History Film / LuckyNumberSlevin

10th Sep '16 2:13:47 AM HarryLovesHermione
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* InTheStyleOf: The lightning-fast dialogue with constant references to other films and tv shows can't fail to make one think of Tarantino.

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* InTheStyleOf: The lightning-fast dialogue with constant references to other films and tv shows shows, black comedy, and non-linear storytelling can't fail to make one think of Tarantino.
26th Aug '16 3:14:36 PM StevieWillShowYou
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A 2006 BlackComedy {{Thriller}} mixed with FilmNoir style, ''Lucky Number Slevin'' (released, bizarrely, as ''The Wrong Man'' only in Australia) The film features an all-star cast comprised of Creator/JoshHartnett, Creator/LucyLiu, Creator/BenKingsley, Creator/MorganFreeman, and Creator/BruceWillis.

The movie opens with [[OnlyOneName Smith]] telling a stranger of a KansasCityShuffle, recounting of an old horse race where a trainer tries to fix a race with a "drugstore handicap".[[note]]By drugging a strong horse, it can be made it a minor contender; by then taking it off the drugs for a specific race, its strong and unexpected performance boost allows a surprise win despite awful winning odds. In other words, people who know of the fix can stick lots of cash on the bet and win big easily.[[/note]] He tells a friend, who tells a friend, before it soon hits a family man Max; betting huge cash he doesn't have, Max then watches in horror when the horse breaks its leg on the home stretch. The bookie's associates decide to make an example of Max, beating and suffocating him after having hitmen murder his wife and son. Ending the story, Smith clarifies that the story itself isn't a shuffle, and points off to the man's left; slipping to the right, Smith breaks his neck.

Meanwhile, an everyman named Slevin has just moved to New York City to stay at his buddy Nick's house after a week of misfortune. After meeting his quirky neighbor Lindsey, Slevin finds himself taken in by two groups of thugs: the first belonging to "The Boss", a gangster demanding payment on $96,000 of debt; and the second The Boss' nemesis, "The Rabbi", who also wants debts paying, which total $33,000. Owing a vast amount to both with little time to pay, compounded with the fact neither entertaining the idea he isn't Nick, Slevin ''then'' finds himself trapped further when The Boss offers to wipe the larger debt provided he assassinate The Rabbi's son. Of course, things get worse when it's clear Smith is somehow tied into it all, and ''everyone seems to have their own motives...''

Borrowing heavily from several sources, such as [[Creator/QuentinTarantino Tarantino]] storytelling (e.g. inconsistent [[InMediasRes ordering]] and [[FlashbackCut cutaways]]) and [[Creator/AlfredHitchcock Hitchcock]] plots (most notably ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''), ''Lucky Number Slevin'' was received well enough to be a CultClassic of sorts, [[CriticalDissonance despite a cold critical reception]]. The movie is notable as the final film to co-star Bruce Willis with hair, and is the TropeNamer for KansasCityShuffle through one its songs (and a murderous tactic by Willis' character).

to:

A 2006 BlackComedy {{Thriller}} mixed with FilmNoir style, the film ''Lucky Number Slevin'' (released, bizarrely, as ''The Wrong Man'' only in Australia) The film features an all-star cast comprised of Creator/JoshHartnett, Creator/LucyLiu, Creator/BenKingsley, Creator/MorganFreeman, and Creator/BruceWillis.

The movie opens with [[OnlyOneName Smith]] telling a stranger of a KansasCityShuffle, recounting the story of an old horse race where that a trainer tries to fix a race with using a "drugstore handicap".[[note]]By drugging [[note]]The trainer drugs a strong horse, so it can be made it underperforms but remains a minor contender; by the horse is then taking taken it off the drugs for a specific race, race so its strong and unexpected performance boost "boost" allows a surprise win despite awful winning odds. In other words, people Anyone who know knows of the fix can stick lots of cash place a big bet on the bet "long shot" and win big easily.big.[[/note]] He The trainer tells a friend, who tells a friend, and before it soon hits long, the news reaches a family man named Max; after betting huge a load of cash that he doesn't have, Max then watches in horror when the horse breaks its leg on the home stretch. The bookie's associates decide to make an example of Max, beating and suffocating him after having hitmen murder his wife and son. Ending the story, Smith clarifies that the story itself isn't a shuffle, and points off to the man's left; slipping to the right, Smith breaks his neck.

