History Film / LastClearChance

17th Jul '16 1:29:07 AM BNSF1995
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While maligned by some as [[{{Narm}} too narmish]] particularly for a reactionary scene near the end of the film, where one railroad worker asks why some drivers fail to heed basic safety rules it was lauded by many others as a sobering effort to instill safe driving in young drivers. Today, it also stands out as a showcase of rural America in the late 1950s, before superhighways although a few four-lane highways are shown and urban sprawl and when farming was still a major part of the economy in rural areas; plus, some old-school railroad crossing technology, most notably the wig-wag (swinging pendulum) crossing signal, can be seen in use, as well as a vintage, early 1900s-style railroad crossbuck (diamond-shaped) sign years before the crossings were upgraded with modern signals and gates plus the long relegated-to-history caboose at the end of several trains. The movie itself was filmed in southwestern Idaho, with some footage also filmed in northern Colorado.

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While maligned by some as [[{{Narm}} too narmish]] particularly for a reactionary scene near the end of the film, where one railroad worker asks why some drivers fail to heed basic safety rules it was lauded by many others as a sobering effort to instill safe driving in young drivers. Today, it also stands out as a showcase of rural America in the late 1950s, before superhighways although a few four-lane highways are shown and urban sprawl and when farming was still a major part of the economy in rural areas; plus, some old-school railroad crossing technology, most notably the wig-wag (swinging pendulum) crossing signal, can be seen in use, as well as a vintage, early 1900s-style railroad crossbuck (diamond-shaped) sign years before the crossings were upgraded with modern signals signals, bells, and gates plus the long relegated-to-history caboose at the end of several trains. The movie itself was filmed in southwestern Idaho, with some footage also filmed in northern Colorado.
28th Aug '15 5:49:56 PM nombretomado
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For the ''MysteryScienceTheater3000'' version, please go to the [[Recap/MysteryScienceTheater3000S05E20RadarSecretService episode recap page]].

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For the ''MysteryScienceTheater3000'' ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' version, please go to the [[Recap/MysteryScienceTheater3000S05E20RadarSecretService episode recap page]].
25th May '15 7:48:35 PM AnotherGuy
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Added DiffLines:

* {{Foreshadowing}}: Frank's mother comments that ''he'' has been taking too many chances on the road.
29th Apr '15 8:28:22 AM Briguy52748
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A police officer obsessed with train and automotive safety torments an innocent mid-western farm family the day that their youngest son receives his driver's licence. He holds them hostage while rattling off tales of horrible driving etiquette and railroad-related horrors, even confronting their youngest son with the horrible image of his deceased friend. Ultimately, for reasons of his own, he finally relents. But has his grim lesson sunk in, or will innocent people die this day at the hands of our mortal enemy, the train? (Answer: Yes.)

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A police officer obsessed with train and Idaho State Patrol Trooper Hal Jackson, concerned over automotive safety torments an innocent mid-western farm and train safety, visits with a local family the day that their (established as friends), whose youngest son receives has recently received his driver's licence. He holds them hostage while rattling off tales license. Through a series of horrible scenarios detailing bad driving etiquette etiquette, unsafe driving -- one story ends in the death of one of the kid's friends -- and railroad-related horrors, even confronting their youngest son with ignorance of safety around railroads, Jackson's goal is to impress upon the horrible image young lad the need to observe safety and driving laws all of his deceased friend. Ultimately, for reasons of his own, he finally relents. the time.

But has his grim lesson sunk in, or will innocent people die this day at the hands of our mortal enemy, the train? (Answer: Yes.)
17th Jan '15 2:23:33 PM Kahran042
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* HeyItsThatGuy: William Boyett, playing the role of Trooper Hal Jackson, became best known as Sergeant William "Mac" [=MacDonald=] (the superior officers Pete Malloy and Jim Reed reported to) in the 1968-1975 police drama ''Series/AdamTwelve''. Boyett, incidentally, would frequently play police officers throughout his career.
23rd Oct '14 11:15:01 PM SpiderRider3
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--> Servo: Hey, the cop never said anything about doing ''intensely stupid'' things!

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--> Servo: '''Servo:''' Hey, the cop never said anything about doing ''intensely stupid'' things!
19th Feb '14 7:10:08 AM Briguy52748
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* CouldThisHappenToYou: The film ends with the police officer reminding the viewers of the fate of Frank.

