History Film / MajorLeague

10th Mar '17 12:45:08 PM hullflyer
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* StrictlyFormula: The movie could not be more clichéd (misfit team pulls together to win). It gets away with this by doing the old (ancient!) formula ''really well'', which sometimes counts more than being original. TropesAreNotBad indeed.

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* StrictlyFormula: The movie could not be more clichéd (misfit team pulls together to win). win, with players like the catcher with bad knees, the slugger who can't connect, a runner who can't get on base, a pitcher with no control, etc.). It gets away with this by doing the old (ancient!) formula ''really well'', which sometimes counts for more than being original. TropesAreNotBad indeed.
17th Jan '17 5:23:22 PM nombretomado
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The other team members have their own subplots. Taylor is cut from the team for the new rookie Rube (a country boy who can't throw the ball back to the pitcher) and big offseason acquisition Jack Parkman (a no-nonsense guy who is pretty much the epitome of "clubhouse cancer", but is a very good hitter), but is retained as one of Lou's assistant managers; Dorn is retired and has bought the team, but has to sell it back to the RichBitch after financial troubles force him to trade Parkman; Cerrano, having converted to Buddhism, is now a happy guy who's lost his edge until he's challenged by Japanese acquisition Taka Tanaka; Hayes, like Vaughn, let the previous year go to his head; he shot a movie with JesseVentura in the offseason and lost his edge on the basepaths. Another worst-to-first comeback ensues, though under the guidance of Taylor after Lou has a heart attack; the DownToTheLastPlay ending in this one is a lot less inventive than the first. The sequel coincided with the real-life Tribe's 1990s resurgence (where they went to World Series in 1995 and 1997; in the 1997 Series they lost to the Florida Marlins, in what some would call [[{{Irony}} ironic]]).

to:

The other team members have their own subplots. Taylor is cut from the team for the new rookie Rube (a country boy who can't throw the ball back to the pitcher) and big offseason acquisition Jack Parkman (a no-nonsense guy who is pretty much the epitome of "clubhouse cancer", but is a very good hitter), but is retained as one of Lou's assistant managers; Dorn is retired and has bought the team, but has to sell it back to the RichBitch after financial troubles force him to trade Parkman; Cerrano, having converted to Buddhism, is now a happy guy who's lost his edge until he's challenged by Japanese acquisition Taka Tanaka; Hayes, like Vaughn, let the previous year go to his head; he shot a movie with JesseVentura Wrestling/JesseVentura in the offseason and lost his edge on the basepaths. Another worst-to-first comeback ensues, though under the guidance of Taylor after Lou has a heart attack; the DownToTheLastPlay ending in this one is a lot less inventive than the first. The sequel coincided with the real-life Tribe's 1990s resurgence (where they went to World Series in 1995 and 1997; in the 1997 Series they lost to the Florida Marlins, in what some would call [[{{Irony}} ironic]]).
2nd Nov '16 10:53:44 AM Drcynic24
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The other team members have their own subplots. Taylor is cut from the team for the new rookie Rube (a country boy who can't throw the ball back to the pitcher) and big offseason acquisition Jack Parkman (a no-nonsense guy who is pretty much the epitome of "clubhouse cancer", but is a very good hitter), but is retained as one of Lou's assistant managers; Dorn is retired and has bought the team, but has to sell it back to the RichBitch after financial troubles force him to trade Parkman; Cerrano, having converted to Buddhism, is now a happy guy who's lost his edge until he's challenged by Japanese acquisition Taka Tanaka; Hayes, like Vaughn, let the previous year go to his head; he shot a movie with Jessie Ventura in the offseason and lost his edge on the basepaths. Another worst-to-first comeback ensues, though under the guidance of Taylor after Lou has a heart attack; the DownToTheLastPlay ending in this one is a lot less inventive than the first. The sequel coincided with the real-life Tribe's 1990s resurgence (where they went to World Series in 1995 and 1997; in the 1997 Series they lost to the Florida Marlins, in what some would call [[{{Irony}} ironic]]).

to:

The other team members have their own subplots. Taylor is cut from the team for the new rookie Rube (a country boy who can't throw the ball back to the pitcher) and big offseason acquisition Jack Parkman (a no-nonsense guy who is pretty much the epitome of "clubhouse cancer", but is a very good hitter), but is retained as one of Lou's assistant managers; Dorn is retired and has bought the team, but has to sell it back to the RichBitch after financial troubles force him to trade Parkman; Cerrano, having converted to Buddhism, is now a happy guy who's lost his edge until he's challenged by Japanese acquisition Taka Tanaka; Hayes, like Vaughn, let the previous year go to his head; he shot a movie with Jessie Ventura JesseVentura in the offseason and lost his edge on the basepaths. Another worst-to-first comeback ensues, though under the guidance of Taylor after Lou has a heart attack; the DownToTheLastPlay ending in this one is a lot less inventive than the first. The sequel coincided with the real-life Tribe's 1990s resurgence (where they went to World Series in 1995 and 1997; in the 1997 Series they lost to the Florida Marlins, in what some would call [[{{Irony}} ironic]]).
9th Sep '16 10:10:06 AM MJaxon
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Added DiffLines:

** Harris warming up [[spoiler: with Jobu right alongside him.]]
6th Aug '16 8:17:54 PM lorgskyegon
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Added DiffLines:

** He should be solid. It's mentioned by Phelps that he'd been coach of the Toledo Mud Hens for ''thirty years''! For comparison, as of this writing, only one MLB coach has been been with the same team for more than ten years (Mike Sciosia of the Los Angeles Angels) and only one has been an MLB coach longer than thirty years (Connie Mack of the Oakland A's).
6th Aug '16 8:07:04 PM lorgskyegon
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--> '''Gus''': ''You're too old, you're too fat, you're too slow. Straight enough?''
--> '''Pops''': ''Yeah, yeah, that'll do it.''

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--> '''Gus''': ''You're You're too old, you're too fat, you're too slow. Straight enough?''
enough?
--> '''Pops''': ''Yeah, Yeah, yeah, that'll do it.''
6th Aug '16 8:06:38 PM lorgskyegon
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Added DiffLines:

* BrutalHonesty: When Gus starts giving Pops a "best for the team" speech when moving him from the outfield to first base, Pops ''asks'' for brutal honesty.
--> '''Gus''': ''You're too old, you're too fat, you're too slow. Straight enough?''
--> '''Pops''': ''Yeah, yeah, that'll do it.''
6th Aug '16 7:58:18 PM lorgskyegon
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--->'''Gus''': Not only that, he ran in the same spot for too long.

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--->'''Gus''': Not only that, he ran too long in the same spot for too long.spot.
27th Jul '16 4:52:34 AM hullflyer
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* {{Foreshadowing}}: Inside the empty stadium, Taylor imagines himself calling his shot a la Babe Ruth and hitting a home run. He tries this ploy in the climactic game.

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* {{Foreshadowing}}: Inside the empty stadium, Taylor imagines himself calling his shot a la Babe Ruth and hitting a home run. He tries this ploy in the climactic game.game, [[spoiler:although he subverts it by making the shot call a fakeout - he's tricking the fielders into backing up slightly in preparation for a big hit, and are unprepared when he ''bunts'']].
12th Jul '16 2:17:44 PM Ambaryerno
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* DeadpanSnarker: Gus Cantrell in the third film.
** While watching his aging outfielder try to track down a fly ball.
-->'''Bench coach''': Got a late jump on it.
-->'''Gus''': Not only that, he ran in the same spot for too long.
** Then when he gives Pops a "gift" to signal a change in position.
-->'''Pops''': This is a first baseman's glove.
-->'''Gus''': Yeah, that's what the guy at the sporting goods place said.
** Also, Haywood of the Yankees, who has some snarky exchanges with Hayes and Taylor.

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* DeadpanSnarker: DeadpanSnarker:
** Pretty much every line of Harry Doyle's broadcasts.
**
Gus Cantrell in the third film.
** *** While watching his aging outfielder try to track down a fly ball.
-->'''Bench --->'''Bench coach''': Got a late jump on it.
-->'''Gus''': --->'''Gus''': Not only that, he ran in the same spot for too long.
** *** Then when he gives Pops a "gift" to signal a change in position.
-->'''Pops''': --->'''Pops''': This is a first baseman's glove.
-->'''Gus''': --->'''Gus''': Yeah, that's what the guy at the sporting goods place said.
** *** Also, Haywood of the Yankees, who has some snarky exchanges with Hayes and Taylor.
This list shows the last 10 events of 148. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.MajorLeague