History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / Music

29th Mar '17 8:47:28 AM Kid
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* Melinda Kathleen Reese, of the ''Google Translate Sings'' series on {{Youtube}}, takes well-known songs, runs them through a few layers of Google Translate, then sings the results. Her early videos were quite basic, with her singing in front of a blank wall and including a video of the original music video for comparison. This began to change when she did a translated cover of "I'll Make a Man Out of You" from ''WesternAnimation/{{Mulan}}'', which featured Caleb Hyles and some props. By the time she covered "I Just Can't Wait to be King" from ''WesternAnimation/TheLionKing'', she was creating full music videos for the translations and was no longer including videos of the original song with hers. Recent videos have her recording herself singing a line multiple times to create a chorus, or occasionally playing characters in the videos, and sometimes instead of covering a whole song she sings well-known bits of a few different ones in the same video. If you only got into the ''Google Translate Sings'' series later on, it can be quite odd to go back to her first video and see how basic it is in comparison.
26th Mar '17 2:00:25 PM EarthCrash
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* Music/PinkFloyd began in 1965 as the prototypical psychedelic rock band, a band noted for improvisational "freakouts", who were encouraged by [[ExecutiveMeddling record execs]] to produce hit pop singles. After 1967's ''Music/ThePiperAtTheGatesOfDawn'', their bandleader, Music/SydBarrett, became a tragic acid casualty (he only appears on three songs on ''Music/ASaucerfulOfSecrets'', and only sings on one), and bassist Music/RogerWaters and new guitarist David Gilmour became vocalists/bandleaders. They spent 1968-72 basically "learning to use their chisels", as Waters would recently put it in a TV documentary, experimenting and slowly forming a group sound and style independent of Barrett, creating CultClassic albums like ''Music/{{Ummagumma}}'' and ''Music/AtomHeartMother'' in the process. 1971's ''Music/{{Meddle}}'' was the first work to resemble what we now know as the Pink Floyd sound and style. They also created music for Italian [[LeFilmArtistique psychedelic art films]] of largely instrumental tracks, two of which were released as soundtracks: ''Music/{{More}}'' (1969) and ''Music/ObscuredByClouds'' (1972). Fans who realise the existence of the first six or seven albums might barely recognise them prior to their 1973 breakthrough album, ''Music/TheDarkSideOfTheMoon'', by which Waters began to take over as FaceOfTheBand. Here's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h99WP2KUvLA Syd's]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap_Z9fLrPf4 Floyd.]] Here's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQUbE48Dc6E "Classic"]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0kcet4aPpQ Floyd]].

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* Music/PinkFloyd began in 1965 as the prototypical psychedelic rock band, a band noted for improvisational "freakouts", who were encouraged by [[ExecutiveMeddling record execs]] to produce hit pop singles. After 1967's ''Music/ThePiperAtTheGatesOfDawn'', their bandleader, Music/SydBarrett, became a tragic acid casualty (he only appears on three songs on ''Music/ASaucerfulOfSecrets'', and only sings on one), and bassist Music/RogerWaters and new guitarist David Gilmour became vocalists/bandleaders. They spent 1968-72 basically "learning to use their chisels", as Waters would recently put it in a TV documentary, experimenting and slowly forming a group sound and style independent of Barrett, creating CultClassic albums like ''Music/{{Ummagumma}}'' and ''Music/AtomHeartMother'' in the process. 1971's ''Music/{{Meddle}}'' was the first work to resemble what we now know as the Pink Floyd sound and style. They also created music for Italian [[LeFilmArtistique psychedelic art films]] of largely instrumental tracks, two of which were released as soundtracks: ''Music/{{More}}'' (1969) and ''Music/ObscuredByClouds'' (1972). Fans who realise the existence of the first six or seven albums might barely recognise them prior to their 1973 breakthrough album, ''Music/TheDarkSideOfTheMoon'', by which Waters began to take over as FaceOfTheBand. Here's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h99WP2KUvLA Syd's]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap_Z9fLrPf4 com/watch?v=z4jXE_XgW2E Floyd.]] Here's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQUbE48Dc6E "Classic"]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0kcet4aPpQ Floyd]].
24th Mar '17 10:48:18 PM Twentington
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* Music/ZacBrownBand's first two singles, "Chicken Fried" and "Whatever It Is", are far more mainstream than their later work. This was because they were written well before the rest of the songs on their breakthrough album, ''The Foundation'' (2009). In fact, "Chicken Fried" was originally released in 2006 by The Lost Trailers, whose version was withdrawn because Zac changed his mind about letting someone else record it. Also, given their track record as one of the tightest bands in country music, members Coy Bowles and Chris Fryar did not play on the first album at all; session musicians were used in their place.

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* Music/ZacBrownBand's first two singles, "Chicken Fried" and "Whatever It Is", are far more mainstream than their later work. This was because they were written well before the rest of the songs on their breakthrough album, ''The Foundation'' (2009). In fact, "Chicken Fried" was originally released in 2006 by The Lost Trailers, whose version was withdrawn because Zac changed his mind about letting someone else record it. Also, given their track record as debut album is the only one of the tightest bands in country music, members Coy Bowles to feature [[ThePeteBest little-known members]] Markus Petruska and Joel Williams, who were respectively replaced by Chris Fryar did not play on and Coy Bowles by the first album at all; session musicians were used in their place.time "Chicken Fried" was actually released.
18th Mar '17 8:37:44 PM mlsmithca
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* Music/TheMoodyBlues are commonly known as one of the codifiers of psychedelic, progressive, and symphonic rock, with songs like "Nights in White Satin", "Tuesday Afternoon", and "Question" blending classical and popular influences, and prominently featuring flute solos from Ray Thomas, the symphonic textures of the mellotron courtesy of Mike Pinder, and spoken poems written by drummer Graeme Edge. You'd never guess that their first album, 1965's ''The Magnificent Moodies'', was straightforward R&B (hence why they're called the Moody ''Blues'') as sung by lead guitarist Denny Laine, exemplified by their chart-topping cover of Larry Banks and Milton Bennett's "Go Now". Within two years, Laine and bassist Clint Warwick left the band and were replaced by Pinder and Thomas' former El Riot and the Rebels bandmate John Lodge on bass and Wilde Three guitarist Justin Hayward, Pinder started using a mellotron instead of a piano, and the band were introduced to producer Tony Clarke... and the rest is history.
18th Mar '17 8:24:10 PM mlsmithca
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** First, they were originally a "punk" band (or whatever the late '50s/early '60s equivalent of punk was) who had much shorter hair than we remember; performed in a surly, indifferent manner; ate fried chicken onstage (leaving the bones behind them); and sneered at the audience. In general, they were probably more performance artists than musicians in those days. Then there was their first three albums, which were more guitar-oriented pop-rock music.It wasn't until ''Beatles for Sale'' that they started to find their artistic footing. They didn't completely go from the [[FanNickname Fab Four]] to artists until ''Music/RubberSoul'', which included much more experimental songs, and ''Music/{{Revolver}}'', which began the psychedelic rock sound that would emerge fully formed in ''Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand''.