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* CouldThisHappenToYou: The film ends with the police officer reminding the viewers of the fate of Frank.what happened to Frank Jr.



** Trooper Hal points out multiple times that while an offending driver may have gotten away with violating traffic laws or ignoring safety rules without consequence many times before, his moral is that it only takes one time to get killed. For instance, with the man who passed several cars while climbing a hill in a clearly marked no passing zone, Hal mentions that it was his first and last accident.

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** Trooper Hal points out multiple times that while an offending driver may have gotten away with violating traffic laws or ignoring safety rules without consequence many times before, his moral is that it only takes one time to get killed.become the victim in a deadly crash. For instance, with the man who passed several cars while climbing a hill in a clearly marked no passing zone, Hal mentions that it was his first and last accident.



* RailroadTracksOfDoom: Much of the premise of the movie trains pose a danger to drivers, they can be expected at any time of the day or night, double tracks can mean double trouble particularly with a second train just after the first one clears the tracks ... and the trope can be enforced if basic safety rules and warnings aren't heeded (ergo, the results of a car-train collision will likely be deadly). Indeed, the trope is reality for Frank Jr. and his fiancé, Betty (who initially survives but it is implied that she, too, will die). The rest of the movie is padded out by reinforcing other driving safety tips.

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* RailroadTracksOfDoom: Much of the premise of the movie trains pose a danger to drivers, they can be expected at any time of the day or night, double tracks can mean double trouble particularly with a second train just after the first one clears the tracks ...crossing ... and the trope can be enforced if basic safety rules and warnings aren't heeded (ergo, the results of a car-train collision will likely be deadly). Indeed, the trope is reality for Frank Jr. and his fiancé, Betty (who initially survives but it is implied that she, too, will die). The rest of the movie is padded out by reinforcing other driving safety tips.
19th Feb '14 7:02:01 AM Briguy52748
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While maligned by some as [[{{Narm}} too narmish]] particularly for a reactionary scene near the end of the film, where one railroad worker asks why some drivers fail to heed basic safety rules it was lauded by many others as a sobering effort to instill safe driving in young drivers. Today, it also stands out as a showcase of rural America in the late 1950s, before superhighways although a few four-lane highways are shown and urban sprawl and when farming was still a major part of the economy in unincorporated areas; plus, some old-school railroad crossing technology, most notably the wig-wag (swinging pendulum) crossing signal, can be seen in use, and a vintage, early 1900s-style railroad crossbuck (diamond-shaped) sign years before the crossings were upgraded with modern signals and gates plus the long relegated-to-history caboose at the end of several trains. The movie itself was filmed in southwestern Idaho, with some footage also filmed in northern Colorado.

to:

While maligned by some as [[{{Narm}} too narmish]] particularly for a reactionary scene near the end of the film, where one railroad worker asks why some drivers fail to heed basic safety rules it was lauded by many others as a sobering effort to instill safe driving in young drivers. Today, it also stands out as a showcase of rural America in the late 1950s, before superhighways although a few four-lane highways are shown and urban sprawl and when farming was still a major part of the economy in unincorporated rural areas; plus, some old-school railroad crossing technology, most notably the wig-wag (swinging pendulum) crossing signal, can be seen in use, and as well as a vintage, early 1900s-style railroad crossbuck (diamond-shaped) sign years before the crossings were upgraded with modern signals and gates plus the long relegated-to-history caboose at the end of several trains. The movie itself was filmed in southwestern Idaho, with some footage also filmed in northern Colorado.



* ScareEmStraight: Although it contrasted with many other driver's ed films of the era -- less preachy (it used a drama presentation, plus Boyett's conversational style narration vs. the lecturing of other safety films) and less graphic (many driver's ed films of the era showed graphic carnage of actual accident victims and destroyed cars) -- it still made its point: Obey all safety rules all of the time or you risk becoming a statistic.

to:

* ScareEmStraight: Although it contrasted with many other driver's ed films of the era -- less preachy (it used a drama presentation, plus Boyett's conversational style natural conversational-style narration vs. the lecturing of other safety films) and less graphic (many driver's ed films of prior to the era 1970s showed graphic carnage of actual accident victims and destroyed cars) -- it still made its point: Obey all safety rules all of the time or you risk becoming a statistic. statistic.
** In-universe, Alan reading the accident report that killed his friend and then witnessing the car-train crash that killed his brother and sister-in-law-to-be, it can be implied, is enough to instill safe driving habits in him for life.
18th Feb '14 7:35:31 PM Briguy52748
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* AnAesop: Observe all traffic laws all of the time, and be aware of the specific hazard that comes with railroad train crossings.



