History Film / Gettysburg

16th Jan '18 12:20:17 PM costanton11
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A 1993 BattleEpic film about the pivotal battle of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, financed by UsefulNotes/TedTurner, directed by Ronald F. Maxwell, and closely adapted from the PulitzerPrize-winning 1974 novel ''Literature/TheKillerAngels'' by Michael Shaara.

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A 1993 BattleEpic film about the pivotal battle of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, financed by UsefulNotes/TedTurner, directed by Ronald F. Maxwell, and closely adapted from the PulitzerPrize-winning UsefulNotes/PulitzerPrize-winning 1974 novel ''Literature/TheKillerAngels'' by Michael Shaara.
12th Jan '18 3:20:47 PM Erivale
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* AntiVillain: The Confederates may be fighting to defend a government and society based on the mass-enslavement of people viewed as racially inferior, but the vast majority of the men in the Confederate Army don't own any slaves at all and plenty of them like Lee and Longstreet really just seem to be fighting because they can't bare the thought of invading their own homes.

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* AntiVillain: The Confederates may be fighting to defend a government and society based on the mass-enslavement of people viewed as racially inferior, but the vast majority of the men in the Confederate Army don't own any slaves at all and plenty of them like Lee and Longstreet really just seem to be fighting because they can't bare bear the thought of invading their own homes.
20th Dec '17 3:41:54 PM Ohio9
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* CavalryOfficer: The film features two of them as characters: John Buford for the Union and J. E. B. Stuart for the Confederates.
16th Dec '17 5:11:28 AM dustyham
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** John Buford's cavalry troops are shown wearing infantry uniforms rather then the proper cavalry uniforms of the day. Since the costume department relied primarily on civil war re-enactors who brought their own uniforms and gear to play the extras, it could simply be that there were not enough cavalry uniforms available.

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** John Buford's cavalry troops are shown wearing infantry uniforms rather then than the proper cavalry uniforms of the day. Since the costume department relied primarily on civil war re-enactors who brought their own uniforms and gear to play the extras, it could simply be that there were not enough cavalry uniforms available.
15th Dec '17 5:41:25 PM Ohio9
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Added DiffLines:

** John Buford's cavalry troops are shown wearing infantry uniforms rather then the proper cavalry uniforms of the day. Since the costume department relied primarily on civil war re-enactors who brought their own uniforms and gear to play the extras, it could simply be that there were not enough cavalry uniforms available.
15th Dec '17 5:38:48 PM Ohio9
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* CoolGuns: Many examples, but most notably are the Sharps carbines wielded by John Burford's cavalry. The Sharps was a breech loading rifle that gave user a significant firepower advantage over troops armed with the standard muzzle loaders of the day. It had a much faster rate of fire, it was much easier to clear jams, and was much easier to reload from a prone or kneeling position. Though not mentioned in the film, the superior weapons of Burford's cavalry troops contributed greatly to their effectiveness in holding their position against repeated attacks by Confederate infantry.
15th Dec '17 5:32:41 PM Ohio9
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* ShownTheirWork: The visual details are incredibly accurate, helped in part by the loads of re-enactors they cast as extras. Their own costumes were incredibly accurate, and they actually corrected mistakes by the production team. Plus, filming on-location at the historically-preserved Gettysburg National Military Park guaranteed full geographic accuracy.



* ShownTheirWork: The visual details are incredibly accurate, helped in part by the loads of re-enactors they cast as extras. Their own costumes were incredibly accurate, and they actually corrected mistakes by the production team. Plus, filming on-location at the historically-preserved Gettysburg National Military Park guaranteed full geographic accuracy.

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* ShownTheirWork: The visual details are incredibly accurate, helped in part SniperRifle: General John Reynolds is killed by the loads of re-enactors they cast as extras. Their own costumes were incredibly accurate, and they actually corrected mistakes by the production team. Plus, filming on-location at the historically-preserved Gettysburg National Military Park guaranteed full geographic accuracy.a Confederate sniper armed with a Whitworth rifle fitted with a telescopic sight.
11th Dec '17 5:32:03 PM Bissek
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* TheGreatestStoryNeverTold: Harrison laments that spy work is hard on an actor, since if he does the job right the audience doesn't know that he's acting.
6th Dec '17 11:53:57 AM dustyham
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A 1993 film about the pivotal battle of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, financed by UsefulNotes/TedTurner, directed by Ronald F. Maxwell, and based on the PulitzerPrize-winning novel ''Literature/TheKillerAngels'' by Michael Shaara.

The movie focuses on four main actors in the battle: Generals Robert E. Lee (Creator/MartinSheen) and James Longstreet (Creator/TomBerenger) on the Confederate side and Gen. John Buford (Creator/SamElliot) and Lt. Col. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (Creator/JeffDaniels) on the Union side, though Buford's part ended about a third of the way through the movie. All of the characters in the movie are (based on) real-life people with the exception of Sgt. Buster Kilrain.

The Blu-Ray release restored all the deleted scenes, including some that had been in the trailer but had not made the cut for the theatrical release.

Particularly known for its extremely long Pickett's Charge Sequence. And just being extremely long ''period (FOUR HOURS! Four '''and a half''' in the Blu-Ray release)''

''Gettysburg'' was followed up in 2003 with a prequel film, ''Film/GodsAndGenerals'', which detailed the {{Backstory}} of many of the characters.

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A 1993 BattleEpic film about the pivotal battle of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, financed by UsefulNotes/TedTurner, directed by Ronald F. Maxwell, and based on closely adapted from the PulitzerPrize-winning 1974 novel ''Literature/TheKillerAngels'' by Michael Shaara.

The movie focuses on four main actors participants in the battle: Generals Robert E. Lee (Creator/MartinSheen) and James Longstreet (Creator/TomBerenger) on the Confederate side and Brig. Gen. John Buford (Creator/SamElliot) (Creator/SamElliott) and Lt. Col. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (Creator/JeffDaniels) on the Union side, though Buford's part ended ends about a third of the way through the movie. All of the characters in the movie are (based on) real-life people [[HistoricalDomainCharacter based on real people]] with the sole exception of Chamberlain's {{Lancer}}, Sgt. Buster Kilrain.

The Blu-Ray release restored all the deleted scenes, including some that had been in the trailer but had not made the cut for the theatrical release.

Particularly known for its extremely long Pickett's Charge Sequence. And sequence, and for just being extremely long ''period (FOUR HOURS! Four '''and ''period'', clocking in at ''four hours''! (Four ''and a half''' half'' in the Blu-Ray release)''

''Gettysburg''
release, which restored all the deleted scenes including some that had been in the trailer but [[NeverTrustATrailer didn't make the theatrical cut]]).

The film
was followed up in 2003 with a prequel film, ''Film/GodsAndGenerals'', based on the [[Literature/GodsAndGenerals novel of the same name]] by Shaara's son Jeff, which detailed the {{Backstory}} {{backstory}} of many of the characters.



* ActionFilmQuietDramaScene: Plenty on both sides of the conflict since the armies naturally take breathers from fighting one another.
* AgonyOfTheFeet: Some of the Confederate troops made the march from Virginia to Gettysburg on bare feet. The opening engagement of the battle was started when General Heth tried to raid the city's shoe factories to resolve this issue.
* AnalogyBackfire:

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* ActionFilmQuietDramaScene: Plenty on both sides of the conflict since the armies naturally take breathers from fighting one another.
each other.
* AgeLift: John Bell Hood was barely 32 during the battle, but actor Patrick Gorman looks considerably older.
* AgonyOfTheFeet: Some of the Confederate troops made the march from Virginia to Gettysburg on bare feet. The opening engagement of the battle was started when General Heth tried to raid the city's shoe factories warehouses to resolve this issue.
issue. (Of course, there were no shoes, since one town resident remarks that Confederate raiding parties had already been around for days and the citizens "can't shoe a plow horse with what they didn't take.")
* AnalogyBackfire: AnalogyBackfire:



*** Subverted in that Fremantle, who was half-heartedly listening to Kemper's diatribe on states' rights, responds much more agreeably to Pickett's simple gentleman's club analogy.
** Both the book and the film have Fremantle going on about how the Southerners are so like the English and being descended from them due to their names, and bringing up Longstreet as an example. Turns out Longstreet is actually of Dutch descent, and Longstreet then reminds him that the U.S. [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution beat the British]], [[UsefulNotes/WarOf1812 twice]].[[note]]Let's be fair, the UsefulNotes/WarOf1812 was really a draw, mostly due to lack of enthusiasm on both sides[[/note]]
* AllThereInTheManual: A number of details about the personality and history of the officers is left in the original novel.
* AndThisIsFor: The Union soldiers chant "Fredericksburg" as the Confederates retreat after Pickett's Charge.
** Made doubly meaningful by the fact that the men chanting are from Hancock's corps. During the battle, the flag of the Irish Brigade can be seen behind the stone wall. Hancock's corps and the Irish Brigade in particular are famous for their part in charging the stone wall at Fredericksburg, a battle that plays out almost exactly the same as this one, just with positions reversed.
* AnnoyingYoungerSibling: Tom, for Col. Chamberlain (even though they're adults).
* AntiVillain: The Confederates may be fighting to defend a government based on the mass-enslavement of people viewed as racially inferior, but the vast majority of the men in the Confederate Army don't own any slaves at all and plenty of them like Lee and Longstreet really just seem to be fighting because they can't bare the thought of invading their own homes.
* ArtisticLicenseHistory:
** The film skips over a key part of the Battle of Little Round Top. Specifically, Company B of the 20th Maine went missing and was thought lost at the start of the battle. They had actually been cut off and remained unengaged for most of the fight, until the bayonet charge gave them an opportunity to hook back up with their unit without getting slaughtered. The sudden appearance of fresh troops with plenty of ammunition charging the Confederate flank tricked the Rebels into thinking that the Federal troops were bringing up new units, contributing to their decision to surrender. This detail was in the original book.
** In real life, Joshua Chamberlain's 20th Maine Regiment was not deployed on Cemetery Ridge on the 3rd day of battle, and did not take part in the defense against Pickett's Charge as the movie depicted. As such, in real life it was not Thomas Chamberlain who found the wounded Confederate General Lewis Armistead after the battle and informed him of General Hancock's injury, but a different officer, Captain Henry H. Bingham.