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** First, they were originally a "punk" band (or whatever the late '50s/early '60s equivalent of punk was) who had much shorter hair than we remember; performed in a surly, indifferent manner; ate fried chicken onstage (leaving the bones behind them); and sneered at the audience. In general, they were probably more performance artists than musicians in those days. Then there was their first three albums, [[Music/PleasePleaseMe first]] [[Music/WithTheBeatles three]] [[Music/AHardDaysNight albums]], which were more guitar-oriented pop-rock music.music. It wasn't until ''Beatles for Sale'' that they started to find their artistic footing. They didn't completely go from the [[FanNickname Fab Four]] to artists until ''Music/RubberSoul'', which included much more experimental songs, and ''Music/{{Revolver}}'', which began the psychedelic rock sound that would emerge fully formed in ''Music/SgtPeppersLonelyHeartsClubBand''.
18th Mar '17 8:22:16 PM mlsmithca
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* Music/AmyWinehouse began as solely a {{Jazz}} singer on her debut album ''Music/{{Frank}}'', but by the time of ''Music/BackToBlack'' she had abandoned Jazz completely for {{Soul}}.
** Her look also changed in accordance with her shift in genres. By the time of ''Back to Black'' she started wearing her trademark beehive haircut and thick black eyeliner which reflected the fact that she was drawing on Soul, girl groups from the 1960s such as The Ronettes for inspiration as opposed to Jazz singers such as Music/FrankSinatra whom her first album was even named after.

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* Music/AmyWinehouse began as solely a {{Jazz}} singer on her debut album ''Music/{{Frank}}'', but by the time of ''Music/BackToBlack'' she had abandoned Jazz completely for {{Soul}}.
**
{{Soul}}. Her look also changed in accordance with her shift in genres. By the time of ''Back to Black'' she started wearing her trademark beehive haircut and thick black eyeliner which reflected the fact that she was drawing on Soul, girl groups from the 1960s such as The Ronettes for inspiration as opposed to Jazz singers such as Music/FrankSinatra whom her first album was even named after.



* The songs recorded in the mid-1970s by [[Music/{{ACDC}} AC/DC]], arguably the biggest rock band on the planet today, sounded very different from their later hits; this was primarily because they weren't quite taking themselves seriously yet, and mostly preferred crude novelty songs. The first album to sound anything like AC/DC as we know them today was ''Let There Be Rock'' (1977), and even that had some goofy mid-'70s glam influence on it. And the band that was the spiritual forerunner of AC/DC - the BritishInvasion-era (though actually Australian) band The Easybeats - hardly sounds like AC/DC at all.

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* The songs recorded in the mid-1970s by [[Music/{{ACDC}} AC/DC]], arguably the biggest rock band on the planet today, Music/{{ACDC}} sounded very different from their later hits; this was primarily because they weren't quite taking themselves seriously yet, and mostly preferred crude novelty songs. The first album to sound anything like AC/DC as we know them today was ''Let There Be Rock'' (1977), and even that had some goofy mid-'70s glam influence on it. And the band that was the spiritual forerunner of AC/DC - the BritishInvasion-era (though actually Australian) band The Easybeats - hardly sounds like AC/DC at all.



* Similarly, listen to Music/VinceGill's 1980s work on Creator/RCARecords versus his 1990s and 2000s material for MCA Records. The RCA material reverberates the hell out of his voice and throws it up against walls of keyboards (par for the course in the 1980s), while the MCA material shows him exploring mainstream country, traditional country and bluegrass with equal skill.
** And before that is his tenure in Pure Prairie League, where his phrasing was a bit more stuffy, and the material more 80s soft rock/AC than he would later become.

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* Similarly, listen to Music/VinceGill's 1980s work on Creator/RCARecords versus his 1990s and 2000s material for MCA Records. The RCA material reverberates the hell out of his voice and throws it up against walls of keyboards (par for the course in the 1980s), while the MCA material shows him exploring mainstream country, traditional country and bluegrass with equal skill.
**
skill. And before that is his tenure in Pure Prairie League, where his phrasing was a bit more stuffy, and the material more 80s soft rock/AC than he would later become.



* The 1982 self-titled debut EP by the band Music/{{Swans}} is vaguely creepy, saxophone-laced PostPunk with a pronounced No Wave influence; their first LP, 1983's ''Filth'', is far harsher, not unlike some sort of primitive hybrid of {{Industrial}} and HardcorePunk. It is also far more unsettling. And then there's their second LP, 1984's ''Cop''. [[HellIsThatNoise "Brutal" does not begin to describe it.]]
** To simplify, the [[MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness relative rock "hardness" of the band's sound]] increased from a 5 to a hard 10 in ''less than two years''.

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* The 1982 self-titled debut EP by the band Music/{{Swans}} is vaguely creepy, saxophone-laced PostPunk with a pronounced No Wave influence; their first LP, 1983's ''Filth'', is far harsher, not unlike some sort of primitive hybrid of {{Industrial}} and HardcorePunk. It is also far more unsettling. And then there's their second LP, 1984's ''Cop''. [[HellIsThatNoise "Brutal" does not begin to describe it.]]
**
]] To simplify, the [[MohsScaleOfRockAndMetalHardness relative rock "hardness" of the band's sound]] increased from a 5 to a hard 10 in ''less than two years''.



*** "Love Me Do" and the TitleTrack from ''Music/PleasePleaseMe'', as well as the stereo version of "From Me To You" stand out for the use of harmonica, an element they barely revisited. [[ThatsWhatSheSaid "I realised I couldn't sing with that thing in my mouth"]].

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*** ** "Love Me Do" and the TitleTrack from ''Music/PleasePleaseMe'', as well as the stereo version of "From Me To You" stand out for the use of harmonica, an element they barely revisited. [[ThatsWhatSheSaid "I realised I couldn't sing with that thing in my mouth"]].



* Music/{{Slipknot}}. Seriously, ''Mate. Feed. Kill. Repeat.'' bordered on NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly. It's considerably less cohesive than their current works.
** It gets weirder. The original vocalist, Anders Colsefini, had an entirely different style than Taylor that was more akin to the late Peter Steele of Music/TypeONegative, meets [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirk_Windstein Kirk Windstein]] of Crowbar, with a dash of [[Music/{{Metallica}} James Hetfield]]. The album also contains more than a few references to ''TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness'' series; the eponymous [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQqVhbMxj5w ''Slipknot'']] (an early version of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oC5ecWH8QgM ''(sic)'']]) being the most glaring example. And finally, to say it bordered on NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly, is a gross understatement as the album had jarring elements of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQo72z6YW8&feature=related glam, funk, jazz, and lounge]]. Yes, ''lounge''.

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* Music/{{Slipknot}}. Seriously, ''Mate. Feed. Kill. Repeat.'' bordered on NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly. It's considerably less cohesive than their current works.
**
works. It gets weirder. The original vocalist, Anders Colsefini, had an entirely different style than Taylor that was more akin to the late Peter Steele of Music/TypeONegative, meets [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirk_Windstein Kirk Windstein]] of Crowbar, with a dash of [[Music/{{Metallica}} James Hetfield]]. The album also contains more than a few references to ''TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness'' series; the eponymous [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQqVhbMxj5w ''Slipknot'']] (an early version of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oC5ecWH8QgM ''(sic)'']]) being the most glaring example. And finally, to say it bordered on NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly, is a gross understatement as the album had jarring elements of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQo72z6YW8&feature=related com/watch?v=1oQo72z6YW8 glam, funk, jazz, and lounge]]. Yes, ''lounge''.