* NostalgiaFilter: Trooper Hal sets the stage for the then-new superhighway system by reflecting back on the days of the horse-and-buggy, Ford Model Ts and tandem bicycles all of which he says weren't just showpieces in old-time festivals but a legitimate part of life and within the lifetimes of most people 50 and older were alive in 1959. Hal also reflects on quiet country roads and that everyone at the time stopped for railroad crossings, contrasting that with modern highways the interstate highway system was in its infancy, although there were still plenty of four-lane superhighways in the late 1950s and even railroad overpasses and underpasses that allow trains to pass through urban areas and/or travel over or under major highways without impeding traffic. Hal prefaces this, however, with the obligatory caution: While highways (and cars) have gotten better and safer, the human body has not changed and that drivers need to be even more careful now and pay heed to all traffic laws all the time.

to:

* NostalgiaFilter: Trooper Hal sets the stage for the then-new superhighway system by reflecting back on the days of the horse-and-buggy, Ford Model Ts and tandem bicycles all of which he says weren't just showpieces in old-time festivals but a legitimate part of life and within the lifetimes of most people 50 and older were alive in 1959.at the time of filming (summer 1959). Hal also reflects on quiet country roads and that everyone at the time stopped for railroad crossings, contrasting that with modern highways the interstate highway system was in its infancy, although there were still plenty of four-lane superhighways in the late 1950s and even railroad overpasses and underpasses that allow trains to pass through urban areas and/or travel over or under major highways without impeding traffic. Hal prefaces this, however, with the obligatory caution: caution and his whole point: While highways (and cars) have gotten better and safer, the human body has not changed and that drivers need to be even more careful now and pay heed to all traffic laws all the time.



* ScareEmStraight: What most of the driver's ed films were prior to the 1990s lots of blood, gore and graphic depictions of accidents.

to:

* ScareEmStraight: What most of the Although it contrasted with many other driver's ed films were prior to of the 1990s lots era -- less preachy (it used a drama presentation, plus Boyett's conversational style narration vs. the lecturing of blood, gore other safety films) and less graphic depictions (many driver's ed films of accidents.the era showed graphic carnage of actual accident victims and destroyed cars) -- it still made its point: Obey all safety rules all of the time or you risk becoming a statistic.
18th Feb '14 7:25:17 PM Briguy52748
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While maligned by some as [[{{Narm}} too narmish]] particularly for a reactionary scene near the end of the film, where one railroad worker asks why some drivers fail to heed basic safety rules it was lauded by many others as a sobering effort to instill safe driving in young drivers. Today, it also stands out as a showcase of rural America in the late 1950s, before superhighways although a few four-lane highways are shown and urban sprawl and when farming was still a major part of the economy in unincorporated areas; plus, some old-school railroad crossing technology, most notably the wig-wag (swinging pendulum) crossing signal, can be seen in use, and a vintage, early 1900s-style railroad crossbuck (diamond-shaped) sign years before the crossings were upgraded with modern signals and gates plus the long relegated-to-history caboose at the end of several trains. The movie itself was filmed in southwestern Idaho.

to:

While maligned by some as [[{{Narm}} too narmish]] particularly for a reactionary scene near the end of the film, where one railroad worker asks why some drivers fail to heed basic safety rules it was lauded by many others as a sobering effort to instill safe driving in young drivers. Today, it also stands out as a showcase of rural America in the late 1950s, before superhighways although a few four-lane highways are shown and urban sprawl and when farming was still a major part of the economy in unincorporated areas; plus, some old-school railroad crossing technology, most notably the wig-wag (swinging pendulum) crossing signal, can be seen in use, and a vintage, early 1900s-style railroad crossbuck (diamond-shaped) sign years before the crossings were upgraded with modern signals and gates plus the long relegated-to-history caboose at the end of several trains. The movie itself was filmed in southwestern Idaho.
Idaho, with some footage also filmed in northern Colorado.
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