History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / VideoGames

27th Mar '17 1:34:15 PM CoCage
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** No Bloody Palace[[note]]Introduced in 2, missing 3, returned in the special edition of the latter, and continued to show up for the rest of the series.[[/note]].

to:

** No Bloody Palace[[note]]Introduced in 2, missing in 3, returned in the special edition of the latter, and continued to show up for the rest of the series.[[/note]].
18th Mar '17 4:35:36 PM KamenRiderOokalf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The first two games are AmbiguouslyChristian rather than subscribing to the FantasyPantheon of the three goddesses. As noted on the CreepyCoolCrosses page, Link has a cross on his shield, rather than the Hylian emblem; a cross is a dungeon item in the second game; and headstones in the cemeteries of these two games are adorned with crosses. WordOfGod states that the original plan was to have Christianity as the religion of Hyrule, but starting with the third game they decided to create a unique mythology instead. And interestingly, even though ''Link to the Past'' was the first installment that explicitly broke from Christian themes, in the booklet, there's art of Link praying to whats very clearly a crucifix, Jesus and everything..

to:

** The first two games are AmbiguouslyChristian rather than subscribing to the FantasyPantheon of the three goddesses. As noted on the CreepyCoolCrosses page, Link has a cross on his shield, rather than the Hylian emblem; a cross is a dungeon item in the second game; and headstones in the cemeteries of these two games are adorned with crosses. WordOfGod states that the original plan was to have Christianity as the religion of Hyrule, but starting with the third game they decided to create a unique mythology instead. And interestingly, even though ''Link to the Past'' was the first installment that explicitly broke from Christian themes, in the booklet, there's art of Link praying to whats what's very clearly a crucifix, Jesus and everything..
15th Mar '17 1:20:20 PM Dere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Compared to later 3D titles, the original ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' is much more open-ended (though ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' and ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'' come close). Also, while six playable characters isn't too many for the ''Sonic'' series, no later games would match the differences between their gameplay; for example, Sonic and Shadow in ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'' control the same and have similarly designed levels. And the writing and voice acting in ''Adventure'' are a lot more stilted and campy and the animation is especially dated in a way where you still knew what they were going for but they weren't quite there yet.



** In Tails' first appearance in ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2'', the CPU could make Tails fly, but a player couldn't and it was just used to get the computer to catch back up with Sonic. ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog3AndKnuckles'' would change that. That game would be the only one where Tails could ''swim''.

to:

** In Tails' first appearance in ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2'', the CPU could make Tails fly, but a player couldn't and it was just used to get the computer to catch back up with Sonic. ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog3AndKnuckles'' ''VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles'' would change that. That game would be the only one where Tails could ''swim''.
14th Mar '17 6:53:49 PM MisterVercetti
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The first ''Franchise/ProfessorLayton'' game, ''[[VideoGame/ProfessorLaytonAndTheCuriousVillage The Curious Village]]'', is a bit different from other games. The characters aren't as zoomed in during dialogue exchanges, the red exclamation mark symbol appears when you do any examination instead of just appearing when you've activated a puzzle, and there's very little voice acting outside of the Anime cutscenes and the victory/failure quotes after puzzles.

to:

* The first ''Franchise/ProfessorLayton'' game, ''[[VideoGame/ProfessorLaytonAndTheCuriousVillage The Curious Village]]'', is a bit different from other games. The characters aren't as zoomed in during dialogue exchanges, the red exclamation mark symbol appears when you do any examination instead of just appearing when you've activated a puzzle, and there's very little voice acting outside of the Anime cutscenes and the victory/failure quotes after puzzles. There was also no Memo function at this point (though a handful of puzzles did let you draw directly on them), meaning that any note-taking and calculating had to be done on a separate sheet of paper. Finally, the optional side puzzles are much simpler than they'd be in later games (one consists entirely of clicking parts to assemble a robot dog - there isn't even the challenge of figuring out where the parts go - while another is little more than a jigsaw puzzle).
14th Mar '17 6:40:48 PM MisterVercetti
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The first ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars'' is vastly different from later games in the series in several respects:

to:

** The first ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars'' '' Advance Wars'' is vastly different from later games in the series in several respects:



*** There are several places where the campaign splits into two distinct paths, as well as certain missions where the entire map changes depending on the chosen CO (particularly the missions against Drake), rendering it impossible to play every single mission in one go. In addition, certain bonus missions can only be opened up by completing specific in-game tasks, such as completing certain missions within a specified number of turns or choosing a specific CO for a certain string of missions ([[GuideDangIt none of which is ever conveyed to the player]])).