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*** Subverted in that Fremantle, who was half-heartedly halfheartedly listening to Kemper's diatribe on states' rights, responds much more agreeably to Pickett's simple gentleman's club analogy.
** Both the book and the film have Fremantle going goes on about how the Southerners are so like the English and being descended from them due to them, citing their names, names as proof, and bringing up Longstreet as an example. Turns out Longstreet is points out that he's actually of Dutch descent, descent and Longstreet then reminds him Freemantle that the U.S. [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution beat the British]], [[UsefulNotes/WarOf1812 twice]].[[note]]Let's [[note]]To be fair, the UsefulNotes/WarOf1812 was really a draw, mostly due to lack draw since the British were far more worried about [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte a certain Frenchman]] and the Americans lost most of enthusiasm on both sides[[/note]]
their impetus after invading Canada proved more difficult than the "[[HomeByChristmas mere matter of marching]]" they'd assumed.[[/note]]
* AllThereInTheManual: A number of Many details about the personality and history backstory of the officers is left in characters aren't carried over from the original novel.
** In particular, the reason for General Garnett's determination to participate in Pickett's Charge on horseback is hinted at but never actually revealed, while the novel explains that Stonewall Jackson accused Garnett of cowardice shortly before his own death.
* AndThisIsFor: The Union soldiers chant "Fredericksburg" "Fredericksburg!" as the Confederates retreat after Pickett's Charge.
** Made
Charge. This is doubly meaningful by the fact that since the men chanting are from Hancock's corps. During the battle, corps and the flag of the Irish Brigade can be seen behind the stone wall. Hancock's corps wall, and the Irish Brigade in particular both units are famous for their part in charging the a stone wall at Fredericksburg, a previous battle that plays played out almost exactly the same as this one, just with positions reversed.
reversed.
* AnnoyingYoungerSibling: Tom, for Col. Chamberlain (even Chamberlain, even though they're adults).
both adults. Chamberlain has to frequently remind Tom to call him "sir," not Lawrence.
* AntiVillain: The Confederates may be fighting to defend a government and society based on the mass-enslavement of people viewed as racially inferior, but the vast majority of the men in the Confederate Army don't own any slaves at all and plenty of them like Lee and Longstreet really just seem to be fighting because they can't bare the thought of invading their own homes.
* ArtisticLicenseHistory:
ArtisticLicenseHistory:
** The film indulges heavily in the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historian%27s_fallacy Historian's Fallacy]] that decision makers of the past viewed events with all the clarity of information, cognition, and perspective that we do now. This is particularly obvious when Buford presages the exact value of the GeoEffects at Gettysburg "as if [the battle] were already done; already a memory," and when Longstreet accurately lists precise details of Pickett's Charge (including the casualty levels) before it even happens.
** The film skips over a key part of the Battle of fight on Little Round Top. Top from the original book (and real life). Specifically, Company B of the 20th Maine went missing and was thought lost at the start of the battle. They had actually been got cut off early on and were presumed lost, but in fact remained unengaged for most of the fight, fight until the bayonet charge gave them an opportunity to hook back up with their unit without getting slaughtered. The sudden appearance of fresh troops with plenty of ammunition charging the Confederate their flank tricked the Rebels Confederates into thinking that the Federal troops Federals were bringing up new units, contributing to their decision to surrender. This detail was in the original book.
surrender.
** In real life, An obvious one sees Joshua Chamberlain's 20th Maine Regiment was not deployed on pulled from the line and relocated from Little Round Top to Cemetery Ridge on the 3rd day of battle, and did not take part in the defense against time for Pickett's Charge Charge, which of course never happened but is [[RuleOfDrama dramatically understandable]] as it gives the movie depicted. main Union protagonist a front-row seat to the movie's climax. As such, in real life it was not wasn't Thomas Chamberlain but another officer, Capt. Henry H. Bingham, who found the wounded Confederate General Lewis Armistead after the battle and informed him of General Hancock's injury, but injury.
** The real Col. Fremantle was more of
a different officer, Captain Henry H. Bingham.tourist than an official representative of the British government and did ''not'' wear his scarlet tunic, though he did write a book about his travels in which he predicted the Confederacy was sure to win.



* BadassBeard: ''Every'' male (which is to say, every cast member) has luxuriant facial hair, as it was the style at the time.
* BadassBookworm: Three words: Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain.

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* BadassBeard: ''Every'' male (which is to say, [[ChromosomeCasting every cast member) member]]) has extremely luxuriant facial hair, as it was which is TruthInTelevision for the style at era, albeit not always a credit to the time.
make-up department.
* BadassBookworm: Three words: Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain.Chamberlain was professor of rhetoric at Bowdoin College in Maine before joining the army.
* BattleEpic: Four (and-a-half) hours of it!



* BloodBrothers: Armistead and Hancock, although both sides would have officers in the same predicament. They both reflect on the tragedy of having raised their hands in anger against each other.
--> '''Hancock''' (to Chamberlain): Tell me, Professor. In your studies have you come across a story from antiquity of two men who are like brothers facing each other on the field of battle? ...Lewis Armistead was my closest friend before the war. I'd like to see him again: but not here, not like this. What do you say, Colonel, what do the books tell you?
** One Confederate scene has Armistead tearfully revealing to Longstreet that the last time he'd met Hancock, he'd swore that if he should raise a hand against his friend, "''may God strike me dead!''". [[spoiler:He's mortally wounded in Pickett's Charge, only to break down in shock and tears when after requesting that his apology be conveyed to Hancock, he's told that Hancock was also struck: "''Not the both of us!''"]] The Picket's Charge scene underlines how alike they are by having each of them calm their men during the artillery exchange using [[MeaningfulEcho the exact same words]].
** While the Armistead/Hancock relationship was the most notable of these sorts of conflict, it was actually quite the common occurrence. The movie itself notes the fact that Lee's second in command, Longstreet, was good friends with UsefulNotes/UlyssesSGrant. And enlistment records of the units that fought at Gettysburg reveal that four brothers fought at Gettysburg. Three for the Confederacy, one for the Union.

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* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: Pickett's desire for his men to see action is fulfilled when his division is decimated on Day 3.
* BloodBrothers: Armistead and Hancock, although both sides would have officers in the same predicament. They Hancock both reflect on the tragedy of having raised their hands in anger against each other.
--> '''Hancock''' (to Chamberlain): ''(to Chamberlain)'': Tell me, Professor. In your studies have you come across a story from antiquity of two men who are like brothers facing each other on the field of battle? ...Lewis Armistead was my closest friend before the war. I'd like to see him again: but not here, not like this. What do you say, Colonel, what do the books tell you?
** One Confederate scene has Armistead tearfully revealing to Longstreet that the last time he'd met Hancock, he'd swore that sworn, "May God strike me dead!" if he should raise a hand against his friend, "''may God strike me dead!''". friend. [[spoiler:He's mortally wounded in Pickett's Charge, only to break down in shock and tears when after requesting that his apology be conveyed to Hancock, he's told that Hancock was also struck: "''Not the both of us!''"]] The Picket's Charge scene underlines sequence underscores how alike they are by having each of them calm their his men during the artillery exchange using [[MeaningfulEcho the exact same words]].
** While the Armistead/Hancock relationship was the most notable famous of these sorts of conflict, it was actually quite the fairly common occurrence. occurrence among professional officers (though it was much less common among citizen volunteers like Chamberlain). The movie itself notes the fact that Lee's second in command, Longstreet, Longstreet was good friends with UsefulNotes/UlyssesSGrant. And enlistment records of the units that fought at Gettysburg reveal that four brothers fought at Gettysburg. Three for the Confederacy, one for the Union.



