History Film / Interstellar

20th Mar '17 10:44:56 PM MyFinalEdits
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* ArtisticLicenseChemistry: The conditions on Mann's planet are the exact opposite of what they should be.[[note]] Chlorine is rather heavy and should have drifted to the surface instead of staying in the higher elevations [[/note]] The film does imply a plausible reason for this, however. [[spoiler: Mann was lying about these conditions and no one caught the mistake.]]

to:

* ArtisticLicenseBiology: One of the major plot devices in the film is the existence of a world-scale blight depopulating the world. While such a situation ''is'' theoretically possible in RealLife, the chances of it occuring are extremely small as it would rely on several factors relating to the need of oxygen to be massively drawn down from the atmosphere. Historically, blights of this nature only happened on a much smaller scale (such as the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytophthora_infestans potato blight]] which caused the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Famine_(Ireland) Great Irish Famine]] in eastern Britain and Belgium; the mainland cultivated multiple crops whereas one-third of Ireland had been forced to rely on potatoes through [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_Laws mainland-government policies]]. In comparison, two-thirds of the entire world at present is dependent on wheat, rice, and corn).
* ArtisticLicenseChemistry: The conditions on Mann's planet are the exact opposite of what they should be.[[note]] Chlorine is rather heavy and should have drifted to the surface instead of staying in the higher elevations [[/note]] The film does imply a plausible reason for this, however. [[spoiler: Mann however: [[spoiler:Mann was lying about these conditions and no one caught the mistake.]]



* RealityIsUnrealistic:
** Some find the concept of the world being depopulated by blight to be improbable. The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytophthora_infestans potato blight]] which caused the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Famine_(Ireland) Great Irish Famine]] was present in eastern Britain and Belgium as well, but was nowhere near as dangerous there because the mainland cultivated multiple crops whereas one-third of Ireland had been forced to rely on potatoes through [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_Laws mainland-government policies]]. In comparison, two-thirds of the entire world at present is dependent on wheat, rice, and corn. There are [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seed_saving#Legality similar current laws]] that force food crops to be more similar than ever before, which means that they can more easily catch each others' diseases and parasites - a cause for concern, given the world's inability to maintain sustenance-level food-production without The Big Three. Indeed, there is an [[http://www.wired.com/2010/02/ff_ug99_fungus/ apocalyptic wheat blight]] ravaging the Third World as of the early 21st century.\\
\\
Even the "super-blight" capable of "hopping across entire species of crops" is not unprecedented: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanobacteria Cyanobacteria]], the primary source of Earth's oxygen atmosphere, caused a shift in atmospheric content that overturned the previous ecosystem that had been around for about a billion years, making way for the life-forms that now occupy the Earth. There is no reason it could not happen again.\\
\\
Moreover, not only do fungi such as blights [[https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080430200848AAUJAfd consume oxygen without creating any]], they don't need it to survive. No equilibrium would be reached where lack of oxygen would kill it and stop the process, so theoretically, a blight could wipe out the Earth's atmosphere.
** But that leaves the other one third of the world, the practice of [[IdiotBall continuing to crops that a world-wide superblight has been eating for decades when there are other crops available]] (from seed banks), that Third World wheat blight [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ug99#Gene_resistance being under control already]], non-crop sources of oxygen (such as trees), and so on. Some find the concept of the world being depopulated by blight to be improbable.
11th Mar '17 9:04:33 PM TheRoguePenguin
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* RealityIsUnrealistic or ArtisticLicenseBiology:

to:

* RealityIsUnrealistic or ArtisticLicenseBiology:RealityIsUnrealistic:
11th Mar '17 4:19:58 PM WingedCat
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* RealityIsUnrealistic:

to:

* RealityIsUnrealistic:RealityIsUnrealistic or ArtisticLicenseBiology:
11th Mar '17 11:31:59 AM MyFinalEdits
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* RasterVision: Used for some (but not all) video screens.