* Music/TypeONegative were always DoomMetal, but their first album ''Slow Deep And Hard'' contained more ThrashMetal influence than their more well known GothicMetal sound. Their lyrics focus more on Peter's hatred for certain people than they do on sex, although there are a couple of songs about the latter.
** Justified in that the songs on the album were written for Peter Steele's previous band Carnivore, who were a thrash band. This is also why the sound of the album is so raw. Type O Negative would become known for their clean sound quality (rare in metal) later on.

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* Music/TypeONegative were always DoomMetal, but their first album ''Slow Deep And Hard'' contained more ThrashMetal influence than their more well known GothicMetal sound. Their lyrics focus more on Peter's hatred for certain people than they do on sex, although there are a couple of songs about the latter.
**
latter. Justified in that the songs on the album were written for Peter Steele's previous band Carnivore, who were a thrash band. This is also why the sound of the album is so raw. Type O Negative would become known for their clean sound quality (rare in metal) later on.



* Music/{{Queen}} was more like Music/LedZeppelin, with much more of a rock feel to them in their early albums. They didn't really hit their stride as a GenreRoulette band until ''Music/ANightAtTheOpera'', which featured hits like "I'm In Love With My Car", "39", and the wildly popular "Bohemian Rhapsody".
** Their self-titled debut album in particular featured more morally-focused and religious themes (even including a song called "Jesus"). The latter was almost entirely absent from later releases, until "All God's People" on their ''Innuendo'' album 18 years later.

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* Music/{{Queen}} was more like Music/LedZeppelin, with much more of a rock feel to them in their early albums. They didn't really hit their stride as a GenreRoulette band until ''Music/ANightAtTheOpera'', which featured hits like "I'm In Love With My Car", "39", and the wildly popular "Bohemian Rhapsody".
**
Rhapsody". Their self-titled debut album in particular featured more morally-focused and religious themes (even including a song called "Jesus"). The latter was almost entirely absent from later releases, until "All God's People" on their ''Innuendo'' album 18 years later.



** Actually, it wasn't so much that ''The Fame'' was out-of-place so much as just... ''different'' from her next two releases. ''The Fame Monster'' was intentionally different, and ''Born This Way'' mostly continued the "darker and edgier" style mentioned above. From there on out, fans just sort of expected this to be her style (particularly ''Born this Way'', as it was largely devoid of the "fun" songs prevalent throughout ''The Fame'', instead going for a more serious approach). In any case, the fans expecting this to be Gaga's permanent style was more of a knee jerk reaction to a singer who's career was still relatively young.
*** To the surprise of some fans, ''ARTPOP'' ended up largely going back to ''The Fame'''s style with its own unique vibes, as mentioned below.

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** Actually, it It wasn't so much that ''The Fame'' was out-of-place so much as just... ''different'' from her next two releases. ''The Fame Monster'' was intentionally different, and ''Born This Way'' mostly continued the "darker and edgier" style mentioned above. From there on out, fans just sort of expected this to be her style (particularly ''Born this Way'', as it was largely devoid of the "fun" songs prevalent throughout ''The Fame'', instead going for a more serious approach). In any case, the fans expecting this to be Gaga's permanent style was more of a knee jerk reaction to a singer who's whose career was still relatively young.
***
young. To the surprise of some fans, ''ARTPOP'' ended up largely going back to ''The Fame'''s style with its own unique vibes, as mentioned below.



* Music/{{KMFDM}}'s second (and breakout) album, ''What Do You Know Deutschland'', had more of a proto-EBM or industrial electro type sound, similar to Microchip League, early Music/{{Ministry}}, and Music/NineInchNails' first album, rather than their signature IndustrialMetal style. Their obscure first album, ''Opium'', was more experimental and thus even weirder.
** It took a few weird installments for KMFDM to find their sound, with three more albums between "Deutschland" and "Naive" where they really started flirting with industrial metal, even though much of the album still had kind of a dance vibe to it. They were releasing albums for almost a decade before finally doing a full-on industrial metal album with "Angst" (and even that had a couple of dance songs on it).
* Music/PinkFloyd began in 1965 as the prototypical psychedelic rock band, a band noted for improvisational "freakouts", who were encouraged by [[ExecutiveMeddling record execs]] to produce hit pop singles. After 1967's ''Music/ThePiperAtTheGatesOfDawn'', their bandleader, Music/SydBarrett, became a tragic acid casualty (he only appears on three songs on ''Music/ASaucerfulOfSecrets'', and only sings on one), and bassist Music/RogerWaters and new guitarist David Gilmour became vocalists/bandleaders. They spent 1968-72 basically "learning to use their chisels", as Waters would recently put it in a TV documentary, experimenting and slowly forming a group sound and style independent of Barrett, creating CultClassic albums like ''Music/{{Ummagumma}}'' and ''Music/AtomHeartMother'' in the process. 1971's ''Music/{{Meddle}}'' was the first work to resemble what we now know as the Pink Floyd sound and style. They also created music for Italian [[LeFilmArtistique psychedelic art films]] of largely instrumental tracks, two of which were released as soundtracks: ''Music/{{More}}'' (1969) and ''Music/ObscuredByClouds'' (1972). Fans who realise the existence of the first six or seven albums might barely recognise them prior to their 1973 breakthrough album, ''Music/TheDarkSideOfTheMoon'', by which Waters began to take over as FaceOfTheBand.
*** Here's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h99WP2KUvLA Syd's]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap_Z9fLrPf4 Floyd.]] Here's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQUbE48Dc6E "Classic"]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0kcet4aPpQ Floyd]].

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* Music/{{KMFDM}}'s second (and breakout) album, ''What Do You Know Deutschland'', had more of a proto-EBM or industrial electro type sound, similar to Microchip League, early Music/{{Ministry}}, and Music/NineInchNails' first album, rather than their signature IndustrialMetal style. Their obscure first album, ''Opium'', was more experimental and thus even weirder.
**
weirder. It took a few weird installments for KMFDM to find their sound, with three more albums between "Deutschland" and "Naive" where they really started flirting with industrial metal, even though much of the album still had kind of a dance vibe to it. They were releasing albums for almost a decade before finally doing a full-on industrial metal album with "Angst" (and even that had a couple of dance songs on it).
* Music/PinkFloyd began in 1965 as the prototypical psychedelic rock band, a band noted for improvisational "freakouts", who were encouraged by [[ExecutiveMeddling record execs]] to produce hit pop singles. After 1967's ''Music/ThePiperAtTheGatesOfDawn'', their bandleader, Music/SydBarrett, became a tragic acid casualty (he only appears on three songs on ''Music/ASaucerfulOfSecrets'', and only sings on one), and bassist Music/RogerWaters and new guitarist David Gilmour became vocalists/bandleaders. They spent 1968-72 basically "learning to use their chisels", as Waters would recently put it in a TV documentary, experimenting and slowly forming a group sound and style independent of Barrett, creating CultClassic albums like ''Music/{{Ummagumma}}'' and ''Music/AtomHeartMother'' in the process. 1971's ''Music/{{Meddle}}'' was the first work to resemble what we now know as the Pink Floyd sound and style. They also created music for Italian [[LeFilmArtistique psychedelic art films]] of largely instrumental tracks, two of which were released as soundtracks: ''Music/{{More}}'' (1969) and ''Music/ObscuredByClouds'' (1972). Fans who realise the existence of the first six or seven albums might barely recognise them prior to their 1973 breakthrough album, ''Music/TheDarkSideOfTheMoon'', by which Waters began to take over as FaceOfTheBand.
***
FaceOfTheBand. Here's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h99WP2KUvLA Syd's]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ap_Z9fLrPf4 Floyd.]] Here's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQUbE48Dc6E "Classic"]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0kcet4aPpQ Floyd]].



