History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / Music

19th Oct '17 5:49:22 PM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Music/CledusTJudd has this in spades. His first release, "Indian In-Laws", doesn't match the source material (Music/TimMcGraw's "Indian Outlaw") as closely as his later parodies do, with many notable music variations from the latter. Its B-side was a rap cover of John Anderson's "Swingin'", something that he never did again. Overall, the first two albums had parodies of songs significantly older than the album's release date (for instance, his first in 1994 parodied "[[Music/{{Eagles}} Hotel California]]" and "Music/WeAreTheWorld" -- which also happen to be among his only non-country parodies -- and the second parodied "The Devil Went Down to Georgia", "[[Music/JohnnyCash Jackson]]", and Sammy Kershaw's 1991 hit "Cadillac Style"). From 1998's ''Did I Shave My Back for This?'' onward, he mostly limited himself to songs within a year or two of the album's release date. The first three albums also have more of a StylisticSuck feel to them (he sang in a nasal, slightly off-key delivery [although this was not the case on "Indian In-Laws"]; his backing vocals from then-wife Kim Winters were similar; and the instruments sometimes deliberately missed notes), but around ''Juddmental'' he began toning down to a more straightforward vocal delivery and started re-creating the music more accurately.

to:

* Music/CledusTJudd has this in spades. His first release, "Indian In-Laws", doesn't match the source material (Music/TimMcGraw's "Indian Outlaw") as closely as his later parodies do, with many notable music variations from the latter. Its B-side was a rap cover of John Anderson's "Swingin'", something that he never did again. Overall, the The first two albums also had parodies of songs significantly older than the album's release date (for instance, his first in 1994 parodied "[[Music/{{Eagles}} Hotel California]]" and "Music/WeAreTheWorld" -- which also happen to be among his only non-country parodies -- and the second parodied "The Devil Went Down to Georgia", "[[Music/JohnnyCash Jackson]]", and Sammy Kershaw's 1991 hit "Cadillac Style"). From 1998's ''Did I Shave My Back for This?'' onward, he mostly limited himself to songs within a year or two of the album's release date. The first three albums also have more of a StylisticSuck feel to them (he sang in a nasal, slightly off-key delivery [although this was not the case on "Indian In-Laws"]; his backing vocals from then-wife Kim Winters were similar; and the instruments sometimes deliberately missed notes), but around ''Juddmental'' he began toning down to a more straightforward vocal delivery and started re-creating the music more accurately.
15th Oct '17 3:12:56 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Music/{{ACDC}}: The songs recorded in the mid-1970s sounded very different from their later hits; this was primarily because they weren't quite taking themselves seriously yet, and mostly preferred crude novelty songs. The first album to sound anything like AC/DC as we know them today was ''Let There Be Rock'' (1977), and even that had some goofy mid-'70s glam influence on it. And the band that was the spiritual forerunner of AC/DC - the BritishInvasion-era (though actually Australian) band The Easybeats - hardly sounds like AC/DC at all.

to:

* Music/{{ACDC}}: The songs recorded in the mid-1970s sounded very different from their later hits; this was primarily because they weren't quite taking themselves seriously yet, and mostly preferred crude novelty songs. The first album to sound anything like AC/DC as we know them today was ''Let There Be Rock'' (1977), and even that had some goofy mid-'70s glam influence on it. And the band that was the spiritual forerunner of AC/DC - the BritishInvasion-era UsefulNotes/TheBritishInvasion-era (though actually Australian) band The Easybeats - hardly sounds like AC/DC at all.
15th Oct '17 3:01:19 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Music/TheRollingStones' musical output was very different in their early years, especially for fans who only know of them based on their last two-three decades of work. [[Music/TheRollingStones1964 Their self-titled debut]] from 1964 consisted almost entirely of covers (with one original song written by Jagger/Richards), and was heavily R&B-oriented. Their debut tour in the United States was a disaster - television hosts made fun of them for dressing as a ripoff of other successful [[TheBritishInvasion British Invasion]] groups like Music/TheBeatles, and their former manager/publicist Andrew Oldham removed at least one man from the group because they did not fit the mould of "thin, long-haired boys" wearing identical suits. It was only on 1966's ''Music/{{Aftermath}}'' that the group began to codify their signature sound, not only making the songs much more otherworldly and [[DarkerAndEdgier darker]], but unintentionally ditching the "boy band" image. Also, they became more [[IntercourseWithYou sexual]] than The Beatles.

to:

* Music/TheRollingStones' musical output was very different in their early years, especially for fans who only know of them based on their last two-three decades of work. [[Music/TheRollingStones1964 Their self-titled debut]] from 1964 consisted almost entirely of covers (with one original song written by Jagger/Richards), and was heavily R&B-oriented. Their debut tour in the United States was a disaster - television hosts made fun of them for dressing as a ripoff of other successful [[TheBritishInvasion [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishInvasion British Invasion]] groups like Music/TheBeatles, and their former manager/publicist Andrew Oldham removed at least one man from the group because they did not fit the mould of "thin, long-haired boys" wearing identical suits. It was only on 1966's ''Music/{{Aftermath}}'' that the group began to codify their signature sound, not only making the songs much more otherworldly and [[DarkerAndEdgier darker]], but unintentionally ditching the "boy band" image. Also, they became more [[IntercourseWithYou sexual]] than The Beatles.
3rd Oct '17 10:55:11 AM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Radney Foster: As half of Foster & Lloyd in TheEighties, he pursued a slick country-rock sound with a bit of an edge (as exemplified on "Crazy Over You"). As a solo artist from TheNineties onward, his sound became softer and twangier, and his lyrics more thoughtful and introspective (such as his biggest solo hit, "Nobody Wins").
28th Sep '17 12:11:19 PM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Walker Hayes (no relation) had a country rock sound comparable to Eric Paslay or Frankie Ballard, with whom he shared producer Marshall Altman. After his first album for Creator/CapitolRecords [[MissingEpisode never materalized]], he disappeared for six years before coming back in 2017 with a new electronic sound akin to Music/SamHunt and a much poppier lyric style, as exemplified on his BreakthroughHit "You Broke Up with Me".

