History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / VideoGames

18th Nov '17 5:55:54 AM SAMAS
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* Aside from some oddities in the game engine and features, the original ''VideoGame/MetalSlug'' is weird for it's ''lack'' of weirdness. The relative cuteness and humor in its animations notwithstanding, it's a straight up battle between soldiers. The second game added [[WeaponizedAnimal armed camels]], mummies, a battleship with tank treads, and martians, and the series has never looked back.

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* Aside from some oddities in the game engine and features, the original ''VideoGame/MetalSlug'' is weird for it's ''lack'' of weirdness. The relative cuteness and humor in its animations notwithstanding, it's a straight up battle between soldiers. The second game added [[WeaponizedAnimal armed camels]], mummies, player transformations, a battleship with tank treads, a lightning submarine in the sewer, and martians, and the series has never looked back.
12th Nov '17 6:09:06 PM Pichu-kun
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** Pauline was originally depicted as a blonde in illustrations for the arcade and Famicom versions of ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'', but became a brunette in ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong94'', presumably to distinguish her from Peach (who at that point had already appeared in more games than Pauline and was a more recognizable character as a result). Her sprite always had her as a brunette anyway.
** Yoshi was [[https://i.stack.imgur.com/44Y33.jpg less-anthropomorphized]] in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' compared to how he would look later on. Certain spin-offs, such as ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' and ''Super Smash Bros. Melee'', also stayed closer to Yoshi's original depiction.
12th Nov '17 9:49:07 AM Pichu-kun
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** Characters' voices didn't become their current standard until the 2000s. Prior to ''VideoGame/SuperMario64'' both Mario and Luigi had Brooklyn accents to reflect their original backstories. Starting with the N64, both gained Italian accents to reflect their Italian heritage. Peach's original voices were deeper than her post-''Sunshine'' ones while Toad's voice was high-pitched and childish (especially in the Japanese version of ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'') instead of raspy. Luigi had a voice that was higher-pitched than Mario's in the Japanese version of ''Mario Kart 64'' and all versions of ''Mario Kart Super Circuit'' and the first two ''Mario Party'' games, while the first two ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' games simply gave him a higher-pitched version of Mario's voice; he was given a deeper voice in other countries' versions of ''Mario Kart 64'', finally being voiced by Charles Martinet, like Mario, but his voice wouldn't be the familiar, timid voice, till ''VideoGame/LuigisMansion''. Wario lacked an Italian accent in the Japanese version of ''Mario Kart 64'', and all versions of ''Mario Kart Super Circuit'' and the first two ''Mario Party'' games and instead was presented as German, like Luigi, he wasn't voiced by Martinet during this time.

