History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / VideoGames

19th Jul '17 7:39:32 AM MagiMecha
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** ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars2'' had an interesting case of giving characters upgrades - while Amuro Ray would go from the RX-78-2 Gundam to the RX-93 Nu Gundam, Kouji Kabuto would jump from Mazinger Z to Anime/GreatMazinger and the original Getter Team (Ryouma Nagare, Hayato Jin, Musashi Tomoe) would go from the classic Getter Robo to Getter Robo G. ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars4'' would end up putting the Getter G Team (Ryouma, Hayato and Benkei Kuruma) in the original Getter Robo.


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*** ''Alpha'' and ''Alpha Gaiden'' had a strange mechanic that allowed players to have certain units disengage from their mecha and fly around in component craft, allowing players to fly around in Core Fighters, Jet Pilders and Getter Machines
3rd Jul '17 7:19:47 PM Dramatic
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* Both sibling series of the ''VideoGame/{{Forza}}'' franchise have noticeable differences between their first instalment and later ones:
** The first ''Motorsport'' game has oddities such as point-to-point races that would never reappear down the line. It also had more original tracks, including 'Blue Mountains' which is a generic recreation of the real world Mount Panorama Circuit. Finally, the way the game handled the [[TierLists Performance Index]] was completely different: Each tier of PI had its own sub-tiers, and it was not possible to see the exact value of a car.
** The first ''Horizon'' game was significantly more linear in both gameplay and structure compared to its sequels. Cars were limited to travelling along roads with only a few open arenas for off-roading action. As for structure, compared to the 'do anything you want' attitude of the sequels, ''Horizon'' limits you to races with strict entry requirements, and has a clear line of progression between races.
30th Jun '17 2:38:04 PM dancnbna
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* The early ''VideoGame/GameAndWatch'' games starring Mario portrayed him very differently. In most of Mario's ''Game & Watch'' games he's portrayed more as an {{Everyman}} with fairly ordinary jobs, much like Mr Game & Watch. ''Mario Bros'' shows Mario & Luigi working at a cake factory and Mario's ''Cement Factory'' is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Perhaps the most unusual one however was ''[[http://www.gameandwatchnow.com/images/games/TB-94.jpg Mario's Bombs Away]]'', portraying Mario as a soldier, complete with a uniform and green helmet, passing bombs over to his troops which would be used to blow up the trees the enemies are hiding in. Also noteworthy is that one of the fellow soldiers is even shown smoking, and will toss lit cigars onto some spilled oil on the ground which catches fire and can light your bomb's fuse prematurely. While the game is still cartoony enough that it's safe for kids, it's certainly a setting that you'd never see Nintendo touch with the ''Mario' franchise today. The game was however unlockable in ''Game & Watch Gallery Advance''.

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* The early ''VideoGame/GameAndWatch'' games starring Mario portrayed him very differently. In most of Mario's ''Game & Watch'' games he's portrayed more as an {{Everyman}} with fairly ordinary jobs, much like Mr Game & Watch. ''Mario Bros'' shows Mario & Luigi working at a cake factory and Mario's ''Cement Factory'' is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Perhaps the most unusual one however was ''[[http://www.gameandwatchnow.com/images/games/TB-94.jpg Mario's Bombs Away]]'', portraying Mario as a soldier, complete with a uniform and green helmet, passing bombs over to his troops which would be used to blow up the trees the enemies are hiding in. Also noteworthy is that one of the fellow soldiers is even shown smoking, and will toss lit cigars onto some spilled oil on the ground which catches fire and can light your bomb's fuse prematurely. While the game is still cartoony enough that it's safe for kids, it's certainly a setting that you'd never see Nintendo touch with the ''Mario' ''Mario'' franchise today. The game was however unlockable in ''Game & Watch Gallery Advance''.



** Major updates in the beginning of the game's life were very small, often focusing on one class and including about three items for that class that had basic properties, with a map or two and maybe a new game mode thrown in for good measure. Until the Sniper vs. Spy Update, none of the major updates included any hats or cosmetic items. Fast-forward to the present, and major updates will include dozens of cosmetic items and a couple of new weapons with wild properties for several classes.

