History Film / Frankenstein1931

25th Mar '18 9:02:05 AM TheSaddleman
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* AnachronismStew: Intended by James Whale, who fostered for this and ''Film/BrideOfFrankenstein'' a sort of AlternateUniverse which mixed deliberately and freely the aesthetics of the early 1800s (the time that Mary Shelley wrote the original novel) and the '30s. As a result, in this film you see electric lights, X-ray images, women attending medical school and modern dress mixed in with clearly 19th century aesthetics. (Whale's intent was somewhat contradicted by the studio that promoted the film as wholly taking place in the modern day, which is totally contradicted by a nearly-exclusive 19th century setting of the sequel.)

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* AnachronismStew: Intended by James Whale, who fostered for this and ''Film/BrideOfFrankenstein'' to be a sort of AlternateUniverse which mixed deliberately and freely the aesthetics of the early 1800s (the time that Mary Shelley wrote the original novel) and the '30s. As a result, in this film you see electric lights, X-ray images, women attending medical school and modern dress mixed in with clearly 19th century aesthetics. (Whale's intent was somewhat contradicted by the studio that promoted the film as wholly taking place in the modern day, which is and was totally contradicted by a the nearly-exclusive 19th century setting of the sequel.)



* ArtisticLicenseMedicine: Frankenstein and Fritz retrieve a dead body hanging from a gallows. Upon cutting it down, he discovers the neck is broken (suggesting he expected the condemned man to have strangled to death), rendering the brain useless. A broken neck would not necessarily damage a brain, and even if this were the case, Frankenstein has no issues sending Fritz to steal a brain that may have been resting in a jar of preservative solution for years, its cause of death unknown.



* BlasphemousBoast: Henry's "Now I know what it feels like to be God!", which drew so much ire in its time from Christians that it had to be cut.

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* BlasphemousBoast: Henry's "Now I know what it feels like to be God!", which drew so much ire in its time from Christians that it had to be cut.covered over with sound effects; the original version wasn't heard for decades.



* DeathOfAChild: Little Maria is thrown into the water by the Monster and drowns. Followed by a memorable scene of her father carrying the lifeless body of his daughter through the town. Originally, the studio demanded that the sequence of Maria being thrown in be cut, resulting in an even more disturbing implication as to what happened to her.

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* DeathOfAChild: Little Maria is thrown into the water by the Monster and drowns. Followed by a memorable scene of her father carrying the lifeless body of his daughter through the town. Originally, the studio demanded that the sequence of Maria being thrown in be cut, resulting in an even more disturbing implication as to what happened to her.her; all we see is the Monster smiling at her and reaching towards her. For decades audiences never saw the monster actually reacting in horror to her death after throwing her in the water.



* InstantSedation: An early example, where the (very large and very angry) Creature is brought down with a single (likewise very large) injection in the back. It takes a couple of seconds though.

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* InstantSedation: An early example, where the (very large and very angry) Creature is brought down with a single (likewise very large) injection in the back. It takes a couple of seconds though.though (and it doesn't last as long as expected).



* NoNameGiven: The Monster is never referred to by any actual name (some adaptations do assign a name to him). This didn't stop the general public from outright referring to the creature by the name Frankenstein, even though this is incorrect. A later Universal film, ''Film/AbbottAndCostelloMeetFrankenstein'', cemented this thanks to its title (no one else by the name Frankenstein appears in the film). And the 2004 film ''Film/VanHelsing'' (a very partial remake of this film) refers to the creature directly by this name.