to:

*** There are several places where the campaign splits into two distinct paths, as well as certain missions where the entire map changes depending on the chosen CO (particularly the missions against Drake), rendering it impossible to play every single mission in one go. In addition, certain bonus missions can only be opened up by completing specific in-game tasks, such as completing certain missions within a specified number of turns or choosing a specific CO for a certain string of missions ([[GuideDangIt none of which is ever conveyed to the player]])).player]]).
14th Mar '17 6:36:54 PM MisterVercetti
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''Super Nintendo Wars'', in addition to introducing Yellow Comet and Green Earth (and, thus, three- and four-faction maps), would feature distinct [=COs=]. However, of the seven in that game, only three had any gameplay differences, all of which were severe {{Game Breaker}}s as they typically gave that CO's army a massive advantage with absolutely no downside ([=COs=] with in the ''Advance'' series usually have weaknesses to offset any strengths they may have). There were still no [[LimitBreak CO Powers]], though, and all of the other weirdness of the original ''Nintendo Wars'' remained.

to:

** ''Super Nintendo Wars'', in addition to introducing Yellow Comet and Green Earth (and, thus, three- and four-faction maps), would feature distinct [=COs=]. However, of the seven in that game, only three had any gameplay differences, all of which were severe {{Game Breaker}}s as they typically gave that CO's army a massive advantage with absolutely no downside ([=COs=] with in the ''Advance'' series usually have weaknesses to offset any strengths they may have). There were still no [[LimitBreak CO Powers]], though, and all of the other weirdness of the original ''Nintendo Wars'' remained.
14th Mar '17 6:34:42 PM MisterVercetti
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The very first game in the series only had two armies (Red Star and Blue Moon) and featured a simple "one army versus another" ExcusePlot. It also lacked proper [=COs=], meaning that the two armies were basically carbon copies of each other. There was also no campaign, instead featuring a simple list of maps to complete. In addition, several units functioned very differently from their later incarnations (for example, while ''Advance Wars'' and beyond have the APC, which can carry footsoldiers and supply adjacent units with fuel and ammo, the APC in ''Nintendo Wars'' could only do the former, with the latter function being delegated to a separate unit, the Supply Truck). Finally, damage and counterattack damage were calculated simultaneously during fights, meaning that two identical units on identical terrain would come out of a battle with exactly the same amount of damage inflicted on each other (in later games, the attacker would have the advantage as counterattack damage was based on the attacked unit's strength ''after'' the initial attack).

to:

** The very first game in the series only had two armies (Red Star and Blue Moon) and featured a simple "one army versus another" ExcusePlot. It also lacked proper [=COs=], meaning that the two armies were basically carbon copies nothing more than {{Palette Swap}}s of each other. There was also no campaign, instead featuring a simple list of maps to complete. In addition, several units functioned very differently from their later incarnations (for example, while ''Advance Wars'' and beyond have the APC, which can carry footsoldiers and supply adjacent units with fuel and ammo, the APC in ''Nintendo Wars'' could only do the former, with the latter function being delegated to a separate unit, the Supply Truck). Finally, damage and counterattack damage were calculated simultaneously during fights, meaning that two identical units on identical terrain would come out of a battle with exactly the same amount of damage inflicted on each other (in later games, the attacker would have the advantage as counterattack damage was based on the attacked unit's strength ''after'' the initial attack).
14th Mar '17 6:33:05 PM MisterVercetti
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The first ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars'' is vastly different from later games in the series in several respects:
** Every CO has only one CO Power, and there's a severe imbalance between each one, with weaker ones like Olaf's Blizzard and massive [[GameBreaker Game Breakers]] like Eagle's Lightning Strike. Powers don't cause a BGMOverride either.
** The tutorial is separate from the main Campaign rather than integrated into it.
** Most missions in Campaign mode are pre-deploy, and you don't get to see the map before you choose [=COs=].
** Only Orange Star is playable in Campaign, and all other nations are enemies.
** The player is prompted to enter their name and takes a direct role in the campaign as Orange Star's "strategic advisor" (similar to the Tactician in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword]]''). This was dropped from all future games.
** Many characterizations are radically different. Olaf is an incompetent StarterVillain rather than a JerkWithAHeartOfGold and is said to be a former CO of Orange Star who was hired by Blue Moon. (Later games make it clear Blue Moon is his homeland.) Andy takes NaiveNewcomer so UpToEleven he boarders on TooDumbToLive (his infamous "What's an airport, again?" comes to mind), and Kanbei is also depicted as [[LordErrorProne a massive idiot]]. All three of them underwent an [[InvertedTrope inverted]] TookALevelInDumbass in later games.
** The Black Hole army uses {{Palette Swap}}s of Orange Star troops as opposed to their own sprites. (There is an in-story reason for this, though.)

