History Film / AClockWorkOrange

21st Mar '17 4:21:50 PM marcoasalazarm
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* TheLudovicoTechnique: The TropeNamer scene where Alex is brainwashed into becoming non-violent, with a rig keeping his eyes open (and him being tied with a straightjacket) and needing someone to apply drops to his eyes (and interestingly, at one point during filming the rig nearly hurt Mc Dowell's eyes). Nowadays oft given a ShoutOut as a method of brainwashing or torture.

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* TheLudovicoTechnique: The TropeNamer scene where Alex is brainwashed into becoming non-violent, with a rig keeping his eyes open (and him being tied with a straightjacket) and needing someone to apply drops to his eyes (and interestingly, at one point during filming the rig nearly hurt Mc Dowell's eyes). Nowadays oft often given a ShoutOut as a method of brainwashing or torture.
21st Mar '17 4:20:50 PM marcoasalazarm
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* LudovicoTechnique: The TropeNamer scene where Alex is brainwashed into becoming non-violent, with a rig keeping his eyes open (and him being tied with a straightjacket) and needing someone to apply drops to his eyes (and interestingly, at one point during filming the rig nearly hurt Mc Dowell's eyes). Nowadays oft given a ShoutOut as a method of brainwashing or torture.

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* LudovicoTechnique: TheLudovicoTechnique: The TropeNamer scene where Alex is brainwashed into becoming non-violent, with a rig keeping his eyes open (and him being tied with a straightjacket) and needing someone to apply drops to his eyes (and interestingly, at one point during filming the rig nearly hurt Mc Dowell's eyes). Nowadays oft given a ShoutOut as a method of brainwashing or torture.
21st Mar '17 4:19:56 PM marcoasalazarm
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Added DiffLines:

* LudovicoTechnique: The TropeNamer scene where Alex is brainwashed into becoming non-violent, with a rig keeping his eyes open (and him being tied with a straightjacket) and needing someone to apply drops to his eyes (and interestingly, at one point during filming the rig nearly hurt Mc Dowell's eyes). Nowadays oft given a ShoutOut as a method of brainwashing or torture.
9th Mar '17 4:46:16 PM CumbersomeTercel
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* AdaptationalConsent: In the book, Alex lures two ten-year-old girls to his flat and proceeds to drug and rape them, whereas in the film this is changed to Alex having consensual sex with two teenage girls around his age. This was probably because even Creator/StanleyKubrick didn't think he could get away with depicting the scene as it appeared in the books on screen.



* AgeInappropriateDress: Alex's mother dresses like a Carnaby Street mod.



* ArchEnemy: Alex [=DeLarge=] to Frank Alexander.



* BadCopIncompetentCop: George and Dim are as violent and vicious as cops as they were in their respective gangs. Also, the only scene in which they're shown (as cops) has them being concerned with revenge, as Alex was known to tolchock both of them repeatedly.



* BehavioralConditioning: The Ludivico Technique involves forcing Alex to watch videos of violence while being injected with drugs that induce nausea. As a result, the thought of violence makes him sick to his stomach. The story explores the moral ramifications of this kind of conditioning, even when accepted voluntarily.



* BigBad: Alex [=DeLarge=].
* BigShutUp: "SHUT YOUR BLEEDING HOLE!"



* {{Blipvert}}: The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPRzm8ibDQ8 trailer]]



* BoundAndGagged: Alex and his droogs improvise ball gags out of rubber super balls and cellophane tape when they break into Frank Alexander's house. Works real horrorshow, too.
* {{Brainwashed}} Alex is strapped down and forced to watch violent scenes while a drug that induces nausea is pumped into him to make him feel repulsion for violence. And sex. And Beethoven's music (because the film included it in the background).



* CaptiveAudience: Alex's reeducation.

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* CaptiveAudience: Alex's reeducation involves him being strapped into a chair and forced to watch scenes of violence that are set to classical music as part of his reeducation.



* CharacterSignatureSong: Despite being a Beethoven fan Alex is seen singing "Singin' In The Rain" twice. It's this that causes him to be recognized by one of his former victims.
* ClassyCane: Alex carries a cane that possesses a knife hidden within.



* CoolAndUnusualPunishment: Alex is forced to sit with his eyes peeled open while watching films about Nazis and violence to pay for his crimes of murder, rape, torture, statutory rape, and drug-taking via milk. Aversion therapy is used to make him sick at the sight of violence— and as a side-effect, the doctors administering the punishment used his beloved classical music to enhance the emotional effect, making him unable to enjoy the music either.