* BloodlessCarnage: Most people who get shot on camera just clutch a part of their body and fall over (if from a gun), or get tossed in the air (if from a cannon - even if it's from a range that should have reduced them to chunky salsa on the spot). This is probably because the film was originally intended to be a tv movie and thus could not show the more gory aspects of war on mainstream television. People who are injured offscreen often sport bloody bandages when they next appear, however.
* BookDumb: Pickett, who considers "All this book-learnin' unbecoming of a soldier." and graduated in last place - dead last - from West Point.
** While not in the film, George Armstrong Custer is mentioned briefly in several deleted scenes; he likewise graduated last from West Point.
* CaliforniaDoubling: In microcosm: None of the Little Round Top sequences are actually filmed on Little Round Top, because the hill was just too small to fit the production crew ''and'' the actors. Big Round Top stood in for the smaller hill instead.
* TheCassandra: General Hood when told to attack the Union left flank head-on, pointing out that the terrain is so lopsided for the defenders that he'd lose half of his division. Longstreet believes him but declares that Lee already disregarded Longstreet's own arguments against such an advance, so Lee won't allow Hood to swing to the right; Hood's division is ''mauled'' at Devil's Den.[[note]]Ironically, circumstances meant that they ended up veering to the right anyway, and at least in part due to Maj. Gen. Sickles moving the Union III Corps a few hundred yards west, the remainder of Hood's division ''does'' nearly catch the Union right flank ''just as Hood had sought'', forcing Chamberlain to lead the [=20th=] Maine all on its own to check the Confederate flanking attempt.[[/note]]

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* BloodlessCarnage: Most people who get shot on camera just clutch a part of their body and fall over (if from a gun), or get tossed in the air (if from a cannon - even if it's from a range at ranges that should have should've reduced them to [[LudicrousGibs chunky salsa salsa]] on the spot). This is probably because the film was originally intended to be a tv movie mainstream TV miniseries and thus could not couldn't show the more gory aspects of war on mainstream television. People who are injured offscreen war. However, the wounded often do sport bloody bandages when they next appear, however.
afterward, most notably Buster Kilrain and John Bell Hood.
* BookDumb: Pickett, who BookDumb:
** Pickett
considers "All this book-learnin' unbecoming book-learnin'" to be "unbecoming of a soldier." soldier," and graduated in last place - dead last - from in his West Point.
Point class.
** While not in the film, [[TheGhost unseen]], George Armstrong Custer is mentioned briefly in several deleted scenes; he likewise graduated last from West Point.
Point.
* CaliforniaDoubling: In microcosm: None of the Little Round Top sequences are actually filmed on Little Round Top, because the hill was just too small to fit the production crew ''and'' the actors. Big Round Top stood in for the smaller hill instead.
CaptainSmoothAndSergeantRough: Col. Chamberlain has this dynamic with Buster Kilrain.
* TheCassandra: TheCassandra:
**
General Hood when told to attack the Union left flank head-on, pointing out that the terrain is so lopsided for the defenders that he'd lose half of his division. Longstreet believes him but declares that Lee already disregarded Longstreet's own arguments against such an advance, so Lee won't allow Hood to swing to the right; Hood's division is ''mauled'' at Devil's Den.[[note]]Ironically, circumstances meant that they ended up veering to the right anyway, and at least in part due to Maj. Gen. Sickles moving the Union III Corps a few hundred yards west, the remainder of Hood's division ''does'' nearly catch the Union right flank ''just as Hood had sought'', forcing Chamberlain to lead the [=20th=] Maine all on its own to check the Confederate flanking attempt.[[/note]]



* TheCavalry: On the first day, Reynold's I Corps shows up to save Buford's division (ironically, Buford's unit was the actual cavalry, while the relieving units were ''infantry'')
* ChangedMyMindKid: Three of the six holdouts from the 2nd Maine. They later join the fight and save Tom Chamberlain.
* ChromosomeCasting: It's a war film. The only female cast members are essentially part of the scenery as the army marches towards Gettysburg, and none of them get more than two lines.
* ColonelBadass: (Lieutenant) Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. The badass comes out when he thinks he's been shot (the shot really bounced off his sword, but it clearly left him in shock and he has a limp for the rest of the movie). As they're dragging him back he sits up and shoots a charging man with his revolver. Just... wow. The historical Chamberlain was also a badass in that he was wounded six times during the war and survived in an era when just one was usually enough to kill you[[note]]While those wounds did eventually kill him, it took until '''1914''' for them to do so, possibly making him the last Civil War veteran to die of battle wounds[[/note]]. In fact, his penchant for not only surviving wounds that would kill or cripple other men but continuing to fight led to his earning the nickname(on both sides) of 'Bloody Chamberlain'--literally, as he was often covered in his own blood. He started the war as a college professor, not an army officer. Which also qualifies him for BadassBookworm. He later became Governor of Maine and Ambassador to France.
* ContemplateOurNavels: There are quite a few scenes with characters sitting around, discussing the war, slavery, and what could or should have been.

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* TheCavalry: On the first day, Reynold's Reynolds' I Corps shows up to save Buford's division (ironically, division. Ironically, Buford's unit was the actual cavalry, while the relieving units were ''infantry'')
''infantry''.
* ChangedMyMindKid: Three of the six holdouts from the 2nd Maine. They later Maine ultimately agree to join the fight and and later save Tom Chamberlain.
* ChromosomeCasting: It's a war film. The only female cast members are essentially part of the scenery some civilians as the army marches towards to and through Gettysburg, and none of them get more than two lines.
* CigarChomper: One of Longstreet's first acts on screen is to light up a cigar while he interviews Harrison.
*
ColonelBadass: (Lieutenant) Colonel (Lt.) Col. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. The badass comes out when he thinks he's been shot (the shot really [[PocketProtector bounced off his sword, sword]], but it clearly left him in shock and he has a limp for the rest of the movie). As they're dragging him back he sits up and shoots a charging man with his revolver. Just... wow. The historical Chamberlain was also a badass in that he was wounded six times during the war and survived in an era when just one was usually enough to kill you[[note]]While those wounds did eventually kill him, it took until '''1914''' for them to do so, possibly making him the last Civil War veteran to die of battle wounds[[/note]]. In fact, his penchant for not only surviving wounds that would kill or cripple other men but continuing to fight led to his earning the nickname(on both sides) of 'Bloody Chamberlain'--literally, as he was often covered in his own blood. He started the war as a college professor, not an army officer. Which also qualifies him for BadassBookworm. He later became Governor of Maine and Ambassador to France.
* ContemplateOurNavels: There are quite a few scenes with characters sitting around, around discussing the war, slavery, their thoughts and feelings, and what could or should have been.



* CourtlyLove: Armistead has an interesting relationship with Hancock's - his best friend's - wife Almira ("Mira", in the novel). Armistead never pursued her romantically and it never got in the way of their friendship, but he does give her his family Bible (an intensely personal possession) before joining the Virginia forces. Also, part of Armistead's HeroicBSOD breakdown in the novel ''during his own death'' is that he fears Mira receiving the terrible news of her husband's (Hancock had been wounded in the battle, but survived) condition.

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* CourtlyLove: Armistead has an interesting relationship with his best friend Hancock's - his best friend's - wife Almira ("Mira", in the novel). Armistead never pursued her romantically and it never got in the way of their friendship, but he does give her his family Bible (an intensely personal possession) before joining the Virginia forces. Also, part of Armistead's HeroicBSOD breakdown in the novel ''during his own death'' is that he fears Mira receiving the terrible news of her husband's (Hancock had been wounded in the battle, but survived) condition.



* CreatorCameo: UsefulNotes/TedTurner appears as a Confederate colonel named Patton (distant relative of [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII THAT Patton]]).
** DeathByCameo: ... who died during Pickett's Charge.

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* CreatorCameo: UsefulNotes/TedTurner appears as a Confederate colonel named Patton (distant relative of [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII THAT Patton]]).
** DeathByCameo: ...
Patton]]) ... [[DeathByCameo who died during Pickett's Charge.Charge]].



* CulturedWarrior: Several of the officers are portrayed as learned men, probably Col. Chamberlain most prominently (a professor of rhetoric). Others include Pettigrew (scholar of the University of North Carolina) and Col. Vincent (from Harvard).

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* CulturedWarrior: Several of the officers are portrayed as learned men, probably most prominently Col. Chamberlain most prominently (a professor (professor of rhetoric). rhetoric at Bowdoin College). Others include Gen. Pettigrew (scholar of the University of North Carolina) and Col. Vincent (from Harvard).



* DarkAndTroubledPast: Longstreet, who became somber after scarlet fever swept through his family in 1862, killing several of his children[[note]]the novel says it killed his wife and children, but in fact at least one of his children survived and his wife lived until 1889.[[/note]]
* DemotedToExtra: While Robert Lee gets plenty of dialog and screen time, General George Meade, the overall commander of Union forces in the battle, is limited to just one short scene in the whole film.

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* DarkAndTroubledPast: Longstreet, who became somber after scarlet fever swept through his family in 1862, killing several of his children[[note]]the children[[note]]The novel says it killed his wife and children, but in fact at least one of his children survived and his wife lived until 1889.[[/note]]
* DemotedToExtra: While Robert Lee gets plenty of dialog and screen time, General George Meade, the overall commander of Union forces in the battle, is limited to just one short scene in the whole film.
[[/note]]



* DeathByAdaptation: In the wake of Pickett's charge, General Lee comes across a wounded General Kemper, who reports that the doctors have just informed him that his wound is mortal. The WhereAreTheyNowEpilogue makes no mention of Kemper, leaving the viewer to assume that he died at Gettysburg; in fact, Kemper survived the battle and the war (though the wound would continue to affect him until he died thirty years later).[[note]]According to the historical record, the exchange between Lee and Kemper is TruthInTelevision; Kemper did believe (with good reason) that he'd been mortally wounded in the battle.[[/note]]
* DeathSeeker: Longstreet temporarily becomes one after watching Pickett's Charge fail. He recklessly races to the front, determined to meet the expected Union counterattack in person while artillery falls all around him. He snaps out of it when one of his aides is thrown off his horse by Union guns and tells him, "There's no use trying to get yourself killed, General. The Lord will come for you in his own good time."
** General Garnet is this, as he feels obliged to clean the stain on his honor [[AllThereInTheManual caused by condemnation he received by Stonewall Jackson before the latter's death]] by taking part in Pickett's Charge on horseback.
* DemotedToExtra: General George Meade, the Union commander, puts in only a brief appearance in both book and film.
** Of course this is essentially TruthInTelevision because Meade didn't arrive at the battle until the night of the first day.
** While the movie does seem to make it the case that Meade simply isn't there, in reality, he was present on the field for the entire second day of battle and actually far more active in moving around near the front-lines of battle than Lee, who spent the day sitting outside A.P. Hill's headquarters.
* {{Determinator}}: Shortly before the battle, Chamberlin is told he cannot give up his position on Little Round top under any circumstances. Chamberlin follows these orders to the letter, even when his officers suggest their situation is looking insurmountable.
* DramaticIrony: The 20th Maine is being moved to the center of the Union line after its beating on Little Round Top because the Union thinks that it's the safest place on the line. In the last scene, Lee and Longstreet were planning an all out assault on that very spot. This actually represents the biggest difference from the real battle, as the 20th Maine was stationed on Big Round Top at the time and did not participate in repelling Picket at all. This may have been an unintentional error on the part of the writers, as Colonel Chamberlain and his brother ''were'' at that spot during Pickets Charge, doing exactly what they are seen doing in the film, requesting more ammunition for the 20th Maine.

