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History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / VideoGames

24th May '16 10:21:02 AM Silverblade2
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*As the title suggests, ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'' the first game of the ''VideoGame/WorldOfMana'' series was a spin off of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasy'' and thus featured several elements such as the Chocobos that were removed in the remake ''VideoGame/SwordOfMana''.
21st May '16 1:49:07 PM erwgd
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[[folder:Action Adventure]]
* ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamAsylum'' is more linear than [[VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity its]] [[VideoGame/BatmanArkhamKnight sequels]] or [[VideoGame/BatmanArkhamOrigins its prequels]], which are open world and feature plenty of sidequests (whereas the first game relies mostly on the Riddler's CollectionSidequest). It also lacks Batman's ability to slide while running, fire the Batclaw in mid-air and incorporate it during gliding. [[spoiler:Nor does the Joker sing during the end credits.]]
* ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' is one of those success stories that somehow survived an extremely rough start. The gameplay is completely bare-bones; you can't interact with anyone who's not involved in some way with your missions. The only optional tasks are rescuing citizens from abusive guards (pretty easy), finding all the flags (a colossal pain without a guide), and killing the Templar Knights (ditto). Incidentally, there's no reward for the latter two tasks other than [[BraggingRightsReward the game acknowledging that you did them]]. Your meager arsenal consists of a Hidden Blade, sword, short sword, and throwing knives. The Hidden Blade is all-or-nothing; if you don't get a kill, it does no damage whatsoever. You have no money or other resources whatsoever. If you land in any kind of water, [[SuperDrowningSkills you die instantly]] (a real pain when you get to Sibrand). Enemies in the countryside will attack you on sight, and you have to move VERY cautiously to avoid their attention. Oh, and let's not forget the violent derelicts that smack you all over the place, unbelievably irritating beggars, and loudmouth preachers which say the same damn things ''over'' and ''over'' and ''over''. ''Just getting rid of that crap'' made ''[[VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII ACII]]'' infinitely better.
* In a fairly subtle example of tonal shift, the original ''VideoGame/LegoStarWars'' was much more of a straight retelling of the films with the occasional joke slipped in than the outright over-the-top parodic wackiness that would later become the standard for the VideoGame/LEGOAdaptationGame series.
** In the very first game, only Jedi had the ability to build objects. Also, characters with blasters couldn't dodge, making playing as them a lot harder in the original game.
** In the first two ''Star Wars'' games, in levels with multiple characters (in other words, more than just the default two), to switch to any additional ones you had to stand right next to them, and you'd need to do so several times in order to complete the puzzles. Beginning with the first ''VideoGame/LegoIndianaJones'' game, you could now switch between any character no matter how far away they were.
* ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClank'' is very different to its sequels. Weapons don't upgrade (bar buying them with Gold Bolts), your health increase is bought only, not from leveling it up, and it starts at four health and only goes up to eight. The game initially has an air meter when you're underwater and no fast swimming (though both of these disappear when you get the appropriate gadgets, and the sequels keep them). Weirdest perhaps of all, the only way to strafe is bought through a hover pack upgrade well into the game (along with a mid air jump not present in the sequels), but makes it impossible to jump and you move very slowly. The later games are practically unwinnable without some quick strafe flipping. Also, Ratchet takes longer to run and swing his wrench, and must remain stationary if he throws it. He has a noticeably different voice actor as well.
** Ratchet is also noticeably different as a character in the original game. In the first game he was characterized as an arrogant, streetwise punk who bullies and belittles Clank for much of the game (before he realises the error of his ways and the two become new best friends), while from the second game onwards he is far more mature, warm-hearted and selfless.
** In the second game, ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClankGoingCommando'', a First Person Mode was added, but it was only available in Challenge Mode after beating the game. Oddly, Ratchet could not swing his wrench in this mode (unless he's on a grind rail), only throw it.
** There's also a noticeable shift in the games' storytelling starting with ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClankFutureToolsOfDestruction''. Whereas the first five games and ''VideoGame/SecretAgentClank'' are whacky episodic adventures, starting with ''Tools of Destruction'' (sans ''All 4 One'' and ''Full Frontal Assault'') the series begins to take itself (slightly) more seriously and features explorations of the titular characters' origins and even features an overarching plot as opposed to the largely episodic nature of the [=PS2=] and PSP games.
[[/folder]]



