History Film / BladeRunner

12th Jan '18 8:40:25 AM Kitchen90
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** Gaff's multilingual Cityspeak, which is a mishmash of various languages including Spanish, Japanese, German and Hungarian. "Lófasz! Nehogy már!" is one of the first things he says to Deckard and it translates to "Horse Dick! No way! You are the Blade... [[TitleDrop Blade Runner!]]" Becomes a Trilingual Bonus when you realize the name Philip is derived from the Latin for "lover of horses (philo = love, hippo = horse)". Thus, "Horse Dick" = a bizarre insult/term of endearment as well as a reference to Philip K. Dick. The author himself even inserted an AuthorAvatar named Horselover Fat into some of his works. The deleted scenes feature further bonuses as Gaff's refers to Bryant as a '{{baka}}' (or 'idiot' in Japanese).

to:

** Gaff's multilingual Cityspeak, which is a mishmash of various languages including Spanish, Japanese, German and Hungarian. "Lófasz! Nehogy már!" is one of the first things he says to Deckard and it translates to "Horse Dick! No way! You are the Blade... [[TitleDrop Blade Runner!]]" Becomes a Trilingual Bonus when you realize the name Philip is derived from the Latin for "lover of horses (philo = love, hippo = horse)". Thus, "Horse Dick" = a bizarre insult/term of endearment as well as a reference to Philip K. Dick. The author himself even inserted an AuthorAvatar named Horselover Fat into some of his works. The deleted scenes feature further bonuses as Gaff's refers to Bryant as a '{{baka}}' 'UsefulNotes/{{baka}}' (or 'idiot' in Japanese).
12th Jan '18 8:38:49 AM Kitchen90
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* BattleInTheRain / RedemptionInTheRain: Between Roy Batty and Rick Deckard near the film's end.

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* BattleInTheRain / RedemptionInTheRain: BattleInTheRain[=/=]RedemptionInTheRain: Between Roy Batty and Rick Deckard near the film's end.



** Gaff's multilingual Cityspeak, which is a mishmash of various languages including Spanish, Japanese, German and Hungarian. "Lófasz! Nehogy már!" is one of the first things he says to Deckard and it translates to "Horse Dick! No way! You are the Blade... [[TitleDrop Blade Runner!]]" Becomes a Trilingual Bonus when you realize the name Philip is derived from the Latin for "lover of horses (philo = love, hippo = horse)". Thus, "Horse Dick" = a bizarre insult/term of endearment as well as a reference to Philip K. Dick. The author himself even inserted an AuthorAvatar named Horselover Fat into some of his works. The deleted scenes feature further bonuses as Gaff's refers to Bryant as a 'baka' (or 'idiot' in Japanese).

to:

** Gaff's multilingual Cityspeak, which is a mishmash of various languages including Spanish, Japanese, German and Hungarian. "Lófasz! Nehogy már!" is one of the first things he says to Deckard and it translates to "Horse Dick! No way! You are the Blade... [[TitleDrop Blade Runner!]]" Becomes a Trilingual Bonus when you realize the name Philip is derived from the Latin for "lover of horses (philo = love, hippo = horse)". Thus, "Horse Dick" = a bizarre insult/term of endearment as well as a reference to Philip K. Dick. The author himself even inserted an AuthorAvatar named Horselover Fat into some of his works. The deleted scenes feature further bonuses as Gaff's refers to Bryant as a 'baka' '{{baka}}' (or 'idiot' in Japanese).
8th Dec '17 8:07:44 PM JesseMB27
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Added DiffLines:

* MeatSackRobot: The Replicants are this being that they are synthetically created human bodies controlled by an AI (though in the original novel (''Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep'' by Philip Dick) from which this 1982 film was adapted from, Roy and his comrades were androids called "Andies" for short.
24th Nov '17 3:27:19 AM jormis29
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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: After Roy interrogates Hannibal Chew (James Hong's character) we never see Hannibal again.

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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: After Roy interrogates Hannibal Chew (James Hong's (Creator/JamesHong's character) we never see Hannibal again.
9th Nov '17 7:30:46 PM smasll_lordvoice
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Added DiffLines:

* RedemptionInTheRain: [[spoiler: Roy Batty]]'s iconic final moments. "And all those moments will be lost in time...like tears...in rain."
5th Nov '17 2:35:54 AM eroock
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*The name has always seemed indicative to this troper. The job of a "Blade Runner" is to kill replicants, who are artificial humans so perfectly like non-technolgically manufactured humans that it takes an elaborate testing proceedure to determine the difference. The replicants who are being hunted are in a situation that would both invoke sympathy in most persons possessing a conventional moral sense (slaves escaping bondage) AND give them every logical reason to strike back violently at their pursuers.