* The first two albums of Music/{{Yes}} count. Along with the unique playing styles of founding guitarist Peter Banks and founding keyboardist Tony Kaye, Yes specialized in re-arranged covers of [[Music/TheByrds Byrds]], [[Music/TheBeatles Beatles]] and BuffaloSpringfield songs, while their originals showed more '60's pop influences. The band's second album, ''Time And A Word'' also incorporates orchestral accompaniment, which Yes would rarely use to such an extent until 2000's ''Magnification''.
** Also, their breakthrough third release, ''The Yes Album'', was Yes' first attempt at using synthesizers, and were used in a relatively subtle way, as keyboardist Kaye was reluctant to use them. Their multi-keyboard sound would not develop until the followup, ''Fragile'', by which Rick Wakeman would replace Kaye in the lineup.

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* The first two albums of Music/{{Yes}} count. Along with the unique playing styles of founding guitarist Peter Banks and founding keyboardist Tony Kaye, Yes specialized in re-arranged covers of [[Music/TheByrds Byrds]], [[Music/TheBeatles Beatles]] and BuffaloSpringfield songs, while their originals showed more '60's pop influences. The band's second album, ''Time And A Word'' also incorporates orchestral accompaniment, which Yes would rarely use to such an extent until 2000's ''Magnification''.
**
''Magnification''. Also, their breakthrough third release, ''The Yes Album'', was Yes' first attempt at using synthesizers, and were used in a relatively subtle way, as keyboardist Kaye was reluctant to use them. Their multi-keyboard sound would not develop until the followup, ''Fragile'', by which time Rick Wakeman would replace Kaye in the lineup.



* Music/{{Yeah Yeah Yeahs}} "Fever To Tell" is a lot more punk-sounding than "Show Your Bones" and "It's Blitz!".
** Another band that sounded a hell of a lot more "punk" at the beginning of their career: The Go-Go's, who got their start in punk clubs before significantly turning up the pop quotient and transforming themselves into more of a '60s beat combo-type band.

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* Music/{{Yeah Yeah Yeahs}} Music/YeahYeahYeahs "Fever To Tell" is a lot more punk-sounding than "Show Your Bones" and "It's Blitz!".
** * Another band that sounded a hell of a lot more "punk" at the beginning of their career: The Go-Go's, who got their start in punk clubs before significantly turning up the pop quotient and transforming themselves into more of a '60s beat combo-type band.



* Music/CaptainBeefheart fans who stumble across his first album, 1967's ''Music/SafeAsMilk'', will be shocked to find that it's relatively normal, with very little of the weirdness that would appear in later albums like ''Music/TroutMaskReplica'' and ''Music/LickMyDecalsOffBaby''. (Early Installment Lack-Of-Weirdness?)
** Captain Beefheart actually started out as a solid blues/rock band in the tradition of Britain's Yardbirds or the early Rolling Stones. What's even crazier is that Captain Beefheart were a featured artist on "{{American Bandstand}}" when ''Safe As Milk'' was released AND Don Van Vliet took questions via phone from a "Bandstand" kid who actually seemed to be a proto-fan.

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* Music/CaptainBeefheart fans who stumble across his first album, 1967's ''Music/SafeAsMilk'', will be shocked to find that it's relatively normal, with very little of the weirdness that would appear in later albums like ''Music/TroutMaskReplica'' and ''Music/LickMyDecalsOffBaby''. (Early Installment Lack-Of-Weirdness?)
**
Lack-Of-Weirdness?) Captain Beefheart actually started out as a solid blues/rock band in the tradition of Britain's Yardbirds or the early Rolling Stones. What's even crazier is that Captain Beefheart were a featured artist on "{{American Bandstand}}" when ''Safe As Milk'' was released AND Don Van Vliet took questions via phone from a "Bandstand" kid who actually seemed to be a proto-fan.



* Music/AliceInChains started off in 1986 as a glam metal band that was extremely similar to Music/GunsNRoses, even appearance-wise. If that wasn't different enough, this group was descended from the glam-rock hair band Alice 'n' Chainz (which, aside from having the same vocalist, are ''not'' the same band). The latter band are noticeably... ''different'' from the famous Music/{{Grunge}} band.
** Their first album, ''Facelift'', has very obvious glam-influence (especially obvious on the second half) in strong contrast to the dark, gloomy heavy metal of their later albums. The lyrics, while far from upbeat/happy, are also a little lighter and less pessimistic.

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* Music/AliceInChains started off in 1986 as a glam metal band that was extremely similar to Music/GunsNRoses, even appearance-wise. If that wasn't different enough, this group was descended from the glam-rock hair band Alice 'n' Chainz (which, aside from having the same vocalist, are ''not'' the same band). The latter band are noticeably... ''different'' from the famous Music/{{Grunge}} band.
**
band. Their first album, ''Facelift'', has very obvious glam-influence (especially obvious on the second half) in strong contrast to the dark, gloomy heavy metal of their later albums. The lyrics, while far from upbeat/happy, are also a little lighter and less pessimistic.



* If you're only familiar with Music/MichaelJackson through the scandals of the decade before he died, even the album cover of ''Music/{{Thriller}}'' is a little jarring. But going back even further, his first actual solo album was 1972's ''Got To Be There'' which was released when Michael was 13 going on 14. It kicks off with a more-than-respectable cover of "Ain't No Sunshine," but from that point forward is incredibly ballad-heavy and even the more well-known stuff ("Rockin' Robin" and the title song) don't even hint at any aspect of the post-disco dance pop of the '80s. His next three albums are more of the same, and even ''Music/OffTheWall'' was far more disco/quiet storm than one might expect from his later work. No rock crossovers or anthemic ballads about saving the world.
** If you know Jackson mostly as the singer of paranoid songs where he screams in anger and lets out many of his trademarked high yells you'll be surprised that most of his output before "Thriller" is rather happy and cheerful without any "a-hi-hi"'s thrown in for good measure.
* Music/WeirdAlYankovic's output can basically be divided into two eras: his self-titled debut album, and literally everything else. Said album's parodies feature only vague approximations of the original arrangements at best, prominently featuring Al on the accordion. There's no polka medley, roughly half the songs feature armpit farts, every single one has the accordion as its lead instrument (due to Al's longtime guitarist Jim West not being at the sessions; the few guitar parts present are instead played by Richard Bennett[[note]]a longtime sideman of Neil Diamond, occasional CountryMusic record producer, and brother of Al's drummer Jon "Bermuda" Schwartz[[/note]]), and only one of the original songs ("Happy Birthday") is done InTheStyleOf some other artist. Coincidentally, it's also his only studio album to date with a featured vocalist.
** His appearance is also a case of Early Instalment weirdness: in the 80s and 90s he wore thick-framed glasses and a mustache, only adopting his current style of appearance in 1999

