History Film / Departures

3rd Aug '15 9:50:48 AM TinyTedDanson
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-->-- '''Creator/RogerEbert''', quoting ''Gates of Heaven'' in his review of ''Departures''.

to:

-->-- '''Creator/RogerEbert''', quoting '''Creator/RogerEbert''' in his review.[[note]](quoting ''Gates of Heaven'' in his review of ''Departures''.
Heaven'')[[/note]]


Added DiffLines:

* AmbiguousEnding: Only two of the threads are fully tied up: [[spoiler:Daigo and Mika stay together despite his job, and Daigo finally has closure with his father. Secondary threads such as the receptionist commenting on the Boss getting too old for the job, or whether the bath house will still be shut down (or who would run it if it isn't), are just left hanging.]]


Added DiffLines:

* ChekhovsGun: [[spoiler:The coffins in NK Agent as, for his hard work, the Boss gives Daigo the expensive one for his own father.]]


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* HardWorkMontage: For the TimeSkip after [[spoiler:Mika moves out]], which shows Daigo performing multiple encoffinments inter-cut with shots of him [[LeftTheBackgroundMusicOn playing the cello music accompanying it.]]


Added DiffLines:

* HiddenDepths: Occurs twice:
** At the end of the second act, Daigo follows a body to the crematorium, [[TheReveal only to learn]] that [[spoiler:the old man from the bath house is actually the resident cremator.]]
** During the conclusion, Daigo receives a confession from [[spoiler:the NK Agent receptionist, who admits she too left her son behind. She presses Daigo to visit his father and get closure, as she can't visit her own son because she is too ashamed.]]
7th Jun '15 5:51:15 PM TinyTedDanson
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Kobayashi Daigo is a cello player in a classical orchestra in Tokyo, but when his cash-strapped ensemble is disbanded, he finds himself without a job. He decides to give up on music and move with his wife back to his hometown in Yamagata prefecture, in northern Japan.

He settles in his late mother's house, and applies for a job in what appears to be a travel agency. In fact, the job offer had been deliberately advertised in a misleading way: the business is actually that of a mortician, who couldn't find an assistant due to the lingering association of such work with the ''Untouchable'' or ''Burakumin'' caste in Edo-era/[[ImperialJapan pre-1868 Japan]][[note]] The lowest of all the castes, the ''Untouchables'' were given the 'spiritually contaminated' jobs that destroyed their moral character and made them and all their children irreperably evil to the point that merely seeing or being in the presence of an ''Untouchable'' could lead you down the path of vice and puppy-kicking. These jobs included collecting shit/'nightsoil' from the towns and spreading it about the rice paddies, gutting and chopping up animals for consumption, making things from animals (e.g. leather), and moving and preparing for funerals and burying/burning the dead. Unsurpisingly, most 17th-century Japanese Christian converts came from this caste, as it was a religion that (unlike UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} and UsefulNotes/{{Shinto}}) told them that they were as spiritually clean/pure as everyone else and that there was no hereditary spiritual taint upon them and their children owing to their jobs. This was a major reason why Christianity was soon banned and its followers exterminated -- it threatened to elevate the ''Untouchables'' to the status of full-citizens, undermining the entire basis of the caste system and by extension Japanese Society itself. ''De facto'' enclaves/districts of Burakumin continued to exist '''''well into the 1970s''''' despite the abolition of the caste system in the 1860s [[/note]]. Daigo, at first reluctant, warms to the job, as he discovers it implies a deep form of respect and care for the deceased. In a heavily ritualized ceremony, his boss and he prepare the bodies for encoffinment, before the eyes of the relatives.

to:

Kobayashi Daigo is a cello player in a classical orchestra in Tokyo, but when his cash-strapped ensemble is disbanded, he finds himself without a job. He decides [[ForWantOfANail Having spent a small fortune on a new cello]], Daigo and his wife Mika cannot get by with what savings are left, prompting Daigo to give up on music music, sell his cello, and move with his wife back to his hometown in Yamagata prefecture, in northern Japan.