* CreepyBlueEyes: Alex has blue eyes of the "Grade-A psycho" [[http://www.dreadcentral.com/img/news/may08/7ds7b.jpg variety]].
* CultOfPersonality: Alex adores Beethoven.



* DastardlyDapperDerby: Alex and his droogs wear bowlers.



* DownerEnding: Without the epilogue, the film ends with [[spoiler:Alex, presumably, ready to resume his life of crime uninterrupted]].

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* DownerEnding: Without the epilogue, the The film ends with [[spoiler:Alex, presumably, ready to resume controversially removed the some might say vital last chapter of the novel, altering the message of the entire work substantially. In the novel, Alex voluntarily relinquishes his former life of crime uninterrupted]].ultraviolence and rape after having the effects of the brainwashing "Ludovico technique" reversed, and hence having his ability to act as an autonomous moral agent restored. In the film, he is implied to have simply returned to his previous vicious and amoral state, with the chilling final words ''"I was cured, alright"''.



* DrivesLikeCrazy: Alex and his droogs have a game they like to play, called "Hogs of the Road".
* DrunkOnMilk: Alex and his violent droogs are first seen with glasses of milk in their hands at their favorite hangout, the Korova Milk Bar. Alex's narration is quick to point out, however, that the milk is laced with various psychotropic drugs to "sharpen you up for a bit of the old ultraviolence."



* ElderlyBlueHairedLady: Alex's mother is shown with bluish-purplish hair. While audiences now might guess that she's a superannuated punk rocker, her color is an exaggerated blue rinse treatment.
* EroticEating: The two girls Alex met in a record store were sucking on popsicles. Not just any popsicles, either; they're actually ... um ... ''anatomically correct'' popsicles.
* EstablishingCharacterMoment: The very first shot is Alex leering into the camera while a synthetic funeral march blares on the soundtrack, establishing Alex's strong, hypnotic and thoroughly evil personality before the voice-over even mentions "the old ultraviolence."



* EvilHero: While Alex is no angel himself, the fact that TheGovernment would be willing to use [[MindRape nausea-enducing]] [[ColdBloodedTorture Pavlov related torture]], basically [[MoreThanMindControl stripping]] [[TheEvilsOFFreeWill free will]] from the brain, on '''any''' human being makes you wonder if there are any real heroes left in the future world.
** How about the revelation that, in his absence, Alex's own [[{{Mook}} "droogs"]] have somehow become cops, cops that hold no second thought on nearly drowning a comrade that they abandoned to the authorities in the first place, and [[KarmaHoudini getting away with it]].



* FanDisservice: There are several quite explicit rape or near-rape scenes.

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* FanDisservice: There are several quite explicit rape or near-rape scenes. As a result, rape footage is among the many scenes of violence Alex is forced to watch as part of The Ludovico Technique meant to "cure" him. The film also does this in a more pleasant way to Alex's consensual three-way with a couple of girls pre-Technique, which is sped up and set to the William Tell Overture with hilarious results that underscore how little sex means to him.



* FantasticDrug: Substances like "synthemesc" (presumably mescaline or a close analogue), "drencrom" (presumably adrenochrome) and "vellocet" (given the resemblance to "velocity", probably "speed"-like amphetamines) are all normally mixed into milk (thus why it's called ""milk plus", as in milk plus whatever you put in it.



* FreudianThreat:
** Mr. Deltoid, a truancy officer, grabs Alex's crotch while warning him of the dangers of his skipping school.
** However, his extremely creepy actions throughout this scene suggest he did this more because he's a pervert than because he was trying to frighten Alex.



* FutureSlang: "Nadsat," a kind of future slang based largely on Russian (for example, one of Alex's favorite adjectives, "horrorshow," sounds a bit like Russian khorosho, "very good") ... but not as much as the book did.
* GangOfHats: Alex and his droogs wear identical outfits, including codpieces, bowlers, and canes. This is intended to be the current fashion of his lifestyle group, as evidenced by fellow patrons of the Korova Milk Bar. Billy Boy's gang wears Nazi regalia and ruffled silk dress shirts. In the films used for Alex's treatment, we see a number of other gangs wearing strange and identical uniforms.
* {{Gaslighting}}: Kubrick did this to the ''viewer''. He made continuity errors on purpose during the scene where Alex has dinner with the author. The dishes on the table move around and the level of wine in the glasses change between shots.



* GroinAttack: Mr. Deltoid punches Alex in the groin in his first scene.