* RasterVision: Used for some (but not all) video screens.

to:

* RasterVision: Used RealityIsUnrealistic:
** Some find the concept of the world being depopulated by blight to be improbable. The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytophthora_infestans potato blight]] which caused the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Famine_(Ireland) Great Irish Famine]] was present in eastern Britain and Belgium as well, but was nowhere near as dangerous there because the mainland cultivated multiple crops whereas one-third of Ireland had been forced to rely on potatoes through [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_Laws mainland-government policies]]. In comparison, two-thirds of the entire world at present is dependent on wheat, rice, and corn. There are [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seed_saving#Legality similar current laws]] that force food crops to be more similar than ever before, which means that they can more easily catch each others' diseases and parasites - a cause
for some (but concern, given the world's inability to maintain sustenance-level food-production without The Big Three. Indeed, there is an [[http://www.wired.com/2010/02/ff_ug99_fungus/ apocalyptic wheat blight]] ravaging the Third World as of the early 21st century.\\
\\
Even the "super-blight" capable of "hopping across entire species of crops" is
not all) video screens.unprecedented: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanobacteria Cyanobacteria]], the primary source of Earth's oxygen atmosphere, caused a shift in atmospheric content that overturned the previous ecosystem that had been around for about a billion years, making way for the life-forms that now occupy the Earth. There is no reason it could not happen again.\\
\\
Moreover, not only do fungi such as blights [[https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080430200848AAUJAfd consume oxygen without creating any]], they don't need it to survive. No equilibrium would be reached where lack of oxygen would kill it and stop the process, so theoretically, a blight could wipe out the Earth's atmosphere.
** But that leaves the other one third of the world, the practice of [[IdiotBall continuing to crops that a world-wide superblight has been eating for decades when there are other crops available]] (from seed banks), that Third World wheat blight [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ug99#Gene_resistance being under control already]], non-crop sources of oxygen (such as trees), and so on. Some find the concept of the world being depopulated by blight to be improbable.
11th Mar '17 11:27:09 AM MyFinalEdits
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* BigBad: The blight that is destroying human civilization and forcing the migration across the wormhole. (This mirrors RealLife agricultural concerns about declining crop diversity and the increasing tendency for monocultures, to the point where the majority of Earth's food is harvested from a literal handful of crop species, though see YMMV about whether this scenario is plausible.)
11th Mar '17 1:22:50 AM WingedCat
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* BigBad: The Blight that is destroying human civilization and forcing the migration across the wormhole. Note that this as Big Bads go, this is a fairly realistic one: Between the declining crop diversity, to the point where 90% of food is harvested from a literal handful of crop species, and the increasing tendency for monocultures, this is a legitimate concern in agriculture.

to:

* BigBad: The Blight blight that is destroying human civilization and forcing the migration across the wormhole. Note that this as Big Bads go, this is a fairly realistic one: Between the wormhole. (This mirrors RealLife agricultural concerns about declining crop diversity, diversity and the increasing tendency for monocultures, to the point where 90% the majority of Earth's food is harvested from a literal handful of crop species, and the increasing tendency for monocultures, though see YMMV about whether this scenario is a legitimate concern in agriculture.plausible.)



* RealityIsUnrealistic:
** Some find the concept of the world being depopulated by blight to be improbable. The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytophthora_infestans potato blight]] which caused the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Famine_(Ireland) Great Irish Famine]] was present in eastern Britain and Belgium as well, but was nowhere near as dangerous there because the mainland cultivated multiple crops whereas one-third of Ireland had been forced to rely on potatoes through [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_Laws mainland-government policies]]. In comparison, ''two-thirds'' of the ''entire world'' at present is dependent on wheat, rice, and corn. There are in fact [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seed_saving#Legality very similar current laws]] that force food crops to be more similar than ever before, which means that they can more easily catch each other's various diseases and parasites -- a cause for concern, to say the least, given the world's inability to maintain sustenance-level food-production without The Big Three. Indeed, there is an [[http://www.wired.com/2010/02/ff_ug99_fungus/ apocalyptic wheat blight]] ravaging the Third World ''right now.''\\
\\
Even the "super-blight" capable of "hopping across entire species of crops" is not unprecedented; [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanobacteria Cyanobacteria]], the primary source of Earth's oxygen atmosphere, caused a shift in atmospheric content that overturned the previous ecosystem that had been around for about a billion years, making way for the life-forms that now occupy the Earth. ''And there is no reason it could not happen again.''\\
\\
Moreover, not only do fungi such as blights [[https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080430200848AAUJAfd consume oxygen without creating any]], they don't need it to survive. No equilibrium would be reached where lack of oxygen would kill it and stop the process, so theoretically, a blight ''could'' wipe out the Earth's atmosphere.