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** Characters' voices didn't become their current standard until the 2000s. Prior to ''VideoGame/SuperMario64'' both Mario and Luigi had Brooklyn accents to reflect their original backstories. Starting with the N64, both gained Italian accents to reflect their Italian heritage. Peach's original voices were deeper than her post-''Sunshine'' ones ones, while Toad's voice was high-pitched and childish (especially in the Japanese version of ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'') instead of raspy. Luigi had a voice that was higher-pitched than Mario's in the Japanese version of ''Mario Kart 64'' and all versions of ''Mario Kart Kart: Super Circuit'' and the first two ''Mario Party'' games, while the first two ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' games simply gave him a higher-pitched version of Mario's voice; he was given a deeper voice in other countries' versions of ''Mario Kart 64'', finally being voiced by Charles Martinet, like Mario, but his voice wouldn't be the familiar, timid voice, till ''VideoGame/LuigisMansion''. Wario lacked an Italian accent in the Japanese version of ''Mario Kart 64'', and all versions of ''Mario Kart Kart: Super Circuit'' and the first two ''Mario Party'' games and instead was presented as German, German; like Luigi, he wasn't voiced by Martinet during this time.time.
* [[EarlyInstallmentCharacterDesignDifference Character designs often started out differently]]:
** Mario had a blue shirt and red overalls in ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'', ''Donkey Kong Jr.'', ''VideoGame/MarioBros'', and ''VideoGame/WreckingCrew''; the colors wouldn't be swapped around until ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros1'', though his in-game sprites in ''[=SMB1=]'' and ''[[VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels The Lost Levels]]'' had ''brown'' overalls. (Mario's sprites wouldn't accurately reflect his now-iconic color palette in artwork until ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'' came around.) The blue shirt and red overalls would eventually return in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioOdyssey'' as an alternate outfit. Also, promotional artwork for ''Videogame/DonkeyKong'' depicted Mario as a [[http://pm1.narvii.com/6420/4ebcabf8c8495d4c1f2c41aae5d8888fdaf44585_hq.jpg middle-aged balding man]] (which is also how he looked in the [[Film/SuperMarioBros 1993 live-action film]]), but Nintendo has since {{retcon}}ned Mario into a twenty-something and shown him to possess a full head of hair underneath his plumber's cap. Mario's limbs were also [[https://www.mariowiki.com/images/e/e3/SMB2Art2.png much stubbier]] in early artwork, making him appear rather stocky, however modern art gives him [[https://www.mariowiki.com/images/2/21/FortuneStMario.png longer limbs]] which gives the impression that he's actually lost weight in the intervening decades.
** Likewise, Luigi had a brown shirt-green overall combo in his first appearance, and a green shirt and white overalls (resembling his Fire Flower form) in ''Super Mario Bros.'' Both of the remakes gave him back said brown shirt-green overall combo (or, in the case of the ''VideoGame/SuperMarioAllStars'' version, the blue shirt-green overalls), and made this costume his Fire Flower form instead.
** [[VideoGame/SuperMarioLand Daisy]] wore a purple crown in her older appearances, but somewhere around ''VideoGame/MarioKartDoubleDash'' it was replaced with a golden one like Peach's one. Her hair was also long like Peach until it was cropped shorter in ''VideoGame/MarioParty 4''. Daisy was AmbiguouslyBrown during the UsefulNotes/Nintendo64 era but returned to her original tone for ''Mario Party 4''.
** [[VideoGame/SuperMarioLand2SixGoldenCoins Wario]] originally wore a long-sleeved shirt, but since ''VideoGame/WarioLandII'' he's often been seen wearing a short-sleeved one. He's consistently portrayed with short sleeves in [[VideoGame/{{Wario}} Wario's own games]], but alternated between them and the long sleeves in the ''Mario'' spin-offs before permanently settling on the short ones.



* The original ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'' is essentially an unlicensed ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' product. It has almost the entire bestiary, including a ''Beholder'' (for those who don't know, it's one of D&D's original creations; this enemy was, of course, changed into a one-eyed skull monster for all releases after the initial Japanese Famicom version in order to avoid legal trouble), and depicts Bahamut as a dragon (the mythological Bahamut is a giant fish, D&D was the first to depict it as a dragon). The classes are suspiciously similar, and the magic system is almost lifted directly from D&D (with some elements lifted from the ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' variations). This is especially hard to imagine nowadays, with releases like ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' which are almost [[ArtifactTitle exclusively SciFi]] and feature MindScrew plots.

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* The original ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'' is essentially an unlicensed ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' product. It has almost the entire bestiary, including a ''Beholder'' (for those who don't know, it's one of D&D's ''D&D'''s original creations; this enemy was, of course, changed into a one-eyed skull monster for all releases after the initial Japanese Famicom version in order to avoid legal trouble), and depicts Bahamut as a dragon (the mythological Bahamut is a giant fish, D&D ''D&D'' was the first to depict it as a dragon). The classes are suspiciously similar, and the magic system is almost lifted directly from D&D ''D&D'' (with some elements lifted from the ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' variations). This is especially hard to imagine nowadays, with releases like ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' which are almost [[ArtifactTitle exclusively SciFi]] and feature MindScrew plots.
12th Nov '17 9:12:39 AM Pichu-kun
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* In the original ''VideoGame/MarioBros'' arcade game, the GoombaStomp didn't work -- you had to knock the enemies on their backs before you could take them out. For players coming from later Mario games, this could become a problem as early enemies include turtles that closely resemble the Koopas in the later games; they can't be stomped in Mario Bros. This is why some {{Nostalgia Level}}s based on ''Mario Bros.'' replace the enemies with TheSpiny, which was firmly established as the standard non-stompable enemy.