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* GroinAttack: GrievousBottleyHarm: After the gang betrays Alex, George smashes a full milk bottle across his face. Played at least somewhat realistically, as Alex drops to the ground in agony.
* GroinAttack:
**
Mr. Deltoid punches Alex in the groin in his first scene.



* {{Guyliner}}: Alex wears false eyelashes on one eye when with his droogs.
* HalfwayPlotSwitch: Like the book, the film was specifically divided into three parts. The first introduces Alex and shows us the dystopian world in which he lives as we see him and his droogs go out and do all kinds of nasty things. Then we get to the second plot centered around the experimental rehabilitation technique, and finally the third story where Alex must deal with the effects of the technique.



* HellIsThatNoise: "I'm singin' in the rain, just singin' in the rain..."



* HumiliationConga: Alex undergoes one after leaving jail.

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* HollywoodPersonalityDisorders: Alex has Anti-Social Personality Disorder. He enjoys ultra-violence as a pastime and is this is why he is conditioned to become violently ill if he tries it again. It was the only way to stop him.
* HospitalGurneyScene: A famous tracking shot shows Alex getting wheeled in on a gurney down a long hospital hallway.
* HumiliationConga: Alex undergoes goes through one after leaving jail.when he gets released, though it might just have been karmic retribution. He ''did'' volunteer for the Ludovico experiment (failing to heed the warnings of the prison chaplain), although he had no idea what the experience would entail (namely, being conditioned to become violently ill whenever he feels horny, witnesses violence or tries to act violently, and worst of all when he hears his favorite piece of music, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony). But he certainly never intended to lose his pet snake, or for his parents to take in a boarder and allow the boarder to rent out Alex's room, and they even consider said boarder as their son. The homeless old Irishman gets a well-deserved [[TheDogBitesBack Dog Bites Back]] moment at Alex's expense, but there is particular unfairness to Alex's mistreatment at the hands of a pair of crooked cops: the cops are none other than two of Alex's former thug friends, who were responsible for sending Alex up the river in the first place!



* IconicOutfit: Alex's boots, pajamas, jockstrap, bowler and fake eyelash on one eye.
* InstantConvertible: Averted. They're already in a convertible, and it suffers no damage whatsoever when it goes under a truck.
* InterplayOfSexAndViolence: The violence and rape is played out among images of nudity. You know the bit in the book where Alex beats the woman to death? He uses a plaster penis as the weapon in the movie.
* IronicNurseryRhyme: The film doesn't use a nursery rhyme, but it uses the next best thing: "Singin' in the Rain".. Alex sings this song while he and his droogs torture an old writer and rape his wife.



* KungShui: The fight between the droogs and Billy Boy's gang is a long sequence of prop chairs, bottles and sheet glass breaking over people's heads. In a bit of meta-humor, they're fighting in a theater.



* TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers: The Tagline:
-->Being the adventures of a young man whose principal interests are rape, ultra-violence and Beethoven.



* LeftTheBackgroundMusicOn: A synthesized version of the Funeral of Queen Mary is heard in the Korova milk bar, first during the intro and in a later scene where Alex and his droogs make a second visit. In the latter, Alex mentions in his narration that said music is actually coming from the bar's sound system, and as he describes its disc coming to a halt, a woman there starts singing a piece from Beethoven's 9th, much to Alex's delight. Some other scenes show tapes and reels being played, serving as the background music; one of them plays a pivotal role during the Ludovico Treatment, making Alex paralyzed whenever he hears the 9th.



* LoudOfWar: Mr. Alexander tortures Alex by locking him in a room and playing Beethoven at him.



* MatterOfLifeAndDeath:
-->'''Alex''': ''Missus! It's a matter of life and death!''



* MindRape: The Ludovico Treatment.

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* MindRape: The Ludovico Treatment.Treatment is nicely summed up by this trope; Alex is tortured mentally to the point where his ultra-violent hobbies cause him pain, to achieve a form of brainwashing that will "reform" him.



* MoodDissonance: Horrible violence and classical music.



** The story is ultimately a tremendous, social ordeal with plenty of heinous and/or pointless crimes commited by both Alex and the government, but it all ends in a chirpy note with Gene Kelly's original, uplifting version of ''Singing in the Rain''

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** The story is ultimately a tremendous, social ordeal with plenty of heinous and/or pointless crimes commited by both Alex and the government, but it all ends in a chirpy note with Gene Kelly's Creator/GeneKelly's original, uplifting version of ''Singing in the Rain''Rain''.



