History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / Music

19th Feb '17 1:54:31 PM LordKeane
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**His appearance is also a case of Early Instalment weirdness: in the 80s and 90s he wore thick-framed glasses and a mustache, only adopting his current style of appearance in 1999
6th Feb '17 9:26:45 PM Twentington
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* Music/TimMcGraw was a lot more mainstream on his early albums, which relied heavily on novelty numbers like "Indian Outlaw" (his BreakthroughHit) and "I Like It, I Love It", along with mainstream mid-90s country songs like "Not a Moment Too Soon" or "She Never Lets It Go to Her Heart" that could've been done by just about anyone in a cowboy hat. Starting around 1997, he started to move into a mature and more pop-oriented sound as seen by the crossover successes of "It's Your Love" and "Please Remember Me", respectively the lead-off singles from ''Everywhere'' (1997) and follow-up ''A Place in the Sun'' (1999). Even on these songs, though, his voice was still fairly high and whiny. He didn't settle into his slightly lower register until around the next album, 2001's ''Set This Circus Down''. Oddly, despite the marked change in sound, "Indian Outlaw", "I Like It, I Love It", and "Not a Moment Too Soon" remain among his {{Signature Song}}s.
** Even before that, he had an unsuccessful debut album in 1992 which showed more weirdness. For instance, he strums a guitar in the "Welcome to the Club" video, although as early as the second album he had established himself as one of the only male country artists who does not accompany himself on guitar.
* Music/LadyAntebellum didn't have the big, grandiose, orchestral sound (e.g. "Need You Now") that much on their first album. They instead had a bit more of a rock edge, as evidenced on "Love Don't Live Here" and especially "Lookin' for a Good Time".

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* Music/TimMcGraw was a lot more mainstream on his early albums, which albums. His little-known self-titled debut has his only song to date not produced by Byron Gallimore ("What Room Was the Holiday In"), and the video for "Welcome to the Club" has him strumming a guitar, something he hasn't done since. His breakthrough albums ''Not a Moment Too Soon'' and ''All I Want'' relied heavily on novelty numbers like "Indian Outlaw" (his BreakthroughHit) and "I Like It, I Love It", along with mainstream mid-90s country songs slick ballads like "Not a Moment Too Soon" or "She Never Lets It Go to Her Heart" that could've been done by just about anyone in a cowboy hat. Starting around 1997, he started to move into a mature and more pop-oriented sound as seen by the crossover successes of "It's Your Love" and "Please Remember Me", respectively the lead-off singles from ''Everywhere'' (1997) and follow-up ''A Place in the Sun'' (1999). Even on these songs, though, his voice was still fairly high and whiny. He didn't settle into his slightly lower register until around the next album, 2001's ''Set This Circus Down''. Oddly, despite the marked change in sound, "Indian Outlaw", "I Like It, I Love It", and "Not a Moment Too Soon" remain among his {{Signature Song}}s.
** Even before that, he had an unsuccessful debut album in 1992 which showed more weirdness. For instance, he strums a guitar in the "Welcome to the Club" video, although as early as the second album he had established himself as one of the only male country artists who does not accompany himself on guitar.
* Music/LadyAntebellum didn't have the big, grandiose, orchestral sound (e.g. "Need You Now") that much on their first album. They instead had a bit more of a rock edge, as evidenced on "Love Don't Live Here" and especially "Lookin' for a Good Time". Also, "Love Don't Live Here" stands out as being one of their only singles to be sung entirely by Charles Kelley, while most of their other songs since have been duets between him and [[VocalTagTeam co-lead singer]] Hillary Scott.



* CountryMusic band Music/{{Lonestar}} was radically different on their first two albums. Besides the fact that John Rich (who was fired from the band in 1998 and became one-half of Big & Rich in 2004) sang lead a few times on said albums, their debut has honky-tonk and country-rock influences not far removed from BrooksAndDunn or Shenandoah; unsurprising, since those two acts and Lonestar were all produced by Don Cook. The second, 1998's ''Crazy Nights'', is more breezy and somewhat Music/{{Eagles}} influenced. From 1999's ''Lonely Grill'' (the first album without Rich) onward, they switched to producer Dann Huff (see Rascal Flatts, above) and dove headfirst into slick country-pop that only got more bombastic and theatrical over time, and Richie [=McDonald=] became the sole lead vocalist. They also became a lot LighterAndSofter, with more songs about family, domestic bliss, and love. It's just hard to believe that their first #1 was the edgy, humorous "No News"; their third was the PowerBallad "Amazed"; and their last two were the soccer mom-friendly, TastesLikeDiabetes "My Front Porch Looking In" and "Mr. Mom". According to band members, their LighterAndSofter sound from "Amazed" onward was the result of ExecutiveMeddling, which ultimately led to [=McDonald=] leaving the group from 2007 to 2011.