Meanwhile, an everyman named Slevin has just moved to New York City to stay at his buddy Nick's Nick Fisher's house after a week of misfortune. After meeting his quirky neighbor Lindsey, Slevin finds himself taken in by two groups of thugs: the thugs who believe he is Nick Fisher. The first belonging group belongs to "The Boss", a gangster demanding payment on who wants Fisher to pay back a $96,000 of debt; and the second belongs to The Boss' nemesis, "The Rabbi", who also wants debts paying, which total Fisher to pay back a debt, this one $33,000. Owing a vast amount Neither man seems willing to both with little time to pay, compounded with the fact neither entertaining the idea he isn't Nick, Slevin ''then'' finds himself trapped further when cut "Fisher" some slack--until The Boss offers to wipe out the larger debt provided he if "Nick" can assassinate The Rabbi's son. son as an act of revenge. Of course, things get worse when it's clear Smith is somehow tied into it all, and ''everyone everyone seems to have their own motives...''

Borrowing heavily from
motives, and there is more to Slevin's arrival in New York than meets the eye...

''Lucky Number Slevin'' borrows
several storytelling techniques from numerous sources, such as the most notable being [[Creator/QuentinTarantino Tarantino]] storytelling (e.g. , inconsistent [[InMediasRes ordering]] and [[FlashbackCut cutaways]]) and [[Creator/AlfredHitchcock Hitchcock]] plots (most notably ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''), ''Lucky Number Slevin'' was received well enough to be ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''). The film has become something of a CultClassic of sorts, [[CriticalDissonance despite in spite of a cold critical reception]]. The movie reception]]; it is notable as also the final film to co-star feature Bruce Willis with hair, hair. Oh, and it is the TropeNamer for KansasCityShuffle through one its of the songs (and a murderous tactic by Willis' character).
on its soundtrack.



!! This film provides examples of:

to:

!! This film provides examples of:
''Lucky Number Slevin'' contains the following tropes:



** There are even a few occasions where Slevin does this to just troll people. Especially when when he first meets the Boss and he explaining the ongoing situation to Slevin. At first, he's asking perfectly reasonable questions. Then at some point in the conversation, Slevin just starts pestering the Boss for kicks. He even has the audacity to grin before starting this line of questions.

to:

** There are even a few occasions where Slevin does this to just troll people. Especially when people--especially when he first meets the Boss and he explaining the The Boss, who explains his ongoing situation to Slevin. At first, he's asking perfectly reasonable questions. Then at some point in the conversation, Slevin just starts pestering the The Boss for kicks. He even has the audacity to grin before starting this line of questions.



** [[spoiler: Both The Boss and The Rabbi]].
** [[spoiler: Nick Fisher, who seems entirely harmless at the start of the film, is revealed to have been a sex offender who served eight years in prison for forcing himself on a fourteen year old cheerleader]].

to:

** [[spoiler: Both [[spoiler:Both The Boss and The Rabbi]].
** [[spoiler: Nick [[spoiler:Nick Fisher, who seems entirely harmless at the start of the film, is revealed to have been a sex offender who served eight years in prison for forcing himself on a fourteen year old cheerleader]].



* KansasCityShuffle: Discussed, though the film itself is not actually an example of the trope, because [[spoiler:The Boss and The Rabbi never even figure out that a con is happening to them, let alone try and manoeuvre their way out of it.]]

to:

* KansasCityShuffle: Discussed, though the film itself is not actually an example of the trope, because [[spoiler:The Boss and The Rabbi never even figure out that a con is happening to them, let alone try and manoeuvre maneuver their way out of it.]]it. They only ever figure out that a con is happening when Slevin tells them the truth--moments before killing them]].



** [[spoiler: Slevin Kelevra. "Slevin" is the name of the horse that died in the opening race. Kelevra is Hebrew for "Bad Dog," [[FridgeBrilliance a reference to his relationship with the hitman Goodkat]]]].
** The Rabbi and his son, the Fairy. Why do they call him the Rabbi? [[ShapedLikeItself Because he is a rabbi.]] Why do they call him the Fairy? Because he's a fairy.

to:

** [[spoiler: Slevin Kelevra. "Slevin" is the name of the horse that died in the opening race. Kelevra is Hebrew for "Bad Dog," Dog", [[FridgeBrilliance a reference to his relationship with the hitman Goodkat]]]].
** The Rabbi and his son, the The Fairy. Why do they call him the The Rabbi? [[ShapedLikeItself Because he is a rabbi.]] Why do they call him the The Fairy? Because he's a fairy.