[[folder:First-Person Shooter]]
* The original ''VideoGame/FarCry'' is a rather different game compared to the sequels. For one, the original game follows a linear level-by-level progression, while the sequels are WideOpenSandbox games with much more action-adventure and RPG elements. There are no sidequests to take on, no villages with friendly [=NPCs=], and the last half of the game takes a sudden shift from fighting mercenaries to fighting mutants created by science. It's also the only entry in the franchise to be developed by Crytek rather than in-house at Ubisoft. Even so, it should be noted at least a few select elements from the first game showed up in the sequels, like the tropical island setting was revisited in ''VideoGame/FarCry3'', as was the "throwing rocks" stealth mechanic, and in one level a hang glider can be used for a brief moment. ''VideoGame/{{Crysis}}'', Crytek's next game after ''Far Cry'', is arguably more of a SpiritualSuccessor to the original ''Far Cry'' than Ubisoft's in-house developed sequels are.
* ''Call of Duty 1'' compared to later games. No RegeneratingHealth, very few RespawningEnemies situations, more sporadic use of grenades by enemies, and no sprinting. Its expansion (another example in itself; none of the later games in the series have had singleplayer-only content added after release) added sprinting, which cannot be used for nearly as long as it can in later games and is bound to [[DamnYouMuscleMemory an entirely different key]], but is otherwise identical. ''Call of Duty: Finest Hour'' was much the same as the first game, but with no GameplayAllyImmortality and a reworked medkit system to accommodate this (you could carry large medkits around with you and HealThyself or an ally with them). It was also the only game with a female player character (Tanya Pavelovna, a Russian sniper) and the only one where a player character starts as a HeroicMime but then becomes an NPC who can talk, until the ''Black Ops'' games (females are playable in some VideoGame/NaziZombies maps, an important female NPC in ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2 Black Ops II]]'' is temporarily playable in an optional mission) and ''Modern Warfare 3'' (the second playable character introduced speaks in cutscenes and the final level, where he is an NPC), respectively.
* The plotless gauntlets of the first ''VideoGame/TimeSplitters'' game compared to the decent story of the second and complex, brilliant and humour-filled time-travel epic of the third.
** The first ''[=TimeSplitters=]'' does make sense as part of the series plotline in retrospect, but at the time it was a series of disconnected gauntlets at various points in time with only the barest story connected to each one, and no over-arching plot. The only unifying factor was things getting ''really'' weird partway through each stage. In retrospect, it chronicles the initial emergence of the Time Splitters as they strike throughout human history and the people who managed to survive and even thwart them, but at the time it just seemed strange.
* ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' has, over its update history, changed so much from its release in August 2007 that it's practically a different game today:
** Major updates in the beginning of the game's life were very small, often focusing on one class and including about three items for that class that had basic properties, with a map or two and maybe a new game mode thrown in for good measure. Until the Sniper vs. Spy Update, none of the major updates included any hats or cosmetic items. Fast-forward to the present, and major updates will include dozens of cosmetic items and a couple of new weapons with wild properties for several classes.
** Hats did not exist until May 2009. It's hard to believe that the "#1 War-Themed Hat Simulator" didn't have them for a year and a half.
** The first few unlockable weapons and hats were simply reskins of existing weapons or hats (though the weapons had unique stats). For weapon examples, there's Natasha (default minigun, colored black and with an ammo belt on its side), Scottish Resistance (default stickybomb launcher, yellow-and-black paint on the ammo drum and a weird device on its top), and the Cloak & Dagger (default Invisi-Watch, yellow instead of silver). Many of the early cosmetic items were the default characters' hats with some extra additions or [[YouHaveResearchedBreathing no hat at all]]. Future items became ''much'' more diverse.
** The first set of "Meet the Team" videos were basically animation tests. They focused on one class, were relatively short, and didn't have too much of a storyline other than "kill the other team." Skip to later videos like "Meet the Medic," "Meet the Pyro," and "Expiration Date," and you'll find minutes-long videos with high-quality animation, focus on many different classes, epic storylines, and more development and expression of the classes' characters.