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* CountryMusic band Music/{{Lonestar}} was radically different on their first two albums. Besides the fact that John Rich (who was fired from the band in 1998 and became one-half of Big & Rich in 2004) [[StepUpToTheMicrophone sang lead a few times times]] on said albums, their debut has honky-tonk and country-rock influences not far removed from BrooksAndDunn Music/BrooksAndDunn or Shenandoah; unsurprising, since those two acts and Lonestar were all produced by Don Cook. The second, 1998's ''Crazy Nights'', is more breezy and somewhat Music/{{Eagles}} influenced. influenced soft-rock. From 1999's ''Lonely Grill'' (the first album without Rich) onward, they switched to producer Dann Huff (see Rascal Flatts, above) and dove headfirst into slick country-pop that only got more bombastic and theatrical over time, and while Rich's departure left Richie [=McDonald=] became as the sole lead vocalist. They also became a lot LighterAndSofter, with more songs about family, domestic bliss, and love. It's just hard to believe that their first #1 was the edgy, humorous "No News"; their third was the PowerBallad "Amazed"; and their last two were the soccer mom-friendly, TastesLikeDiabetes "My Front Porch Looking In" and "Mr. Mom". According to band members, their LighterAndSofter sound from "Amazed" onward was the result of ExecutiveMeddling, which ultimately led to [=McDonald=] leaving the group from 2007 to 2011.



* Music/{{Sugarland}}'s first album, ''Twice the Speed of Life'', was more mainstream than their subsequent releases. It was their only album produced by someone other than Byron Gallimore (specifically, Garth Fundis), and the only album on which Kristen Hall was a member. After she left the group, the other two members (lead singer Jennifer Nettles and guitarist/mandolinist Kristian Bush) decided to pursue a more dynamic, acoustic pop-influenced sound, often with lighter lyrics than Hall contributed.

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* Music/{{Sugarland}}'s first album, ''Twice the Speed of Life'', was more mainstream than their subsequent releases. It was had slicker production (from Garth Fundis instead of their only album produced by someone other than usual producer Byron Gallimore (specifically, Garth Fundis), Gallimore), and it was the only album on which Kristen Hall was a member. After she left the group, the other two members (lead singer Jennifer Nettles and guitarist/mandolinist Kristian Bush) decided to pursue a more dynamic, acoustic pop-influenced sound, often with lighter lyrics than Hall contributed.



* In the 1980s, Sawyer Brown was a very bubblegummy country-pop band, noted for their dance moves, pink tennis shoes, and near-total lack of substance. They changed things up with ''The Dirt Road'' in 1991, changing to a more mature image and sound, helped in part by lead singer Mark Miller co-writing with Mac [=McAnally=]. The change in sound from the lightweight, repetitive romps like "Step That Step" or "Betty's Bein' Bad" to the spare, acoustic ballad "All These Years" or the thoughtful "Cafe on the Corner" is staggering.

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* In the 1980s, Sawyer Brown was a very bubblegummy country-pop band, noted for their dance moves, pink tennis shoes, and near-total lack of substance. They changed things up with ''The Dirt Road'' in 1991, changing to a more mature image and sound, helped in part by lead singer Mark Miller co-writing with Mac [=McAnally=]. The change in sound from the lightweight, repetitive romps completely weightless fluff like "Step That Step" or "Betty's Bein' Bad" to the spare, acoustic ballad "All These Years" or the thoughtful "Cafe on the Corner" is staggering.