Japan. He settles in his late mother's house, house with Mika, and applies for a job in what appears looks to be a travel agency. In fact, the agency job offer had been deliberately advertised in [[TitleDrop "departures."]]

Offered an immediate start and
a misleading way: the fantastic wage by simply for turning up, Daigo presses business is actually owner Sasaki and learns that the ad was a misprint: the job is with "departures" in the sense of [[NeverSayDie "the recently departed"]]. Hardly enthused about being a type of mortician, who couldn't find Daigo reluctantly becomes an assistant assistant, an especially undesirable job due to the lingering association of such work with the ''Untouchable'' or ''Burakumin'' caste in Edo-era/[[ImperialJapan pre-1868 Japan]][[note]] The lowest of all the castes, the ''Untouchables'' were given the 'spiritually contaminated' jobs that destroyed their moral character and made them and all their children irreperably evil to the point that merely seeing or being in the presence of an ''Untouchable'' could lead you down the path of vice and puppy-kicking. These jobs included collecting shit/'nightsoil' from the towns and spreading it about the rice paddies, gutting and chopping up animals for consumption, making things from animals (e.g. leather), and moving and preparing for funerals and burying/burning the dead. Unsurpisingly, most 17th-century Japanese Christian converts came from this caste, as it was a religion that (unlike UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} and UsefulNotes/{{Shinto}}) told them that they were as spiritually clean/pure as everyone else and that there was no hereditary spiritual taint upon them and their children owing to their jobs. This was a major reason why Christianity was soon banned and its followers exterminated -- it threatened to elevate the ''Untouchables'' to the status of full-citizens, undermining the entire basis of the caste system and by extension Japanese Society itself. ''De facto'' enclaves/districts of Burakumin continued to exist '''''well into the 1970s''''' despite the abolition of the caste system in the 1860s [[/note]].Japan]]. Daigo, at first reluctant, warms to the job, as he discovers it implies a deep form of respect and care for the deceased. In a heavily ritualized ceremony, his boss and he prepare the bodies for encoffinment, before the eyes of the relatives.
relatives.

Of course, Daigo soon has to deal with hiding his job from his wife, along with getting used to some gruesome and especially trying work.



* TrailersAlwaysSpoil: [[spoiler:A particularly devious example, since it ''had'' to have been on purpose with an American audience in mind - Tomeo is clearly wearing a ''boy's'' uniform in that black-ribboned photo.]]

to:

* TrailersAlwaysSpoil: [[spoiler:A particularly devious example, since it ''had'' to have been on purpose with an American audience in mind - Tomeo is clearly wearing a ''boy's'' uniform in that black-ribboned photo.]] ]]
* TruthInTelevision: The taboo of working with the dead, particularly in Japan, is still somewhat frowned upon today. In the past, the lowest of all the castes, the ''Untouchables'', were given the 'spiritually contaminated' jobs that destroyed their moral character and made them and all their children irreparably evil; it was believed that seeing or being in the presence of an ''Untouchable'' could lead you down the path of vice.[[labelnote:ex.]]Jobs mainly involved anything tied to: fertilizing rice paddies, animal butchery, making things from animals (e.g. leather), and dealing with dead.[[/labelnote]] De facto enclaves/districts of Burakumin continued to exist ''well into the 1970s'' despite the abolition of the caste system in the 1860s, so it's unsurprising people are still uncomfortable with it.
19th May '15 5:06:40 PM nombretomado
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''Departures'' is a Japanese film directed by Takita Yojiro and scored by Music/JoeHisaishi, which won the [[AcademyAward Oscar]] for best foreign film in 2009.

to:

''Departures'' is a Japanese film directed by Takita Yojiro and scored by Music/JoeHisaishi, which won the [[AcademyAward [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscar]] for best foreign film in 2009.
20th Apr '15 10:12:11 PM Morgenthaler
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* [[spoiler: DrivenToSuicide: The Wholesome Crossdresser, though we only hear this from the SeenItAll president.]]

to:

* [[spoiler: DrivenToSuicide: [[spoiler: The Wholesome Crossdresser, though we only hear this from the SeenItAll president.]]