to:

* ''VideoGame/NintendoWars''
** The very first game in the series only had two armies (Red Star and Blue Moon) and featured a simple "one army versus another" ExcusePlot. It also lacked proper [=COs=], meaning that the two armies were basically carbon copies of each other. There was also no campaign, instead featuring a simple list of maps to complete. In addition, several units functioned very differently from their later incarnations (for example, while ''Advance Wars'' and beyond have the APC, which can carry footsoldiers and supply adjacent units with fuel and ammo, the APC in ''Nintendo Wars'' could only do the former, with the latter function being delegated to a separate unit, the Supply Truck). Finally, damage and counterattack damage were calculated simultaneously during fights, meaning that two identical units on identical terrain would come out of a battle with exactly the same amount of damage inflicted on each other (in later games, the attacker would have the advantage as counterattack damage was based on the attacked unit's strength ''after'' the initial attack).
** ''Super Nintendo Wars'', in addition to introducing Yellow Comet and Green Earth (and, thus, three- and four-faction maps), would feature distinct [=COs=]. However, of the seven in that game, only three had any gameplay differences, all of which were severe {{Game Breaker}}s as they typically gave that CO's army a massive advantage with absolutely no downside ([=COs=] with in the ''Advance'' series usually have weaknesses to offset any strengths they may have). There were still no [[LimitBreak CO Powers]], though, and all of the other weirdness of the original ''Nintendo Wars'' remained.
**
The first ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars'' is vastly different from later games in the series in several respects:
** *** Every CO has only one CO Power, and there's a severe imbalance between each one, with weaker ones like Olaf's Blizzard and massive [[GameBreaker Game Breakers]] like Eagle's Lightning Strike. Powers don't cause a BGMOverride either.
** *** The tutorial is separate from the main Campaign rather than integrated into it.
** *** Most missions in Campaign mode are pre-deploy, and you don't get to see the map before you choose [=COs=].
** *** Only Orange Star is playable in Campaign, and all other nations are enemies.
** *** There are several places where the campaign splits into two distinct paths, as well as certain missions where the entire map changes depending on the chosen CO (particularly the missions against Drake), rendering it impossible to play every single mission in one go. In addition, certain bonus missions can only be opened up by completing specific in-game tasks, such as completing certain missions within a specified number of turns or choosing a specific CO for a certain string of missions ([[GuideDangIt none of which is ever conveyed to the player]])).
*** There are no ranking points at the end of each mission, with Speed, Power, and Technique scores represented by vague bars instead. As a result of this, maps and additional [=COs=] are not purchased with ranking points but instead using coins earned based on your letter grade.
***
The player is prompted to enter their name and takes a direct role in the campaign as Orange Star's "strategic advisor" (similar to the Tactician in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword]]''). This was dropped from all future games.
** *** Many characterizations are radically different. Olaf is an incompetent StarterVillain rather than a JerkWithAHeartOfGold and is said to be a former CO of Orange Star who was hired by Blue Moon. (Later Moon (later games make it clear Blue Moon is his homeland.) homeland). Andy takes NaiveNewcomer so UpToEleven he boarders borders on TooDumbToLive (his infamous "What's an airport, again?" comes to mind), TooDumbToLive, and Kanbei is also depicted as [[LordErrorProne a massive idiot]]. All three of them underwent an [[InvertedTrope inverted]] TookALevelInDumbass in later games.
** *** The overall art style is much more cartoonish than in later games. In particular, Olaf and Kanbei in this game bear only a scant resemblance to their ''Black Hole Rising'' and ''Dual Strike'' counterparts.
***
The Black Hole army uses {{Palette Swap}}s of Orange Star troops as opposed to their own sprites. (There is an in-story reason for this, though.)
11th Mar '17 2:09:33 PM CoCage
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder: Beat'em Up/Hack n Slash]]