* Music/TobyKeith is known for his macho, swaggering, patriotic style. But early on, his style was focused more on ballads and midtempos about a relationship, such as "Who's That Man", "Me Too", and "Does That Blue Moon Ever Shine on You". Also, his first three albums have very dated, reverberant production courtesy of Harold Shedd and Nelson Larkin. The swagger, though occasionally present in fare such as "A Little Less Talk and a Lot More Action" (coincidentally, the only single from his first three albums that he didn't write), didn't really come in full force until he switched from Mercury to Creator/DreamWorksRecords and released the in-your-face "How Do You Like Me Now?!", although even at that point in his career, he still cut a few ballads such as "You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This". And the rampant patriotism didn't really come along until after his angry [[TheWarOnTerror post-9/11]] song "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)", which has informed nearly all of his albums since in some way or another.

to:

* Music/TobyKeith is known for his macho, swaggering, patriotic style. But early on, his style was focused more on ballads and midtempos about a relationship, such as "Who's That Man", "Me Too", and "Does That Blue Moon Ever Shine on You". Also, his first three albums have very dated, reverberant production courtesy of Harold Shedd and Nelson Larkin. The swagger, though occasionally present in fare such as "A Little Less Talk and a Lot More Action" (coincidentally, the only single from his first three albums that he didn't write), didn't really come in full force until he switched from Mercury to Creator/DreamWorksRecords and released the in-your-face "How Do You Like Me Now?!", although even at that point in his career, he still cut a few ballads such as "You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This". And the rampant patriotism didn't really come along until after his angry [[TheWarOnTerror post-9/11]] song "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)", which has informed nearly all of his subsequent albums since in some one way or another.



* Collin Raye's first two albums were mostly unremarkable country-pop, outside the #1 smash "Love, Me", often regarded as a prime country TearJerker and to this day a popular choice for funerals. The first album was produced by singer-songwriter Jerry Fuller, and the second by Garth Fundis. Upon switching to Paul Worley for his 1994 album ''Extremes'', Raye began recording [[IssueDrift much heavier material that often tackled societal issues]], most notably the story of a recovering alcoholic in "Little Rock". His voice also became a lot more assured, and the production and songwriting much stronger to match.

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* Collin Raye's first two albums were mostly unremarkable country-pop, outside display this to a great extent. Other than the #1 smash TearJerker "Love, Me", often regarded as a prime country TearJerker which is still one of his biggest and to this day a most popular choice for funerals. The songs, the first album was produced by singer-songwriter Jerry Fuller, and the second by Garth Fundis. Upon switching to Paul Worley for his two albums largely consisted of lightweight, forgettable material with dated production. Starting with 1994 album ''Extremes'', ''Extremes'' (his first with longtime producer Paul Worley), Raye began recording [[IssueDrift much heavier material that often tackled societal issues]], most notably the such as a story of a recovering alcoholic ("Little Rock"), women's place in society ("I Think About You"), child abuse ("The Eleventh Commandment"), acceptance ("Not That Different", "What If Jesus Comes Back Like That"), while even his lighter fare such as "That's My Story", "My Kind of Girl", or "Little Rock". His voice also became a lot Red Rodeo" had much more assured, and the production and songwriting much stronger punch to match.it.



** It gets weirder; the band started out in the late 80s as a ''Main/{{Funk}} band'' called Mighty Joe Young, and then Shirley Temple's Pussy until the name was [[{{Bowdlerise}} censored]] to their current name.
* Music/DieArzte were marketed as a teeny boyband type of act in the early 1980s (something which they themselves never fully bought into and soon mercilessly lampshaded) and while their "bad boy" image dates to their very first days (their first ever LP angered the MoralGuardians so much it spent years being banned for under 18 years olds), their humor and stage antics only developed into a beloved part of their routines much later into their career. The predecessors of Rodrigo Gonzalez at the bass also got in ''way'' less words edgewise (despite Sahnie's protestations that the band "needed his face" shortly before being kicked out)

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** It gets weirder; the band started out in the late 80s as a ''Main/{{Funk}} ''{{Funk}} band'' called Mighty Joe Young, and then Shirley Temple's Pussy until the name was [[{{Bowdlerise}} censored]] to their current name.
* Music/DieArzte were marketed as a teeny boyband type of act in the early 1980s (something which they themselves never fully bought into and soon mercilessly lampshaded) and while their "bad boy" image dates to their very first days (their first ever LP angered the MoralGuardians so much it spent years being banned for under 18 years olds), their humor and stage antics only developed into a beloved part of their routines much later into their career. The predecessors of Rodrigo Gonzalez at the bass also got in ''way'' less fewer words edgewise (despite Sahnie's protestations that the band "needed his face" shortly before being kicked out)
6th Feb '17 9:09:52 PM Twentington
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* Music/TaylorSwift was a lot less pop on her first album. The change in sound may owe to her phasing out Liz Rose as a co-writer: they wrote most of the first album together, but Rose co-wrote only a couple of songs on her second. Since then, Taylor generally writes all her stuff solo.
** As noted at the end of [[http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2012/08/30/taylor_swift_s_we_are_never_ever_getting_back_together_is_no_1_on_the_pop_charts_is_swift_breaking_up_with_nashville_.html this piece]], she has been moving further and further into mainstream pop.