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* ''VideoGame/MarioBros'':
**
In the original ''VideoGame/MarioBros'' arcade game, the GoombaStomp didn't work -- you had to knock the enemies on their backs before you could take them out. For players coming from later Mario games, this could become a problem as early enemies include turtles that closely resemble the Koopas in the later games; they can't be stomped in Mario Bros. This is why some {{Nostalgia Level}}s based on ''Mario Bros.'' replace the enemies with TheSpiny, which was firmly established as the standard non-stompable enemy.



** The game was more non-linear. While you could select a particular star to pursue, the game would generally not actively prevent you from going after others. While selecting certain stars would sometimes make changes to the world that makes a star accessible or inaccessible, you could get many stars in a level in any order. Later 3D Mario games would only allow you to go after the specific star you select (secret stars would also be available). Also, the star missions in Mario 64 lack introductory cutscenes, which renders their locations far from obvious (bar, at times, the missions' titles).

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** The game was more non-linear. While you could select a particular star to pursue, the game would generally not actively prevent you from going after others. While selecting certain stars would sometimes make changes to the world that makes a star accessible or inaccessible, you could get many stars in a level in any order. Later 3D Mario ''Mario'' games would only allow you to go after the specific star you select (secret stars would also be available). Also, the star missions in Mario 64 ''Mario 64'' lack introductory cutscenes, which renders their locations far from obvious (bar, at times, the missions' titles).



** Peach having a father is referenced in early material, but later games present her as the [[PrincessesRule monarch of the kingdom]].

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** Peach having a father is referenced in early English material, but later games present her as the [[PrincessesRule monarch of the kingdom]].


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** The original Mega Drive era games were low on lore and plot. This led Sega of America and Sega of Europe to create their own lore individual from Japan's. Thus Sonic lived on "Mobius", a WorldOfFunnyAnimals, until well into the 1990s. By ''VideoGame/SonicJam'' the idea only appeared in adaptations and by ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' (which introduced human [=NPCs=]) Sega of America couldn't deny that Sonic [[LionsAndTigersAndHumansOhMy lived on Earth]] anyone and abandoned Mobius. Mobius as a concept only continues in ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'' comics as TheArtifact.
29th Oct '17 5:38:31 PM FuriKuri
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** The earlier games simply had small hubs with doors to the different levels. Starting with the experiment of ''Lego Indiana Jones 2'' and really finalized with ''Lego Harry Potter'', the hubs became sprawling open worlds with a ton of content hidden in them.
28th Oct '17 12:59:34 PM morenohijazo
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** ''Grand Theft Auto 2'', even more so than the first game. The use of codenames for the player, the strange neo-noir setting, the sound effects, and so on make ''GTA 2'' difficult to consider it part of the same series that later went hyper realistic in ''IV'' and ''V''.

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** ''Grand Theft Auto 2'', even more so than the first game. The use of codenames for the player, the strange neo-noir setting, the sound effects, and so on make ''GTA 2'' difficult to consider it part of the same series that later went hyper realistic in ''IV'' and ''V''. Also, along with its predecessor, this game has limited continues, unlike later games' infinite continues; the player would get a literal GameOver text after wasting all continues.
27th Oct '17 10:38:42 PM ZombieAladdin
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** It wasn't until ''VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles'' that Sonic could run along the surface of the water at a high enough speed. Prior to that, he simply skimmed long the surface like a stone or [[SuperDrowningSkills sank into the water]] at the same rate as usual.
23rd Oct '17 8:39:11 PM rjd1922
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** In ''VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand'' Kirby doesn't absorb the powers of enemies; this was introduced in the second game and became the series' trademark. The only games after the first that ''don't'' contain Copy Abilities are spinoffs and [[OddballInTheSeries other oddballs in the series]].