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** Major updates in the beginning of the game's life were very small, often focusing on one class and including about three items for that class that had basic properties, with a map or two and maybe a new game mode thrown in for good measure. Until the Sniper vs. Spy Update, none of the major updates included any hats or cosmetic items. Fast-forward to the present, and major updates will include dozens of cosmetic items and and, at least until recent years, a couple of new weapons with wild properties for several classes.



** The first few unlockable weapons and hats were simply reskins of existing weapons or hats (though the weapons had unique stats). For weapon examples, there's Natasha (default minigun, colored black and with an ammo belt on its side), Scottish Resistance (default stickybomb launcher, yellow-and-black paint on the ammo drum and a weird device on its top), and the Cloak & Dagger (default Invisi-Watch, yellow instead of silver). Many of the early cosmetic items were the default characters' hats with some extra additions or [[YouHaveResearchedBreathing no hat at all]]. Future items became ''much'' more diverse.

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** The first few unlockable weapons and hats were simply reskins of existing weapons or hats (though hats, though the weapons had unique stats). stats. For weapon examples, there's Natasha (default minigun, colored black and with an ammo belt on its side), Scottish Resistance (default stickybomb launcher, yellow-and-black paint on the ammo drum and a weird device on its top), barrel), and the Cloak & Dagger (default Invisi-Watch, yellow instead of silver). Many of the early cosmetic items were the default characters' hats with some extra additions or [[YouHaveResearchedBreathing no hat at all]]. Future items became ''much'' more diverse.


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** The first Halloween event is considerably different than later ones. The Halloween map, Harvest Event, featured very little Halloween-themed items and decor aside from its purple-and-orange color scheme, cobwebs, dark areas, pumpkin bombs, Halloween pumpkin pickups, and the ghost. Subsequent Halloween event maps amp up the Halloween themes and designs much more. This map doesn't have any type of boss; those wouldn't start until the next year. Mersasmus, who stars in or narrates most of the Halloween events, didn't debut until the fourth Halloween event. Finally, subsequent events introduced a deluge of Halloween cosmetics. How many did the first one have? ''Two''.
22nd Jun '17 5:04:47 PM Mineboot45
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* The first ''VideoGame/{{Oddworld}}'' game, ''Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee'', has a few quirks compared to the later games and its remake. You could only have one Mudokon following you at a time (meaning, if there were multiple Mudokons in an area, you would have to keep going back and forth in order to rescue them all), there was no Quicksave option (instead the game had checkpoints that Abe would return to upon dying), Mudokons didn't have emotions, and Paramites and Scrabs couldn't be possessed. Also, all the cutscenes were narrated by Abe (in rhyme, no less) and, with the exception of the endings, featured no dialogue other than Abe's narration. The remaster, ''Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty!'', added the Quicksave option and the ability to have multiple Mudokons following you at once.



* The first ''VideoGame/{{Oddworld}}'' game, ''Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee'', has a few quirks compared to the later games and its remake. You could only have one Mudokon following you at a time (meaning, if there were multiple Mudokons in an area, you would have to keep going back and forth in order to rescue them all), there was no Quicksave option (instead the game had checkpoints that Abe would return to upon dying), Mudokons didn't have emotions, and Paramites and Scrabs couldn't be possessed. Also, all the cutscenes were narrated by Abe (in rhyme, no less) and, with the exception of the endings, featured no dialogue other than Abe's narration. The remaster, ''Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty!'', added the Quicksave option and the ability to have multiple Mudokons following you at once.
16th Jun '17 6:09:02 PM TwilightLord
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* The first ''VideoGame/Oddworld'' game, ''Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee'', has a few quirks compared to the later games and its remake. You could only have one Mudokon following you at a time (meaning, if there were multiple Mudokons in an area, you would have to keep going back and forth in order to rescue them all), there was no Quicksave option (instead the game had checkpoints that Abe would return to upon dying), Mudokons didn't have emotions, and Paramites and Scrabs couldn't be possessed. Also, all the cutscenes were narrated by Abe (in rhyme, no less) and, with the exception of the endings, featured no dialogue other than Abe's narration. The remaster, ''Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty!'', added the Quicksave option and the ability to have multiple Mudokons following you at once.