* ''Franchise/DevilMayCry 1'' had several odd things done that would not show up again or behave differntly in future installments:
** There is no RealTimeWeaponChange feature, the game has swimming sections, there is no level select, and there are a total of 23 missions [[note]] From [=DMC2=] and onward the mission count goes up to 20[[/note]].
** Once Hard Mode is unlocked, you can't go back and do Normal mode on a New Game+ until after the former has been beaten. After being beaten, then the game will allow to play on a lower or higher difficulty.
** The Super Dante and the Sparda Costume have to be played in a new game meaning you have to buy moves all over again.
** There are no white orbs to regain Devil Trigger, but Dante can get a full a meter of it back after defeating certain mini bosses or sections when Phantom attacks Dante in a hallway. Some doors have to be unlocked by spending red orbs.
** Even though there are 4 melee weapons, Alastor[[note]]Yamato with the Sparda costume[[/note]], Sparda, and Force Edge all share mostly the same move set, only differing in special abilities, damage, or devil trigger. Or lack thereof.
** 1 is the only game in the series that have unique fatalities performed on Dante when at critical health.
** This and 2 are the only ones to have no camera control. 3 & 4 allowed some control of the camera while the reboot allowed full control of it.
** The jump button (X) being switched in the US and EU version of the game (fixed in the HD collection).
** In addition there is a timer for some rooms when playing on Dante Must Die to let the player know how long they have before enemies devil trigger.
** There is a [[UnexpectedGameplayChange rail shooting]] section at the end of the game.
** No Bloody Palace[[note]]Introduced in 2, missing 3, returned in the special edition of the latter, and continued to show up for the rest of the series.[[/note]].
* This is played with in the case of the ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriors'' games. The original ''Sangoku Musou'' was a straight-up fighting game featuring characters from the ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms''. Following that, ''Shin Sangoku Musou'' was released, introducing the HackAndSlash gameplay that the series is known for. The latter game was [[MarketBasedTitle localized as simply]] ''Dynasty Warriors 2'', making it a clear example of this trope outside of Japan, while in Japan, they ''technically'' belong to separate series.
* The original ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'' lacks a lot of the combos that appear in the sequels, there are only three bosses, the 'Rage' special attack cannot be be interrupted and the gods don't appear physically but fiery holograms and most of them are be redesigned in later games (Hades has a demonic face as opposed to wearing a horned helm, Poseidon's an old bald guy as opposed to appearing young and having long brown hair, etc.). It's also the only game to feature or even mention Artemis. The extra videos include several possible storylines that will be retconned by furthers installments (Cronos is said to have died in the desert a century after the events of the game, Kratos' brother was originally taken by the Spartan soldiers and starved in the mountains and Kratos knew [[spoiler:Zeus]] was his father much earlier). It's also worth noting is that the storyline of the original is a classic Greek tragedy, an element that the sequels forgot.
* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaTheSandsOfTime'' was originally designed to be a vague prequel to [[VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1 the original game]] rather than set in its own continuity. The Prince mentions that his home city is Siraf, when the sequels established it to be Babylon. The game is also set in medieval Islamic Persia due to the Arabic inscriptions everywhere. The other games seem to be set in pre-Islamic Persia, since Babylon is the capital of the empire and ''[[VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaTheForgottenSands The Forgotten Sands]]'' takes place in Israel, which was controlled by Achaemenid Persia but no later dynasties. Furthermore, the first game has [[http://imgur.com/a/ciniI#0 a series of wall paintings depicting the origins of the Sands of Time,]] which contradict the backstory given in ''[[VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaWarriorWithin Warrior Within]]''.
[[/folder]]



* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaTheSandsOfTime'' was originally designed to be a vague prequel to [[VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1 the original game]] rather than set in its own continuity. The Prince mentions that his home city is Siraf, when the sequels established it to be Babylon. The game is also set in medieval Islamic Persia due to the Arabic inscriptions everywhere. The other games seem to be set in pre-Islamic Persia, since Babylon is the capital of the empire and ''[[VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaTheForgottenSands The Forgotten Sands]]'' takes place in Israel, which was controlled by Achaemenid Persia but no later dynasties. Furthermore, the first game has [[http://imgur.com/a/ciniI#0 a series of wall paintings depicting the origins of the Sands of Time,]] which contradict the backstory given in ''[[VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaWarriorWithin Warrior Within]]''.



* This is played with in the case of the ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriors'' games. The original ''Sangoku Musou'' was a straight-up fighting game featuring characters from the ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms''. Following that, ''Shin Sangoku Musou'' was released, introducing the HackAndSlash gameplay that the series is known for. The latter game was [[MarketBasedTitle localized as simply]] ''Dynasty Warriors 2'', making it a clear example of this trope outside of Japan, while in Japan, they ''technically'' belong to separate series.



* The original ''VideoGame/GodOfWar'' lacks a lot of the combos that appear in the sequels, there are only three bosses, the 'Rage' special attack cannot be be interrupted and the gods don't appear physically but fiery holograms and most of them are be redesigned in later games (Hades has a demonic face as opposed to wearing a horned helm, Poseidon's an old bald guy as opposed to appearing young and having long brown hair, etc.). It's also the only game to feature or even mention Artemis. The extra videos include several possible storylines that will be retconned by furthers installments (Cronos is said to have died in the desert a century after the events of the game, Kratos' brother was originally taken by the Spartan soldiers and starved in the mountains and Kratos knew [[spoiler:Zeus]] was his father much earlier). It's also worth noting is that the storyline of the original is a classic Greek tragedy, an element that the sequels forgot.
9th Mar '17 7:00:57 PM Pichu-kun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Super Mario Kart also introduced the Feather item that allowed players to jump super high and over walls. The item hasn't appeared since then, most likely because in ''64'' it would have caused problems with the [[GoodBadBugs already-sketchy]] collision detection system and allowed massive shortcuts, and from ''7'' and up the hang-glider portions of the tracks served mostly the same purpose as the Feather, but in a more controlled way.

to:

** Super ''Super Mario Kart Kart'' also introduced the Feather item that allowed players to jump super high and over walls. The item hasn't appeared since then, most likely because in ''64'' it would have caused problems with the [[GoodBadBugs already-sketchy]] collision detection system and allowed massive shortcuts, and from ''7'' and up the hang-glider portions of the tracks served mostly the same purpose as the Feather, but in a more controlled way.



* The early ''UsefulNotes/GameAndWatch'' games starring Mario portrayed him very differently. In most of Mario's ''Game & Watch'' games he's portrayed more as an {{Everyman}} with fairly ordinary jobs, much like Mr Game & Watch. ''Mario Bros'' shows Mario & Luigi working at a cake factory and Mario's ''Cement Factory'' is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Perhaps the most unusual one however was ''[[http://www.gameandwatchnow.com/images/games/TB-94.jpg Mario's Bombs Away]]'', portraying Mario as a soldier, complete with a uniform and green helmet, passing bombs over to his troops which would be used to blow up the trees the enemies are hiding in. Also noteworthy is that one of the fellow soldiers is even shown smoking, and will toss lit cigars onto some spilled oil on the ground which catches fire and can light your bomb's fuse prematurely. While the game is still cartoony enough that it's safe for kids, it's certainly a setting that you'd never see Nintendo touch with the ''Mario' franchise today. The game was however unlockable in ''Game & Watch Gallery Advance''.

to:

* The early ''UsefulNotes/GameAndWatch'' ''VideoGame/GameAndWatch'' games starring Mario portrayed him very differently. In most of Mario's ''Game & Watch'' games he's portrayed more as an {{Everyman}} with fairly ordinary jobs, much like Mr Game & Watch. ''Mario Bros'' shows Mario & Luigi working at a cake factory and Mario's ''Cement Factory'' is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Perhaps the most unusual one however was ''[[http://www.gameandwatchnow.com/images/games/TB-94.jpg Mario's Bombs Away]]'', portraying Mario as a soldier, complete with a uniform and green helmet, passing bombs over to his troops which would be used to blow up the trees the enemies are hiding in. Also noteworthy is that one of the fellow soldiers is even shown smoking, and will toss lit cigars onto some spilled oil on the ground which catches fire and can light your bomb's fuse prematurely. While the game is still cartoony enough that it's safe for kids, it's certainly a setting that you'd never see Nintendo touch with the ''Mario' franchise today. The game was however unlockable in ''Game & Watch Gallery Advance''.



* Early UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS and UsefulNotes/NintendoWiiU games came with full-fledged physical manuals. Eventually these were watered down into single paper pamphlets and eventually even that was just replaced with a generic paper telling you how to view the digital manual. Some games still come with manuals however they're very rare and mostly limited to indie games.

to:

* Early UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS and UsefulNotes/NintendoWiiU UsefulNotes/WiiU games came with full-fledged physical manuals. Eventually these were watered down into single paper pamphlets and eventually even that was just replaced with a generic paper telling you how to view the digital manual. Some games still come with manuals however they're very rare and mostly limited to indie games.
This list shows the last 10 events of 773. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=EarlyInstallmentWeirdness.VideoGames