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** In ''VideoGame/KirbysDreamLand'' Kirby doesn't absorb the powers of enemies; this was introduced in the second game and became the series' trademark. He couldn't slide or spit a more powerful star by inhaling two enemies at once, either. The only games after the first that ''don't'' contain Copy Abilities are spinoffs and [[OddballInTheSeries other oddballs in the series]].
23rd Oct '17 8:30:27 PM Kadorhal
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** The [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianDawn first game]] had oddities such as absolutely no production queues (even training a lot of infantry or building a lot of tanks included clicking the icon once, waiting for the unit to be finished, and only ''then'' being able to click again to make the next one) and the ability to speed up training queues for infantry by owning multiple barracks. Also, buildings had to be placed ''right'' next to each other without any sort of spacing between them (and with "defensive" structures adding to the available build space), and a button could be clicked to remove the sidebar at will. There's also no skirmish mode, both sides having the same voice for their EVA advisor/computer, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and]] said advisor [[MemeticMutation using the "building" voice clip when training infantry]]. It even has the only expansion pack in the series that doesn't add any sort of actual story.
** ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert 1'' actually tried to play the series premise (a battered alliance fighting the onslaught of an invading, tyrannical empire led by an AxCrazy dictator) entirely straight, with subtle performances and writing. The rest of the series devolved into high {{Camp}} immediately. In other words, Early Installment ''[[InvertedTrope Lack of Weirdness]]''. The first Red Alert game also apparently takes place in the same universe as the [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSeries Tiberian-series]] games, as Kane appears as a Soviet advisor. The second game obviously doesn't fit into the timeline of the Tiberian games, so at some point after the first one, the timeline must have split. The first two games also had fewer cosmetic differences between the sides - the barracks looked different, and there were some unique structures, but for the most part both sides had access to the same buildings that did the same things. Later games at least added cosmetic differences to shared units and structures, while gradually removing nearly all shared units.
** Up through ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSun Tiberian Sun]]'', only two lines in the sidebar existed, one for buildings and one for units. ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert2 Red Alert 2]]'' and onwards added separate tabs for different things you could make; that game in particular had four tabs, two each for buildings (one for "production" ones, stuff that produced other stuff, and one for "defensive" things like walls, turrets, and bonuses; also allowing for building one thing from each tab at the same time) and two for infantry and vehicles.

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** The [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianDawn first game]] had several oddities such as absolutely no that were removed from later games. Some particular ones were the lack of production queues (even training a lot of multiple infantry units or building a lot of several tanks included clicking required you to click the icon for them once, waiting wait for the unit it to be finished, and only finish, ''then'' being able to click again to make the next one) again) and the ability inability to speed up training queues for infantry by owning multiple barracks. Also, place buildings had to be placed ''right'' next to each other without any with ''any'' sort of spacing space between them (and with "defensive" structures adding to the available build space), them, despite pre-built bases, both allied and enemy, having a button could be clicked to remove the noticeable amount of space between them. The sidebar could also be pushed away at will. will at the click of a button, which made sense for missions where you never get to build and train anything, but nevertheless was removed in later games since even when they had infantry/tank-only missions, they'd at least give you free radar. There's also no skirmish mode, either, so the only way to play the game against the AI is the campaign. Finally, both sides having have the same voice for their EVA advisor/computer, advisor/computer character, even if explained that Nod is using a stolen one because they don't have anything equivalent; ''Tiberian Sun'' onward gave separate advisors for each side. [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and]] And]] said advisor [[MemeticMutation using advisor, in the first game, says "building" voice clip [[MemeticMutation even when you're training infantry]]. It even has also stands as the only expansion pack game in the series with no expansion packs that doesn't add actually expand on the story in any sort of actual story.
meaningful way.
** ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert 1'' actually tried to play the series premise (a battered alliance fighting the onslaught of an invading, tyrannical empire led by an AxCrazy dictator) entirely straight, with subtle performances and writing. The rest of the series devolved into high {{Camp}} immediately. In other words, Early Installment ''[[InvertedTrope Lack of Weirdness]]''. The first Red Alert game also apparently takes place in the same universe as the [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSeries Tiberian-series]] games, as Kane appears as a Soviet advisor.advisor and the Soviet ending even has explicit references to the Brotherhood of Nod. The second game obviously doesn't fit into the timeline of the Tiberian games, so at some point after the first one, the timeline must have split. The first two games It's also had fewer cosmetic differences between the sides - last game in the barracks looked series to continue heavily dabbling in CosmeticallyDifferentSides - some of their buildings look different, and there were some unique structures, but for the most part both sides had access to it's a lot of the same buildings that did tech doing the same things. Later stuff between both sides, before later games at least added cosmetic differences to shared units and structures, while gradually removing nearly all shared units.
gave the individual sides even different generic infantry.
** Up through ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSun Tiberian Sun]]'', there were only two lines columns in the sidebar existed, sidebar, one for buildings of any kind and one for units. infantry and vehicles, with other stuff shoved into one of the two at random when applicable. ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert2 Red Alert 2]]'' and onwards added separate tabs for all the different things types of stuff you could make; make, with that game in particular had four tabs, having four, two each for buildings (one for "production" ones, stuff that produced other stuff, and one for "defensive" things like walls, turrets, and bonuses; also allowing for building one thing from each tab at the same time) "defensive") and two each for units (one for infantry and vehicles.one for vehicles).
22nd Oct '17 5:47:43 PM Kadorhal
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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'':