* ScavengerWorld: While life for common people in America is looking pretty comfortable and ordinary, most advanced technology that is still around are leftovers. When Cooper sees an old surveillance drone flying at low altitude he wants to salvage its solar cells and use its computer to control farming machines. NASA is housed in an old nuclear base and the robots are old military euipment.

to:

* ScavengerWorld: While life for common people in America is looking pretty comfortable and ordinary, most advanced technology that is still around are leftovers. When Cooper sees an old surveillance drone flying at low altitude he wants to salvage its solar cells and use its computer to control farming machines. NASA is housed in an old nuclear base and the robots are old military euipment.equipment.
6th Jan '17 7:04:31 PM nombretomado
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* TheEpic: It fits the outline of a classical Graeco-Roman epic to a T. The story opens InMediasRes, the hero goes on several (somewhat) episodic adventures (Finding NASA, exploring the three planets, [[spoiler: fighting Mann and finding a way to send the ''Endurance'' home...]]), which take place across a great length of time and [[spoiler: there's even a rough analogue to the required [[ToHellAndBack journey to the underworld]] inside the black hole.]] Chris Nolan seems quite conscious of this, since his previous film ''{{Inception}}'' closely parallels this structure as well.

to:

* TheEpic: It fits the outline of a classical Graeco-Roman epic to a T. The story opens InMediasRes, the hero goes on several (somewhat) episodic adventures (Finding NASA, exploring the three planets, [[spoiler: fighting Mann and finding a way to send the ''Endurance'' home...]]), which take place across a great length of time and [[spoiler: there's even a rough analogue to the required [[ToHellAndBack journey to the underworld]] inside the black hole.]] Chris Nolan seems quite conscious of this, since his previous film ''{{Inception}}'' ''Film/{{Inception}}'' closely parallels this structure as well.
23rd Dec '16 8:17:34 PM MyFinalEdits
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*** It doesn't quite get everything right, though-- there is no known way for a habitable planet to exist so close to a black hole without being torn apart by tidal forces.



* SnarkToSnarkCombat: Cooper and TARS, many times, owing to their mutual DeadpanSnarker personalities. Between the two of them, they provide a very large fraction of the humor in the film.

to:

* SnarkToSnarkCombat: SnarkToSnarkCombat:
**
Cooper and TARS, many times, owing to their mutual DeadpanSnarker personalities. Between the two of them, they provide a very large fraction of the humor in the film.



* SpiritualSuccessor[=/=][[SpiritualAntithesis Antithesis]]: The film acts as both towards ''Film/{{Inception}}''. Time passing by at bizarre speeds, a father being separated from his children in a far away location, [[spoiler:an TragicVillain who almost screws up the team's goals]], Nolan being in the Sci-Fi genre again, etc. Of course, the main difference is that the scale is much more grander than ''Film/{{Inception}}'s'' smaller focus. Even lampshaded by Nolan himself in a couple of interviews.
** In the SpiritualSuccessor side, the film is a more practical and straightforward version of 1997's ''Film/{{Contact}}'', which also deals with an otherworldy message that triggers a drive for space exploration. In ''Interstellar'''s case, they actually have the logistics for space travel and [[spoiler:Cooper speculates that the messengers are advanced futuristic humans]], whereas in ''Contact'', the beings basically provide the means [[spoiler:and are extraterrestrial]].

to:

* SpiritualSuccessor[=/=][[SpiritualAntithesis Antithesis]]: SpiritualSuccessor:
**
The film acts as both this towards ''Film/{{Inception}}''. Time passing by at bizarre speeds, a father being separated from his children in a far away location, [[spoiler:an TragicVillain who almost screws up the team's goals]], Nolan being in the Sci-Fi genre again, etc. Of course, the main difference is that the scale is much more grander than ''Film/{{Inception}}'s'' smaller focus. Even lampshaded by Nolan himself in a couple of interviews.
** In the SpiritualSuccessor side, the The film is a more practical and straightforward version of 1997's ''Film/{{Contact}}'', which also deals with an otherworldy message that triggers a drive for space exploration. In ''Interstellar'''s case, they actually have the logistics for space travel and [[spoiler:Cooper speculates that the messengers are advanced futuristic humans]], whereas in ''Contact'', the beings basically provide the means [[spoiler:and are extraterrestrial]].
23rd Dec '16 7:14:22 PM TheRoguePenguin
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Added DiffLines:

* GovernmentConspiracy: While the day-to-day bureaucracy just focuses on keeping the population fed, the higher-ups know Earth is going to die and have secretly recommissioned NASA to develop a means to save the species.
23rd Dec '16 6:56:10 PM TheRoguePenguin
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Added DiffLines:

* PoorCommunicationKills: TARS is ProperlyParanoid about [[spoiler:Dr. Mann]] and prepares accordingly, but never thinks to voice this concern to his fellow crew at any point. Had he done so, [[spoiler:Romilly may have survived and the ''Endurance'' wouldn't have been badly damaged by Mann's failed docking attempt]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.Interstellar