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* Music/TaylorSwift was a lot less pop on her first album. The change in sound may owe to her phasing out Liz Rose as a co-writer: they wrote most of the Music/TaylorSwift's first album together, but Rose co-wrote only a couple of songs on was by far her second. Since then, Taylor generally writes all most country-sounding, with a lot more fiddle and banjo. The pop influence began showing as early as her stuff solo.
** As noted at
second album ''Fearless'', and she just continued to get more and more pop until completing the end of [[http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2012/08/30/taylor_swift_s_we_are_never_ever_getting_back_together_is_no_1_on_the_pop_charts_is_swift_breaking_up_with_nashville_.html this piece]], she has been moving further and further into mainstream pop.GenreShift with ''1989'' in 2014.
3rd Feb '17 10:32:14 AM MarkLungo
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* Music/TobyKeith is known for his macho, swaggering, patriotic style. But early on, his style was focused more on ballads and midtempos about a relationship, such as "Who's That Man", "Me Too", and "Does That Blue Moon Ever Shine on You". Also, his first three albums have very dated, reverberant production courtesy of Harold Shedd and Nelson Larkin. The swagger, though occasionally present in fare such as "A Little Less Talk and a Lot More Action" (coincidentally, the only single from his first three albums that he didn't write), didn't really come in full force until he switched from Mercury to Creator/DreamWorks Records and released the in-your-face "How Do You Like Me Now?!", although even at that point in his career, he still cut a few ballads such as "You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This". And the rampant patriotism didn't really come along until after his angry post-9/11 song "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)", which has informed nearly all of his albums since in some way or another.

to:

* Music/TobyKeith is known for his macho, swaggering, patriotic style. But early on, his style was focused more on ballads and midtempos about a relationship, such as "Who's That Man", "Me Too", and "Does That Blue Moon Ever Shine on You". Also, his first three albums have very dated, reverberant production courtesy of Harold Shedd and Nelson Larkin. The swagger, though occasionally present in fare such as "A Little Less Talk and a Lot More Action" (coincidentally, the only single from his first three albums that he didn't write), didn't really come in full force until he switched from Mercury to Creator/DreamWorks Records Creator/DreamWorksRecords and released the in-your-face "How Do You Like Me Now?!", although even at that point in his career, he still cut a few ballads such as "You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This". And the rampant patriotism didn't really come along until after his angry post-9/11 [[TheWarOnTerror post-9/11]] song "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)", which has informed nearly all of his albums since in some way or another.
24th Jan '17 2:14:17 PM MikeK
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** The "Cookie Puss" single is sometimes considered their first foray into hip-hop influenced material, but even that is pretty far from what they'd sound like on their first full album: It was a parody of instrumental breakdance music with no actual rapping, just deliberately amateurish turntablism and samples of things like a Creator/SteveMartin comedy record, earlier songs recorded by the band, and Adam Horowitz making several {{Prank Call}}s to a Carvel ice cream store.

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** The "Cookie unexpected success of early single "Cooky Puss" single is sometimes considered their first foray into hip-hop influenced material, was what eventually led them to start performing hip-hop, but even that is release was pretty far from what they'd sound like on their first full album: It The title song was a parody of instrumental breakdance music music, with no actual rapping, just deliberately amateurish turntablism and samples of things like a Creator/SteveMartin comedy record, earlier songs recorded by the band, and Adam Horowitz making several {{Prank Call}}s crank-calls to a Carvel ice cream store.restaurant as the only non-sampled vocals, while the only b-side that wasn't a "Cooky Puss" remix was "Beastie Revolution", a dub reggae jam.
24th Jan '17 1:57:41 PM MikeK
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* The Music/FlamingLips' first EP was heavily psychedelic-influenced punk rock, with very low-pitched monotone vocals (courtesy of Wayne Coyne's brother Mark - Wayne got [[StepUpToTheMicrophone promoted to lead singer]] soon after). While psychedelia has pretty much always been a part of their sound, the first EP is barely recognizable as the same band. Even after switching singers, it sort of took a while for their sound to evolve - for instance, [[VocalEvolution Wayne Coyne took a few albums to start using the higher-pitched vocal style he's now known for.]]