* MeaningfulEcho: [[spoiler:Brikowski mentions that Slevin should play ball, and he {{Literal Minded}}-ly remarks "You think I'm tall enough?"; later, it's revealed that Slevin ''literally plays ball when he murders a bookie with a thrown baseball.'']]
* MobWar: Between the Boss and the Rabbi. It has escalated to the point where neither can leave his penthouse for fear of being executed by the other.

to:

* MeaningfulEcho: [[spoiler:Brikowski mentions that Slevin should play ball, and he {{Literal Minded}}-ly remarks "You think I'm tall enough?"; later, it's revealed that Slevin ''literally plays ball when he murders ''murdered a bookie with a thrown baseball.'']]
* MobWar: Between the The Boss and the Rabbi. It The Rabbi are locked in one that has escalated to the point where neither can leave his penthouse man leaves their penthouses for fear of being executed by the other.killed.



* ObfuscatingStupidity: Slevin runs a fine line at this all throughout the movie. His stupidity isn't of the literal sort but the physical. Slevin's continuously firing quips at very violent people - two different sets of mooks and mob bosses, as well as the police and is constantly getting punched for it, as soon as physical violence comes into play, Slevin backs down (for a little while at least). It's a brilliant subversion of the idea, [[spoiler: Slevin's actually a fairly accomplished hitman who's killed at least three people just to put himself in play.]] He straddles a line of aggravating people into hitting him, mixed with just not caring about the danger he's in. [[spoiler: Little do his rivals know, he is planning on killing all of them.]] Sometimes, it's unclear if he's doing it on purpose so they underestimate him, because of his [[spoiler: supposed]] ataraxia or if he just honestly pissing off all the people around him ''because he can.''
* OhCrap: Slevin does this twice -- once when Brikowski confronts him in the men's room at the restaurant, and once when Goodkat sees him with Lindsey, [[spoiler:who's supposed to be dead]]. He recovers fairly quickly in both instances.
* OnlyKnownByTheirNickname: The Boss and The Rabbi, although we do hear the Rabbi's name from a couple of mooks early on. [[spoiler:The ending has them referring to each other by their real names: Anthony and Shlomo]].
* PinballProtagonist: Slevin Kelevra is apparently this during the beginning of the film, [[spoiler: before the Kansas City Shuffle and Slevin's true intentions are revealed]]

to:

* ObfuscatingStupidity: Slevin runs a fine line at this all throughout the movie. His stupidity isn't of the literal sort but the physical. Slevin's continuously firing quips at very violent people - two people--two different sets of mooks and mob bosses, as well as the police and is constantly getting punched for it, as soon as physical violence comes into play, Slevin backs down (for a little while at least). It's [[spoiler:It's a brilliant subversion of the idea, [[spoiler: Slevin's idea because Slevin is actually a fairly accomplished hitman who's killed at least three people just to put himself in play.the position he's in.]] He straddles a line of aggravating people into hitting him, mixed with just not caring about the danger he's in. [[spoiler: Little [[spoiler:Little do his rivals know, know that he is planning on killing plans to kill all of them.]] Sometimes, it's unclear if he's doing it on purpose so they underestimate him, him because of his [[spoiler: supposed]] ataraxia [[spoiler:supposed]] ataraxia, or if he just honestly pissing off all the people around him ''because he can.''
can''.
* OhCrap: Slevin does this twice -- once twice: Once when Brikowski confronts him in the men's room at the restaurant, and once when Goodkat sees him with Lindsey, [[spoiler:who's supposed to be dead]]. He recovers fairly quickly in both instances.
* OnlyKnownByTheirNickname: The Boss and The Rabbi, Rabbi are known only by those names, although we do hear the Rabbi's name from a couple of mooks early on. [[spoiler:The ending has them referring to each other by their real names: Anthony and Shlomo]].
* PinballProtagonist: Slevin Kelevra is apparently this during the beginning of the film, [[spoiler: before the film. [[spoiler:The Kansas City Shuffle and Slevin's true intentions are revealed]]change that.]]