This situation obviously creates a rather vicious Catch-22 dichotomy: the cops sent to pursue them might grow to empathise with their prey, in which case they might let them go (becoming criminals themselves) or hesitate in a confrontation and then die when their built-for-combat opponent takes advantage of that hesitation.

Conversely, a more callous "Blade Runner" might start considering everyone they intereact with as a potential Replicant target, and eventually end up "retiring" a non-replicant human, becoming a COMPLETE sociopath, as well as ending up fired and/or jailed if the person they killed was "important".
So, morally, professionally and psychologically, the individual cop is always on the "edge of a blade"; prone to falling off of one side (too compassionate = dead) or the other (totally uncaring murderer).

* NoodleIncident: In the Director's Cut and The Final Cut, Deckard's reason for originally leaving the police is never stated.

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\n *The name has always seemed indicative to this troper. The job of a "Blade Runner" is to kill replicants, who are artificial humans so perfectly like non-technolgically manufactured humans that it takes an elaborate testing proceedure to determine the difference. The replicants who are being hunted are in a situation that would both invoke sympathy in most persons possessing a conventional moral sense (slaves escaping bondage) AND give them every logical reason to strike back violently at their pursuers.\n\n This situation obviously creates a rather vicious Catch-22 dichotomy: the cops sent to pursue them might grow to empathise with their prey, in which case they might let them go (becoming criminals themselves) or hesitate in a confrontation and then die when their built-for-combat opponent takes advantage of that hesitation.\n\n Conversely, a more callous "Blade Runner" might start considering everyone they intereact with as a potential Replicant target, and eventually end up "retiring" a non-replicant human, becoming a COMPLETE sociopath, as well as ending up fired and/or jailed if the person they killed was "important".\n So, morally, professionally and psychologically, the individual cop is always on the "edge of a blade"; prone to falling off of one side (too compassionate = dead) or the other (totally uncaring murderer).\n\n * NoodleIncident: In the Director's Cut and The Final Cut, Deckard's reason for originally leaving the police is never stated.
5th Nov '17 1:12:17 AM Cantido
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Added DiffLines:

* AndTheAdventureContinues: The film ends just as Deckard and Rachel flee for their lives.
4th Nov '17 10:31:26 AM NessaEllenesse
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4th Nov '17 10:30:32 AM NessaEllenesse
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So, morally, professionally and psychologically, the individual cop is always on the "edge of a blade"; prone to falling off of one side (too compassionate = dead) or the other (totally uncaring murderer).

to:

\n So, morally, professionally and psychologically, the individual cop is always on the "edge of a blade"; prone to falling off of one side (too compassionate = dead) or the other (totally uncaring murderer).
4th Nov '17 10:28:03 AM NessaEllenesse
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° The name has always seemed indicative to this troper. The job of a "Blade Runner" is to kill replicants, who are artificial humans so perfectly like non-technolgically manufactured humans that it takes an elaborate testing proceedure to determine the difference. The replicants who are being hunted are in a situation that would both invoke sympathy in most persons possessing a conventional moral sense (slaves escaping bondage) AND give them every logical reason to strike back violently at their pursuers.

This situation obviously creates a rather vicious Catch-22 dichotomy: the cops sent to pursue them might grow to empathise with their prey, in which case they might let them go (becoming criminals themselves) or hesitate in a confrontation and then die when their built-for-combat opponent takes advantage of that hesitation.

Conversely, a more callous "Blade Runner" might start considering everyone they intereact with as a potential Replicant target, and eventually end up "retiring" a non-replicant human, becoming a COMPLETE sociopath, as well as ending up fired and/or jailed if the person they killed was "important".

So, morally, professionally and psychologically, the individual cop is always on the "edge of a blade"; prone to falling off of one side (too compassionate = dead) or the other (totally uncaring murderer).

to:

° The *The name has always seemed indicative to this troper. The job of a "Blade Runner" is to kill replicants, who are artificial humans so so perfectly like non-technolgically manufactured humans that it takes an elaborate testing proceedure to determine the difference. The replicants replicants who are being hunted are in a situation that would both invoke sympathy in most persons possessing a conventional moral sense (slaves escaping escaping bondage) AND give them every logical reason to strike back violently at their pursuers.

pursuers.

This situation obviously creates a rather vicious Catch-22 dichotomy: the cops sent to pursue them might grow to empathise with their prey, prey, in which case they might let them go (becoming criminals themselves) or hesitate in a confrontation and then die when their built-for-combat built-for-combat opponent takes advantage of that hesitation.

hesitation.

Conversely, a more callous "Blade Runner" might start considering everyone they intereact with as a potential Replicant target, and and eventually end up "retiring" a non-replicant human, becoming a COMPLETE sociopath, as well as ending up fired and/or jailed if the person they they killed was "important".

"important".

So, morally, professionally and psychologically, the individual cop is always on the "edge of a blade"; prone to falling off of one side side (too compassionate = dead) or the other (totally uncaring murderer).
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