* NakedFreakOut: A young woman is stripped by Billy's gang, and she runs off naked when Alex and his crew arrive on the scene looking for a fight.
* NakedPeopleAreFunny: Very much subverted thrice (two of them in the first 20 minutes). And played straight in a sped-up montage of a menage a trois.



* NoHoldsBarredBeatdown: What Alex and his droogs do to the drunken homeless guy at the beginning of the film. After his treatment, Alex receives one from a group of bums as well as his former droogs.



* TheOner:
** In one scene, Alex's head is forced into an (obviously full) water trough while he is brutally beaten (complete with zany 'bong' sound effects). Apparently there was actually a breathing apparatus under the water, but it failed to work properly and [=McDowell=] did, indeed, nearly drown.
** The film's opening shot is one of the most iconic oners in film history, showing Alex giving a menacing, unblinking Kubrick Stare to the viewer as the camera slowly pans out and he gives a voiceover monologue.



* OutGambitted: [[spoiler: Frank Alexander drives Alex to suicide in hopes of using his death as a symbol of the government's corruption. Not only does Alex survive, but then the government decides to use him as their new poster boy, effectively destroying Alexander's credibility.]]

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* OutGambitted: OutGambitted:
**
[[spoiler: Frank Alexander drives Alex to suicide in hopes of using his death as a symbol of the government's corruption. Not only does Alex survive, but then the government decides to use him as their new poster boy, effectively destroying Alexander's credibility.]]



* OverTheShoulderCarry: Mrs. Alexander is slung over Dim's shoulder while Alex gags her and sings "Singin' in the Rain".



* PoliceState: It's strongly implied that the government is devolving into one of these. The "cure" itself even comes about because they need to free up space for future political prisoners, and the government starts recruiting street thugs as police (including Alex's former "droogs").



* PreAssKickingOneLiner: "Ho ho ho! Well if it isn't fat, stinking, billygoat Billyboy in poison! How art thou, thou globby bottle of cheap, stinking chip oil? Come and get one in the yarbles — if ya have any yarbles, ya eunuch jelly, thou!"



* PowerWalk: With a twist: the power walk suddenly degenerates into a fight, while everything is still in slow motion and cool music keeps playing (and is synchronized with the fight for added coolness).
* PublicDomainSoundtrack: The entirety of the soundtrack comprises classical pieces (fittingly, since the protagonist is expressly stated to be a classical music buff, which even becomes a plot point), some of them arranged for a Moog synthesizer to lend them a surreal, nightmarish quality.



* {{Satire}}: The film is a satire of the battle against violence in society.
* SceneryCensor: Subverted. When Alex is being checked in to the prison, he is stark naked with a box in front of the camera at groin level... then they remove the box.



* SlasherSmile: Alex whenever he gets deep into the old ultraviolence.



* SmugSmiler: Alex sports a pretty arrogant smile of his own.



* SpitefulSpit: Alex's probation officer, Deltoid, spits on his face after he is arrested.



* StrangeSyntaxSpeaker: The "Nadsat" slang often involves unusual word order, conjugation and word choice in addition to the mostly Russian-based slang words. The film's version is less pronounced than the book's, since the viewer only has about 90 minutes to become accustomed to it.



* TemptingFate: Alex is being interviewed while being fed by Mr. Alexander. During the interview, he says, "I get the feeling something bad is going to happen." Two seconds later, he's out like a light.



* TortureAlwaysWorks: Slightly ambiguous, but it seems to indicate that even if torture did work, would that really justify its use?
* TrademarkFavoriteFood: Alex with his Milk Plus, which he drinks in preparation for a bit of the old Ultraviolence.



* UnusualPetsForUnusualPeople: Sociopathic Alex owns a pet snake. This detail was not in the novel and in fact Malcolm [=McDowell=] was frightened of snakes

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* {{Undercrank}}: During the three-way sex scene, with the William Tell Overture as a soundtrack.
* UnusualPetsForUnusualPeople: Sociopathic Alex owns a pet snake. This detail was not in the novel and in fact Malcolm [=McDowell=] was frightened of snakessnakes.
* VagueAge: Apparently done deliberately in casting Creator/MalcolmMcDowell as Alex. The character is revealed to be fifteen in the book, while -[=McDowell=] appears to be somewhere in the rage of late teens to early twenties.


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* VillainSong: Alex sings "Singin' in the Rain".


