History Film / BonnieAndClyde

20th Jan '16 4:08:49 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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Broke up the hollywood history bit into seperate entries.
** Plain-faced Bonnie Parker and shrimpy little Clyde Barrow, played by foxy Faye Dunaway and handsome Creator/WarrenBeatty.
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** Plain-faced Plain-faced, 90-pound Bonnie Parker and shrimpy 5'6 little Clyde Barrow, played by foxy Faye Dunaway and tall, handsome Creator/WarrenBeatty.

* CompositeCharacter: C.W. Moss is a composite of two members of the Barrow Gang, W.D. Jones and Henry Methvin. The real W.D. Jones was not amused by this, and attempted to sue Warner Bros. for defamation.
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* CompositeCharacter: C.W. Moss is a composite of two members of the Barrow Gang, W.D. Jones and Henry Methvin. The real W.D. Jones was not amused by this, and attempted to sue Warner Bros. for defamation. There is no known record his case was ever heard.

* TheGreatDepression: The backdrop for the film, and, as Clyde believes, the main reason for the gang's vocation. * HistoricalHeroUpgrade: A big offender. Bonnie and Clyde are considerably nicer and more sympathetic toward the common people than the real ones. Clyde in particular was noted for a HairTriggerTemper and targeted civilians more than banks, killing at least one shopkeeper out of anger. The film's Clyde has more in common with John Dillinger, another outlaw of the era known primarily for bank robberies.
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* TheGreatDepression: The backdrop for the film, and, as Clyde believes, the main reason for the gang's vocation. \n In real life, it is believed that Clyde's motivation was revenge against abuses he suffered during his imprisonment in [[HellholePrison Eastham]]. * HistoricalHeroUpgrade: A big offender. The real Bonnie and Clyde are considerably nicer and more were nowhere near as sympathetic toward as the common people than the real ones. film portrays them. Clyde in particular was noted for having a HairTriggerTemper and targeted civilians more than banks, killing at least one shopkeeper out of anger. held no mercy for his victims, lawman or civilian. The film's Clyde has more in common with bank robber John Dillinger, another outlaw Dillinger. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the era known primarily gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for bank robberies.three days." * HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Frank Hamer is portrayed in the film as a bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the protagonists and their friends]]. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.

* HollywoodHistory[=/=]VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Lots. ** For starters, C.W. Moss [[CompositeCharacter is a composite]] of W.D. Jones and the man who betrayed Bonnie and Clyde, Henry Methvin. Other gang members are omitted. A nasty car accident on the night of June 11, 1933 that left Bonnie with a permanently lame leg is not in the film. The gang's preferred weapons were [[{{BFG}} Browning Automatic Rifles]] stolen from military armories that left police outgunned in confrontations, whereas the film has them using Thompson sub-machine guns. Clyde died in the car with Bonnie, instead of getting out as we see in the film. Frequent visits to their families and the fact that Bonnie and Clyde were together for two years before starting their crime spree are also omitted. ** [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them.]] Bonnie and Clyde were active at the same time as John Dillinger, whom the public had far more sympathy for, while the Barrow Gang was despised by the public for murdering lawmen and innocents alike in cold blood. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days." Additionally, Bonnie and Clyde rarely gained newspaper attention outside of the Dallas area, compared to Dillinger, who dominated newspaper headlines all across the United States. ** [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade Frank Hamer is portrayed in the film as a bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the protagonists and their friends]]. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.
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* HollywoodHistory[=/=]VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Lots. ** Lots. For starters, C.W. Moss [[CompositeCharacter is a composite]] of W.D. Jones and the man who betrayed Bonnie and Clyde, Henry Methvin. Other gang members are omitted. A nasty car accident on the night of June 11, 1933 that left Bonnie with a permanently lame leg is not in the film. The gang's preferred weapons were [[{{BFG}} Browning Automatic Rifles]] stolen from military armories that left police outgunned in confrontations, whereas the film has them using Thompson sub-machine guns. Clyde died in the car with Bonnie, instead of getting out as we see in the film. Frequent visits to their families and the fact that Bonnie and Clyde were together for two years before starting their crime spree are also omitted. ** [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them.]] Bonnie and Clyde were active at the same time as John Dillinger, whom the public had far more sympathy for, while the Barrow Gang was despised by the public for murdering lawmen and innocents alike in cold blood. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days." Additionally, Bonnie and Clyde rarely gained newspaper attention outside of the Dallas area, compared to Dillinger, who dominated newspaper headlines all across the United States. ** [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade Frank Hamer is portrayed in the film as a bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the protagonists and their friends]]. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.omitted.