** The First Annual Saxxy Awards was limited to using the Replay Tool, so most winners of that contest were basically gameplay videos. If you wanted additional special effects other than slowdown, you had to add them with external video editing software. Future Saxxy Awards allowed the use of Source Filmmaker, which resulted in videos of amazing quality, effects, story, and animation.
** The game itself, when first released, lacked a lot of features and gamemodes that were later added and have since become more iconic of the game. There was no Payload or King of the Hill or Arena at first, nor was there a Halloween event, or any kind of event, during the game's first couple of years. You also ''had'' to pay for the game; it was not free-to-play until three and a half years after release. Mann Vs. Machine was not added until almost ''five'' years after release. Considering how much all of these things dominate the metagame and culture these days, it can be pretty jarring to think that there was ever a period where these did not exist at all.
** Some abilities that are vital to classes today weren't around for a while. The Pyro didn't have the projectile-reflecting, foe-pushing, and ally-extinguishing airblast, today seen as the most valuable ability of the Pyro, for close to a year. The Engineer couldn't carry buildings, which greatly limited his range and usefulness, until his update in July 2010.
* ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'':
** The first installment is noticeably different from its later two installments. Most obviously, it was sold under the title ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty [[NumberedSequels 4]]'', which was later [[ArtifactTitle mostly phased out]] due to [[ExecutiveMeddling the franchise's split between Treyarch and Infinity Ward]]. Its campaign switches between little more than [[{{Ruritania}} the Russian countryside]] and [[{{Qurac}} a hostile, unnamed Islamic country]], as opposed to the more varied setings of the series' later two installments. This, combined with the second and third installments' heavy use of RuleOfCool, is why some of the first installment's gritty realism feels lost in its sequels. It also featured "Arcade Mode" and unlockable campaign cheats for collecting the intelligence, which were nowhere to be found in later installments. The game's multiplayer experience is also heavily modified in its sequels. The first installment featured three fixed killstreaks, equippable night vision goggles, and an equipment/perk system that was heavily reworked in sequels. The first-tier perks were all for extra equipment such as an RPG, claymore mines or extra ammo, for instance, and you were forced to go without one if you attached a grenade launcher or underbarrel grip to your weapon. The system for attachments was also slightly different (a maximum of one attachment at a time for any weapon, and some weapon types were noticeably restricted in what was available, like sniper rifles only getting the ACOG), and the AK-47 was the first alternate assault rifle available upon unlocking the ability to create your own classes - later games made it, or its nearest equivalent, the final unlock (here that honor goes to the [[BlingBlingBang Golden Desert Eagle]]). The PC version also had some noticeable differences from the console versions - there was no Prestige system, and all of the post-release content console players had to purchase as DLC was made available for free in patches for the PC version, including a Christmas-themed variation of one map that the consoles never got. By ''Modern Warfare 2'' the publisher and developers realized the implications of selling the games over UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} and were able to implement Prestiging and sell DLC map packs.
** ''World at War'', in addition to many of the oddities from the first ''Modern Warfare'' above, featured fully usable tanks in multiplayer, complete with players gaining a fourth perk that only affects some aspect of using a tank, and a single-player co-op -- two things that have never been seen again. Co-op did return in a different format for later games, however -- ''Modern Warfare'' includes Spec Ops mode that can be played with two players (WordOfGod says that they wanted straight-up campaign co-op like in ''World at War'', but couldn't balance the levels for more than one player and so went for {{remixed level}}s more suited for instant two-player action instead), while ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' has kept the four-player VideoGame/NaziZombies mode (which is likely why singleplayer co-op didn't return until ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3 Black Ops III]]'' seven years later -- given the choice between that or Zombies, [[ComplacentGamingSyndrome everyone always picked Zombies]]).
[[/folder]]



* ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamAsylum'' is more linear than [[VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity its]] [[VideoGame/BatmanArkhamKnight sequels]] or [[VideoGame/BatmanArkhamOrigins its prequels]], which are open world and feature plenty of sidequests (whereas the first game relies mostly on the Riddler's CollectionSidequest). It also lacks Batman's ability to slide while running, fire the Batclaw in mid-air and incorporate it during gliding. [[spoiler:Nor does the Joker sing during the end credits.]]



* The plotless gauntlets of the first ''VideoGame/TimeSplitters'' game compared to the decent story of the second and complex, brilliant and humour-filled time-travel epic of the third.
** The first ''[=TimeSplitters=]'' does make sense as part of the series plotline in retrospect, but at the time it was a series of disconnected gauntlets at various points in time with only the barest story connected to each one, and no over-arching plot. The only unifying factor was things getting ''really'' weird partway through each stage. In retrospect, it chronicles the initial emergence of the Time Splitters as they strike throughout human history and the people who managed to survive and even thwart them, but at the time it just seemed strange.



* ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClank'' is very different to its sequels. Weapons don't upgrade (bar buying them with Gold Bolts), your health increase is bought only, not from leveling it up, and it starts at four health and only goes up to eight. The game initially has an air meter when you're underwater and no fast swimming (though both of these disappear when you get the appropriate gadgets, and the sequels keep them). Weirdest perhaps of all, the only way to strafe is bought through a hover pack upgrade well into the game (along with a mid air jump not present in the sequels), but makes it impossible to jump and you move very slowly. The later games are practically unwinnable without some quick strafe flipping. Also, Ratchet takes longer to run and swing his wrench, and must remain stationary if he throws it. He has a noticeably different voice actor as well.
** Ratchet is also noticeably different as a character in the original game. In the first game he was characterized as an arrogant, streetwise punk who bullies and belittles Clank for much of the game (before he realises the error of his ways and the two become new best friends), while from the second game onwards he is far more mature, warm-hearted and selfless.
** In the second game, ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClankGoingCommando'', a First Person Mode was added, but it was only available in Challenge Mode after beating the game. Oddly, Ratchet could not swing his wrench in this mode (unless he's on a grind rail), only throw it.
** There's also a noticeable shift in the games' storytelling starting with ''VideoGame/RatchetAndClankFutureToolsOfDestruction''. Whereas the first five games and ''VideoGame/SecretAgentClank'' are whacky episodic adventures, starting with ''Tools of Destruction'' (sans ''All 4 One'' and ''Full Frontal Assault'') the series begins to take itself (slightly) more seriously and features explorations of the titular characters' origins and even features an overarching plot as opposed to the largely episodic nature of the [=PS2=] and PSP games.



* ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'':
** The first installment is noticeably different from its later two installments. Most obviously, it was sold under the title ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty [[NumberedSequels 4]]'', which was later [[ArtifactTitle mostly phased out]] due to [[ExecutiveMeddling the franchise's split between Treyarch and Infinity Ward]]. Its campaign switches between little more than [[{{Ruritania}} the Russian countryside]] and [[{{Qurac}} a hostile, unnamed Islamic country]], as opposed to the more varied setings of the series' later two installments. This, combined with the second and third installments' heavy use of RuleOfCool, is why some of the first installment's gritty realism feels lost in its sequels. It also featured "Arcade Mode" and unlockable campaign cheats for collecting the intelligence, which were nowhere to be found in later installments. The game's multiplayer experience is also heavily modified in its sequels. The first installment featured three fixed killstreaks, equippable night vision goggles, and an equipment/perk system that was heavily reworked in sequels. The first-tier perks were all for extra equipment such as an RPG, claymore mines or extra ammo, for instance, and you were forced to go without one if you attached a grenade launcher or underbarrel grip to your weapon. The system for attachments was also slightly different (a maximum of one attachment at a time for any weapon, and some weapon types were noticeably restricted in what was available, like sniper rifles only getting the ACOG), and the AK-47 was the first alternate assault rifle available upon unlocking the ability to create your own classes - later games made it, or its nearest equivalent, the final unlock (here that honor goes to the [[BlingBlingBang Golden Desert Eagle]]). The PC version also had some noticeable differences from the console versions - there was no Prestige system, and all of the post-release content console players had to purchase as DLC was made available for free in patches for the PC version, including a Christmas-themed variation of one map that the consoles never got. By ''Modern Warfare 2'' the publisher and developers realized the implications of selling the games over UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} and were able to implement Prestiging and sell DLC map packs.
** ''World at War'', in addition to many of the oddities from the first ''Modern Warfare'' above, featured fully usable tanks in multiplayer, complete with players gaining a fourth perk that only affects some aspect of using a tank, and a single-player co-op -- two things that have never been seen again. Co-op did return in a different format for later games, however -- ''Modern Warfare'' includes Spec Ops mode that can be played with two players (WordOfGod says that they wanted straight-up campaign co-op like in ''World at War'', but couldn't balance the levels for more than one player and so went for {{remixed level}}s more suited for instant two-player action instead), while ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps'' has kept the four-player VideoGame/NaziZombies mode (which is likely why singleplayer co-op didn't return until ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps3 Black Ops III]]'' seven years later -- given the choice between that or Zombies, [[ComplacentGamingSyndrome everyone always picked Zombies]]).
* ''Call of Duty 1'' compared to later games. No RegeneratingHealth, very few RespawningEnemies situations, more sporadic use of grenades by enemies, and no sprinting. Its expansion (another example in itself; none of the later games in the series have had singleplayer-only content added after release) added sprinting, which cannot be used for nearly as long as it can in later games and is bound to [[DamnYouMuscleMemory an entirely different key]], but is otherwise identical. ''Call of Duty: Finest Hour'' was much the same as the first game, but with no GameplayAllyImmortality and a reworked medkit system to accommodate this (you could carry large medkits around with you and HealThyself or an ally with them). It was also the only game with a female player character (Tanya Pavelovna, a Russian sniper) and the only one where a player character starts as a HeroicMime but then becomes an NPC who can talk, until the ''Black Ops'' games (females are playable in some VideoGame/NaziZombies maps, an important female NPC in ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2 Black Ops II]]'' is temporarily playable in an optional mission) and ''Modern Warfare 3'' (the second playable character introduced speaks in cutscenes and the final level, where he is an NPC), respectively.



