History Film / AngelsInTheOutfield

24th Jun '17 10:54:20 AM CaptEquinox
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** The whole "Real Angels" deal being rejected also makes no sense since this is set in the USA, where the overwhelming majority of people are Christians. Christians not believing in heavenly help is just silly, but many actually do not believe in that level of direct intervention. The arbitrary distinction is lampshaded by Maggie at the sanity hearing.

to:

** The whole "Real Angels" deal being rejected also makes no sense might seem ludicrous since this is set in the USA, where the overwhelming majority of people are Christians. Christians not believing in heavenly help is might just look silly, but many actually do not believe in that level of direct intervention. intervention and certainly not in sports as opposed to, say, natural disasters where people inexplicably survive. In the original film, the ''nuns'' discount angelic assistance on the ballfield and Sister Edwitha loudly denies it to the press, insisting that Bridget had "been out in the sun too long." She later has the child hospitalized and brings in a psychiatrist. Bridget is completely cognizant of what's going on: "Sure. You want to find out if I'm wacky."
**
The arbitrary distinction is lampshaded by Maggie at the sanity hearing.



* IncorruptiblePurePureness: Seems to be a prerequisite for seeing angels. Only the innocent children can do it. Duffy never sees the angels even after he completely reforms. [[spoiler:Knox can see Al at the very end of the movie when he completes his CharacterDevelopment.]]

to:

* IncorruptiblePurePureness: Seems to be a prerequisite for seeing angels. Only the innocent children can do it. Duffy never sees the angels even after he completely reforms. Out of all the children, only Bridget sees them, reasoning that it's because she's been praying for the team. [[spoiler:Knox can see Al at the very end of the movie when he completes his CharacterDevelopment.]]



* MissingMom: In the Disney version, we learn this in ''the second line of the movie''.

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* MissingMom: In the Disney version, we learn this in ''the second line of the movie''. In the original, we are never told what happened to Bridget's parents, only that she's lived at the Home her entire life.
24th Jun '17 10:46:34 AM CaptEquinox
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* HeartwarmingOrphan: Bridget White, eight years old. She lost both parents at age two and has lived in St. Gabriel's Home for Orphan Girls ever since.

to:

* HeartwarmingOrphan: Bridget White, eight years old. She lost both parents at age two and has lived in St. Gabriel's Home for Orphan Girls ever since.the orphanage all her life.
24th Jun '17 2:34:47 AM CaptEquinox
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Both versions are standard kids' movies but feel-good ones ultimately about the power of faith wrapped around a sports story. The 1994 version was followed by two [[MadeForTVMovie Made For TV sequels]] , 1997's ''Angels in the Endzone'' (Same thing as ''Outfield'', but football) and 2000's ''Angels in the Infield'' which replaced Christopher Lloyd with David Alan Grier as the head angel.

to:

Both versions are standard kids' movies -- the original has appeal to adults as well -- but feel-good ones ultimately about the power of faith wrapped around a sports story. The 1994 version was followed by two [[MadeForTVMovie Made For TV sequels]] , 1997's ''Angels in the Endzone'' (Same thing as ''Outfield'', but football) and 2000's ''Angels in the Infield'' which replaced Christopher Lloyd with David Alan Grier as the head angel.



* {{Angrish}}: Knox in the remake is said to be profane, but to keep the rating appropriate for small children the audience just hears Knox muffled and from a distance. Roger covers up JP's ears and then suggests to Knox that the angels might not like to hear so much cussing.

to:

* {{Angrish}}: Duffy's foul, filthy mouth is depicted by cutting the audio to pieces, sticking it back together at random and playing it backwards.
**
Knox in the remake is said to be profane, but to keep the rating appropriate for small children the audience just hears Knox muffled and from a distance. Roger covers up JP's ears and then suggests to Knox that the angels might not like to hear so much cussing.



** The whole "Real Angels" deal being rejected also makes no sense since this is set in the USA, where the overwhelming majority of people are Christians. Christians not believing in heavenly help is just silly. The arbitrary distinction is lampshaded by Maggie at the sanity hearing.

to:

** The whole "Real Angels" deal being rejected also makes no sense since this is set in the USA, where the overwhelming majority of people are Christians. Christians not believing in heavenly help is just silly.silly, but many actually do not believe in that level of direct intervention. The arbitrary distinction is lampshaded by Maggie at the sanity hearing.



* BadBoss:
** George Knox starts off as this; [[DefrostingIceQueen He gets better though]].

to:

* BadBoss:
** George Knox
BadBoss: Duffy starts off as this; this. [[DefrostingIceQueen He gets better though]]. though]].
** George Knox likewise.