* TheLoinsSleepTonight: "I ain't much of a loverboy."
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* TheLoinsSleepTonight: "I ain't much of a loverboy."Clyde is portrayed by the film as impotent. Though there's no known basis for this in reality.

* ScreamingWoman: Blanche, much to the chagrin of the rest of the gang (especially [[ActionGirl Bonnie]]), as well as to the real-life Blanche.
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* ScreamingWoman: Blanche, much to the chagrin of the rest of the gang (especially [[ActionGirl Bonnie]]), as well as to the real-life Blanche. The film deliberately played this up in order to make Bonnie seem "cooler".
28th Dec '15 6:38:21 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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Added DiffLines:
* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: A big offender. Bonnie and Clyde are considerably nicer and more sympathetic toward the common people than the real ones. Clyde in particular was noted for a HairTriggerTemper and targeted civilians more than banks, killing at least one shopkeeper out of anger. The film's Clyde has more in common with John Dillinger, another outlaw of the era known primarily for bank robberies.
25th Dec '15 4:17:44 PM nombretomado
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Useful Notes/ pages are not tropes
''Bonnie and Clyde'' was a smash hit that made huge stars out of Beatty and Dunaway. It was nominated for ten Oscars and won two, for Best Supporting Actress (Estelle Parsons as Blanche) and Best Cinematography. It is regarded as part of the first wave of the NewHollywood movement that helped to break down the studio system and usher in a creative rebirth for Hollywood, with its increased [[HotterAndSexier sex]] and [[BloodierAndGorier violence]], glorification of {{anti hero}}es, and [[CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority skepticism of authority]].
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''Bonnie and Clyde'' was a smash hit that made huge stars out of Beatty and Dunaway. It was nominated for ten Oscars and won two, for Best Supporting Actress (Estelle Parsons as Blanche) and Best Cinematography. It is regarded as part of the first wave of the NewHollywood UsefulNotes/NewHollywood movement that helped to break down the studio system and usher in a creative rebirth for Hollywood, with its increased [[HotterAndSexier sex]] and [[BloodierAndGorier violence]], glorification of {{anti hero}}es, and [[CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority skepticism of authority]].

* NewHollywood: One of the first movies of this era.
28th Aug '15 3:42:24 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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* CompositeCharacter: C.W. Moss is a composite of two members of the Barrow Gang, W.D. Jones and Henry Methvin.
to:
* CompositeCharacter: C.W. Moss is a composite of two members of the Barrow Gang, W.D. Jones and Henry Methvin. The real W.D. Jones was not amused by this, and attempted to sue Warner Bros. for defamation.

** [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them.]] Bonnie and Clyde were active at the same time as John Dillinger, whom the public had far more sympathy for, while the Barrow Gang was despised by the public for murdering lawmen and innocents alike at will. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days." Additionally, Bonnie and Clyde rarely gained newspaper attention outside of the Dallas area, compared to Dillinger, who dominated newspaper headlines all across the United States. ** [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade Frank Hamer is portrayed in the film as a bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the protagonists and their friends]]. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a legendary Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23th, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.
to:
** [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade The real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as the film portrays them.]] Bonnie and Clyde were active at the same time as John Dillinger, whom the public had far more sympathy for, while the Barrow Gang was despised by the public for murdering lawmen and innocents alike at will.in cold blood. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days." Additionally, Bonnie and Clyde rarely gained newspaper attention outside of the Dallas area, compared to Dillinger, who dominated newspaper headlines all across the United States. ** [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade Frank Hamer is portrayed in the film as a bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the protagonists and their friends]]. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a legendary Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23th, 23, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.
27th Aug '15 11:28:48 AM BaronVonFistcrunch
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Touched up my touch ups
* AntiHero: Clyde is a thief and murderer. Despite this, the film's Clyde is [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade far more sympathetic than the real one]].
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* AntiHero: Clyde is a thief and murderer. Despite this, the film's Clyde murderer, but is [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade far given a more sympathetic treatment by the film than the real one]].historically.