* In a fairly subtle example of tonal shift, the original ''VideoGame/LegoStarWars'' was much more of a straight retelling of the films with the occasional joke slipped in than the outright over-the-top parodic wackiness that would later become the standard for the VideoGame/LEGOAdaptationGame series.
** In the very first game, only Jedi had the ability to build objects. Also, characters with blasters couldn't dodge, making playing as them a lot harder in the original game.
** In the first two ''Star Wars'' games, in levels with multiple characters (in other words, more than just the default two), to switch to any additional ones you had to stand right next to them, and you'd need to do so several times in order to complete the puzzles. Beginning with the first ''VideoGame/LegoIndianaJones'' game, you could now switch between any character no matter how far away they were.



* ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' has, over its update history, changed so much from its release in August 2007 that it's practically a different game today:
** Major updates in the beginning of the game's life were very small, often focusing on one class and including about three items for that class that had basic properties, with a map or two and maybe a new game mode thrown in for good measure. Until the Sniper vs. Spy Update, none of the major updates included any hats or cosmetic items. Fast-forward to the present, and major updates will include dozens of cosmetic items and a couple of new weapons with wild properties for several classes.
** Hats did not exist until May 2009. It's hard to believe that the "#1 War-Themed Hat Simulator" didn't have them for a year and a half.
** The first few unlockable weapons and hats were simply reskins of existing weapons or hats (though the weapons had unique stats). For weapon examples, there's Natasha (default minigun, colored black and with an ammo belt on its side), Scottish Resistance (default stickybomb launcher, yellow-and-black paint on the ammo drum and a weird device on its top), and the Cloak & Dagger (default Invisi-Watch, yellow instead of silver). Many of the early cosmetic items were the default characters' hats with some extra additions or [[YouHaveResearchedBreathing no hat at all]]. Future items became ''much'' more diverse.
** The first set of "Meet the Team" videos were basically animation tests. They focused on one class, were relatively short, and didn't have too much of a storyline other than "kill the other team." Skip to later videos like "Meet the Medic," "Meet the Pyro," and "Expiration Date," and you'll find minutes-long videos with high-quality animation, focus on many different classes, epic storylines, and more development and expression of the classes' characters.
** The First Annual Saxxy Awards was limited to using the Replay Tool, so most winners of that contest were basically gameplay videos. If you wanted additional special effects other than slowdown, you had to add them with external video editing software. Future Saxxy Awards allowed the use of Source Filmmaker, which resulted in videos of amazing quality, effects, story, and animation.
** The game itself, when first released, lacked a lot of features and gamemodes that were later added and have since become more iconic of the game. There was no Payload or King of the Hill or Arena at first, nor was there a Halloween event, or any kind of event, during the game's first couple of years. You also ''had'' to pay for the game; it was not free-to-play until three and a half years after release. Mann Vs. Machine was not added until almost ''five'' years after release. Considering how much all of these things dominate the metagame and culture these days, it can be pretty jarring to think that there was ever a period where these did not exist at all.
** Some abilities that are vital to classes today weren't around for a while. The Pyro didn't have the projectile-reflecting, foe-pushing, and ally-extinguishing airblast, today seen as the most valuable ability of the Pyro, for close to a year. The Engineer couldn't carry buildings, which greatly limited his range and usefulness, until his update in July 2010.



* ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' is one of those success stories that somehow survived an extremely rough start. The gameplay is completely bare-bones; you can't interact with anyone who's not involved in some way with your missions. The only optional tasks are rescuing citizens from abusive guards (pretty easy), finding all the flags (a colossal pain without a guide), and killing the Templar Knights (ditto). Incidentally, there's no reward for the latter two tasks other than [[BraggingRightsReward the game acknowledging that you did them]]. Your meager arsenal consists of a Hidden Blade, sword, short sword, and throwing knives. The Hidden Blade is all-or-nothing; if you don't get a kill, it does no damage whatsoever. You have no money or other resources whatsoever. If you land in any kind of water, [[SuperDrowningSkills you die instantly]] (a real pain when you get to Sibrand). Enemies in the countryside will attack you on sight, and you have to move VERY cautiously to avoid their attention. Oh, and let's not forget the violent derelicts that smack you all over the place, unbelievably irritating beggars, and loudmouth preachers which say the same damn things ''over'' and ''over'' and ''over''. ''Just getting rid of that crap'' made ''[[VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII ACII]]'' infinitely better.



* The original ''VideoGame/FarCry'' is a rather different game compared to the sequels. For one, the original game follows a linear level-by-level progression, while the sequels are WideOpenSandbox games with much more action-adventure and RPG elements. There are no sidequests to take on, no villages with friendly [=NPCs=], and the last half of the game takes a sudden shift from fighting mercenaries to fighting mutants created by science. It's also the only entry in the franchise to be developed by Crytek rather than in-house at Ubisoft. Even so, it should be noted at least a few select elements from the first game showed up in the sequels, like the tropical island setting was revisited in ''VideoGame/FarCry3'', as was the "throwing rocks" stealth mechanic, and in one level a hang glider can be used for a brief moment. ''VideoGame/{{Crysis}}'', Crytek's next game after ''Far Cry'', is arguably more of a SpiritualSuccessor to the original ''Far Cry'' than Ubisoft's in-house developed sequels are.
21st May '16 1:33:02 PM erwgd
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* ''VideoGame/UnchartedDrakesFortune'' has some noticeable changes in the gameplay compared to the sequels in the ''Uncharted'' series. There are a few quick time events, Drake must manually switch to grenades from his current weapon in order to throw them, there is no zoom in feature for automatic weapons, machine gun turrets Drake can commandeer have unlimited ammo as opposed to the sequels where the ammo is limited, and the melee combat system is much more simplistic. And though enemies do improve in gear as the game goes on, the HeavilyArmoredMook enemies that otherwise take heavy fire or headshots to finish off are absent. Story-wise, the plot is a bit more simple as well, with the action taking place entirely on an island as opposed to the vast number of locations and settings the sequels visit.

to:

* ''VideoGame/UnchartedDrakesFortune'' has some noticeable changes in the gameplay compared to the sequels in the ''Uncharted'' series. There are a few quick time events, Drake must manually switch to grenades from his current weapon in order to throw them, there is no zoom in feature for automatic weapons, machine gun turrets Drake can commandeer have unlimited ammo as opposed to the sequels where the ammo is limited, and the melee combat system is much more simplistic. And though enemies do improve in gear as the game goes on, the HeavilyArmoredMook enemies that otherwise take heavy fire or headshots to finish off are absent. Story-wise, the plot is a bit more simple as well, with the action taking place almost entirely on an island island; only 3 out of 22 chapters take place outside the island, as opposed to the vast number of locations and settings the sequels visit.
19th May '16 6:39:06 AM pgj1997
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** The game had five races per cup instead of four like in the later games. It also featured Donkey Kong Jr. as one of the playable characters; Franchise/DonkeyKong himself wouldn't appear in the series until ''MarioKart64''.

to:

** The game had five races per cup instead of four like in the later games. It also featured Donkey Kong Jr. as one of the playable characters; Franchise/DonkeyKong himself wouldn't appear in the series until ''MarioKart64''.''VideoGame/MarioKart64''.
12th May '16 5:00:24 PM eliaskelham
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** The ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' series itself has undergone several changes since it started out. The [[VideoGame/MegamiTensei first game]] in the series was an adaptation of Aya Nishitani's ''Literature/DigitalDevilStory'' novels, featuring none of the alignment choices or MultipleEndings that would be characteristic of the series later on. The connection with the ''Lierature/DigitalDevilStory'' series was drastically toned down in [[VideoGame/MegamiTenseiII the sequel]], and the ContinuityReboot, ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiI'' dropped the novel series' plotline entirely. Also, many earlier Megaten games had first-person dungeon crawling as a key mechanic. This has been phased out from ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiIIITenseiNocturne'' onwards.