* Bowdlerize: George Knox accuses his players of having their "heads up [their] butts." TV airings change this to "screwed on backwards."

to:

* Bowdlerize: In the remake, George Knox accuses his players of having their "heads up [their] butts." TV airings change this to "screwed on backwards."



* ChildrenRaiseYou: Knox becomes less of a grump and more of a ReasonableAuthorityFigure by surrogate parenting Roger and JP.

to:

* ChildrenRaiseYou: Knox Duffy learns a lot from Bridget and becomes less of a grump and more of a ReasonableAuthorityFigure as he begins to ease into a fatherly role.
** Knox in the sequel,
by surrogate parenting Roger and JP.



* CrazyEnoughToWork: When an angel shows up besides a player, Roger has to convince Knox to use him even if it goes against all common sense. For instance, Roger suggests that Knox have his light-hitting bench player pinch-hit for his cleanup hitter in the bottom of the 9th because of an angel presence.

to:

* CrazyEnoughToWork: When You never see the angels in the original film. It's all done subtly and explained as the angels inspiring Duffy and his players to make better decisions on the field. At one point Duffy tells the batting coach "Tell him to bunt -- No. Let him hit away." The batter socks it over the left field fence and the coach asks how he knew, since this man isn't much of a longball hitter. Duffy says he just "had a feeling", but his hat is knocked off seconds later and we're to understand one of the angels did it in affection.
** In the remake, when
an angel shows up besides a player, Roger has to convince Knox to use him even if it goes against all common sense. For instance, Roger suggests that Knox have his light-hitting bench player pinch-hit for his cleanup hitter in the bottom of the 9th because of an angel presence.



* GodIsGood: Roger prays for a miracle (The Angels team winning the pennant) and his prayers are answered by angels descending from Heaven to help TheTeam.
* HappilyAdopted: [[spoiler: Knox adopts Roger and JP in the ending and they are all ecstatic.]]
* HeartwarmingOrphan: Both Roger and JP but especially JP because he's also TheCutie.

to:

* GodIsGood: Roger prays All the orphans and the nuns are huge Pirates fans and Bridget's been praying for a miracle (The Angels the team winning ever since they hit the pennant) and his slump. Her prayers are answered by angels descending from Heaven to help TheTeam.
** In the remake, Roger prays for a miracle (The Angels team winning the pennant), although his motivation is different.
* HappilyAdopted: [[spoiler: Knox adopts Roger Bridget ends up adopted by Duffy and JP in the ending and they are all ecstatic.Jennifer.]]
** [[spoiler: Knox adopts Roger and JP in the ending and they are all ecstatic.]]
* HeartwarmingOrphan: Bridget White, eight years old. She lost both parents at age two and has lived in St. Gabriel's Home for Orphan Girls ever since.
**
Both Roger and JP but especially JP because he's also TheCutie.



* IncorruptiblePurePureness: Seems to be a prerequisite for seeing angels. Only the innocent children can do it. [[spoiler:Knox can see Al at the very end of the movie when he completes his CharacterDevelopment.]]

to:

* IncorruptiblePurePureness: Seems to be a prerequisite for seeing angels. Only the innocent children can do it. Duffy never sees the angels even after he completely reforms. [[spoiler:Knox can see Al at the very end of the movie when he completes his CharacterDevelopment.]]]]



* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: Lots of them in the Disney version with Knox being an obvious example. Despite the cranky personality he's baseline good.

to:

* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: Duffy, obviously.
**
Lots of them in the Disney version with Knox being an obvious example. Despite the cranky personality he's baseline good.



* MissingMom: We learn this in ''the second line of the movie''.

to:

* MissingMom: We In the Disney version, we learn this in ''the second line of the movie''.



** None of this happens in the original film; instead, Hellman is clearly tiring, Duffy wants to take him out but he says he wants to continue.



* NoIndoorVoice: George Knox has a loud and exuberant voice.

to:

* NoIndoorVoice: Duffy [=McGovern=] and George Knox has a have loud and exuberant voice.voices.