** [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade Frank Hamer is portrayed in the film as a bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the protagonists and their friends]]. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a legendary Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.
to:
** [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade Frank Hamer is portrayed in the film as a bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the protagonists and their friends]]. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a legendary Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 23th, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.

* VillainProtagonist: The title characters are robbers and killers. Despite this, [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade the film's portrayal of them is considerably softer than the real Bonnie and Clyde]], who were far more willing to rob and kill anyone they crossed paths with. * WorkingOnTheChainGang: Clyde chopped off two of his toes to avoid this.
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* VillainProtagonist: The title characters are robbers and killers. Despite this, even so, [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade the film's portrayal of them is considerably softer than the real Bonnie and Clyde]], who were far more willing to rob and kill anyone they crossed paths with.Clyde]]. * WorkingOnTheChainGang: Clyde chopped off two of his toes to avoid this. TruthInTelevision, although most sources say that another inmate did it for him.
26th Aug '15 3:13:23 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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Might as well touch up some other things while I'm here
* AntiHero: Clyde is a thief and murderer. * AssholeVictim: They rob banks, which after seeing what the banks have done to the poor folks of the country by foreclosing on their property, makes them look not as bad after all. However, this description arguably better describes John Dillinger than it would the real Bonnie and Clyde.
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* AntiHero: Clyde is a thief and murderer. murderer. Despite this, the film's Clyde is [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade far more sympathetic than the real one]]. * AssholeVictim: They rob banks, which after seeing what the banks have done to the poor folks of the country by foreclosing on their property, makes them look not as bad after all. However, this description arguably better describes John Dillinger than it would the real Bonnie and Clyde.

* BankRobbery
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* BankRobberyBankRobbery: The gang's main source of money and infamy. In reality, the gang didn't do this very often and preferred to rob convenience stores and gas stations instead.

* BountyHunter: The gang believe Frank Hamer to be one. In truth, he was hired by the Texas prison system administrator, Lee Simmons, to hunt Bonnie and Clyde, but not as a bounty hunter.
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* BountyHunter: The gang believe Frank Hamer to be one. In truth, real-life, he was hired by the Texas prison system administrator, Lee Simmons, to hunt Bonnie and Clyde, but not as a bounty hunter.

* CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority * DamnItFeelsGoodToBeAGangster
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* CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority: The laxer standards in censorship when this was made allowed far more of this attitude than most earlier films got away with. * DamnItFeelsGoodToBeAGangsterDamnItFeelsGoodToBeAGangster: With the bonus of the title characters being [[OutlawCouple lovers on the run]].

* EyeScream: Blanche gets shot in the eye and later ends up blind in a hospital. She actually got it from shards of flying glass due to a shootout in Platte City in July 1933.
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* EyeScream: Blanche gets shot in the eye and later ends up blind in a hospital. She In real-life, she actually got it from shards of flying glass due to a shootout in Platte City in July 1933.

* {{Gorn}}: For its time (right after the removal of UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode), this was a very violent movie.
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* {{Gorn}}: For Although [[SocietyMarchesOn not impressive by modern standards]], for its time (right after the removal of UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode), this was a very violent movie.movie and among the first to show actual blood splatter on screen.

* MoodWhiplash: The bank robbery scene, where Moss parks the car, first plays out as comedy as the trio bumble around trying to escape, but turns deadly when the banker jumps onto the running board and Clyde graphically shoots him in the face. ** This scene would have been especially so in the 1960's when showing actual [[{{Gorn}} blood splatter]] on screen was virtually unheard of.
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* MoodWhiplash: Used to give the graphic ([[SocietyMarchesOn for the time]]) violence more impact. For example; The bank robbery scene, where Moss parks the car, first plays out as comedy as the trio bumble around trying to escape, but turns deadly when the banker jumps onto the running board and Clyde graphically shoots him in the face. ** This scene would have been especially so in the 1960's when showing actual [[{{Gorn}} blood splatter]] on screen was virtually unheard of. face.