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* DeathByAdaptation: In the wake of Pickett's charge, General Lee comes across a wounded General Kemper, who reports that the doctors have just informed him that diagnosed his wound is as mortal. The [[TruthInTelevision This actually happened]], but the WhereAreTheyNowEpilogue makes no mention of Kemper, leaving the viewer to assume that he died at Gettysburg; Gettysburg when in fact, Kemper fact he survived the battle and the war (though the wound would continue to affect him until he died thirty years later).[[note]]According to the historical record, the exchange between Lee war and Kemper is TruthInTelevision; Kemper did believe (with had merely ''believed'' ([[NoOneShouldSurviveThat with good reason) reason]]) that he'd been mortally wounded in the battle.[[/note]]
wounded. His wound continued to trouble him until his death thirty years later.
* DeathSeeker: DeathSeeker:
**
Longstreet temporarily becomes one after watching Pickett's Charge fail. He recklessly races to the front, determined to meet the expected Union counterattack in person while artillery falls all around him. He snaps out of it when one of his aides is thrown off his horse by Union guns and tells him, "There's no use trying to get yourself killed, General. The Lord will come for you in his own good time."
** General Garnet Garnett is this, as he feels obliged to clean cleanse the stain on his honor [[AllThereInTheManual caused by condemnation he received by Stonewall Jackson before the latter's death]] by taking part in Pickett's Charge on horseback.
* DemotedToExtra: Inevitably given the size and complexity of the battle, even with over ''four hours'' of screen-time.
** While Robert Lee gets plenty of dialog and screentime, his counterpart
General George Meade, the Union commander, puts in overall commander of the Army of the Potomac, gets only a single scene so brief appearance that it serves only to save him from being TheGhost entirely. In reality, after his arrival late on the first night, Meade was far more active in both book surveying his lines and film.coordinating his forces on the second and third days than Lee, who spent most of his time sitting outside A.P. Hill's headquarters waiting for his commanders to carry out their orders.
** Lee's other two corps commanders A.P. Hill and Richard S. Ewell exist almost exclusively to be criticized for their failings on July 1 with little-to-no mention of their nearly successful attacks on July 2.

** Of course this is essentially TruthInTelevision because Meade didn't arrive at the battle until the night Union III Corps commander Dan Sickles, one of the first day.
** While the movie does seem to make it the case that Meade simply isn't there, in reality, he was present
most influential ([[LeeroyJenkins and]] [[RightForTheWrongReasons controversial]]) Union commanders on the field for gets demoted right out of the entire second day of battle film entirely even though it was primarily his men who resisted Longstreet's attack on Day 2 and actually far more active his actions that resulted in moving around near Chamberlain's position on Little Round Top.
** Gouverneur Warren,
the front-lines of battle than Lee, staff officer who spent first noted the day sitting outside A.P. Hill's headquarters.
tactical importance of Little Round Top and ordered it occupied by Union forces is reduced to a single-shot HistoricalInJoke of an extra recreating the pose of his statue on Little Round Top.
* {{Determinator}}: Shortly before the battle, Chamberlin Chamberlain is told he cannot give up his position on Little Round top under any circumstances. Chamberlin Chamberlain follows these orders to the letter, even when his officers suggest their situation is looking insurmountable.
* DramaticIrony: DramaticIrony:
** Before the battle, Buford is convinced that if the Union doesn't hold the high ground, Meade will be pressured into an attack and the Union troops will "charge valiantly and be butchered valiantly," and the story will be extolled as an example of WarIsGlorious by self-important blowhards after the fact, which is a pretty good description of how Pickett's Charge played out and how the "Lost Cause" movement treated it afterward.
**
The 20th Maine is being moved to the center of the Union line after its beating on Little Round Top because the Union thinks that it's the safest place on the line. In the last previous scene, Lee and Longstreet were planning an all out assault on that very spot. This actually represents the biggest [[ArtisticLicenseHistory difference from the real battle, battle]], as the 20th Maine was stationed on Big Round Top at the time and did not participate in repelling Picket at all. This may have been an unintentional error on the part of the writers, as Colonel Chamberlain and his brother ''were'' at that spot during Pickets Pickett's Charge, doing exactly what they are seen doing in the film, requesting more ammunition for the 20th Maine.Maine.
* DwindlingParty: Before the battle even begins, Col. Chamberlain notes that the 20th Maine's strength has dropped from 1,000 to less than 300 in its first year of service. Then they go into battle at Gettysburg...



--->'''Sgt. Owens:''' Colonel Vincent is badly wounded, (nods) yes sir, got hit a few minutes after the fight started. We've been reinforced at the top of the hill by Weed's brigade up front, this is what they tell me, but Weed is dead. And so they moved Hazlet's battery of artillery up there, but Hazlet's dead....

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--->'''Sgt. Owens:''' Colonel Vincent is badly wounded, (nods) wounded; yes sir, got hit a few minutes after the fight started. We've been reinforced at the top of the hill by Weed's brigade up front, this is what they tell me, but Weed is dead. And so they moved Hazlet's battery of artillery up there, but Hazlet's dead....dead...



* EpicMovie: Four hours long, plenty of familiar faces, lots of action, epic score by Randy Edelman, it's got the components.

to:

* EpicMovie: Four hours long, plenty of familiar faces, lots of action, epic score by Randy Edelman, Edelman; it's got all the components.



* AFatherToHisMen: General Robert E. Lee.
** Colonel Chamberlain.
** Though not as obvious, Longstreet and Hancock also qualify, both in-movie and historically.
* ForegoneConclusion: It does not end well for the Confederates, as Gen. Longstreet predicted beforehand as he describes the withering firepower the soldiers of Pickett's Charge would face.
* {{Foreshadowing}}: It's passed off as a joke, but Chamblerlain tries to reassure his men while they march into position on Little Round Top that the rebel artillery coming their way won't hit them because they "always overshoot." The next day, the massive artillery barrage Lee orders to weaken the Union line prior to Pickett's Charge is shown to have nearly zero effect because most of the cannons are overshooting.

to:

* AFatherToHisMen: General Robert E. Lee.
** Colonel Chamberlain.
** Though not as obvious, Longstreet
Lee, Joshua Chamberlain, James Longstreet, and Hancock also qualify, Winfield Hancock, both in-movie in-universe and historically.
historically.
* FightingIrish: Buster Kilrain, as well as a cameo of the famous Irish Brigade receiving absolution before battle.
* ForegoneConclusion: It does not end well for The film goes out of its way to portray Pickett's Charge (and to some degree the Confederates, war itself) as Gen. Longstreet predicted beforehand as he describes this, particularly with Longstreet's long, detailed description of the withering firepower and obstacles the soldiers of Pickett's Charge would will face.
* {{Foreshadowing}}: It's passed off as a joke, but Chamblerlain Chamberlain tries to reassure his men while they march into position on Little Round Top that the rebel artillery coming their way won't hit them because they "always overshoot." The next day, the massive artillery barrage Lee orders to weaken the Union line prior to Pickett's Charge is shown to have nearly zero effect because most of the cannons are overshooting.



* FreezeFrameBonus: ''So many'' little details, but one in particular: At the beginning of the film, Chamberlain's shoulder boards show the rank of lt. colonel (oak leaves). By the events on Little Round Top he's wearing the rank of a full colonel (eagles). It's a bit of ShownTheirWork, as well, as Chamberlain received his promotion to colonel in June of 1863.

to:

* FreezeFrameBonus: ''So many'' little details, but one in particular: At the beginning of the film, Chamberlain's shoulder boards show the rank of lt. colonel Lt. Colonel (oak leaves). By the events on Little Round Top he's wearing the rank of a full colonel Colonel (eagles). It's a bit of ShownTheirWork, as well, as Chamberlain received his promotion to colonel in June of 1863.



** Though it never comes up in the movie, Confederate Major General George Pickett would not tolerate any insults to President Abraham Lincoln in his presence. Pickett was admitted to West Point was thanks to Congressional Appointment by then-Congressman Lincoln, and Pickett never forgot his personal debt to Lincoln, even as he fought for the South.
* FrontlineGeneral:
** Lee warns General Longstreet against his habit of going too far forward, as he's already lost a number of his generals (particularly Stonewall) to this trope and he feels he cannot spare Longstreet.
** Both sides had several generals who were killed or wounded in action during this battle, most notably general John Reynolds of the Union and Lewis Armistead of the Confederacy.
* FunnyForeigner: Col. Fremantle. He's possibly not meant to be funny, but the filmmakers accentuated his Englishness by having him wear a bright red dress uniform (which the historical character certainly did not do) and, in one scene, walk around the Confederate camp drinking tea from a china cup and saucer. The real Fremantle was so impressed by Pickett's Charge he wrote a book predicting that the South would win the war. It was published a few months before the South surrendered.
** In the book it is even more pronounced with the description of the Austrian and Prussian officers accompanying Lee's headquarters on the morning of the second day of the battle. Captain Ross, "the fat Austrian with the Scottish name" (the real Fitzgerald Ross was born in Surrey and probably would have spoken to Fremantle in English, not French) is dressed in [[TruthInTelevision his hussar (light cavalry) uniform]], but also wears an incongruous [[BlingOfWar helmet (only heavy cavalry wore helmets),]] [[DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch which is described as a "shiny silver chamber-pot", i. e. is of a type not used in Austria]]. The Prussian officer, Scheibert, is dressed all in white (presumably a civilian get-up; Justus Scheibert was an engineer, his uniform would have been dark blue and black) and wears an "[[HighClassGlass inevitable glittering monocle]]" (monocles did not really come into fashion with Prussian officers until later that century).