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* The first ''VideoGame/Oddworld'' ''VideoGame/{{Oddworld}}'' game, ''Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee'', has a few quirks compared to the later games and its remake. You could only have one Mudokon following you at a time (meaning, if there were multiple Mudokons in an area, you would have to keep going back and forth in order to rescue them all), there was no Quicksave option (instead the game had checkpoints that Abe would return to upon dying), Mudokons didn't have emotions, and Paramites and Scrabs couldn't be possessed. Also, all the cutscenes were narrated by Abe (in rhyme, no less) and, with the exception of the endings, featured no dialogue other than Abe's narration. The remaster, ''Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty!'', added the Quicksave option and the ability to have multiple Mudokons following you at once.
16th Jun '17 4:59:44 AM TwilightLord
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* The first ''VideoGame/Oddworld'' game, ''Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee'', has a few quirks compared to the later games and its remake. You could only have one Mudokon following you at a time (meaning, if there were multiple Mudokons in an area, you would have to keep going back and forth in order to rescue them all), there was no Quicksave option (instead the game had checkpoints that Abe would return to upon dying), Mudokons didn't have emotions, and Paramites and Scrabs couldn't be possessed. Also, all the cutscenes were narrated by Abe (in rhyme, no less) and, with the exception of the endings, featured no dialogue other than Abe's narration. The remaster, ''Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty!'', added the Quicksave option and the ability to have multiple Mudokons following you at once.
13th Jun '17 5:05:34 PM GastonRabbit
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** Japanese players had to suffer through a password system with the first two games, while the American releases thankfully got a battery backup system. On the bright side, the password system is probably why ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' got its catchy 85-second menu theme, which seems out of place on the American release since it only takes about five seconds to continue an old save, making it a case of LongSongShortScene in the international release and the game's various remakes.

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** Japanese players had to suffer through a password system with the first two games, while the American releases thankfully got a battery backup system. On the bright side, the password system is probably why ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' got its catchy 85-second menu theme, which seems out of place on the American release since it only takes about five seconds to continue an old save, making it a case of LongSongShortScene in the international North American release and the game's various remakes.
13th Jun '17 5:02:33 PM GastonRabbit
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** Japanese players had to suffer through a password system with the first two games, while the American releases thankfully got a battery backup system. On the bright side, the password system is probably why ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' got its catchy 85-second menu theme, which seems out of place on the American release since it only takes about five seconds to continue an old save, making it a case of LongSongShortScene in the international releases and the game's various remakes.

to:

** Japanese players had to suffer through a password system with the first two games, while the American releases thankfully got a battery backup system. On the bright side, the password system is probably why ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' got its catchy 85-second menu theme, which seems out of place on the American release since it only takes about five seconds to continue an old save, making it a case of LongSongShortScene in the international releases release and the game's various remakes.
13th Jun '17 4:59:28 PM GastonRabbit
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** The first ''[[VideoGame/{{Metroid1}} Metroid]]'' game is frustrating in comparison to later ones due to its lack of a map display and DenialOfDiagonalAttack. It's also the only ''Metroid'' game where you can save your progress anywhere (the SavePoint wasn't introduced until ''[[VideoGame/MetroidIIReturnOfSamus Metroid II]]'') and the game used a PasswordSave system in the international releases (the Japanese release had a save system similar to that of the 8-bit ''Zelda'' games). It also had [[AmbidextrousSprite Ambidextrous Sprites]], something that even ''Metroid II'' averts despite being an early UsefulNotes/GameBoy game, and had no visual differences in the different suit power ups bar {{Palette Swap}}s and beam upgrades were mutually exclusive. The designs of Ridley and Kraid were also rather different: Ridley was a completely stationary winged thing of some kind who was fairly easy to defeat, and Kraid was tiny, barely larger than Samus. ''Super Metroid'' codified their current designs: Ridley as a fiendlishly tough and agile Space Dragon and Kraid as a gigantic lizard monster.

