History Film / BonnieAndClyde

24th Aug '16 12:26:14 AM DemonDuckofDoom
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* BigBadDuumvirate: [[VillainProtagonist Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow]], the OutlawCouple leaders of a gang of bank robbers.
21st Jul '16 3:52:46 AM CumbersomeTercel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FollowTheLeader: The film's success inspired a few {{exploitation film}}s about other '30s gangsters, such as ''A Bullet for Pretty Boy'' (1970), starring former teen idol Fabian Forte as Pretty Boy Floyd, ''Bloody Mama'' (1970), starring Shelley Winters as Ma Barker and directed by Creator/RogerCorman, and ''Film/{{Dillinger}}'' (1973), starring Warren Oates and directed by Creator/JohnMilius
12th Jul '16 11:03:02 AM BaronVonFistcrunch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AdaptationalAttractiveness:
** Plain-faced, 90-pound Bonnie Parker and shrimpy 5'6 little Clyde Barrow, played by foxy Faye Dunaway and tall, handsome Creator/WarrenBeatty.
** {{Inverted|Trope}} with Blanche and Buck Barrow. The actors in the film are considerably dumpier-looking than their real life counterparts. In 1933, Blanche was in her early 20s, pretty and petite (here played by a 40 year old) and Buck was a good-looking guy age around 30. The producers wanted ordinary looking people for the non-headline parts.



* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: A big offender. The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them. Clyde in particular was noted for having a HairTriggerTemper and bordered on AxCrazy at his worst.[[note]]In a 1968 interview, former Barrow Gang member W.D. Jones described Clyde as willing to kill anyone "in a hot instant" and had once threatened Jones for not changing a tire quickly enough, Bonnie had to pull a gun on Clyde to make him back off. The real Blanche also described Clyde as holding no mercy for his victims.[[/note]] The film's Clyde has more in common with bank robbers John Dillinger and "Pretty Boy" Floyd, who were also active at the time and held considerably more public sympathy, whereas the public eventually grew tired of Bonnie and Clyde's constant violence and cop killings. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days."
** Buck also gets this treatment. He was described as the most hot-tempered of the Barrows, often advocating killing hostages and an incident where he tied two police officers they had captured to a tree with barbed wire, something that even Clyde found distasteful.

to:

* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: A big offender. The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them. Clyde in particular was noted for having a HairTriggerTemper and bordered on AxCrazy at his worst.[[note]]In a 1968 interview, former Barrow Gang member W.D. Jones described Clyde as willing to kill anyone "in a hot instant" and had once threatened to kill Jones for not changing a tire quickly enough, Bonnie had to pull a gun on Clyde to make him back off. The real Blanche also described Clyde as holding no mercy for his innocent victims.[[/note]] The film's Clyde has more in common with bank robbers John Dillinger and "Pretty Boy" Floyd, who were also active at the time and held considerably more public sympathy, whereas the public eventually grew tired of Bonnie and Clyde's constant violence and cop killings. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days."
** Buck also gets this treatment. He was described as the most hot-tempered of the Barrows, often advocating killing hostages and an incident where he had once tied two police officers they had captured to a tree with barbed wire, ''barbed wire'', something that even Clyde found distasteful.
2nd Jul '16 1:20:06 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HistoricalBeautyUpdate:
** Plain-faced, 90-pound Bonnie Parker and shrimpy 5'6 little Clyde Barrow, played by foxy Faye Dunaway and tall, handsome Creator/WarrenBeatty.
** {{Inverted|Trope}} with Blanche and Buck Barrow. The actors in the film are considerably dumpier-looking than their real life counterparts. In 1933, Blanche was in her early 20s, pretty and petite (here played by a 40 year old) and Buck was a good-looking guy age around 30. The producers wanted ordinary looking people for the non-headline parts.



** Buck also gets this treatment. He was described as the most hot-tempered of the Barrows, often advocating killing hostages and an incident where he tied two police officers they had captured to a tree with barbed wire, something that even Clyde found distasteful.



* HollywoodHistory[=/=]VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Lots. For starters, C.W. Moss [[CompositeCharacter is a composite]] of W.D. Jones and the man who betrayed Bonnie and Clyde, Henry Methvin. Other gang members are omitted. A nasty car accident on the night of June 11, 1933 that left Bonnie with a permanently lame leg is not in the film. The gang's preferred weapons were [[{{BFG}} Browning Automatic Rifles]] stolen from military armories that left police outgunned in confrontations, whereas the film has them using Thompson sub-machine guns. Clyde died in the car with Bonnie, instead of getting out as we see in the film. Frequent visits to their families and the fact that Bonnie and Clyde were together for two years before starting their crime spree are also omitted.

to:

* HollywoodHistory[=/=]VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Lots. For starters, C.W. Moss [[CompositeCharacter is a composite]] of W.D. Jones and the man who betrayed Bonnie and Clyde, Henry Methvin. Other gang members are omitted. A nasty car accident on the night of June 11, 1933 that left Bonnie with a permanently lame leg is not in the film. The gang's preferred weapons were [[{{BFG}} Browning Automatic Rifles]] stolen from military armories that left police outgunned in confrontations, whereas the film has them using Thompson sub-machine guns. Clyde died in the car with Bonnie, instead of getting out as we see in the film. Frequent visits to their families and the fact that Bonnie and Clyde were together for two years before starting their crime spree are also omitted. The events the film covers have a number of details changed to make the pair more sympathetic. For example, the butcher robbery in the film is based off a real incident where Clyde executed a shopkeeper during a robbery because [[DisproportionateRetribution the man had talked back to him]].
8th Jun '16 6:30:16 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BangBangBANG

to:

* BangBangBANGBangBangBANG: Deliberately done, as Warren Beatty wanted the gunshots to overpower the soundtrack. This lead to at least one case of a projectionist turning down the sound during gunfights, blaming the loud gunshots on bad sound mixing.



* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: A big offender. The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them. Clyde in particular was noted for having a HairTriggerTemper and bordered on AxCrazy at his worst.[[note]]In a 1968 interview, former Barrow Gang member W.D. Jones described Clyde as willing to kill anyone "in a hot instant" and once threatened to kill Jones for not changing a tire quickly enough, Bonnie had to pull her own gun on Clyde to make him back off. The real Blanche also described Clyde as holding no mercy for his victims.[[/note]] The film's Clyde has more in common with bank robbers John Dillinger and "Pretty Boy" Floyd, who were also active at the time and held considerably more public sympathy, whereas the public eventually grew tired of Bonnie and Clyde's constant violence and cop killings. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days."

to:

* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: A big offender. The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them. Clyde in particular was noted for having a HairTriggerTemper and bordered on AxCrazy at his worst.[[note]]In a 1968 interview, former Barrow Gang member W.D. Jones described Clyde as willing to kill anyone "in a hot instant" and had once threatened to kill Jones for not changing a tire quickly enough, Bonnie had to pull her own a gun on Clyde to make him back off. The real Blanche also described Clyde as holding no mercy for his victims.[[/note]] The film's Clyde has more in common with bank robbers John Dillinger and "Pretty Boy" Floyd, who were also active at the time and held considerably more public sympathy, whereas the public eventually grew tired of Bonnie and Clyde's constant violence and cop killings. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days."
8th Jun '16 3:49:59 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FollowTheLeader: The film's success inspired a few {{exploitation film}}s about other '30s gangsters, such as ''A Bullet for Pretty Boy'' (1970), starring former teen idol Fabian Forte as Pretty Boy Floyd, and ''Bloody Mama'' (1970), starring Shelley Winters as Ma Barker and directed by Creator/RogerCorman.

to:

* FollowTheLeader: The film's success inspired a few {{exploitation film}}s about other '30s gangsters, such as ''A Bullet for Pretty Boy'' (1970), starring former teen idol Fabian Forte as Pretty Boy Floyd, and ''Bloody Mama'' (1970), starring Shelley Winters as Ma Barker and directed by Creator/RogerCorman.Creator/RogerCorman, and ''Film/{{Dillinger}}'' (1973), starring Warren Oates and directed by Creator/JohnMilius



* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: A big offender. The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them. Clyde in particular was noted for having a HairTriggerTemper and held no mercy for his victims, lawman or civilian. The film's Clyde has more in common with bank robbers John Dillinger and "Pretty Boy" Floyd, who were also active at the time. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days."

to:

* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: A big offender. The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them. Clyde in particular was noted for having a HairTriggerTemper and held bordered on AxCrazy at his worst.[[note]]In a 1968 interview, former Barrow Gang member W.D. Jones described Clyde as willing to kill anyone "in a hot instant" and once threatened to kill Jones for not changing a tire quickly enough, Bonnie had to pull her own gun on Clyde to make him back off. The real Blanche also described Clyde as holding no mercy for his victims, lawman or civilian. victims.[[/note]] The film's Clyde has more in common with bank robbers John Dillinger and "Pretty Boy" Floyd, who were also active at the time.time and held considerably more public sympathy, whereas the public eventually grew tired of Bonnie and Clyde's constant violence and cop killings. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days."
26th May '16 11:05:23 AM Ohio9
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Frank Hamer is portrayed in the film as a bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the protagonists and their friends. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.

to:

* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Frank Hamer is portrayed in the film as a bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the protagonists and their friends. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break. The film shows Hammer and his men gunning down Clyde when he is unarmed and outside his car, while in real life both Bonnie and Clyde were inside their car when they were shot, and the vehicle was filled with weapons. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.
30th Apr '16 4:03:16 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: A big offender. The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them. Clyde in particular was noted for having a HairTriggerTemper and held no mercy for his victims, lawman or civilian. The film's Clyde has more in common with bank robber John Dillinger. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days."
* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Frank Hamer is portrayed in the film as a bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the protagonists and their friends]]. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.

to:

* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: A big offender. The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them. Clyde in particular was noted for having a HairTriggerTemper and held no mercy for his victims, lawman or civilian. The film's Clyde has more in common with bank robber robbers John Dillinger.Dillinger and "Pretty Boy" Floyd, who were also active at the time. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days."
* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Frank Hamer is portrayed in the film as a bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the protagonists and their friends]].friends. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.
27th Apr '16 2:05:59 PM TheHestinator
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* MohsScaleOfViolenceHardness: It rates a 7, which is pretty high for a 1967 movie, largely due to the blood splatter from Clyde Barrow (Warren Beatty) pistol-whipping the man in the grocery show in the head, the bank teller's bloody headshot through a car window, and, of course, the [[spoiler: the deaths of the two main characters at the end, complete with a small chunk of Clyde's scalp flying off, if you look carefully enough]].
5th Apr '16 1:04:13 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''Bonnie and Clyde'' is a 1967 biopic about the famous 1930s bank-robbing duo of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, directed by Arthur Penn and starring Faye Dunaway and Creator/WarrenBeatty.

to:

''Bonnie and Clyde'' is a A 1967 biopic about the famous 1930s bank-robbing duo of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, directed by Arthur Penn and starring Faye Dunaway and Creator/WarrenBeatty.
This list shows the last 10 events of 119. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.BonnieAndClyde