* MoreDakka: How the title characters went down, in the movie and in reality. Those two had killed at least nine police officers over the course of their career, so the cops weren't taking any chances, even though one of the posse members, Sheriff Henderson Jordan did debate whether or not to try attempting to take them alive.
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* MoreDakka: How the title characters went down, in the movie and in reality. Those The two had killed at least nine police officers and several civilians over the course of their career, so the cops weren't taking any chances, even though one of the posse members, Sheriff Henderson Jordan did debate whether or not to try attempting to take them alive.

* PhallicWeapon
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* PhallicWeaponPhallicWeapon: The film is not at all subtle about this with Clyde.

* ScreamingWoman: Blanche, much to the chagrin of the rest of the gang (especially [[ActionGirl Bonnie]]), as well as to her real-life inspiration.
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* ScreamingWoman: Blanche, much to the chagrin of the rest of the gang (especially [[ActionGirl Bonnie]]), as well as to her the real-life inspiration.Blanche.

* VillainProtagonist
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* VillainProtagonistVillainProtagonist: The title characters are robbers and killers. Despite this, [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade the film's portrayal of them is considerably softer than the real Bonnie and Clyde]], who were far more willing to rob and kill anyone they crossed paths with.
26th Aug '15 2:13:24 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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cleaned up my clean up. Derp.
** For starters, C.W. Moss [[CompositeCharacter is a composite]] of W.D. Jones and the man who betrayed Bonnie and Clyde, Henry Methvin. Other gang members are omitted. A nasty car accident on the night of June 11, 1933 that left Bonnie with a permanently lame leg is not in the film. The gang's preferred weapons were [[{{BFG}} Browning Automatic Rifles]] stolen from military armories that outgunned most police officers, whereas the film has them with Thompson sub-machine guns. Clyde died in the car with Bonnie, instead of getting out as we see in the film. Frequent visits to their families and the fact that Bonnie and Clyde were together for two years before starting their crime spree are also omitted. ** [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade The real-life Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as this movie portrays them.]] Bonnie and Clyde were active at the same time as John Dillinger, whom the public had far more sympathy for. The Barrow Gang were largely despised for murdering lawmen and innocents alike at the slightest provocation, not just during robberies. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days." Additionally, Bonnie and Clyde rarely gained newspaper attention outside of the Dallas area, compared to Dillinger, who dominated newspaper headlines all across the United States. ** Frank Hamer [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade is portrayed in the film as a bumbling idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the movie's protagonists and their friends]]. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a legendary Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break where a guard was killed. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.
to:
** For starters, C.W. Moss [[CompositeCharacter is a composite]] of W.D. Jones and the man who betrayed Bonnie and Clyde, Henry Methvin. Other gang members are omitted. A nasty car accident on the night of June 11, 1933 that left Bonnie with a permanently lame leg is not in the film. The gang's preferred weapons were [[{{BFG}} Browning Automatic Rifles]] stolen from military armories that left police outgunned most police officers, in confrontations, whereas the film has them with using Thompson sub-machine guns. Clyde died in the car with Bonnie, instead of getting out as we see in the film. Frequent visits to their families and the fact that Bonnie and Clyde were together for two years before starting their crime spree are also omitted. ** [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade The real-life real Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as this movie the film portrays them.]] Bonnie and Clyde were active at the same time as John Dillinger, whom the public had far more sympathy for. The for, while the Barrow Gang were largely was despised by the public for murdering lawmen and innocents alike at the slightest provocation, not just during robberies.will. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days." Additionally, Bonnie and Clyde rarely gained newspaper attention outside of the Dallas area, compared to Dillinger, who dominated newspaper headlines all across the United States. ** **[[HistoricalVillainUpgrade Frank Hamer [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade is portrayed in the film as a bumbling bumbling, spiteful idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the movie's protagonists and their friends]]. In real life, Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he was a legendary Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the gang led a prison break where a guard was killed.break. He had never personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.
25th Aug '15 4:26:37 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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Rewrote part of the messy Hollywood History bit