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** The first ''[[VideoGame/{{Metroid1}} Metroid]]'' game is frustrating in comparison to later ones due to its lack of a map display and DenialOfDiagonalAttack. It's also the only ''Metroid'' game where you can save your progress anywhere (the SavePoint wasn't introduced until ''[[VideoGame/MetroidIIReturnOfSamus Metroid II]]'') and the game used a PasswordSave system in the international releases (the Japanese release release, which was on the Famicom Disk System, had a save system similar to that of the 8-bit ''Zelda'' games). It also had [[AmbidextrousSprite Ambidextrous Sprites]], something that even ''Metroid II'' averts despite being an early UsefulNotes/GameBoy game, and had no visual differences in the different suit power ups bar {{Palette Swap}}s and beam upgrades were mutually exclusive. The designs of Ridley and Kraid were also rather different: Ridley was a completely stationary winged thing of some kind who was fairly easy to defeat, and Kraid was tiny, barely larger than Samus. ''Super Metroid'' codified their current designs: Ridley as a fiendlishly tough and agile Space Dragon and Kraid as a gigantic lizard monster.



** The menus were/ quite clunky early on: In all of the NES ''DQ'' games, you had to go into your menu to do something as simple as talk to someone or open a door. It wasn't until ''VideoGame/DragonQuestV'' that much of this became more streamlined with an "action" button that had multiple features like in most other {{Role Playing Game}}s.

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** The menus were/ were quite clunky early on: In all of the NES ''DQ'' games, you had to go into your menu to do something as simple as talk to someone or open a door. It wasn't until ''VideoGame/DragonQuestV'' that much of this became more streamlined with an "action" button that had multiple features like in most other {{Role Playing Game}}s.
13th Jun '17 4:56:11 PM GastonRabbit
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** The first ''[[VideoGame/{{Metroid1}} Metroid]]'' game is frustrating in comparison to later ones due to its lack of a map display and DenialOfDiagonalAttack. It's also the only ''Metroid'' game where you can save your progress anywhere (the SavePoint wasn't introduced until ''[[VideoGame/MetroidIIReturnOfSamus Metroid II]]'') and the game used a PasswordSave system in the international releases (the Japanese release had a save system similar to that of the 8-bit ''Zelda'' games. It also had [[AmbidextrousSprite Ambidextrous Sprites]], something that even ''Metroid II'' averts despite being an early UsefulNotes/GameBoy game, and had no visual differences in the different suit power ups bar {{Palette Swap}}s and beam upgrades were mutually exclusive. The designs of Ridley and Kraid were also rather different: Ridley was a completely stationary winged thing of some kind who was fairly easy to defeat, and Kraid was tiny, barely larger than Samus. ''Super Metroid'' codified their current designs: Ridley as a fiendlishly tough and agile Space Dragon and Kraid as a gigantic lizard monster.

to:

** The first ''[[VideoGame/{{Metroid1}} Metroid]]'' game is frustrating in comparison to later ones due to its lack of a map display and DenialOfDiagonalAttack. It's also the only ''Metroid'' game where you can save your progress anywhere (the SavePoint wasn't introduced until ''[[VideoGame/MetroidIIReturnOfSamus Metroid II]]'') and the game used a PasswordSave system in the international releases (the Japanese release had a save system similar to that of the 8-bit ''Zelda'' games.games). It also had [[AmbidextrousSprite Ambidextrous Sprites]], something that even ''Metroid II'' averts despite being an early UsefulNotes/GameBoy game, and had no visual differences in the different suit power ups bar {{Palette Swap}}s and beam upgrades were mutually exclusive. The designs of Ridley and Kraid were also rather different: Ridley was a completely stationary winged thing of some kind who was fairly easy to defeat, and Kraid was tiny, barely larger than Samus. ''Super Metroid'' codified their current designs: Ridley as a fiendlishly tough and agile Space Dragon and Kraid as a gigantic lizard monster.
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