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** Though it never comes up in the movie, Confederate Major General George Pickett would not tolerate any insults to President Abraham Lincoln in his presence. Pickett was admitted to West Point was thanks to Congressional Appointment congressional appointment by then-Congressman Lincoln, Lincoln and Pickett never forgot his personal debt to Lincoln, even as he fought for the South.
* FrontlineGeneral:
**
FrontlineGeneral: The norm on both sides from brigade commanders like Armistead, Kemper, Garnett, Buford, and Vincent, on up to division commanders like Pickett, Hood, and Trimble, and even sometimes to corps commanders like Longstreet, Reynolds, and Hancock. Lee specifically warns General Longstreet against his habit of going too far forward, as he's already lost a number of his generals (particularly Stonewall) Stonewall Jackson) to this trope and he feels he cannot spare Longstreet.
** Both sides had
Longstreet.[[note]]A bullet to the throat would in fact put Longstreet out of action for several generals who were killed or wounded in action during this battle, most notably general John Reynolds months almost a year later at the Battle of the Union and Lewis Armistead of the Confederacy.
Wilderness.[[/note]]
* FunnyForeigner: Col. Fremantle. He's possibly not Fremantle probably isn't meant to be funny, but the filmmakers accentuated his Englishness so much by having him wear a bright red dress uniform (which the historical character certainly did not do) and, in one scene, walk didn't do), stroll around the Confederate camp [[SpotOfTea daintily drinking tea from a china cup and saucer. The real Fremantle was so impressed by Pickett's Charge he wrote a book predicting saucer]], and generally have some of the only comic-relief in the entire film that the South would win the war. It was published a few months before the South surrendered.
it has this effect.
** In the book it is it's even more pronounced with the description of the Austrian and Prussian officers accompanying Lee's headquarters on the morning of the second day of the battle. Captain Ross, "the fat Austrian with the Scottish name" (the real Fitzgerald Ross was born in Surrey and probably would have spoken to Fremantle in English, not French) is dressed in [[TruthInTelevision his hussar (light cavalry) uniform]], but also wears an incongruous [[BlingOfWar helmet (only heavy cavalry wore helmets),]] [[DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch which is described as a "shiny silver chamber-pot", i. e. is of a type not used in Austria]]. The Prussian officer, Scheibert, is dressed all in white (presumably a civilian get-up; Justus Scheibert was an engineer, his uniform would have been dark blue and black) and wears an "[[HighClassGlass inevitable glittering monocle]]" (monocles did not really come into fashion with Prussian officers until later that century).



* HeartbrokenBadass: Longstreet. Freemantle takes note of how dour he always seems and has it explained to him that scarlet fever devastated Longstreet's family a year earlier. He latter knowingly ordered Pickett's division to make an attack he knew was suicidal.

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* HeartbrokenBadass: Longstreet. When Freemantle takes note of notes how dour he always seems and has it Longstreet often is, it's explained to him that scarlet fever [[OutlivingOnesOffspring devastated Longstreet's family a year earlier. He latter family]] the previous year. Later, Longstreet is further distressed by knowingly ordered ordering Pickett's division to make an attack he knew was suicidal. suicidal.



** Chamberlain, Buford and Hancock in the sense that they are brought to the forefront of the audience's attention. Though their actions were not really upgraded in any significant way.
** This movie and the book it was based on played a major role in rehabilitating General Longstreet's reputation among historians who frequently badmouthed him and used him as a scapegoat for the defeat, as he openly criticized Lee's tactics and became a Republican after the war. Robert E. Lee deeply trusted and relied upon Longstreet and the Confederates lost the battle (and subsequently the War) in large part because Lee ''didn't'' listen to him. It's true that his corps ''was'' slow to attack Little Round Top on the second day but if he had attacked earlier Sickles' Corps would have been in a stronger position (i.e. not at Devil's Den) and things could have been worse.
** Pickett, in general, receives the TragicHero treatment. He's certainly not a villain or incompetent (historically), but the fact that he was a mediocre commander is notably absent, and he's not really Tragic in any sense, other than the mere fact he led the charge.
* HistoricalVillainDowngrade: The film's tunnel focus on the battle neglects the fact that before and after the battle, the Confederate soldiers captured African-Americans (runaway slaves, ex-slaves and freedmen) [[http://www.history.com/news/7-things-you-should-know-about-the-battle-of-gettysburg and send them back to Virginia into slavery]].
* HistoricalInJoke: There's a brief shot of a general and his officers surveying the ground with binoculars on Little Round Top. Though given no lines, the actor is playing Gouverneur Warren, who is credited with spotting Hood's division and is memorialized with a statue in that exact pose, directly behind the actor.
** There's also a shot of a dead Confederate soldier at General Webbs feet being dragged off. While it's unknown if Webb actually stood there, the position of the dead rebel is well known to anyone who visits the park... the Confederate High Water Mark.
* HollywoodHistory: Both the film and the novel portray Stuart's joyride as a major impediment for Lee. In actuality, Southern cavalry was used mainly for raiding, not scouting. Individual horsemen, spies like Harrison, and overly-informative Northern newspapers were the primary sources of intelligence; while Lee did rebuke Stuart, it was not for leaving him blind in enemy country. An understandable mistake, however, as historians and Lost Cause advocates made Stuart's supposed culpability a part of popular history.
** Another obvious one has the 20th Maine relocate from Little Round Top to Cemetery Ridge in time for Pickett's Charge. Which never happened, though dramatically understandable as it gives the main Union protagonist (Chamberlain) a front-row seat to the movie's climax.
* HollywoodTactics: Pickett's Charge, in an unfortunate case of TruthInTelevision. In fairness, it was preceded by a Confederate artillery bombardment intended to break up the Union artillery units on the ridge... problem was, the Confederate artillery was of inferior quality, short on ammunition[[note]]Pickett's advance begins after he's told by Longstreet's artillery chief to "Hurry up, for God's sake, or the artillery can't help you!"[[/note]]. They also overshot the bulk of the Union forces, aiming for an area behind the ridge where they thought the union was staging, when in fact most their men were tight to the line on along the ridge.
** While ''today'' we would call this HollywoodTactics, the fact is that for this time period, this was the standard accepted tactical doctrine of ''both'' sides. Pickett's Charge was hardly the first, and not the last major mass frontal assault of the Civil War. It's not even the worst in terms of casualties. It's just the most famous.
** Meade was also ''expecting'' Lee to assault the middle of his line, and had ordered his forces there to hunker down and ride out the artillery barrage to await Pickett's men.
* HonorBeforeReason: The South in general. Discussed more thoroughly in the book when Longstreet privately thinks that "honor without intelligence" could lose the war for the Confederacy, but the movie contains some of it, such as the line "We should have freed the slaves, ''then'' fired on Fort Sumpter." Fremantle views it in a more positive light and sees it as something the South and Britain have in common.
** General Stuart shows this trait when he gets so upset by Lee's rebuke that he lays down his hat and sword and says "Since my services are no longer-", clearly implying his resignation, but gets cut off by General Lee telling him they need him to make up for his mistake and fight rather than quit.

to:

** Buford, Chamberlain, Buford and Hancock in the sense that that, though their actions aren't really upgraded in any significant way, they are ''are'' brought to the forefront of the audience's attention. Though attention in a manner that plays up their importance to the detriment of dozens of equally heroic and important actions were not really upgraded in any significant way.
elsewhere on the field.[[note]]Col. David Ireland and the 137th New York deserve special mention for doing on Culp's Hill ''precisely'' what Chamberlain and the 20th Maine did on Little Round Top.[[/note]]
** This movie film and the book it was based on it's source material played a major role in rehabilitating General James Longstreet's reputation among historians who frequently in both professional and popular history, which before had mostly followed the ex-Confederate narrative that badmouthed him and used him Longstreet as a scapegoat for the defeat, as defeat at Gettysburg (and therefore the entire ''war'') because he openly criticized Lee's tactics and became a Republican and publicly criticized Lee after the war. Robert E. However, Shaara's narrative takes the opposite extreme of portraying him as the blameless OnlySaneMan, effectively arguing that Lee deeply trusted and relied upon Longstreet and the Confederates lost the battle (and subsequently therefore the War) in large part war) because Lee he ''didn't'' listen to him. It's true that Longstreet, downplaying Longstreet's own command flaws, particularly his corps ''was'' slow to attack Little Round Top somewhat desultory performance on 2 July (which might've affected the second day but if he overall result[[note]]On one hand, had Longstreet attacked earlier sooner Sickles' Corps would would've been better integrated with the rest of the Union line, which could've made things worse for the Confederates; on the other hand, had Sickle been where he was supposed to be, Union reinforcements might not have been in a stronger position (i.e. not at so prompt and Longstreet's units wouldn't have had to fight for Devil's Den) Den, the Peach Orchard, the Wheat Field, and things could have been worse.
Little Round Top.[[/note]]), and especially by painting him as fundamentally against bloody frontal assaults (which his brilliant successes at Gaines's Mill, Second Bull Run, Chickamauga, and his self-determined EpicFail at [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Sanders Fort Sanders]] all contradict).
** Pickett, in general, Pickett generally receives the TragicHero treatment. He's certainly not a villain or incompetent (historically), but treatment, noticeably downplaying the fact that historically he was at best a mediocre commander is notably absent, and he's not wasn't really Tragic tragic in any sense, other than sense beyond the mere bare fact he led of leading one third of the charge.
* HistoricalVillainDowngrade: The film's tunnel focus on the battle neglects the fact that before and after the battle, the Confederate soldiers Confederates captured African-Americans (runaway slaves, ex-slaves ex-slaves, and freedmen) [[http://www.history.com/news/7-things-you-should-know-about-the-battle-of-gettysburg and send sent them back to Virginia into slavery]].
as slaves]].
* HistoricalInJoke: HistoricalInJoke:
**
There's a brief shot of a general and his officers surveying the ground with binoculars on Little Round Top. Though Although [[DemotedToExtra given no lines, lines]], the actor is playing Gouverneur Warren, who is the staff officer credited with spotting Hood's division and ordering the Union occupation of Little Round Top, who is memorialized with [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gouverneur_K._Warren#/media/File:Gouverneur_K._Warren_Gettysburg_statue.jpg a statue in that exact pose, pose]], directly behind the actor.
** There's also a shot of a dead Confederate soldier at General Webbs Webb's feet being dragged off. While it's unknown if Webb actually stood there, the position of the dead rebel is well known to anyone who visits the park... the Confederate High Water Mark.
* HollywoodHistory: Both the film and the novel portray Stuart's joyride as a major impediment for Lee. In actuality, Southern cavalry was used mainly for raiding, not scouting. Individual horsemen, spies like Harrison, and overly-informative Northern newspapers were the primary sources of intelligence; while Lee did rebuke Stuart, it was not for leaving him blind in enemy country. An understandable mistake, however, as historians and Lost Cause advocates made Stuart's supposed culpability a part of popular history.
** Another obvious one has the 20th Maine relocate from Little Round Top to Cemetery Ridge in time for Pickett's Charge. Which never happened, though dramatically understandable as it gives the main Union protagonist (Chamberlain) a front-row seat to the movie's climax.
* HollywoodTactics: Pickett's Charge, in an unfortunate case of TruthInTelevision. In fairness, it was preceded by a Confederate artillery bombardment intended to break up the Union artillery units on the ridge... problem was, the Confederate artillery was of inferior quality, short on ammunition[[note]]Pickett's advance begins after he's told by Longstreet's artillery chief to "Hurry up, for God's sake, or the artillery can't help you!"[[/note]]. They also overshot the bulk of the Union forces, aiming for an area behind the ridge where they thought the union was staging, when in fact most their men were tight to the line on along the ridge.
**
While ''today'' we would call frontal assaults like Pickett's Charge ludicrous, and the film goes out of it's way to put this HollywoodTactics, sentiment into several characters' mouths, the fact is that for in this time period, this was the standard accepted era massive frontal assaults were an entirely acceptable tactical doctrine of used by even the most cautious commanders on ''both'' sides. sides, and remained so really until the invention of reliable wireless communication. Pickett's Charge was hardly far from the first, and not first or the last major mass frontal such assault of the Civil War. It's war, and not even the worst in terms of casualties. It's largest or bloodiest, just the most famous.
** Meade was also ''expecting''
famous (ironically because it ''almost'' worked). Moreover, Lee to assault the middle of and his line, men had seen such attacks work at Gaines's Mill, Second Bull Run, and had ordered his forces there to hunker down Chancellorsville, and ride out the artillery barrage to await Pickett's men.
Charge actually had fairly good odds of success had the Confederate artillery not overshot the bulk of the Union forces hunkered down tight to the line on the ridge, making it far more of a ForWantOfANail than a ForegoneConclusion.
* HonorBeforeReason: The South in general. Discussed more thoroughly in the book when Longstreet privately thinks that "honor without intelligence" could lose the war for the Confederacy, but the movie contains some of it, such as the line line, "We should have freed the slaves, ''then'' fired on Fort Sumpter.Sumter." Fremantle views it in a more positive light and sees it as something the South and Britain have in common.
** General Stuart shows this trait when he gets so upset by Lee's rebuke that he lays down his hat and sword and says "Since my services are no longer-", longer--", clearly implying his resignation, but gets cut off by General Lee telling him they need him to make up for his mistake and fight rather than quit.



** Lee insists on fighting the three-day battle despite the fact that the only reason they needed to take Gettysburg at all was for the shoe factories, which they took the first day, because military convention of the day was that the army that commanded the battlefield when the fighting was over was the winner. Thus to avoid the appearance of defeat by surrendering control of a town he had no use for so he could fight and win another battle on terms of his choosing later on, he stayed and ended up suffering a real defeat.

to:

** Lee insists on fighting the three-day battle despite the fact that the only reason they needed to take Gettysburg at all was for the shoe factories, which they took the first day, because military convention of the day was that the army that commanded the battlefield when the fighting was over was the winner. Thus to avoid the appearance of defeat by surrendering control of a town he had no use for so he could fight and win another battle on terms of his choosing later on, he stayed and ended up suffering a real defeat.defeat.
* HoldTheLine: The main Union tactic on all three days.



* {{Intermission}}: At least when it was shown in a theater. But then, it was planned as a four hour, two day TV Mini Series before they decided to show it in theaters.

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* {{Intermission}}: At least when it was shown in a theater. But then, it was planned as a four hour, two day four-hour, two-day TV Mini Series mini-series before they decided to show it in theaters.



** Early in the movie Buford rages quietly to his subordinate that Meade will move too slow to take the hills, requiring a desperate charge across open ground in an attempt to dislodge the rebels. He goes on that he [[TheCassandra can see it]] "clear as day" that it would surely fail and with high casualties and there would be nothing he could do about it except "help it fail". This happens exactly as he predicts. Except it happens to the ''Confederates'' as a direct result of Buford acting quickly to change the starting conditions and prevent it. Also, General Meade moved his troops faster than anyone expected, which was why Lee was surprised to find the Army of the Potomac so close.
** Actor Richard Jordan plays Confederate General Lewis Armistead, who is mortally wounded during Pickett's charge and dies shortly after the battle. Jordan was suffering the from cancer at the time, and he died shortly after filming for the movie was completed.
*** Even more poignantly, the producers learned of Jordan's death ''while editing that very scene''.
* ItsAllMyFault: Lee says this repeatedly after the failure of Pickett's Charge.

to:

** Early in the movie Buford rages quietly to his subordinate that Meade will move too slow to take the hills, requiring necessitating a desperate charge across open ground in an attempt to dislodge the rebels. He goes on that he [[TheCassandra can see it]] "clear as day" that it would surely fail and with high casualties and there would be nothing he could do about it except "help it fail". This happens exactly as he predicts. Except it happens to the ''Confederates'' as a direct result of Buford acting quickly to change the starting conditions and prevent it. Also, General Meade moved his troops faster than anyone expected, which was why Lee was surprised to find the Army of the Potomac so close.
** Actor Richard Jordan plays Confederate General Lewis Armistead, who is mortally wounded during Pickett's charge and dies shortly after the battle. Jordan was suffering the from cancer at the time, and he died shortly after filming for the movie was completed.
***
completed. Even more poignantly, the producers learned of Jordan's death ''while editing that very scene''.
* ItsAllMyFault: Lee says this repeatedly after the failure of Pickett's Charge.Charge, which [[TruthInTelevision really happened]]. Some of the men hotly dispute this and offer to reform and try again.



-->'''Kilrain''': "Colonel, I've never served under a finer man. The Army was blessed. Blessed! I wanted to tell you (pauses and nods at his wounded arm), you know, in case."

to:

-->'''Kilrain''': "Colonel, I've never served under a finer man. The Army was blessed. Blessed! I wanted to tell you (pauses ''(pauses and nods at his wounded arm), arm)'', you know, in case."



* LargeHam: Pickett. Rightly so, as he was well-known for being a flamboyant and having an eccentric personality.
* LastNameBasis: Lawrence tells his brother to address him formally. Generals, on the other hand, tend to do whatever they want.
* LosingTheTeamSpirit: SubvertedTrope - despite being historically known as the battle the Confederacy couldn't recover from, and Lee profusely blames himself and apologizes to his troops around him for the failure of Pickett's Charge immediately after it, his men deny his words and one even ask for them to regroup and attack again. Of course, the war would last at nearly two years after the battle.

to:

* LargeHam: Pickett. Rightly so, as he was well-known for being a flamboyant Pickett has an energetic and having an eccentric personality.
personality, and is a very animated and entertaining storyteller.
* LastNameBasis: Lawrence Chamberlain tells his brother to address him formally. Generals, on the other hand, tend to do whatever they want.
* LosingTheTeamSpirit: SubvertedTrope - despite {{Subverted}}. Despite being historically known popularly (mis)remembered as the turning point of the war and the battle the Confederacy couldn't recover from, and when Lee profusely [[ItsAllMyFault blames himself and apologizes to his troops around him himself]] for the failure of Pickett's Charge immediately after it, his men vehemently deny his words and one even ask for them to regroup [[TheDeterminator reform and attack again. Of course, try again]]. The closing title card even states, "The spirit of the Southern army was far from broken, and the war would last at nearly rage on for two years after the battle.more devastating years."