* [[spoiler: WholesomeCrossdresser: The deceased pretty girl in the opening scenes and the receiver of a red dress in the trailers is actually a boy.]]

to:

* [[spoiler: WholesomeCrossdresser: [[spoiler: The deceased pretty girl in the opening scenes and the receiver of a red dress in the trailers is actually a boy.]]
11th Mar '15 4:43:09 AM JakesBrain
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He settles in his late mother's house, and applies for a job in what appears to be a travel agency. In fact, the job offer had been deliberately advertised in a misleading way: the business is actually that of a mortician, who couldn't find an assistant due to the lingering association of such work with the ''Untouchable'' or ''Burakumin'' caste in Edo-era/[[ImperialJapan pre-1868 Japan]][[note]] The lowest of all the castes, the ''Untouchables'' were given the 'spiritually contaminated' jobs that destroyed their moral character and made them and all their children irreperably evil to the point that merely seeing or being in the presence of an ''Untouchable'' could lead you down the path of vice and puppy-kicking. These jobs included collecting shit/'nightsoil' from the towns and spreading it about the rice paddies, gutting and chopping up animals for consumption, making things from animals (e.g. leather), and moving and preparing for funerals and burying/burning the dead. Unsurpisingly, most 17th-century Japanese Christian converts came from this caste as it was a religion that (unlike UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} and UsefulNotes/{{Shinto}}) told them that they were as spiritually clean/pure as everyone else and that there was no hereditary spiritual taint upon them and their children owing to their jobs. This was a major reason why Christianity was soon banned and its followers exterminated - it threatened to elevate the ''Untouchables'' to the status of full-citizens, undermining the entire basis of the caste system and by extension Japanese Society itself. ''De facto'' enclaves/districts of untouchables continued to exist well into ''the 1970s'' despite the abolition of the caste system in the 1860s [[/note]]. Daigo, at first reluctant, warms to the job, as he discovers it implies a deep form of respect and care for the deceased. In a heavily ritualized ceremony, his boss and he prepare the bodies for encoffinment, before the eyes of the relatives.

to:

He settles in his late mother's house, and applies for a job in what appears to be a travel agency. In fact, the job offer had been deliberately advertised in a misleading way: the business is actually that of a mortician, who couldn't find an assistant due to the lingering association of such work with the ''Untouchable'' or ''Burakumin'' caste in Edo-era/[[ImperialJapan pre-1868 Japan]][[note]] The lowest of all the castes, the ''Untouchables'' were given the 'spiritually contaminated' jobs that destroyed their moral character and made them and all their children irreperably evil to the point that merely seeing or being in the presence of an ''Untouchable'' could lead you down the path of vice and puppy-kicking. These jobs included collecting shit/'nightsoil' from the towns and spreading it about the rice paddies, gutting and chopping up animals for consumption, making things from animals (e.g. leather), and moving and preparing for funerals and burying/burning the dead. Unsurpisingly, most 17th-century Japanese Christian converts came from this caste caste, as it was a religion that (unlike UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} and UsefulNotes/{{Shinto}}) told them that they were as spiritually clean/pure as everyone else and that there was no hereditary spiritual taint upon them and their children owing to their jobs. This was a major reason why Christianity was soon banned and its followers exterminated - -- it threatened to elevate the ''Untouchables'' to the status of full-citizens, undermining the entire basis of the caste system and by extension Japanese Society itself. ''De facto'' enclaves/districts of untouchables Burakumin continued to exist well '''''well into ''the 1970s'' the 1970s''''' despite the abolition of the caste system in the 1860s [[/note]]. Daigo, at first reluctant, warms to the job, as he discovers it implies a deep form of respect and care for the deceased. In a heavily ritualized ceremony, his boss and he prepare the bodies for encoffinment, before the eyes of the relatives.
6th Dec '14 10:16:14 AM MAI742
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''Departures'' is a Japanese film directed by Takita Yojiro and scored by {{Music/JoeHisaishi}}, which won the [[AcademyAward Oscar]] for best foreign film in 2009.

