18 AM Mdumas43073
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2nd Dec '17 10:13:58 AM Mdumas43073
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