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* WaterTorture: Dim and Billy beat up Alex and then forcibly dunk his head in a pig trough filled with water for a minute, nearly drowning him to death.


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* WhatIsEvil: When Alex's uncle speaks to him of right and wrong he says, "Come now, you know that's just a matter of words."
16th Feb '17 8:38:53 PM JulianLapostat
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** The finale where [[spoiler:Alex jumps out the window and we see a first-person view of Alex jumping out with the camera falling out the window simulating his fall is one for Creator/MaxOphuls' ''Le Plaisir'', whose third story ends this way. Ophuls film is even more elaborate since its a single setup following a girl climbing up the stairs, jumping out the window with the camera hitting the ground. Ophuls was one of Kubrick's favorite film-makers]].
9th Feb '17 9:52:55 AM Mdumas43073
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9th Feb '17 9:52:40 AM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:242:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/clockwork_3818.png]]

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[[quoteright:242:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/clockwork_3818.png]]org/pmwiki/pub/images/img_0817.JPG]]
2nd Feb '17 4:15:32 PM CumbersomeTercel
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* LighterAndSofter: For all of its reputation for shocking violence, the film is actually lighter than the book. In the book, Alex is even younger and more violently depraved. Most notably, the sex scene in the film was originally Alex raping two 10-year-olds (whereas in the film they are clearly the same age as Alex and have consensual sex with him ). The film also lightens things up with occasional slapstick humor. Likewise, in the book after he is free from the Ludovico treatment he fantasizes about rampaging around the world committing ultraviolence, whereas in the film he imagines having sex with one woman.

to:

* LighterAndSofter: For all of its reputation for shocking violence, the film is actually lighter than the book. In the book, Alex is even younger and more violently depraved. Most notably, the sex scene in the film was originally Alex raping two 10-year-olds (whereas in the film they are clearly the same age as Alex and have consensual sex with him ).him). The film also lightens things up with occasional slapstick humor. Likewise, in the book after he is free from the Ludovico treatment he fantasizes about rampaging around the world committing ultraviolence, whereas in the film he imagines having sex with one woman.



** The film's most [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faML0QvVb2A (in)famous scene]] is a sort of wicked reenactment of Gene's Kelly ''Film/SinginInTheRain''.

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** The film's most [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faML0QvVb2A (in)famous scene]] is a sort of wicked reenactment of Gene's Kelly Creator/GeneKelly ''Film/SinginInTheRain''.
29th Dec '16 3:46:29 AM Solle
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''A Clockwork Orange'' is a 1971 film by Creator/StanleyKubrick based on [[Literature/AClockworkOrange the eponymous 1962 novella]] by Creator/AnthonyBurgess. In a [[{{Dystopia}} dystopic]] future where [[TeenageWasteland street crime is rampant and youths are uncontrollable]], teenage sociopath Alex [=DeLarge=] (Creator/MalcolmMcDowell) and his "Droogs" [[TeensAreMonsters prowl the night spreading terror and destruction wherever they go]]. By daybreak, Alex returns home to his [[AdultsAreUseless vapid parents]], who turn a blind eye to his activities, and enjoys his second favorite thing in the world: classical music. On one particular night, his gang brutalizes some people they find on the street, then steal a sports car and drive out to an isolated mansion to torture and rape the resident couple. They finish the night off at their local watering hole, where they sip milk laced with narcotics.

Things are going swimmingly for Alex until his gang begins to chafe under his leadership. Alex is still content with pointless violence, but the gang is starting to grow up and think about making a profit. After a fight for supremacy, he reasserts himself as the leader, but bows to the gang's interest in robbing a wealthy widow's house. Alex takes the lead in the robbery, but the widow discovers him, leading to a fight. As the gang flees, they betray Alex and leave him for the police to apprehend. At the station, the police inform Alex that the widow died of her injuries, making him a murderer. He is quickly sentenced to a lengthy prison term.

In prison, Alex settles into his old habits, pretending to be a model prisoner while plotting his return to violence. When he discovers that the government is planning to test an experimental treatment on a prisoner in exchange for freedom, Alex jumps at the opportunity. The prison chaplain warns him not to volunteer, claiming that no external force can turn a man good, but Alex is only interested in getting free and returning to his murderous ways.

The treatment turns out to be a nightmare. Alex is constantly injected with drugs that make him sick while watching scenes of violence in a theater. His mind soon associates violence and sex with the sickness, causing a Pavlovian response. Particularly abhorrent is the fact that he inadvertently relates the classical music on the soundtrack with the sickness as well. When the procedure is complete, Alex cannot even think about violence, physical or sexual, without suffering from [[RestrainingBolt crippling illness]], rendering him harmless to society. He also can't listen to his favorite music without intense pain.