Added DiffLines:

* PrecisionFStrike: [[spoiler:"The two of you killed everything I ever loved. Fuck you both."]]
8th May '16 3:35:20 PM Sestren_NK
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* AssholeVictim: Nick Fisher, who seems entirely harmless at the start of the film, is revealed to have been a sex offender who served eight years in prison for forcing himself on a fourteen year old cheerleader.

to:

* AssholeVictim: AssholeVictim:
** [[spoiler: Both The Boss and The Rabbi]].
** [[spoiler:
Nick Fisher, who seems entirely harmless at the start of the film, is revealed to have been a sex offender who served eight years in prison for forcing himself on a fourteen year old cheerleader.cheerleader]].
26th Jan '16 1:19:35 PM rjung
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Added DiffLines:

* SinisterMinister: The Rabbi, who is a major crime boss.
20th Jan '16 12:25:55 PM rjung
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* FakeDefector: The way Sleven plays both sides.

to:

* FakeDefector: The [[spoiler:The way Sleven plays both sides.]]
20th Jan '16 11:59:20 AM rjung
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* KansasCityShuffle: TropeNamer.

to:

* KansasCityShuffle: TropeNamer.Discussed, though the film itself is not actually an example of the trope, because [[spoiler:The Boss and The Rabbi never even figure out that a con is happening to them, let alone try and manoeuvre their way out of it.]]
20th Jan '16 11:55:36 AM rjung
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Added DiffLines:

* IronicNickname: The bookie "Slim" is rather portly.
20th Jan '16 11:49:53 AM rjung
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* PlayingBothSides: Slevin turns a gang warfare into a full-blown KansasCityShuffle.

to:

* PlayingBothSides: Slevin [[spoiler:Slevin]] turns a gang warfare into a full-blown KansasCityShuffle.



* SecondPersonAttack: The film does this with the death of The Rabbi's bookie (who died from having a baseball thrown at his head).

to:

* SecondPersonAttack: The film does this with the death of The "Slim", the Rabbi's bookie (who died from having a baseball thrown at his head).



* SmartPeoplePlayChess: Goodkat and Slevin, as they each report to The Boss.

to:

* SmartPeoplePlayChess: Goodkat and Slevin, Slevin play chess with The Boss as they each report to The Boss.him.
16th Dec '15 6:27:08 PM YT45
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* YourCheatingHeart: Slevin caught his girlfriend cheating on him. [[spoiler: It didn't actually happen]].

to:

* YourCheatingHeart: Slevin caught his girlfriend cheating on him. [[spoiler: It didn't actually happen]]. His rebuttal of her excuse is ''excellent'': she's being doggy-styled by some other guy when Slevin walks in, and tries to say, "It was an accident."
-->'''Slevin:''' Accident, eh? What, like, he tripped and you fell?
29th Oct '15 5:04:22 AM eroock
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!! ''Lucky Number Slevin'' provides examples of the following tropes:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:A-C]]

to:

!! ''Lucky Number Slevin'' This film provides examples of the following tropes:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:A-C]]
of:



* BookEnds: The film ends in the same airport terminal it started in, [[RuleOfSymbolism though it is empty the first time and full the second]].

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* BookEnds: {{Bookends}}: The film ends in the same airport terminal it started in, [[RuleOfSymbolism though it is empty the first time and full the second]].



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[[folder:D-M]]



* FakeDefector: The way Sleven plays both sides.



[[/folder]]

[[folder:N-Z]]



* ObfuscatingStupidity: - Jeez, this movie plays with Obfuscation like a bandit. Slevin runs a fine line at this all throughout the movie. His stupidity isn't of the literal sort but the physical. Slevin's continuously firing quips at very violent people - two different sets of mooks and mob bosses, as well as the police and is constantly getting punched for it, as soon as physical violence comes into play, Slevin backs down (for a little while at least). It's a brilliant subversion of the idea, [[spoiler: Slevin's actually a fairly accomplished hitman who's killed at least three people just to put himself in play.]] He straddles a line of aggravating people into hitting him, mixed with just not caring about the danger he's in. [[spoiler: Little do his rivals know, he is planning on killing all of them.]] Sometimes, it's unclear if he's doing it on purpose so they underestimate him, because of his [[spoiler: supposed]] ataraxia or if he just honestly pissing off all the people around him ''because he can.''

to:

* ObfuscatingStupidity: - Jeez, this movie plays with Obfuscation like a bandit. Slevin runs a fine line at this all throughout the movie. His stupidity isn't of the literal sort but the physical. Slevin's continuously firing quips at very violent people - two different sets of mooks and mob bosses, as well as the police and is constantly getting punched for it, as soon as physical violence comes into play, Slevin backs down (for a little while at least). It's a brilliant subversion of the idea, [[spoiler: Slevin's actually a fairly accomplished hitman who's killed at least three people just to put himself in play.]] He straddles a line of aggravating people into hitting him, mixed with just not caring about the danger he's in. [[spoiler: Little do his rivals know, he is planning on killing all of them.]] Sometimes, it's unclear if he's doing it on purpose so they underestimate him, because of his [[spoiler: supposed]] ataraxia or if he just honestly pissing off all the people around him ''because he can.''



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