to:

''Departures'' is a Japanese film directed by Takita Yojiro and scored by {{Music/JoeHisaishi}}, Music/JoeHisaishi, which won the [[AcademyAward Oscar]] for best foreign film in 2009.
6th Dec '14 10:16:03 AM MAI742
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''Departures'' is a Japanese film directed by Takita Yojiro, which won the [[AcademyAward Oscar]] for best foreign film in 2009.

to:

''Departures'' is a Japanese film directed by Takita Yojiro, Yojiro and scored by {{Music/JoeHisaishi}}, which won the [[AcademyAward Oscar]] for best foreign film in 2009.
6th Oct '14 8:57:17 AM MAI742
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He settles in his late mother's house, and applies for a job in what appears to be a travel agency. In fact, the job offer had been deliberately advertised in a misleading way: the business is actually that of a mortician, who couldn't find an assistant due to the lingering association of such work with the ''Untouchable'' or ''Burakumin'' caste in Edo-era/[[ImperialJapan pre-1868 Japan]][[note]] The lowest of all the castes, the ''Untouchables'' were given the 'spiritually contaminated' jobs that destroyed their moral character and made them and all their children irreperably evil to the point that merely seeing or being in the presence of an ''Untouchable'' could lead you down the path of vice and puppy-kicking. These jobs included collecting shit/'nightsoil' from the towns and spreading it about the rice paddies, gutting and chopping up animals for consumption, making things from animals (e.g. leather), and moving and preparing for funerals and burying/burning the dead. Unsurpisingly, most 17th-century Japanese Christian converts came from this caste as it was a religion that (unlike Buddhism and Shinto) told them that they were as spiritually clean/pure as everyone else and that there was no hereditary spiritual taint upon them and their children owing to their jobs. This was a major reason why Christianity was soon banned and its followers exterminated - it threatened to elevate the ''Untouchables'' to the status of full-citizens, undermining the entire basis of the caste system and by extension Japanese Society itself. ''De facto'' enclaves/districts of untouchables continued to exist well into ''the 1970s'' despite the abolition of the caste system in the 1860s [[/note]]. Daigo, at first reluctant, warms to the job, as he discovers it implies a deep form of respect and care for the deceased. In a heavily ritualized ceremony, his boss and he prepare the bodies for encoffinment, before the eyes of the relatives.

to:

He settles in his late mother's house, and applies for a job in what appears to be a travel agency. In fact, the job offer had been deliberately advertised in a misleading way: the business is actually that of a mortician, who couldn't find an assistant due to the lingering association of such work with the ''Untouchable'' or ''Burakumin'' caste in Edo-era/[[ImperialJapan pre-1868 Japan]][[note]] The lowest of all the castes, the ''Untouchables'' were given the 'spiritually contaminated' jobs that destroyed their moral character and made them and all their children irreperably evil to the point that merely seeing or being in the presence of an ''Untouchable'' could lead you down the path of vice and puppy-kicking. These jobs included collecting shit/'nightsoil' from the towns and spreading it about the rice paddies, gutting and chopping up animals for consumption, making things from animals (e.g. leather), and moving and preparing for funerals and burying/burning the dead. Unsurpisingly, most 17th-century Japanese Christian converts came from this caste as it was a religion that (unlike Buddhism UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} and Shinto) UsefulNotes/{{Shinto}}) told them that they were as spiritually clean/pure as everyone else and that there was no hereditary spiritual taint upon them and their children owing to their jobs. This was a major reason why Christianity was soon banned and its followers exterminated - it threatened to elevate the ''Untouchables'' to the status of full-citizens, undermining the entire basis of the caste system and by extension Japanese Society itself. ''De facto'' enclaves/districts of untouchables continued to exist well into ''the 1970s'' despite the abolition of the caste system in the 1860s [[/note]]. Daigo, at first reluctant, warms to the job, as he discovers it implies a deep form of respect and care for the deceased. In a heavily ritualized ceremony, his boss and he prepare the bodies for encoffinment, before the eyes of the relatives.
6th Oct '14 8:05:33 AM MAI742
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He settles in his late mother's house, and applies for a job in what appears to be a travel agency. In fact, the job offer had been deliberately advertised in a misleading way: the business is actually that of a mortician, who couldn't find an assistant due to the lingering association of such work with the ''Untouchable'' or ''Burakumin'' caste in Edo-era/[[ImperialJapan pre-1868 Japan]][[note]] The lowest of all the castes, the ''Untouchables'' were given the 'spiritually contaminated' jobs that destroyed their moral character and made them and all their children irreperably evil to the point that merely seeing or being in the presence of an ''Untouchable'' could lead you down the path of vice and puppy-kicking. These jobs included collecting shit/'nightsoil' from the towns and spreading it about the rice paddies, gutting and chopping up animals for consumption, making things from animals (e.g. leather), and moving and preparing for funerals and burying/burning the dead. Unsurpisingly, most 17th-century Japanese Christian converts came from this caste as it was a religion that (unlike [[UsefulNotes:Buddhism Buddhism]] and [[UsefulNotes:Shinto Shinto]]) told them that they were as spiritually clean/pure as everyone else and that there was no hereditary spiritual taint upon them and their children owing to their jobs. This was a major reason why Christianity was soon banned and its followers exterminated - it threatened to elevate the ''Untouchables'' to the status of full-citizens, undermining the entire basis of the caste system and by extension Japanese Society itself. ''De facto'' enclaves/districts of untouchables continued to exist well into ''the 1970s'' despite the abolition of the caste system in the 1860s [[/note]]. Daigo, at first reluctant, warms to the job, as he discovers it implies a deep form of respect and care for the deceased. In a heavily ritualized ceremony, his boss and he prepare the bodies for encoffinment, before the eyes of the relatives.

to:

He settles in his late mother's house, and applies for a job in what appears to be a travel agency. In fact, the job offer had been deliberately advertised in a misleading way: the business is actually that of a mortician, who couldn't find an assistant due to the lingering association of such work with the ''Untouchable'' or ''Burakumin'' caste in Edo-era/[[ImperialJapan pre-1868 Japan]][[note]] The lowest of all the castes, the ''Untouchables'' were given the 'spiritually contaminated' jobs that destroyed their moral character and made them and all their children irreperably evil to the point that merely seeing or being in the presence of an ''Untouchable'' could lead you down the path of vice and puppy-kicking. These jobs included collecting shit/'nightsoil' from the towns and spreading it about the rice paddies, gutting and chopping up animals for consumption, making things from animals (e.g. leather), and moving and preparing for funerals and burying/burning the dead. Unsurpisingly, most 17th-century Japanese Christian converts came from this caste as it was a religion that (unlike [[UsefulNotes:Buddhism Buddhism]] Buddhism and [[UsefulNotes:Shinto Shinto]]) Shinto) told them that they were as spiritually clean/pure as everyone else and that there was no hereditary spiritual taint upon them and their children owing to their jobs. This was a major reason why Christianity was soon banned and its followers exterminated - it threatened to elevate the ''Untouchables'' to the status of full-citizens, undermining the entire basis of the caste system and by extension Japanese Society itself. ''De facto'' enclaves/districts of untouchables continued to exist well into ''the 1970s'' despite the abolition of the caste system in the 1860s [[/note]]. Daigo, at first reluctant, warms to the job, as he discovers it implies a deep form of respect and care for the deceased. In a heavily ritualized ceremony, his boss and he prepare the bodies for encoffinment, before the eyes of the relatives.
6th Oct '14 8:04:02 AM MAI742
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He settles in his late mother's house, and applies for a job in what appears to be a travel agency. In fact, the job offer had been deliberately advertised in a misleading way: the business is actually that of a mortician, who couldn't find an assistant due to the lingering association of such work with the ''Untouchable'' or ''Burakumin'' caste in Edo-era/[[ImperialJapan pre-1868 Japan]][[note]] The lowest of all the castes, the ''Untouchables'' were given the 'spiritually contaminated' jobs that destroyed their moral character and made them and all their children irreperably evil to the point that merely seeing or being in the presence of an ''Untouchable'' could lead you down the path of vice and puppy-kicking. These jobs included collecting shit/'nightsoil' from the towns and spreading it about the rice paddies, gutting and chopping up animals for consumption, making things from animals (e.g. leather), and moving and preparing for funerals and burying/burning the dead. Unsurpisingly, most 17th-century Japanese Christian converts came from this caste as it was a religion that (unlike [[UsefulNotes/Buddhism Buddhism]] and [[UsefulNotes/Shinto Shinto]]) told them that they were as spiritually clean/pure as everyone else and that there was no hereditary spiritual taint upon them and their children owing to their jobs. This was a major reason why Christianity was soon banned and its followers exterminated - it threatened to elevate the ''Untouchables'' to the status of full-citizens, undermining the entire basis of the caste system and by extension Japanese Society itself. ''De facto'' enclaves/districts of untouchables continued to exist well into ''the 1970s'' despite the abolition of the caste system in the 1860s [[/note]]. Daigo, at first reluctant, warms to the job, as he discovers it implies a deep form of respect and care for the deceased. In a heavily ritualized ceremony, his boss and he prepare the bodies for encoffinment, before the eyes of the relatives.

to:

He settles in his late mother's house, and applies for a job in what appears to be a travel agency. In fact, the job offer had been deliberately advertised in a misleading way: the business is actually that of a mortician, who couldn't find an assistant due to the lingering association of such work with the ''Untouchable'' or ''Burakumin'' caste in Edo-era/[[ImperialJapan pre-1868 Japan]][[note]] The lowest of all the castes, the ''Untouchables'' were given the 'spiritually contaminated' jobs that destroyed their moral character and made them and all their children irreperably evil to the point that merely seeing or being in the presence of an ''Untouchable'' could lead you down the path of vice and puppy-kicking. These jobs included collecting shit/'nightsoil' from the towns and spreading it about the rice paddies, gutting and chopping up animals for consumption, making things from animals (e.g. leather), and moving and preparing for funerals and burying/burning the dead. Unsurpisingly, most 17th-century Japanese Christian converts came from this caste as it was a religion that (unlike [[UsefulNotes/Buddhism [[UsefulNotes:Buddhism Buddhism]] and [[UsefulNotes/Shinto [[UsefulNotes:Shinto Shinto]]) told them that they were as spiritually clean/pure as everyone else and that there was no hereditary spiritual taint upon them and their children owing to their jobs. This was a major reason why Christianity was soon banned and its followers exterminated - it threatened to elevate the ''Untouchables'' to the status of full-citizens, undermining the entire basis of the caste system and by extension Japanese Society itself. ''De facto'' enclaves/districts of untouchables continued to exist well into ''the 1970s'' despite the abolition of the caste system in the 1860s [[/note]]. Daigo, at first reluctant, warms to the job, as he discovers it implies a deep form of respect and care for the deceased. In a heavily ritualized ceremony, his boss and he prepare the bodies for encoffinment, before the eyes of the relatives.
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