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* ''Franchise/MetalGear'':''VideoGame/MetalGear'':



** While ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'' is much closer to ''Metal Gear Solid'' than the previous installments, it is still limited by the same technical constraints as the original ''Metal Gear''. It also had some of the oddest items and puzzles in the series, such as hideable buckets, poisonous hamsters, and egg hatching.
** In the first ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', Snake's maximum health and item/ammo capacity increases after every boss battle (a play mechanic carried over from the MSX games), he would regain some health after every boss battle by taking a puff from a cigarette (later games would eliminate this and just bring you back to full health without explanation when it felt the need), and there were two endings based on one specific choice halfway through (all the other games in the series only had single endings). Also, there were no tranquilizers, relative lack of sound-based stealth (one could run as fast as they can towards an enemy, and so long as it wasn't over a specifically loud floor he won't notice), there was no way to aim a gun in first person view or perform a roll, and the plot, while still intricate, is not as [[KudzuPlot insane]] as later games.

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** While ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'' is much closer to ''Metal Gear Solid'' than the previous installments, it is still limited by the same technical constraints as the original ''Metal Gear''. It also had some of the [[MoonLogicPuzzle oddest items and puzzles puzzles]] in the series, such as hideable buckets, buckets in addition to the box, poisonous hamsters, hamsters that kill you just from a touch (having to be lead into an area where they can easily be killed by equipping a specific type of ration), and egg hatching.
hatching to trick a guard into thinking it's nighttime.
** In the first ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', Snake's maximum health and item/ammo capacity increases after every boss battle (a play mechanic carried over from the MSX games), he would regain some health after every boss battle by taking a puff from a cigarette (later games would eliminate this and just bring you back to full health without explanation when it felt the need), and there were two endings based on one specific choice halfway through (all the other games in the series only had single endings). endings), with unlockables that were available for NewGamePlus based on which ending you got (other games make them rewards for a CollectionSidequest, for completing a PacifistRun, or for completing the game on high difficulties). Also, there were no tranquilizers, relative lack of sound-based stealth (one could run as fast as they can towards an enemy, and so long as it wasn't (only running over a specifically specific loud floor he won't notice), floors or tapping on a wall would garner a reaction), there was no way to aim a gun in first person view or perform a roll, and the plot, while still intricate, is not as [[KudzuPlot insane]] as later games.



* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'': The original game, and the London Expansion pack. All the excitement of a fully realized living city in glorious, er, two dimensional blocky graphics that look like something on an Amiga. In ''1997''. Your character was a OneHitPointWonder, and the body armor only protects you from three bullets. Lives and scoring multipliers were in both first game. They would be done away with in ''III''. There also was no saving during levels either, meaning quitting the mission early or GameOver cancels a few hours of work the player did. This was essentially bad in the two Vice City levels, where it would take a few hours to complete the levels. Players had only four weapons to choose from: a Handgun, Machine Gun, Flamethrower or Rocket Launcher. Wanted levels were also different from other games: Even a one-level wanted level would not dissipate on its own, unlike other games.
** The third game had the option of changing the camera view to an overhead state so you could play it similar to the previous titles in the series. This was notably missing from Vice City onward. Also missing from ''III'' was the in-game map in the pause menu, which forced you to use the map included with the game manual if you wanted to navigate the streets well. An in-game full map was included starting with ''Vice City''. An in-game map for ''III'' would only appear on the Android/[=iOS=] version, released 10 years after the original was released.