** Armistead while telling Longstreet about his last meeting with Hancock before riding to war.

to:

** Armistead while when telling Longstreet about his last meeting with Hancock before riding to war.the war and upon learning that Hancock has also been wounded.



** Armistead's fate.

to:

** Armistead's fate.Longstreet is so certain that Pickett's Charge will fail that he is too choked up to order the assault. When Pickett asks him if he should begin the attack, the best the heartbroken Longstreet can manage is a nod. Made worse by how eager and elated Pickett is to carry out the order.[[note]]This is actually how Longstreet issued the order in reality, according to his memoirs (which the novel The Killer Angels drew heavily from).[[/note]]



* MyMasterRightOrWrong: Longstreet shows some of this when Hood asks to outflank the Round Top positions. Lee had already turned down Longstreet's request to perform a strategic movement of the army in that direction and told Longstreet to send Hood right into the right side of the Union line. So Longstreet feels he must order Hood to follow Lee's orders exactly, rather than giving Hood some leeway to interpret them creatively with a tactical outflanking of the position.

to:

* MyMasterRightOrWrong: Longstreet shows some of this when Hood asks to outflank the Round Top positions. Lee had already turned down Longstreet's request to perform a strategic movement of the army in that direction and told Longstreet to send Hood right into the right side of the Union line. So Longstreet feels insists he must order Hood to follow Lee's orders exactly, rather than giving Hood some leeway to interpret them creatively with a tactical outflanking of the position.position. Ironically, this means Longstreet won't let Hood do tactically precisely what he's upset at Lee for not allowing him to do strategically, thereby refusing to allow Hood to find the ''actual'' right flank (out where Chamberlain is) and instead forcing him into a costly frontal assault on Devil's Den.



* NonUniformUniform: Reflecting TruthInTelevision, the Confederates' troops largely lack consistent uniforms unlike their blue-dressed Union adversaries and instead wear a great variety of simple clothes and hats - its pretty much only the officers who are probably wearing a grey uniform among them. [[hottip:*:The reason for this was a lack of centralized logistics for all units, so clothes were being supplied by individual states that were frequently incapable of the textile industries to produce uniforms for troops in addition to Union blockades preventing them by buying them elsewhere quickly.]]
* NotSoDifferent: Armistead and Hancock, most prominently, but this is a major theme of the entire movie.

to:

* NonUniformUniform: Reflecting TruthInTelevision, the Confederates' Confederate troops largely lack consistent uniforms unlike like their blue-dressed blue-clad Union adversaries and instead wear a great variety of simple clothes and hats - hats; its pretty much only basically just the officers who are probably wearing get a grey uniform among them. [[hottip:*:The uniform.[[note]]The reason for this was a lack of centralized logistics for all units, so clothes were being supplied by individual states that were frequently incapable of often lacked the textile industries needed to produce mass-produce uniforms for and the Union blockade prevented them from acquiring them from anywhere else efficiently.[[/note]] Meanwhile, even the Federal troops have noticeable variety and customization, particularly in addition to Union blockades preventing them by buying them elsewhere quickly.]]
headgear, even within individual units.
* NotSoDifferent: Armistead and Hancock, most prominently, but this is a A major theme of the entire movie.movie.
** Armistead and Hancock are by far the most prominent example.
** Freemantle sees great similarity between England and the honor-bound, aristocratic South.



-->"[[SuddenlyShouting I HAVE TOLD YOU THERE IS NO TIME FOR THAT; THERE IS NO TIME!]]"

to:

-->"[[SuddenlyShouting I HAVE TOLD YOU THERE IS NO TIME FOR THAT; THERE IS NO TIME!]]"have told you there is no time for that; there is no time!]]"



* PoorCommunicationKills: Quite literally. J.E.B Stuart's adventure deprives Lee of vital information and cavalry support. Though this is a subversion of real life, where Stuart's absence was of lesser importance than the film makes it seem.
* PowerTrio: Pickett's brigade commanders; Armistead is the ego, Kemper is id, and Garnett superego. Could also be said for the leaders the divisions in Picket's Charge as a whole (Pickett, Trimble, and Pettigrew).

to:

* PocketProtector: A bullet ricochets of Chamberlain's sword scabbard during the battle.
* PoorCommunicationKills: Quite literally. J.E.B Stuart's adventure deprives Lee of vital information and cavalry support. Though this support during his march north, for which he is [[DisappointedInYou calmly reprimanded]] by Lee when he finally arrives on Day 2.[[note]]This was later overplayed by ex-Confederate writers seeking scapegoats, since the first day was a subversion of real life, where serendipitous triumph for the Confederates and Stuart's absence was didn't really force Lee's hand on Day 2 or Day 3, but Stuart's absence with the cream of lesser importance his cavalry ''did'' leave Lee's army with less-than-optimal reconnaissance that resulted in Heth's infantry lumbering into Buford's cavalry at Gettysburg rather than allowing Lee to concentrate his forces before engaging the film makes it seem.
Federals.[[/note]]
* PowerTrio: Pickett's brigade commanders; Armistead is the ego, Kemper is the id, and Garnett the superego. Could also be said for the leaders the divisions in Picket's Charge as a whole (Pickett, Trimble, and Pettigrew).



* RagtagBunchOfMisfits: Pretty much everyone, but especially most of the Southerners, as their supplies/equipment were much more haphazard than the North (i.e. much more "Ragtag" than the North, but both with a whole bunch of Misfits).

to:

* RagtagBunchOfMisfits: Pretty much everyone, but especially most of the Southerners, as their supplies/equipment were much more haphazard than the North (i.e. much more "Ragtag" "ragtag" than the North, but both with a whole bunch of Misfits).



** The start of Pickett's Charge across an open field: all those troops marching in order, banners unfurled. In RealLife, a Union general declared it was the most beautiful thing he ever saw.

to:

** The start of Pickett's Charge across an open field: all those troops marching in order, banners unfurled. In RealLife, a Union general declared that initially it was [[WarIsGlorious the most beautiful thing he ever saw.saw]].



* SedgwickSpeech: Reynolds has an abridged form. Ironically, the actual General Sedgwick was sort of involved in the battle, though he is not portrayed in the film. Sedgwick's VI Corps was held in reserve.
-->'''Reynolds:''' "Forward Iron Brigade!.... Clear those guns out of that wood!.... Forward! For God's sake, FORWARD!" -bang-
** Hancock suffers a non-fatal (he is seriously wounded, but survives) version of this during Pickett's Charge.

to:

* SedgwickSpeech: SedgwickSpeech:
**
Reynolds has an abridged form. Ironically, the actual General Sedgwick was sort of involved in the battle, though he is not portrayed in the film. Sedgwick's film, mostly because his VI Corps arrived last and was held in reserve.
-->'''Reynolds:''' "Forward Iron Brigade!.... Clear those guns out of that wood!.... Forward! For God's sake, FORWARD!" forward!" -bang-
** Hancock suffers a serious but non-fatal (he is seriously wounded, but survives) version of this during Pickett's Charge.



* SelfDestructiveCharge: AKA Pickett's Charge, and Longstreet ''completely called it'' well in advance.

to:

* SelfDestructiveCharge: AKA SelfDestructiveCharge:
**
Pickett's Charge, and Longstreet ''completely called it'' well in advance.



* SingleIssueWonk: Some of the Rebels view the common Northern focus on slavery as a reason for the war this way. Many of them say they honestly don't care about it either way, and see themselves as fighting for their "rahts". Longstreet muses that they would have won their independence already if they had freed the slaves before firing on Fort Sumter, taking it away as a motivation for the other side and keeping in Britain and France's good graces. This in any case was never a realistic option because as far as the leaders were concerned, [[https://www.bluffton.edu/~bergerd/essays/trclark.htm slavery really was the essential cause]] for the South. [[note]]As one legislator who opposed freeing slaves to fight for the Confederates in 1864 noted, "If slaves will make good soldiers our whole theory of slavery is wrong", prompting Jefferson Davis to say that the Confederacy's tombstone should read: "Died of a theory."[[/note]]

to:

* SingleIssueWonk: Some of the Rebels Confederates express this view of the common Northern focus on slavery as a reason for the war this way. Many of them say war, saying they honestly don't care about it either way, way and see themselves as fighting for their "rahts". "[[FunetikAksent rahts]]". Longstreet even muses that they would they'd have won their independence already if they had they'd freed the slaves before ''before'' firing on Fort Sumter, taking it away removing emancipation as a motivation motive for the other side and keeping in Britain and France's good graces. This graces.
** Of course, this is largely ArtisticLicenseHistory because millions
in any case the North vehemently ''opposed'' emancipation and supported the war ''only'' as an effort to force the South to stay in the Union (not the other way around), and because freeing all the slaves was never a realistic option because for the South since as far as the its leaders were concerned, concerned [[https://www.bluffton.edu/~bergerd/essays/trclark.htm slavery really was the essential cause]] for and even the South. [[note]]As one legislator who opposed freeing slaves poorest white men (while they often expressed it differently) were interested in maintaining their racial dominance, hence why they struggled so hard to fight for end Reconstruction and institute segregation after the Confederates in 1864 noted, "If slaves will make good soldiers our whole theory of slavery is wrong", prompting Jefferson Davis to say that war. Even Robert E. Lee called the Confederacy's tombstone should read: "Died of Emancipation Proclamation a theory."[[/note]]"savage and brutal policy which leaves us no alternative but success or [[FateWorseThanDeath degradation worse than death]]."