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* NoNameGiven: The Monster is never referred to by any actual name (some adaptations do assign a name to him). This didn't stop the general public from outright referring to the creature by the name Frankenstein, even though this is incorrect. A later Universal film, ''Film/AbbottAndCostelloMeetFrankenstein'', cemented this thanks to its title (no one else by the name Frankenstein appears in the film). And the 2004 film ''Film/VanHelsing'' (a very partial remake of this film) refers to the creature directly by this name.name and the creature answers to it.
1st Feb '18 1:28:31 AM eroock
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* RepeatCut: When the monster enters Elizabeth's room through the window and she turns around to see him, her {{Gasp}} gesture is repeated.
21st Jan '18 5:52:39 PM maxwellsilver
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->'''Henry Frankenstein''': Look! It's moving. It's alive. It's alive... It's alive, it's moving, it's alive, it's alive, it's alive, ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xos2MnVxe-c&feature=related it's alive, IT'S ALIVE!]]''\\

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->'''Henry Frankenstein''': Look! It's moving. It's alive. It's alive... It's alive, it's moving, it's alive, it's alive, it's alive, ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xos2MnVxe-c&feature=related it's ''it's alive, IT'S ALIVE!]]''\\ALIVE!''\\
16th Jan '18 12:32:23 AM jormis29
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Along with Karloff, it stars Colin Clive as Dr. Henry Frankenstein, Mae Clarke as his fiancée Elizabeth, Creator/DwightFrye as Fritz and Edward Van Sloan as Dr. Waldman.

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Along with Karloff, it stars Colin Clive as Dr. Henry Frankenstein, Mae Clarke Creator/MaeClarke as his fiancée Elizabeth, Creator/DwightFrye as Fritz and Edward Van Sloan as Dr. Waldman.
30th Oct '17 10:08:40 AM ClintEastwood
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* FakeShemp: [[spoiler:The screenplay originally called for Henry Frankenstein to die from his fall from the burning mill. When Universal decided for a happy ending, Colin Clive was in England, so his stand-in was used for the far shot of him recuperating in his bed, with Elizabeth at his side]].
30th Oct '17 10:02:38 AM ClintEastwood
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* EvolvingCredits: Opening credits list all the actors ''[[NotNamedInOpeningCredits except]]'' the one playing the Creature, who is billed only with a question mark. Creator/BorisKarloff is only named in the closing credits.


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* StockSoundEffects: The "Castle Thunder" effect makes its first appearance here.
20th Oct '17 9:33:11 PM Josef5678
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* AdaptationalWimp: The creature goes from being intelligent enough to learn how to read and speak on his own, as well as [[spoiler:framing someone for murder]] in the book, to almost completely mindless brute. [[TropesAreTools Tropes Are Not Bad]] as this arguably makes him a much more sympathetic (not to mention believable) character.
20th Oct '17 5:09:47 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* AdaptationalHeroism: While Frankenstein wasn't evil by any means in the original book, he wasn't quite as friendly or responsible as his film's portrayal. He made the monster mainly for his own glory and threw it out into the cold just because is was ugly. And rather than telling his family and friends about the situation when it starts to get out of hand, he keeps quiet and tries to handle it on his own, which results in the death of each of his loved ones one by one as well as his own. In the movie, he does it more for the benefit of science and knows better than to judge his creation by his appearance alone. And when the monster starts attacking, he does tell his loved ones which is largely why not nearly as many people ending up dying in the film.



* AdaptationalHeroism: While Frankenstein wasn't evil by any means in the original book, he wasn't quite as friendly or responsible as his film's portrayal. He made the monster mainly for his own glory and threw it out into the cold just because is was ugly. And rather than telling his family and friends about the situation when it starts to get out of hand, he keeps quiet and tries to handle it on his own, which results in the death of each of his loved ones one by one as well as his own. In the movie, he does it more for the benefit of science and knows better than to judge his creation by his appearance alone. And when the monster starts attacking, he does tell his loved ones which is largely why not nearly as many people ending up dying in the film.
13th Oct '17 9:08:58 PM DaFlabbagasta
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[[quoteright:340:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/8157b678b9389d7202ee4c64bf0951d3.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:340: If only she had known better...]]

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[[quoteright:340:http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/8157b678b9389d7202ee4c64bf0951d3.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:340: If only she had known better...]]
org/pmwiki/pub/images/frankenstein_page_image.jpg]]
29th Sep '17 4:05:32 PM maxwellsilver
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** A case could be made that this trope extends to ''every'' named character in the film.
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