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* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'': The [[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoClassic original game, game]], and the London Expansion ''London 1969'' expansion pack. All the excitement of a fully realized living city in glorious, er, two dimensional blocky graphics that look like something on an Amiga. In ''1997''. Your character was a OneHitPointWonder, and the body armor only protects you from three bullets. Lives and scoring multipliers were in both the first game. and [[VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto2 second games]]. They would be done away with in ''III''.''[[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIII III]]''. There also was no saving during levels either, meaning quitting the mission early or GameOver cancels a few hours of work the player did. This was essentially bad in the two Vice City levels, where it would take a few hours to complete the levels. Players had only four weapons to choose from: a Handgun, Machine Gun, Flamethrower or Rocket Launcher. Wanted levels were also different from other games: Even a one-level wanted level would not dissipate on its own, unlike other games.
** ''Grand Theft Auto 2'', even more so than the first game. The use of codenames for the player, the strange neo-noir setting, the sound effects, and so on make ''GTA 2'' difficult to consider it part of the same series that later went hyper realistic in ''IV'' and ''V''.
** The third game had the option of changing the camera view to an overhead state so you could play it similar to the previous titles in the series. This was notably missing from ''[[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoViceCity Vice City City]]'' onward. Also missing from ''III'' was the in-game map in the pause menu, which forced you to use the map included with the game manual if you wanted to navigate the streets well. An in-game full map was included starting with ''Vice City''. An in-game map for ''III'' would only appear on the Android/[=iOS=] version, released 10 years after the original was released.



*** According to the dialogue between Reimu and Remilia, Reimu actually ''killed'' Sakuya in their last battle. (She's mysteriously okay in the ending.)

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*** According to the dialogue between Reimu and Remilia, Reimu actually ''killed'' Sakuya in their last battle. (She's She's [[UnexplainedRecovery mysteriously okay okay]] in the ending.)



* The original ''VideoGame/{{Rayman}}'' game featured almost an ''entirely'' different setting from the later games, with a different cast of characters, a more WackyLand-style world as opposed to the more [[DreamLand dreamlike one]] of the later games, a different mythos, and even different ''collectables''. It wasn't until the second game that the modern cast of the ''Rayman'' series were introduced (most of them being [[RememberTheNewGuy old friends of Rayman's we'd never met before]]), along with the current version of its backstory. A subtle difference is that many characters are limbless like Rayman himself. This would not be the case in later installments. ''VideoGame/RaymanOrigins'' tries to [[ArcWelding fuse the two conflicting storylines]], but still skews a bit more heavily towards the ''VideoGame/Rayman2'' version of things. It does manage to explain the Electoons and Rayman's origin at the hands of Betilla the Fairy. Rayman 1 is also the only game where finding all the cages is required to reach the final boss as opposed to optional 100 %completition.
* ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert 1'' actually tried to play the series premise (a battered alliance fighting the onslaught of an invading, tyrannical empire led by an AxCrazy dictator) entirely straight, with subtle performances and writing. The rest of the series devolved into high {{Camp}} immediately. In other words, [[InvertedTrope Early Installment]] ''[[InvertedTrope lack of]]'' [[InvertedTrope Weirdness]]. The first Red Alert game also apparently takes place in the same universe as the [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSeries Tiberian-series]] games, as Kane appears as a Soviet advisor. The second game obviously doesn't fit into the timeline of the Tiberian games, so at some point after the first one, the timeline must have split.

to:

* The original ''VideoGame/{{Rayman}}'' game featured almost an ''entirely'' different setting from the later games, with a different cast of characters, a more WackyLand-style world as opposed to the more [[DreamLand dreamlike one]] of the later games, a different mythos, and even different ''collectables''. It wasn't until the second game that the modern cast of the ''Rayman'' series were introduced (most of them being [[RememberTheNewGuy old friends of Rayman's we'd never met before]]), along with the current version of its backstory. A subtle difference is that many characters are limbless like Rayman himself. This would not be the case in later installments. ''VideoGame/RaymanOrigins'' tries to [[ArcWelding fuse the two conflicting storylines]], but still skews a bit more heavily towards the ''VideoGame/Rayman2'' version of things. It does manage to explain the Electoons and Rayman's origin at the hands of Betilla the Fairy. Rayman 1 is also the only game where finding all the cages is required to reach the final boss as opposed to optional 100 %completition.
100% completion.
* ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'' series:
** The [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianDawn first game]] had oddities such as absolutely no production queues (even training a lot of infantry or building a lot of tanks included clicking the icon once, waiting for the unit to be finished, and only ''then'' being able to click again to make the next one) and the ability to speed up training queues for infantry by owning multiple barracks. Also, buildings had to be placed ''right'' next to each other without any sort of spacing between them (and with "defensive" structures adding to the available build space), and a button could be clicked to remove the sidebar at will. There's also no skirmish mode, both sides having the same voice for their EVA advisor/computer, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and]] said advisor [[MemeticMutation using the "building" voice clip when training infantry]]. It even has the only expansion pack in the series that doesn't add any sort of actual story.
**
''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert 1'' actually tried to play the series premise (a battered alliance fighting the onslaught of an invading, tyrannical empire led by an AxCrazy dictator) entirely straight, with subtle performances and writing. The rest of the series devolved into high {{Camp}} immediately. In other words, [[InvertedTrope Early Installment]] Installment ''[[InvertedTrope lack of]]'' [[InvertedTrope Weirdness]].Lack of Weirdness]]''. The first Red Alert game also apparently takes place in the same universe as the [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSeries Tiberian-series]] games, as Kane appears as a Soviet advisor. The second game obviously doesn't fit into the timeline of the Tiberian games, so at some point after the first one, the timeline must have split. The first two games also had fewer cosmetic differences between the sides - the barracks looked different, and there were some unique structures, but for the most part both sides had access to the same buildings that did the same things. Later games at least added cosmetic differences to shared units and structures, while gradually removing nearly all shared units.
** Up through ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSun Tiberian Sun]]'', only two lines in the sidebar existed, one for buildings and one for units. ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert2 Red Alert 2]]'' and onwards added separate tabs for different things you could make; that game in particular had four tabs, two each for buildings (one for "production" ones, stuff that produced other stuff, and one for "defensive" things like walls, turrets, and bonuses; also allowing for building one thing from each tab at the same time) and two for infantry and vehicles.



** ''04'' introduced alternate paint schemes for planes that the player could choose themselves[[note]]''3'' had paint schemes determined by which faction you were currently working with[[/note]], but had some weirdness regarding them. There were three different paint schemes available for every plane - one normal, one used by enemy {{Red Shirt}}s unlocked by getting an A or S rank on a specific mission, and one used by unique enemy aces that would be unlocked by shooting them down. However, those aces wouldn't appear unless you were playing NewGamePlus above Normal difficulty. On top of that, the alternate paint schemes were treated as entirely separate craft (only special weapons were shared between the different paint schemes of a plane) and had to be purchased individually, with the ace ones costing a little bit extra. Later games changed it so aces could appear in a new game, with only a few restricted by difficulty, and paint schemes could be changed out on a single aircraft without having to shell out for them[[note]]they went back to having to pay to switch paint schemes in ''[[VideoGame/AceCombatInfinity Infinity]]'', but that's in part due to the focus on tuning and upgrading planes to far surpass their regular abilities - plus switching paint only ever costs about 50 credits anyway, compared to the thousands needed to buy the actual plane in the first place[[/note]].

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** ''04'' introduced alternate paint schemes for planes that the player could choose themselves[[note]]''3'' had paint schemes determined by which faction you were currently working with[[/note]], with, at least in the Japanese version where you actually had a choice[[/note]], but had some weirdness regarding them. There were three different paint schemes available for every plane - one normal, one used by enemy {{Red Shirt}}s unlocked by getting an A or S rank on a specific mission, and one used by unique enemy aces that would be unlocked by shooting them down. However, those aces wouldn't appear unless you were playing NewGamePlus above Normal difficulty. On top of that, the alternate paint schemes were treated as entirely separate craft (only special weapons were shared between the different paint schemes of a plane) and had to be purchased individually, with the ace ones costing a little bit extra. Later games changed it so aces could appear in a new game, with only a few restricted by difficulty, and paint schemes could be changed out on a single aircraft without having to shell out for them[[note]]they went back to having to pay to switch paint schemes in ''[[VideoGame/AceCombatInfinity Infinity]]'', but that's in part due to the focus on tuning and upgrading planes to far surpass their regular abilities - plus switching paint only ever costs about 50 credits anyway, compared to the thousands needed to buy the actual plane in the first place[[/note]].



* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto2'': Even more so than the first game. The use of codenames for the player, the strange neo-noir setting, the sound effects, and so on make ''GTA 2'' difficult to consider it part of the same series that later went hyper realistic in ''IV'' and ''V''.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=EarlyInstallmentWeirdness.VideoGames