to:

* Walker Hayes (no relation) had started out with a country rock sound comparable to Eric Paslay or Frankie Ballard, with whom he shared producer Marshall Altman. After This sound was exemplified on his first debut single "Pants". But after his album for Creator/CapitolRecords [[MissingEpisode never materalized]], materalized due to single underperformance]], he disappeared for six years before coming back in 2017 with a new electronic sound akin to Music/SamHunt and a much poppier lyric style, as exemplified on his BreakthroughHit "You Broke Up with Me".
28th Sep '17 12:10:04 PM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Sara Evans' debut album ''Three Chords and the Truth'' in 1997 was far more traditional than everything that came afterward. It even had covers of Patsy Cline, Buck Owens and Bill Anderson.

to:

* Sara Evans' debut album ''Three Chords and the Truth'' in 1997 was far more traditional than everything that came afterward. It even had covers of Patsy Cline, Buck Owens Music/BuckOwens, and Bill Anderson.Music/BillAnderson. Her second album, despite having her BreakthroughHit in the lush pop ballad "No Place That Far", also had some more twangy traditional sounding material such as "Cryin' Game", and vocal contributions from Music/GeorgeJones and Music/{{Alison Krauss|And Union Station}}. From ''Born to Fly'' onward, she had fully established her more pop-sounding style of country.
28th Sep '17 11:58:09 AM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Dustin Lynch's debut single "Cowboys and Angels" sticks out as it has a twangy, traditional country sound, while all of his other singles have been very slick, polished, rock and rap-influenced country similar to Music/JasonAldean. It would be easy to brand nearly all of his post-"Cowboys" releases as "bro-country".
27th Sep '17 9:47:34 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** "Love Me Do" and the TitleTrack from ''Music/PleasePleaseMe'', as well as the stereo version of "From Me To You" stand out for the use of harmonica, an element they barely revisited. [[ThatsWhatSheSaid "I realised I couldn't sing with that thing in my mouth"]].

to:

** "Love Me Do" and the TitleTrack from ''Music/PleasePleaseMe'', as well as the stereo version of Do", "Music/PleasePleaseMe", "From Me To You", "Thank You Girl" and "I'll Get You" all stand out for the use of harmonica, an element they barely revisited. [[ThatsWhatSheSaid "I realised I couldn't sing with that thing in my mouth"]].
26th Sep '17 9:43:35 PM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Walker Hayes (no relation) had a country rock sound comparable to Eric Paslay or Frankie Ballard, with whom he shared producer Marshall Altman. After his first album for Creator/CapitolRecords [[MissingEpisode never materalized]], he disappeared for six years before coming back in 2017 with a new electronic sound akin to Music/SamHunt and a much poppier lyric style, as exemplified on his BreakthroughHit "You Broke Up with Me".
23rd Sep '17 11:33:11 AM Twentington
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Music/TobyKeith is known for his macho, swaggering, patriotic style. But his first three albums on Mercury Records are dominated by ballads and midtempos about a relationship, such as "Who's That Man", "Me Too", and "Does That Blue Moon Ever Shine on You". Debut single "Should've Been a Cowboy", despite being one of his {{signature song}}s, also stands out for its romantic cowboy imagery that he never used again (he's done a few more "cowboy" songs since, most notably "Beer for My Horses", but they were far from romantic). The swagger, though occasionally present in fare such as "A Little Less Talk and a Lot More Action" (coincidentally, the only single from his first three albums that he didn't write), didn't really come in full force until he switched from Mercury to Creator/DreamWorksRecords at the TurnOfTheMillennium and released the in-your-face "How Do You Like Me Now?!", although even at that point in his career, he still cut a few ballads such as "You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This". And the rampant patriotism didn't really come along until after his angry [[TheWarOnTerror post-9/11]] song "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)", which has informed nearly all of his subsequent albums in one way or another.

to:

* Music/TobyKeith is known for his macho, swaggering, patriotic style. But his first three albums on Mercury Records are dominated by ballads and midtempos about a relationship, such as "Who's That Man", "Me Too", and "Does That Blue Moon Ever Shine on You".You", or "We Were in Love". Debut single "Should've Been a Cowboy", despite being one of his {{signature song}}s, also stands out for its romantic cowboy imagery that he never used again (he's done a few more "cowboy" songs since, most notably "Beer for My Horses", but they were far from romantic). The swagger, though occasionally present in fare such as "A Little Less Talk and a Lot More Action" (coincidentally, the only single from his first three albums that he didn't write), Action", didn't really come in full force until he switched from Mercury to Creator/DreamWorksRecords at the TurnOfTheMillennium and released the in-your-face "How Do You Like Me Now?!", although even at that point in Now?!". Despite containing this song and the equally in-your-face CountryRap "I Wanna Talk About Me", his career, he first two [=DreamWorks=] albums still cut a few had some older-style ballads on them such as "You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This". And the rampant patriotism This" and "My List". The PatrioticFervor didn't really come along show up at all until after his angry [[TheWarOnTerror post-9/11]] song "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)", the lead single to his third [=DreamWorks=] album, which has informed nearly all of his subsequent albums in one way or another.
This list shows the last 10 events of 426. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=EarlyInstallmentWeirdness.Music