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* If you're only familiar with Music/MichaelJackson through the scandals of the decade before he died, even the album cover of ''Music/{{Thriller}}'' is a little jarring. But going back even further, his first actual solo album was 1972's ''Got To Be There'' which was released when Michael was 13 going on 14. It kicks off with a more-than-respectable cover of "Ain't No Sunshine," but from that point forward is incredibly ballad-heavy and even the more well-known stuff ("Rockin' Robin" and the title song) don't even hint at any aspect of the post-disco dance pop of the '80s. His next three albums are more of the same, and even ''Music/OffTheWall'' was far more disco/quiet storm than one might expect from his later work. No rock crossovers or anthemic ballads about saving the world.
**
world. If you know Jackson mostly as the singer of paranoid songs where he screams in anger and lets out many of his trademarked high yells you'll be surprised that most of his output before "Thriller" ''Thriller'' is rather happy and cheerful without any "a-hi-hi"'s thrown in for good measure.
* Music/WeirdAlYankovic's output can basically be divided into two eras: his self-titled debut album, and literally everything else. Said album's parodies feature only vague approximations of the original arrangements at best, prominently featuring Al on the accordion. There's no polka medley, roughly half the songs feature armpit farts, every single one has the accordion as its lead instrument (due to Al's longtime guitarist Jim West not being at the sessions; the few guitar parts present are instead played by Richard Bennett[[note]]a longtime sideman of Neil Diamond, occasional CountryMusic record producer, and brother of Al's drummer Jon "Bermuda" Schwartz[[/note]]), and only one of the original songs ("Happy Birthday") is done InTheStyleOf some other artist. Coincidentally, it's also his only studio album to date with a featured vocalist.
**
vocalist. His appearance is also a case of Early Instalment weirdness: in the 80s and 90s he wore thick-framed glasses and a mustache, only adopting his current style of appearance in 19991999.



* Music/BobMarley: During most of the 1960s he sounded more like a smooth Motown soul singer. Marley was inspired by Music/TheImpressions and almost sounds like an exact copy. The topics of his early songs are often childlike and banal: ''"Mr. Chatterbox"'' is about the irritating aspects of radio, for instance! Also, he only became a Rastafari after 1965.
** The studio version of ''"No Woman, No Cry" (1974)'', found ''Music/NattyDread'' sounds almost comedic, compared to the much slower, dramatic and famous live version found on the album ''"Live" (1975)''.

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* Music/BobMarley: During most of the 1960s he sounded more like a smooth Motown soul singer. Marley was inspired by Music/TheImpressions and almost sounds like an exact copy. The topics of his early songs are often childlike and banal: ''"Mr. Chatterbox"'' "Mr. Chatterbox" is about the irritating aspects of radio, for instance! Also, he only became a Rastafari after 1965.
**
1965. The studio version of ''"No ''No Woman, No Cry" (1974)'', Cry'' (1974), found ''Music/NattyDread'' sounds almost comedic, compared to the much slower, dramatic and famous live version found on the album ''"Live" (1975)''. ''Live'' (1975).



* Music/{{Stratovarius}} was an incredibly different band than what it is today. Consider this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBpIPIyCauk]], versus this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEYZqdA0SL8]]; it's important to understand that the band does not feature any of their original members anymore.
** The first three albums featured Timo Tolkki on vocals - Timo Kotipelto didn't take over until the fourth album, ''Fourth Dimension'', and the band wouldn't start using their signature "symphonic power metal" style until the next album, ''Episode'', which was the first album to use the "classic" Stratovarius lineup (Timo Kotipelto on vocals, Timo Tolkki on lead guitar, Jari Kainulainen on bass guitar, Jens Johansson on keyboards and Jörg Michael on drums).
* Late band ''Sentenced'' began as this with Taneli Jarva on vocals [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRs4PBXG-WM]], and ended like this with Ville Laihiala as his replacement [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YyqDFJ-4E1k]]. Consider that the guitarists and drummer are the same in both songs.

to:

* Music/{{Stratovarius}} was an incredibly different band than what it is today. Consider this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBpIPIyCauk]], versus this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEYZqdA0SL8]]; it's important to understand that the band does not feature any of their original members anymore.
**
anymore. The first three albums featured Timo Tolkki on vocals - Timo Kotipelto didn't take over until the fourth album, ''Fourth Dimension'', and the band wouldn't start using their signature "symphonic power metal" style until the next album, ''Episode'', which was the first album to use the "classic" Stratovarius lineup (Timo Kotipelto on vocals, Timo Tolkki on lead guitar, Jari Kainulainen on bass guitar, Jens Johansson on keyboards and Jörg Michael on drums).
* Late band ''Sentenced'' Sentenced began as this with Taneli Jarva on vocals [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRs4PBXG-WM]], and ended like this with Ville Laihiala as his replacement [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YyqDFJ-4E1k]]. Consider that the guitarists and drummer are the same in both songs.



* Music/{{Maroon 5}}'s early stuff has a bit more soul/jazz influence. ThatOtherWiki lists one of the genres for their debut ''Songs About Jane'' as "blue-eyed soul". If you listen to the demo versions of "Harder to Breathe" and "Sunday Morning" (released as part of the 10th anniversary edition of ''Songs About Jane''), the R&B influence is even more evident. Their later albums are almost completely pop-rock and, starting with ''Overexposed'', electropop.
** The band started out as a Music/{{Jellyfish}}-like PowerPop ''quartet'' called Kara's Flowers in the mid-[[TheNineties 1990s]], with Adam Levine as the band's sole guitarist.

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* Music/{{Maroon 5}}'s early stuff has a bit more soul/jazz influence. ThatOtherWiki lists one of the genres for their debut ''Songs About Jane'' as "blue-eyed soul". If you listen to the demo versions of "Harder to Breathe" and "Sunday Morning" (released as part of the 10th anniversary edition of ''Songs About Jane''), the R&B influence is even more evident. Their later albums are almost completely pop-rock and, starting with ''Overexposed'', electropop.
**
electropop. The band started out as a Music/{{Jellyfish}}-like PowerPop ''quartet'' called Kara's Flowers in the mid-[[TheNineties 1990s]], with Adam Levine as the band's sole guitarist.



* Music/TheMisfits' debut single, "Cough/Cool" b/w "She", was pretty typical for the Glenn Danzig-fronted version of the band... Except for the fact that it was recorded by a lineup that was temporarily without a guitarist, so in addition to singing, Danzig also filled in the rhythm by playing electric piano. In a way, it sort of worked: Turns out if you take early Misfits and replace the guitar with a keyboard, it sort of sounds like a PunkRock version of Music/TheDoors. Both songs were later re-recorded with proper lead guitar.

to:

* Music/TheMisfits' Music/TheMisfits:
** Their
debut single, "Cough/Cool" b/w "She", was pretty typical for the Glenn Danzig-fronted version of the band... Except for the fact that it was recorded by a lineup that was temporarily without a guitarist, so in addition to singing, Danzig also filled in the rhythm by playing electric piano. In a way, it sort of worked: Turns out if you take early Misfits and replace the guitar with a keyboard, it sort of sounds like a PunkRock version of Music/TheDoors. Both songs were later re-recorded with proper lead guitar.