* OurAngelsAreDifferent: The angels fit the standard good-guys-with-wings image, as befits a feel-good kids' movie. They are repelled by foul language, being pure and ethical in all respects. At one point, Al intervenes to interrupt Knox's argument with an umpire. He makes Knox pleasantly agree with the umpire instead.

to:

* OurAngelsAreDifferent: The angels fit the standard good-guys-with-wings image, as befits a feel-good kids' movie. They are repelled by foul language, being pure and ethical in all respects. The one who originally exhorts Duffy to change his ways is a pretty tough but clean talker and hints he and the other angels (the "Heavenly Choir Nine") are former ballplayers.
**
At one point, Al intervenes to interrupt Knox's argument with an umpire. He makes Knox pleasantly agree with the umpire instead.instead.
*** This happens to Duffy, and he reminds his angel that he has to be able to argue with the umpires; the angel tells him there's plenty of clean language he can use. He begins by reading Shakespeare and using FloweryElizabethanEnglish epithets:
---> '''Umpire.''' Fair!
---> '''Duffy.''' (''stalking out onto the field'') Fair? Fair? Fair ball? Why, thou knave, thou dolt! Thou hast eyes but seest not!
---> '''Umpire 2.''' You heard him, he said fair.
---> '''Duffy.''' Fie, fie upon you and a pox upon you too. Thou art blind, thou black-livered bat!



** In all fairness, the new version just had them lending a hand, so to speak. They don't influence every play of every game and explicitly don't show up at all for the championship.

to:

** In all fairness, the new version just had them lending a hand, so to speak. They In both pictures, they don't influence every play of every game and explicitly don't show up at all for the championship.



** In the original they don't get this explicit. "I would like to say a few words about today's endeavour with the Cincinnatis. '''OF ALL THE'''..." [the rest is gibberish, but Jennifer's shocked expression tells us what he's saying]



* SecretlyDying: [[spoiler: Mel Clark. Even he doesn't know he has terminal lung cancer.]]

to:

* SecretlyDying: Hellman, and he probably knows it.
** In the remake,
[[spoiler: Mel Clark. Even he doesn't know he has terminal lung cancer.]]



* WhamLine: [[spoiler: "I came to check up on Mel. He's coming up soon. Going to be one of us."]]

to:

* WhamLine: "That won't make any difference, he won't be around next season. We're signing him up in the spring."
**
[[spoiler: "I came to check up on Mel. He's coming up soon. Going to be one of us."]]
31st Mar '17 3:15:14 AM gjjones
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* HoistByHisOwnPetard: Ranch badmouths George and the entire team on air in the final play of the game right after the entire stadium throws all their support behind Mel on the pitcher's mound. Mr. Murphy hears it all and fires him after the game.

to:

* HoistByHisOwnPetard: Ranch badmouths George and the entire team on air in the final play of the game right after the entire stadium throws all their support behind Mel on the pitcher's mound. Mr. Murphy hears it all and fires him after the game.



** Ranch Wilder. It's heavily implied that he slid spikes up into George Knox's knee which caused the injury that ended his career. Not only does he all but gloat to him about it on the air (prompting a well deserved punch to the face), but he takes every opportunity to smear Knox to the Angels faithful. He also manipulates the naive and distraught JP into spilling the beans on the assistance from on high, resulting very nearly in Knox's termination as manager. This windbag deserves every inch of what he gets at the end of the movie - FIRED.

to:

** Ranch Wilder. It's heavily implied that he slid spikes up into George Knox's knee which caused the injury that ended his career. Not only does he all but gloat to him about it on the air (prompting a well deserved punch to the face), but he takes every opportunity to smear Knox to the Angels faithful. He also manipulates the naive and distraught JP into spilling the beans on the assistance from on high, resulting very nearly in Knox's termination as manager. This windbag deserves every inch of what he gets at the end of the movie - FIRED.''fired''.



* NoIndoorVoice: George Knox.

to:

* NoIndoorVoice: George Knox. Knox has a loud and exuberant voice.
* OhCrap: Knox in the remake when he realizes that he's going to be fired for saying that there are real angels.
22nd Mar '17 9:45:26 AM Tegid
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** The whole "Real Angels" deal being rejected also makes no sense since this is set in the USA, where the overwhelming majority of people are Christians. Christians not believing in heavenly help is just silly.

to:

** The whole "Real Angels" deal being rejected also makes no sense since this is set in the USA, where the overwhelming majority of people are Christians. Christians not believing in heavenly help is just silly. The arbitrary distinction is lampshaded by Maggie at the sanity hearing.
---> '''Maggie:''' When a professional football player drops to one knee to thank God for making a touchdown, nobody laughs at that. Or when a pitcher crosses himself before going to the mound, no one laughs at that either. It's like you're saying it's okay to believe in God, but it's not okay to believe in angels.
4th Jan '17 5:28:01 PM Kinola
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[[Bowdlerize]]: George Knox accuses his players of having their "heads up [their] butts." TV airings change this to "screwed on backwards."

to:

[[Bowdlerize]]: * Bowdlerize: George Knox accuses his players of having their "heads up [their] butts." TV airings change this to "screwed on backwards."
21st Dec '16 12:38:21 PM EnglishGuruLady
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Added DiffLines:

[[Bowdlerize]]: George Knox accuses his players of having their "heads up [their] butts." TV airings change this to "screwed on backwards."
2nd Nov '16 4:23:27 AM Morgenthaler
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* CaliforniaDoubling: Oakland Coliseum (in [=NorCal=]) stands in for Anaheim Stadium (in [=SoCal=]) for logistical reasons. At the time, Anaheim Stadium was a complete closed-off stadium due to upper deck seating in the outfield, so there would've been no way for the kids to peep into the game from the outside. The Angels' stadium is also located in a business area, while the Coliseum is in more of a residential location, where it would make sense that Roger could see the stadium from his house.
14th Oct '16 1:03:06 PM megarockman
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* CueTheFlyingPigs: Roger's dad's quip of him and Roger getting back to becoming a family again "maybe when the Angels win the pennant" was meant to be the equivalent of "when pigs fly", seeing as how at the All-Star Break (a little after the mid-point of the season) the Angels were dead last and mired in a 15-game losing streak[[note]]For reference, the all-time longest losing streak in the AL is owned by the 1988 Baltimore Orioles, who started their season 0-21[[/note]]. Roger [[InnocentInaccurate thought he was being literal]] and prayed to God for this to happen. [[spoiler: Subverted when Roger's dad officially gives up custody and walks out of the courtroom just as Roger enters despite the Angels' sudden turaround in the standings.]]

to:

* CueTheFlyingPigs: Roger's dad's quip of him and Roger getting back to becoming a family again "maybe when the Angels win the pennant" was meant to be the equivalent of "when pigs fly", seeing as how at the All-Star Break (a little after the mid-point of the season) the Angels were dead last and mired in a 15-game losing streak[[note]]For reference, the all-time longest losing streak in the AL is owned by the 1988 Baltimore Orioles, who started their season 0-21[[/note]]. Roger [[InnocentInaccurate thought he was being literal]] and prayed to God for this to happen. [[spoiler: Subverted when Roger's dad officially gives up custody and walks out of the courtroom just as Roger enters despite the Angels' sudden turaround turnaround in the standings.standings. Then DoubleSubverted when, after the Angels win the pennant, Roger ''does'' get adopted by Knox (along with JP).]]



*** There was also a point in the movie where the divine intervention didn't show. Knox sees an amazing play made, and starts making the Angel Sign happily... only for Roger to shrug, meaning that wasn't an angel's doing. Knox is understandably shocked.

to:

*** There was also a point in the movie during the montage of amazing plays the Angels perform on their late-season climb where the divine intervention didn't show. Knox sees an amazing play made, and starts making the Angel Sign happily... only for Roger to shrug, meaning that wasn't an angel's doing. Knox is understandably shocked.



** In all fairness, the new version just had them lending a hand, so to speak. They don't influence every play of every game and explictly don't show up at all for the championship.

to:

** In all fairness, the new version just had them lending a hand, so to speak. They don't influence every play of every game and explictly explicitly don't show up at all for the championship.



--> '''George Knox''': One more loss! One more loss which could've been a win! You call yourselves ''professionals''. I have never, ever seen a worse group of twenty-five players! You don't think as a team, you don't play as a team, you don't even ''LOSE'' as a team! You've all got your heads so far up your ''butts'', you can't even see the light of day! One more loss and I'll...and I'll do this... (throws a chair at a rack of bats) to each and every one of you! (...) I want you ''here'' in uniform at nine tomorrow! We're going back to work on ''fundamentals''!

to:

--> '''George Knox''': One more loss! One more loss which could've been a win! You And you call yourselves ''professionals''. I have never, ever seen a worse group of twenty-five players! You don't think as a team, you don't play as a team, you don't even ''LOSE'' as a team! You've all got your heads so far up your ''butts'', you can't even see the light of day! One more loss and I'll...and I'll do this... (throws a chair at a rack of bats) to each and every one of you! (...) I want you ''here'' in uniform at nine tomorrow! We're going back to work on practicing ''fundamentals''!
25th Aug '16 5:19:04 PM gjjones
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* RousingSpeech: Towards the end of the film, Maggie gives one of these to Hank, inspiring the entire team to profess their faith in Knox and allow him to keep his job.

to:

* RousingSpeech: Towards At Knox's press conference in the end of the film, Disney version, Maggie gives one of these to Hank, inspiring about the angels helping the team win, which inspires the entire team to profess their faith in Knox and allow him to keep his job.
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