* TakeAThirdOption: "We can't run away. If we stay here, we can't shoot." Given the choice between holding and retreating, Chamberlain decides to charge (with bayonets).
* TemptingFate: At the beginning of Pickett's Charge one of Hancock's aides asks him to get off his horse (so he'll be a less obvious target), to which he replies "There are times when a Corps commander's life does not count." Later during the battle, still riding his horse, he is shot and badly wounded (though he survives).
* TearJerker: In-universe example. Longstreet is so certain that Pickett's Charge will fail that he is too choked up to order the assault. When Pickett asks him if he should begin the attack, the best the heartbroken Longstreet can manage is a nod. Made worse by how eager and elated Pickett is to carry out the order.[[note]]This is actually how Longstreet issued the order in reality, according to his memoirs(which the novel The Killer Angels took heavily from).[[/note]]
** Armistead's reaction to learning that Hancock has also been wounded.
*** ''Everything about'' Armistead and Hancock. Throughout the whole movie, most of their conversations are about each other, and both are brought to tears more than once reflecting on it.
* TheyCallMeMisterTibbs: Col. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain is annoyed with his brother for calling him "Lawrence" in front of the troops, as he thinks it will lead to accusations of favoritism. There's also this exchange when a {{Jerkass}} lower-ranking officer from another regiment fails to properly address him:

to:

* TakeAThirdOption: Have exhausted their ammunition, Chamberlain realizes, "We can't run away. If we stay here, we can't shoot." Given the choice between holding and retreating, Chamberlain decides to charge (with bayonets).
[[RefugeInAudacity charge]] ([[BayonetYa with bayonets]]).
* TemptingFate: At the beginning of Pickett's Charge one of Hancock's aides asks him to get off his horse (so he'll be a less obvious target), to which he replies "There are times when a Corps commander's life does not count." Later during the battle, still riding his horse, he is shot and badly wounded (though he (but survives).
* TearJerker: In-universe example. Longstreet is so certain that Pickett's Charge will fail that he is too choked up to order the assault. When Pickett asks him if he should begin the attack, the best the heartbroken Longstreet can manage is a nod. Made worse by how eager and elated Pickett is to carry out the order.[[note]]This is actually how Longstreet issued the order in reality, according to his memoirs(which the novel The Killer Angels took heavily from).[[/note]]
** Armistead's reaction to learning that Hancock has also been wounded.
*** ''Everything about'' Armistead and Hancock. Throughout the whole movie, most of their conversations are about each other, and both are brought to tears more than once reflecting on it.
* TheyCallMeMisterTibbs: Col. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain is annoyed with his brother for calling him "Lawrence" in front of the troops, as he thinks it will lead to [[BeingPersonalIsntProfessional accusations of favoritism. favoritism]]. There's also this exchange when a {{Jerkass}} lower-ranking officer captain from another regiment fails to properly address him:



--> '''Col. Chamberlain''': (DeathGlare) ''Colonel'' Chamberlain to you.

to:

--> '''Col. Chamberlain''': (DeathGlare) ''(DeathGlare)'' ''Colonel'' Chamberlain to you.



* TragicHero: Armistead above all others: driven by his own honor to fight against his best friend, haunted by the memories of Hancock and his beautiful wife Almyra, he still musters the courage to lead his Virginian troops into the Union lines, bravely holding his sword aloft with his hat on it as a standard... and is mortally wounded doing so. Making it ''worse'' for him is being told that his good friend Hancock was wounded during that charge...
* TruthInTelevision: Since it's mostly historically accurate, some lines are actual quotes.
* WarIsHell: Depicting a battle in which over 50,000 men were killed or wounded over three days. The 20th Maine started with 1,000 men and has been cut down to 250 (That was on day 1. Adding the men from the 2nd brings them back up to 360 for their fight on day 2, but casualties on Little Round Top drop the unit down to 120 by day 3) because the Union is just using them until there's no one left. Bodies carpet the battlefield and medical treatment is almost as dangerous as going into battle in the first place. Old friends who are like brothers are forced to fight each other, and Pickett's Charge is a hideous mistake that leaves six thousand men dead or wounded on the field.

to:

* TragicHero: Armistead above all others: driven by his own honor to fight against his best friend, haunted by the memories of Hancock and his beautiful wife Almyra, Almira, he still musters the courage to lead his Virginian troops into the Union lines, bravely holding his sword aloft with his hat on it as a standard... and is mortally wounded doing so. Making it ''worse'' for him is being told that his good friend Hancock was wounded during that charge...
* TruthInTelevision: Since it's mostly historically accurate, some lines are actual quotes.
quotes. However, some of it is DatedHistory or simply draws controversial conclusions about its characters and their decisions.
* UnspokenPlanGuarantee: Thoroughly {{inverted|trope}} since the primary characters are almost exclusively officers who go into great detail about what their plans are and how they think they will work.
* WarIsHell: Depicting a battle in which over 50,000 men were killed or wounded over three days. The 20th Maine started the war with 1,000 men and but has been cut down to 250 (That was on day 1. Adding by the men from time of the battle, plus the 2nd brings them back up to 360 for their fight on day Day 2, but casualties on Little Round Top drop the unit down to 120 by day Day 3) because the Union is just using them until there's no one left. Bodies carpet the battlefield and medical treatment is almost as dangerous as going into battle in the first place. Old friends who are like brothers are forced to fight each other, and Pickett's Charge is a hideous mistake that leaves six thousand men dead or wounded on the field.



--> '''Col. Chamberlain''': "We can't run away. If we stay here we can't shoot. So let's fix bayonets. (Everyone stares at him.) We'll have the advantage of moving down the hill."

to:

--> '''Col. Chamberlain''': "We can't run away. If we stay here we can't shoot. So let's fix bayonets. (Everyone ''(Everyone stares at him.) him)'' We'll have the advantage of moving down the hill."



--> '''Gen. Pickett''': General Lee.... I ''have'' no ''Division!''
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Confederate General James Kemper is wounded at Pickett's charge, but his ultimate fate is not mentioned in the ending. Furthermore, Kemper says the doctors have told him his wound is fatal, implying that he died at Gettysburg. In real life, Kemper survived his wounds and the war, going on to become governor of Virginia in 1874.
* WhereAreTheyNowEpilogue: A particularly nice example of the trope with the actors faces morphing into the actual historic figures.
** Which is a nice reverse of the opening credits, where photos of the historical figures morphed into the actors.
* WorldOfCardboardSpeech: Armistead, to Freemantle before Pickett's charge.

to:

--> '''Gen. Pickett''': General Lee.... I ''have'' no ''Division!''
''division!''
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: WhatHappenedToTheMouse:
**
Confederate General James Kemper is wounded at Pickett's charge, but his ultimate fate is not mentioned in the ending. Furthermore, Kemper says the doctors have told him his wound taken during Pickett's charge is fatal, but his ultimate fate is not mentioned in the ending, implying that he died at Gettysburg. In real life, Kemper survived his wounds and the war, going on to become governor of Virginia in 1874.
** Chamberlain's brigade commander Strong Vincent has a few exchanges with Chamberlain, stresses upon him that he HoldTheLine, and is later reported as badly wounded, but no more is said of him. In fact he died of his wounds on July 7th.
** John Bell Hood is last seen in the hospital in danger of losing his arm and bemoaning the terrible cost of his attack on Day 2. While the doctors would managed to save his crippled arm, he would go on to lose an entire leg at Chickamauga before rising to command the Army of Tennessee, which he would lead to the slaughter in massive frontal assaults at Franklin, sometimes called the "Pickett's Charge of the West."
* WhereAreTheyNowEpilogue: A particularly nice example of the trope with the actors faces morphing into the actual historic figures.
** Which is
figures, a nice reverse of the opening credits, credits where photos of the historical figures morphed into the actors.
actors.
* WorldOfCardboardSpeech: Armistead, Armistead gives one to Freemantle before Pickett's charge.



** The real Fremantle was so impressed by Pickett's Charge he wrote a book predicting that the South would win the war. It was published a few months before the South surrendered.



--> Armistead (about Hancock): "The Lord don't make 'em any better, and that's a fact!"[[note]]And by many historical metrics, Hancock genuinely ''was'' the finest General on the Union side to never receive an independent command - something he was denied because of politics[[/note]]

to:

--> Armistead (about Hancock): "The Lord don't make 'em any better, and that's a fact!"[[note]]And by many historical metrics, Hancock genuinely ''was'' the finest General on the Union side to general never to receive an independent command - something he was denied because due to a combination of politics[[/note]]politics and his wounding (there were plenty of Democratic generals, but Hancock's wound from Gettysburg nicked his urethra and kept his wounds infected for the rest of his life.[[/note]]
25th Oct '17 7:10:56 AM themisterfree
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A 1993 film about the pivotal battle of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, financed by Ted Turner, directed by Ronald F. Maxwell, and based on the PulitzerPrize-winning novel ''Literature/TheKillerAngels'' by Michael Shaara.

to:

A 1993 film about the pivotal battle of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, financed by Ted Turner, UsefulNotes/TedTurner, directed by Ronald F. Maxwell, and based on the PulitzerPrize-winning novel ''Literature/TheKillerAngels'' by Michael Shaara.



* CreatorCameo: Ted Turner appears as a Confederate colonel named Patton (distant relative of [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII THAT Patton]]).

to:

* CreatorCameo: Ted Turner UsefulNotes/TedTurner appears as a Confederate colonel named Patton (distant relative of [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII THAT Patton]]).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.Gettysburg