* If you know Music/DeepPurple primarily as the hard rock band who brought you heavy rock albums like ''Music/DeepPurpleInRock'', ''[[Music/MachineHeadAlbum Machine Head]]'' and ''Music/MadeInJapan'' then you're in for a surprise with ''Music/ConcertoForGroupAndOrchestra'' (1969), a LiveAlbum where they perform together with a classical orchestra!
** Also Deep Purple Mk. 1 with Rod Evans on vocals. Their keyboard-heavy EpicRocking and penchant for bombastic covers made them sound a lot like an English Vanilla Fudge, while Evans' deep, soulful vocals are a sharp contrast to the shrieking, screaming Ian Gillan, who would come on board in mid-1969, ahead of ''In Rock''.

to:

* If you know Music/DeepPurple primarily as the hard rock band who brought you heavy rock albums like ''Music/DeepPurpleInRock'', ''[[Music/MachineHeadAlbum Machine Head]]'' and ''Music/MadeInJapan'' then you're in for a surprise with ''Music/ConcertoForGroupAndOrchestra'' (1969), a LiveAlbum where they perform together with a classical orchestra!
** Also
orchestra! Then there's Deep Purple Mk. 1 with Rod Evans on vocals. Their keyboard-heavy EpicRocking and penchant for bombastic covers made them sound a lot like an English Vanilla Fudge, while Evans' deep, soulful vocals are a sharp contrast to the shrieking, screaming Ian Gillan, who would come on board in mid-1969, ahead of ''In Rock''.



* The Music/BeastieBoys started out as a punk rock group. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lu5VkypHzoI No, really!]] That didn't last long, however- they quickly realized that punk wasn't going to be profitable and switched to rap. Considering how successful they were, it was probably a wise choice - specially as their musical instruction allowed for songs where they played the musical backing such as "Sabotage".
** The unexpected success of early single "Cooky Puss" was what eventually led them to start performing hip-hop, but even that release was pretty far from what they'd sound like on their first full album: The title song was a parody of instrumental breakdance music, with crank-calls to a Carvel restaurant as the only non-sampled vocals, while the only b-side that wasn't a "Cooky Puss" remix was "Beastie Revolution", a dub reggae jam.

to:

* The Music/BeastieBoys started out as a punk rock group. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lu5VkypHzoI No, really!]] That didn't last long, however- they quickly realized that punk wasn't going to be profitable and switched to rap. Considering how successful they were, it was probably a wise choice - specially as their musical instruction allowed for songs where they played the musical backing such as "Sabotage".
**
"Sabotage". The unexpected success of early single "Cooky Puss" was what eventually led them to start performing hip-hop, but even that release was pretty far from what they'd sound like on their first full album: The title song was a parody of instrumental breakdance music, with crank-calls to a Carvel restaurant as the only non-sampled vocals, while the only b-side that wasn't a "Cooky Puss" remix was "Beastie Revolution", a dub reggae jam.



* Music/StoneTemplePilots were one of the biggest alternative acts of the 1990s, but their debut album ''Core'' has a HeavyMetal sound and marketed as such[[note]]all of their albums [[NewSoundAlbum sound different from the last]], but this one is the most out-of-place in the discography[[/note]]. Released in 1992, ''Core'' was initially lambasted by critics for being derivative of bands like Music/AliceInChains from the then-huge [[{{Grunge}} grunge metal]] scene. Fans of 1996's "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ds_43MdYiuQ Lady Picture Show]]" may be surprised to hear "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hhu-OyHqZM Sex Type Thing]]", the band's debut single, for the first time. Also, it was in the 1996 album ''Tiny Music'' where Scott Weiland arguably found his own voice as a singer, almost completely [[VocalEvolution eschewing the yarling grunge baritone]] going forward.
** It gets weirder; the band started out in the late 80s as a ''{{Funk}} band'' called Mighty Joe Young, and then Shirley Temple's Pussy until the name was [[{{Bowdlerise}} censored]] to their current name.

to:

* Music/StoneTemplePilots were one of the biggest alternative acts of the 1990s, but their debut album ''Core'' has a HeavyMetal sound and marketed as such[[note]]all of their albums [[NewSoundAlbum sound different from the last]], but this one is the most out-of-place in the discography[[/note]]. Released in 1992, ''Core'' was initially lambasted by critics for being derivative of bands like Music/AliceInChains from the then-huge [[{{Grunge}} grunge metal]] scene. Fans of 1996's "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ds_43MdYiuQ Lady Picture Show]]" may be surprised to hear "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hhu-OyHqZM Sex Type Thing]]", the band's debut single, for the first time. Also, it was in the 1996 album ''Tiny Music'' where Scott Weiland arguably found his own voice as a singer, almost completely [[VocalEvolution eschewing the yarling grunge baritone]] going forward.
**
forward. It gets weirder; the band started out in the late 80s as a ''{{Funk}} band'' called Mighty Joe Young, and then Shirley Temple's Pussy until the name was [[{{Bowdlerise}} censored]] to their current name.



* You probably remember "England Dan" Seals and his fellow Texan John Ford Coley as the soft-rock duo who gave us hits like "I'd Really Love to See You Tonight". In 1968, they were the mainstays of Southwest F.O.B., a pop-psych group who had a minor hit (No. 56) with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N088bPAtBTo "Smell of Incense"]].
** For the late Seals, it was a case of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness-ception. Before changing their sound and renaming themselves to Southwest F.O.B., the band was known as Theze Few, and they had an upbeat frat rocker called "Dynamite", which was included in the ''Highs in the Mid-Sixties'' garage rock anthology. After England Dan and John Ford Coley, Seals went solo, initially sticking to his stage name, but making it big in the mid-'80s under his real name as a country singer.

to:

* You probably remember "England Dan" Seals and his fellow Texan John Ford Coley as the soft-rock duo who gave us hits like "I'd Really Love to See You Tonight". In 1968, they were the mainstays of Southwest F.O.B., a pop-psych group who had a minor hit (No. 56) with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N088bPAtBTo "Smell of Incense"]].
**
Incense"]]. For the late Seals, it was a case of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness-ception. Before changing their sound and renaming themselves to Southwest F.O.B., the band was known as Theze Few, and they had an upbeat frat rocker called "Dynamite", which was included in the ''Highs in the Mid-Sixties'' garage rock anthology. After England Dan and John Ford Coley, Seals went solo, initially sticking to his stage name, but making it big in the mid-'80s under his real name as a country singer.
7th Mar '17 11:26:10 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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* Music/RickSpringfield had a couple of them way back in 1973, long before he was a chart-smashing phenom who also starred on "Series/GeneralHospital". Not only do these songs not fit under the "power pop" category that most people associate with Springfield's music, they also feature very different vocal stylings from Rick that sound nothing like the crooning he became known for in later songs such as "Jesse's Girl".

to:

* Music/RickSpringfield had a couple of them way back in 1973, long before he was a chart-smashing phenom who also starred on "Series/GeneralHospital". ''Series/GeneralHospital''. Not only do these songs not fit under the "power pop" "PowerPop" category that most people associate with Springfield's music, they also feature very different vocal stylings from Rick that sound nothing like the crooning he became known for in later songs such as "Jesse's "Jessie's Girl".
19th Feb '17 1:54:31 PM LordKeane
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Added DiffLines:

**His appearance is also a case of Early Instalment weirdness: in the 80s and 90s he wore thick-framed glasses and a mustache, only adopting his current style of appearance in 1999
6th Feb '17 9:26:45 PM Twentington
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* Music/TimMcGraw was a lot more mainstream on his early albums, which relied heavily on novelty numbers like "Indian Outlaw" (his BreakthroughHit) and "I Like It, I Love It", along with mainstream mid-90s country songs like "Not a Moment Too Soon" or "She Never Lets It Go to Her Heart" that could've been done by just about anyone in a cowboy hat. Starting around 1997, he started to move into a mature and more pop-oriented sound as seen by the crossover successes of "It's Your Love" and "Please Remember Me", respectively the lead-off singles from ''Everywhere'' (1997) and follow-up ''A Place in the Sun'' (1999). Even on these songs, though, his voice was still fairly high and whiny. He didn't settle into his slightly lower register until around the next album, 2001's ''Set This Circus Down''. Oddly, despite the marked change in sound, "Indian Outlaw", "I Like It, I Love It", and "Not a Moment Too Soon" remain among his {{Signature Song}}s.
** Even before that, he had an unsuccessful debut album in 1992 which showed more weirdness. For instance, he strums a guitar in the "Welcome to the Club" video, although as early as the second album he had established himself as one of the only male country artists who does not accompany himself on guitar.
* Music/LadyAntebellum didn't have the big, grandiose, orchestral sound (e.g. "Need You Now") that much on their first album. They instead had a bit more of a rock edge, as evidenced on "Love Don't Live Here" and especially "Lookin' for a Good Time".

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* Music/TimMcGraw was a lot more mainstream on his early albums, which albums. His little-known self-titled debut has his only song to date not produced by Byron Gallimore ("What Room Was the Holiday In"), and the video for "Welcome to the Club" has him strumming a guitar, something he hasn't done since. His breakthrough albums ''Not a Moment Too Soon'' and ''All I Want'' relied heavily on novelty numbers like "Indian Outlaw" (his BreakthroughHit) and "I Like It, I Love It", along with mainstream mid-90s country songs slick ballads like "Not a Moment Too Soon" or "She Never Lets It Go to Her Heart" that could've been done by just about anyone in a cowboy hat. Starting around 1997, he started to move into a mature and more pop-oriented sound as seen by the crossover successes of "It's Your Love" and "Please Remember Me", respectively the lead-off singles from ''Everywhere'' (1997) and follow-up ''A Place in the Sun'' (1999). Even on these songs, though, his voice was still fairly high and whiny. He didn't settle into his slightly lower register until around the next album, 2001's ''Set This Circus Down''. Oddly, despite the marked change in sound, "Indian Outlaw", "I Like It, I Love It", and "Not a Moment Too Soon" remain among his {{Signature Song}}s.
** Even before that, he had an unsuccessful debut album in 1992 which showed more weirdness. For instance, he strums a guitar in the "Welcome to the Club" video, although as early as the second album he had established himself as one of the only male country artists who does not accompany himself on guitar.
* Music/LadyAntebellum didn't have the big, grandiose, orchestral sound (e.g. "Need You Now") that much on their first album. They instead had a bit more of a rock edge, as evidenced on "Love Don't Live Here" and especially "Lookin' for a Good Time". Also, "Love Don't Live Here" stands out as being one of their only singles to be sung entirely by Charles Kelley, while most of their other songs since have been duets between him and [[VocalTagTeam co-lead singer]] Hillary Scott.



* CountryMusic band Music/{{Lonestar}} was radically different on their first two albums. Besides the fact that John Rich (who was fired from the band in 1998 and became one-half of Big & Rich in 2004) sang lead a few times on said albums, their debut has honky-tonk and country-rock influences not far removed from BrooksAndDunn or Shenandoah; unsurprising, since those two acts and Lonestar were all produced by Don Cook. The second, 1998's ''Crazy Nights'', is more breezy and somewhat Music/{{Eagles}} influenced. From 1999's ''Lonely Grill'' (the first album without Rich) onward, they switched to producer Dann Huff (see Rascal Flatts, above) and dove headfirst into slick country-pop that only got more bombastic and theatrical over time, and Richie [=McDonald=] became the sole lead vocalist. They also became a lot LighterAndSofter, with more songs about family, domestic bliss, and love. It's just hard to believe that their first #1 was the edgy, humorous "No News"; their third was the PowerBallad "Amazed"; and their last two were the soccer mom-friendly, TastesLikeDiabetes "My Front Porch Looking In" and "Mr. Mom". According to band members, their LighterAndSofter sound from "Amazed" onward was the result of ExecutiveMeddling, which ultimately led to [=McDonald=] leaving the group from 2007 to 2011.

to:

* CountryMusic band Music/{{Lonestar}} was radically different on their first two albums. Besides the fact that John Rich (who was fired from the band in 1998 and became one-half of Big & Rich in 2004) [[StepUpToTheMicrophone sang lead a few times times]] on said albums, their debut has honky-tonk and country-rock influences not far removed from BrooksAndDunn Music/BrooksAndDunn or Shenandoah; unsurprising, since those two acts and Lonestar were all produced by Don Cook. The second, 1998's ''Crazy Nights'', is more breezy and somewhat Music/{{Eagles}} influenced. influenced soft-rock. From 1999's ''Lonely Grill'' (the first album without Rich) onward, they switched to producer Dann Huff (see Rascal Flatts, above) and dove headfirst into slick country-pop that only got more bombastic and theatrical over time, and while Rich's departure left Richie [=McDonald=] became as the sole lead vocalist. They also became a lot LighterAndSofter, with more songs about family, domestic bliss, and love. It's just hard to believe that their first #1 was the edgy, humorous "No News"; their third was the PowerBallad "Amazed"; and their last two were the soccer mom-friendly, TastesLikeDiabetes "My Front Porch Looking In" and "Mr. Mom". According to band members, their LighterAndSofter sound from "Amazed" onward was the result of ExecutiveMeddling, which ultimately led to [=McDonald=] leaving the group from 2007 to 2011.



* Music/{{Sugarland}}'s first album, ''Twice the Speed of Life'', was more mainstream than their subsequent releases. It was their only album produced by someone other than Byron Gallimore (specifically, Garth Fundis), and the only album on which Kristen Hall was a member. After she left the group, the other two members (lead singer Jennifer Nettles and guitarist/mandolinist Kristian Bush) decided to pursue a more dynamic, acoustic pop-influenced sound, often with lighter lyrics than Hall contributed.

to:

* Music/{{Sugarland}}'s first album, ''Twice the Speed of Life'', was more mainstream than their subsequent releases. It was had slicker production (from Garth Fundis instead of their only album produced by someone other than usual producer Byron Gallimore (specifically, Garth Fundis), Gallimore), and it was the only album on which Kristen Hall was a member. After she left the group, the other two members (lead singer Jennifer Nettles and guitarist/mandolinist Kristian Bush) decided to pursue a more dynamic, acoustic pop-influenced sound, often with lighter lyrics than Hall contributed.