Alex's case is controversial. His own prison chaplain argues against the procedure, and other critics agree that removing Alex's capacity for moral choice has not turned him good, but reduced him into a programmable machine. The government, however, is only interested in the bottom line of cutting down crime. They release Alex into the world, still evil to his core, but without the ability to defend himself against all his enemies and former victims. His fate ultimately proves the self-defeating nature of the government's program.

Infamously, the film cuts out the epilogue that was present in the original version of the story [[ExecutiveMeddling due to it being removed from many editions of the book in its early international release]]. It involved major CharacterDevelopment and something resembling a HappyEnding for Alex. Though Burgess apparently contacted Kubrick towards the end of production, the director preferred the ending that he had left planned, claiming the original diluted the message in the story. Whether this was a [[PragmaticAdaptation good move]] on Kubrick's part varies from viewer to viewer.

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''A Clockwork Orange'' is a 1971 film by Creator/StanleyKubrick based on [[Literature/AClockworkOrange the eponymous 1962 novella]] by Creator/AnthonyBurgess.

In a [[{{Dystopia}} dystopic]] future where [[TeenageWasteland street crime is rampant and youths are uncontrollable]], teenage sociopath Alex [=DeLarge=] (Creator/MalcolmMcDowell) and his "Droogs" [[TeensAreMonsters prowl the night spreading terror and destruction wherever they go]]. By daybreak, Alex returns home to his [[AdultsAreUseless vapid parents]], who turn a blind eye to his activities, and enjoys his second favorite thing in the world: classical music. On one particular night, his gang brutalizes some people they find on the street, then steal a sports car and drive out to an isolated mansion to inflict torture and rape on the resident couple. They finish the night off at their local watering hole, where they sip milk laced with narcotics.

Things are going swimmingly for
residents.

Alex until his gang begins to chafe under his leadership. Alex is still content with pointless violence, but the gang is starting to grow ends up and think about making a profit. After a fight for supremacy, he reasserts himself as the leader, but bows to the gang's interest in robbing a wealthy widow's house. Alex takes the lead in the robbery, but the widow discovers him, leading to a fight. As the gang flees, they betray Alex and leave him for the police to apprehend. At the station, the police inform Alex that the widow died of her injuries, making him a murderer. He is quickly sentenced to a lengthy prison term.

In prison, Alex settles into
for his old habits, pretending to be a model prisoner while plotting his return to violence. crime soon after. When he discovers that the government is planning to test an experimental treatment on a prisoner in exchange for freedom, Alex jumps at the opportunity. The prison chaplain warns him not opportunity -- until the treatment turns out to volunteer, claiming that no external force can turn be a man good, but Alex is only interested in getting free and returning to his murderous ways.nightmare.

The treatment turns out to be a nightmare. Alex is constantly injected with drugs that make him sick while watching scenes of violence in a theater. His mind soon associates violence and sex with the sickness, causing a Pavlovian response. Particularly abhorrent is the fact that he inadvertently relates the classical music on the soundtrack with the sickness as well. When the procedure is complete, Alex cannot even think about violence, physical or sexual, without suffering from [[RestrainingBolt crippling illness]], rendering him harmless to society. He also can't listen to his favorite music without intense pain.

Alex's case is controversial. His own prison chaplain argues against the procedure, and other critics agree that removing Alex's capacity for moral choice has not turned him good, but reduced him into a programmable machine. The government, however, is only interested in the bottom line of cutting down crime. They release Alex into the world, still evil to his core, but without the ability to defend himself against all his enemies and former victims. His fate ultimately proves the self-defeating nature of the government's program.

Infamously, the film cuts out the epilogue that was present in the original version of the story [[ExecutiveMeddling due to it being removed from many editions of the book in its early international release]]. It involved major CharacterDevelopment and something resembling a HappyEnding for Alex. Though Burgess apparently contacted Kubrick towards the end of production, the director preferred the ending that he had left planned, claiming the original diluted the message in the story. Whether this was a [[PragmaticAdaptation good move]] on Kubrick's part varies from viewer to viewer.
Burgess remains unhappy about the film adapation, and later re-released the novel with added commentary about its hermeneutics.
27th Dec '16 8:23:27 AM Saveelich
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* MeaningfulName: Dim is both BookDumb and DumbMuscle.
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