to:

** The ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' series itself has undergone several changes since it started out. The [[VideoGame/MegamiTensei first game]] in the series was an adaptation of Aya Nishitani's ''Literature/DigitalDevilStory'' novels, featuring none of the alignment choices or MultipleEndings that would be characteristic of the series later on. The connection with the ''Lierature/DigitalDevilStory'' series was drastically toned down in [[VideoGame/MegamiTenseiII the sequel]], and the ContinuityReboot, ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiI'' dropped the novel series' plotline entirely. Also, many earlier Megaten games had first-person dungeon crawling as a key mechanic. This has been phased out from ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiIIITenseiNocturne'' ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne'' onwards.
4th May '16 9:08:16 PM Kythereia
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Added DiffLines:

** Nafaalilargus is a dragon that shows up in ''Redguard'' to work alongside Tiber Septim and other humans. Much later, in ''Skyrim'', the Dragon language and its naming conventions--three syllables only--mean that Nafaalilargus's name is pure gibberish. (There's an alternate spelling of Nahfahlaar, which comes closer, but it still doesn't quite fit.)
27th Apr '16 8:01:17 PM BirdAlliance
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* ''VideoGame/CubeEscape'': The first created game of the series, ''The Lake'', is a relatively simplistic game with a FeaturelessProtagonist and no specified time period, as well as no SequelHook or obvious connection to a larger plot. In contrast, later games have clearly defined characters, time periods, and gradually-accumulating pieces of a JigsawPuzzlePlot. Even with a later update to tie it a bit to ''Seasons'', you could basically skip it entirely and not miss anything about the series' overarching plot. It also remains the only game in the series to have MultipleEndings.



* ''VideoGame/CubeEscape'': The first created game of the series, ''The Lake'', is a relatively simplistic game with a FeaturelessProtagonist and no specified time period, as well as no SequelHook or obvious connection to a larger plot. In contrast, later games have clearly defined characters, time periods, and gradually-accumulating pieces of a JigsawPuzzlePlot. Even with a later update to tie it a bit to ''Seasons'', you could basically skip it entirely and not miss anything about the series' overarching plot. It also remains the only game in the series to have MultipleEndings.
23rd Apr '16 5:52:40 AM Sikon
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** On a more low-key note, when Malfurion Stormrage was introduced in the original ''Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos'', he was called simply Furion, but then his name was changed to Malfurion in the expansion ''The Frozen Throne'' and remained that way ever since.
18th Apr '16 9:07:14 PM Lemia
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to:

* ''VideoGame/CubeEscape'': The first created game of the series, ''The Lake'', is a relatively simplistic game with a FeaturelessProtagonist and no specified time period, as well as no SequelHook or obvious connection to a larger plot. In contrast, later games have clearly defined characters, time periods, and gradually-accumulating pieces of a JigsawPuzzlePlot. Even with a later update to tie it a bit to ''Seasons'', you could basically skip it entirely and not miss anything about the series' overarching plot. It also remains the only game in the series to have MultipleEndings.
18th Apr '16 2:48:33 PM erforce
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* In a fairly subtle example of tonal shift, the original ''Lego Franchise/StarWars'' was much more of a straight retelling of the films with the occasional joke slipped in than the outright over-the-top parodic wackiness that would later become the standard for the VideoGame/LEGOAdaptationGame series.

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* In a fairly subtle example of tonal shift, the original ''Lego Franchise/StarWars'' ''VideoGame/LegoStarWars'' was much more of a straight retelling of the films with the occasional joke slipped in than the outright over-the-top parodic wackiness that would later become the standard for the VideoGame/LEGOAdaptationGame series.



** In the first two ''Star Wars'' games, in levels with multiple characters (in other words, more than just the default two), to switch to any additional ones you had to stand right next to them, and you'd need to do so several times in order to complete the puzzles. Beginning with the first ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' game, you could now switch between any character no matter how far away they were.

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** In the first two ''Star Wars'' games, in levels with multiple characters (in other words, more than just the default two), to switch to any additional ones you had to stand right next to them, and you'd need to do so several times in order to complete the puzzles. Beginning with the first ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' ''VideoGame/LegoIndianaJones'' game, you could now switch between any character no matter how far away they were.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=EarlyInstallmentWeirdness.VideoGames