* In the 1980s, Sawyer Brown was a very bubblegummy country-pop band, noted for their dance moves, pink tennis shoes, and near-total lack of substance. They changed things up with ''The Dirt Road'' in 1991, changing to a more mature image and sound, helped in part by lead singer Mark Miller co-writing with Mac [=McAnally=]. The change in sound from the lightweight, repetitive romps like "Step That Step" or "Betty's Bein' Bad" to the spare, acoustic ballad "All These Years" or the thoughtful "Cafe on the Corner" is staggering.

to:

* In the 1980s, Sawyer Brown was a very bubblegummy country-pop band, noted for their dance moves, pink tennis shoes, and near-total lack of substance. They changed things up with ''The Dirt Road'' in 1991, changing to a more mature image and sound, helped in part by lead singer Mark Miller co-writing with Mac [=McAnally=]. The change in sound from the lightweight, repetitive romps completely weightless fluff like "Step That Step" or "Betty's Bein' Bad" to the spare, acoustic ballad "All These Years" or the thoughtful "Cafe on the Corner" is staggering.



* Music/TobyKeith is known for his macho, swaggering, patriotic style. But early on, his style was focused more on ballads and midtempos about a relationship, such as "Who's That Man", "Me Too", and "Does That Blue Moon Ever Shine on You". Also, his first three albums have very dated, reverberant production courtesy of Harold Shedd and Nelson Larkin. The swagger, though occasionally present in fare such as "A Little Less Talk and a Lot More Action" (coincidentally, the only single from his first three albums that he didn't write), didn't really come in full force until he switched from Mercury to Creator/DreamWorksRecords and released the in-your-face "How Do You Like Me Now?!", although even at that point in his career, he still cut a few ballads such as "You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This". And the rampant patriotism didn't really come along until after his angry [[TheWarOnTerror post-9/11]] song "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)", which has informed nearly all of his albums since in some way or another.

to:

* Music/TobyKeith is known for his macho, swaggering, patriotic style. But early on, his style was focused more on ballads and midtempos about a relationship, such as "Who's That Man", "Me Too", and "Does That Blue Moon Ever Shine on You". Also, his first three albums have very dated, reverberant production courtesy of Harold Shedd and Nelson Larkin. The swagger, though occasionally present in fare such as "A Little Less Talk and a Lot More Action" (coincidentally, the only single from his first three albums that he didn't write), didn't really come in full force until he switched from Mercury to Creator/DreamWorksRecords and released the in-your-face "How Do You Like Me Now?!", although even at that point in his career, he still cut a few ballads such as "You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This". And the rampant patriotism didn't really come along until after his angry [[TheWarOnTerror post-9/11]] song "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)", which has informed nearly all of his subsequent albums since in some one way or another.



* Collin Raye's first two albums were mostly unremarkable country-pop, outside the #1 smash "Love, Me", often regarded as a prime country TearJerker and to this day a popular choice for funerals. The first album was produced by singer-songwriter Jerry Fuller, and the second by Garth Fundis. Upon switching to Paul Worley for his 1994 album ''Extremes'', Raye began recording [[IssueDrift much heavier material that often tackled societal issues]], most notably the story of a recovering alcoholic in "Little Rock". His voice also became a lot more assured, and the production and songwriting much stronger to match.

to:

* Collin Raye's first two albums were mostly unremarkable country-pop, outside display this to a great extent. Other than the #1 smash TearJerker "Love, Me", often regarded as a prime country TearJerker which is still one of his biggest and to this day a most popular choice for funerals. The songs, the first album was produced by singer-songwriter Jerry Fuller, and the second by Garth Fundis. Upon switching to Paul Worley for his two albums largely consisted of lightweight, forgettable material with dated production. Starting with 1994 album ''Extremes'', ''Extremes'' (his first with longtime producer Paul Worley), Raye began recording [[IssueDrift much heavier material that often tackled societal issues]], most notably the such as a story of a recovering alcoholic ("Little Rock"), women's place in society ("I Think About You"), child abuse ("The Eleventh Commandment"), acceptance ("Not That Different", "What If Jesus Comes Back Like That"), while even his lighter fare such as "That's My Story", "My Kind of Girl", or "Little Rock". His voice also became a lot Red Rodeo" had much more assured, and the production and songwriting much stronger punch to match.it.



** It gets weirder; the band started out in the late 80s as a ''Main/{{Funk}} band'' called Mighty Joe Young, and then Shirley Temple's Pussy until the name was [[{{Bowdlerise}} censored]] to their current name.
* Music/DieArzte were marketed as a teeny boyband type of act in the early 1980s (something which they themselves never fully bought into and soon mercilessly lampshaded) and while their "bad boy" image dates to their very first days (their first ever LP angered the MoralGuardians so much it spent years being banned for under 18 years olds), their humor and stage antics only developed into a beloved part of their routines much later into their career. The predecessors of Rodrigo Gonzalez at the bass also got in ''way'' less words edgewise (despite Sahnie's protestations that the band "needed his face" shortly before being kicked out)

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** It gets weirder; the band started out in the late 80s as a ''Main/{{Funk}} ''{{Funk}} band'' called Mighty Joe Young, and then Shirley Temple's Pussy until the name was [[{{Bowdlerise}} censored]] to their current name.
* Music/DieArzte were marketed as a teeny boyband type of act in the early 1980s (something which they themselves never fully bought into and soon mercilessly lampshaded) and while their "bad boy" image dates to their very first days (their first ever LP angered the MoralGuardians so much it spent years being banned for under 18 years olds), their humor and stage antics only developed into a beloved part of their routines much later into their career. The predecessors of Rodrigo Gonzalez at the bass also got in ''way'' less fewer words edgewise (despite Sahnie's protestations that the band "needed his face" shortly before being kicked out)
6th Feb '17 9:09:52 PM Twentington
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* Music/TaylorSwift was a lot less pop on her first album. The change in sound may owe to her phasing out Liz Rose as a co-writer: they wrote most of the first album together, but Rose co-wrote only a couple of songs on her second. Since then, Taylor generally writes all her stuff solo.
** As noted at the end of [[http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2012/08/30/taylor_swift_s_we_are_never_ever_getting_back_together_is_no_1_on_the_pop_charts_is_swift_breaking_up_with_nashville_.html this piece]], she has been moving further and further into mainstream pop.

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* Music/TaylorSwift was a lot less pop on her first album. The change in sound may owe to her phasing out Liz Rose as a co-writer: they wrote most of the Music/TaylorSwift's first album together, but Rose co-wrote only a couple of songs on was by far her second. Since then, Taylor generally writes all most country-sounding, with a lot more fiddle and banjo. The pop influence began showing as early as her stuff solo.
** As noted at
second album ''Fearless'', and she just continued to get more and more pop until completing the end of [[http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2012/08/30/taylor_swift_s_we_are_never_ever_getting_back_together_is_no_1_on_the_pop_charts_is_swift_breaking_up_with_nashville_.html this piece]], she has been moving further and further into mainstream pop.GenreShift with ''1989'' in 2014.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=EarlyInstallmentWeirdness.Music