* HollywoodHistory[=/=]VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: ** C.W. Moss is a composite of W.D. Jones and the man who betrayed Bonnie and Cylde, Henry Methvin, and other gang members are omitted. A nasty car accident on the night of June 11, 1933 that left Bonnie with a permanently lame leg is not in the film. Frank Hamer was not kidnapped and embarrassed by the Barrow Gang; rather, he was an ex-Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down. Clyde died in the car with Bonnie, instead of getting out as we see in the film. Frequent visits to their families and the fact that Bonnie and Clyde were together for two years before starting their crime spree are also omitted. ** [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade The real-life Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as this movie portrays them.]] Bonnie and Clyde were active at the same time as John Dillinger, whom the public had more sympathy for. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days." In contrast, there were a large number of people who ''rooted'' for Dillinger. Then again, there's a reason the Dillinger Gang was known as the "Terror Gang" for their use of submachine weaponry. Additionally, Bonnie and Clyde rarely gained newspaper attention outside of the Dallas area, compared to Dillinger, who dominated newspaper headlines all across the United States. ** Frank Hamer, the Texas Ranger who led the effort to track down and kill Bonnie and Clyde, is portrayed as a bumbling idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the movie's protagonists and their friends. In real life, although he knew who they were and masterminded the ambush, he never had personally interacted with them before the shootout May 23, 1934, near Gibsland, Louisiana. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.
to:
* HollywoodHistory[=/=]VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: HollywoodHistory[=/=]VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Lots. ** For starters, C.W. Moss [[CompositeCharacter is a composite composite]] of W.D. Jones and the man who betrayed Bonnie and Cylde, Clyde, Henry Methvin, and other Methvin. Other gang members are omitted. A nasty car accident on the night of June 11, 1933 that left Bonnie with a permanently lame leg is not in the film. Frank Hamer was not kidnapped and embarrassed by The gang's preferred weapons were [[{{BFG}} Browning Automatic Rifles]] stolen from military armories that outgunned most police officers, whereas the Barrow Gang; rather, he was an ex-Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt film has them down.with Thompson sub-machine guns. Clyde died in the car with Bonnie, instead of getting out as we see in the film. Frequent visits to their families and the fact that Bonnie and Clyde were together for two years before starting their crime spree are also omitted. ** [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade The real-life Bonnie and Clyde were nowhere near as sympathetic as this movie portrays them.]] Bonnie and Clyde were active at the same time as John Dillinger, whom the public had far more sympathy for.for. The Barrow Gang were largely despised for murdering lawmen and innocents alike at the slightest provocation, not just during robberies. Newspaper columnist Mike Royko, shortly after the film came out, printed a number of angry letters from relatives of the gang's real-life victims offended by their romanticization. One said, "They got my father. They did him with machine guns. He lived for three days." In contrast, there were a large number of people who ''rooted'' for Dillinger. Then again, there's a reason the Dillinger Gang was known as the "Terror Gang" for their use of submachine weaponry. Additionally, Bonnie and Clyde rarely gained newspaper attention outside of the Dallas area, compared to Dillinger, who dominated newspaper headlines all across the United States. ** Frank Hamer, the Texas Ranger who led the effort to track down and kill Bonnie and Clyde, Hamer [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade is portrayed in the film as a bumbling idiot who allows himself to be made into a jackass by the movie's protagonists and their friends. friends]]. In real life, although Frank Hamer was not kidnapped; rather, he knew who they were and masterminded was a legendary Texas Ranger hired out of retirement by prison system administrator Lee Simmons to hunt them down after the ambush, he gang led a prison break where a guard was killed. He had never had personally interacted with them before the shootout in May 23, 1934, near Gibsland, Louisiana.1934 where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. Hamer's surviving family was so outraged at the negative, buffoonish portrayal they filed a lawsuit against Warner Bros. for defamation; the movie studio settled out-of-court.
30th Jun '15 2:34:25 AM Aquila89
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one quote is enough
->Shirt dem a tear-up trousers a go\\ I don't want to end up like Bonny and Clyde\\ - Desmond Dekker, ''The Israelites''
6th May '15 7:38:04 AM sturmovik
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Added DiffLines:
* MoodWhiplash: The bank robbery scene, where Moss parks the car, first plays out as comedy as the trio bumble around trying to escape, but turns deadly when the banker jumps onto the running board and Clyde graphically shoots him in the face. ** This scene would have been especially so in the 1960's when showing actual [[{{Gorn}} blood splatter]] on screen was virtually unheard of.
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