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* The Music/FlamingLips' first EP was heavily psychedelic-influenced punk rock, with very low-pitched monotone vocals (courtesy of Wayne Coyne's brother Mark - Mark left the group shortly after the EP's release, so Wayne got [[StepUpToTheMicrophone promoted from guitarist to lead singer]] soon after).singer]]). While psychedelia has pretty much always been a part of their sound, the first EP is barely recognizable as the same band. Even after switching singers, it sort of took a while for their sound to evolve - for instance, [[VocalEvolution Wayne Coyne took a few albums to start using the higher-pitched vocal style he's now known for.]]
24th Jan '17 12:20:07 PM Xtifr
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* The Spinto Band had a lot of self-released albums full of Music/{{Ween}}-inspired NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly; by the time they got signed they whittled down their influences to something more coherent. From their 2006 album ''Nice And Nicely Done'' and on, their style can basically be summed up as a mix of indie, [[NewWaveMusic New Wave]], and PowerPop. Earlier albums like ''Digital Summer (New Wave Techno Pop)'' jump from trippy instrumentals to ska to novelty rap.

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* The Spinto Band had a lot of self-released albums full of Music/{{Ween}}-inspired NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly; by the time they got signed they whittled down their influences to something more coherent. From their 2006 album ''Nice And Nicely Done'' and on, their style can basically be summed up as a mix of indie, [[NewWaveMusic New Wave]], NewWaveMusic, and PowerPop. Earlier albums like ''Digital Summer (New Wave Techno Pop)'' jump from trippy instrumentals to ska to novelty rap.



* {{Music/Descendents}}' first single, ''Ride The Wild \ Hectic World'': As opposed to the melodic HardcorePunk they'd become known for, the two featured songs were sort of a mix of PowerPop and [[NewWaveMusic New Wave]], prominently featuring a SurfRock-influenced guitar-playing style with no distortion. In addition, Milo Aukerman hadn't joined the band yet, so members Frank Navetta and Tony Lombardo sang one song each. "Ride The Wild" and "Hectic World" were later included on the compilations ''Bonus Fat'' and ''Two Things At Once'', and the contrast with the rest of the material can be sort of jarring.

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* {{Music/Descendents}}' first single, ''Ride The Wild \ Hectic World'': As opposed to the melodic HardcorePunk they'd become known for, the two featured songs were sort of a mix of PowerPop and [[NewWaveMusic New Wave]], NewWaveMusic, prominently featuring a SurfRock-influenced guitar-playing style with no distortion. In addition, Milo Aukerman hadn't joined the band yet, so members Frank Navetta and Tony Lombardo sang one song each. "Ride The Wild" and "Hectic World" were later included on the compilations ''Bonus Fat'' and ''Two Things At Once'', and the contrast with the rest of the material can be sort of jarring.



* Early Music/DeadOrAlive material was guitar-oriented PostPunk with some GothRock vibe. Starting with fifth single "Misty Circles" they adopted their NewWave / SynthPop sound they would become known for.

to:

* Early Music/DeadOrAlive material was guitar-oriented PostPunk with some GothRock vibe. Starting with fifth single "Misty Circles" they adopted their NewWave NewWaveMusic / SynthPop sound they would become known for.



* Music/HotHotHeat started out with a much heavier, PostHardcore / [[PostPunk "synthpunk"]] sound, original vocalist Matthew Marnik mainly did a lot of screaming, and part of their signature style was that rather than have a lead guitarist, they had Steve Bays play lead synthesizer. After adding guitarist Dante [=DeCaro=] and having Bays take over on vocals (as well as synthesizer), they started playing the catchy [[NewWaveMusic new wave]] and DancePunk they're known for now. ''Scenes One Through Thirteen'', a compilation of their earliest material, hardly sounds like the same band as their other releases.

to:

* Music/HotHotHeat started out with a much heavier, PostHardcore / [[PostPunk "synthpunk"]] sound, original vocalist Matthew Marnik mainly did a lot of screaming, and part of their signature style was that rather than have a lead guitarist, they had Steve Bays play lead synthesizer. After adding guitarist Dante [=DeCaro=] and having Bays take over on vocals (as well as synthesizer), they started playing the catchy [[NewWaveMusic new wave]] NewWaveMusic and DancePunk they're known for now. ''Scenes One Through Thirteen'', a compilation of their earliest material, hardly sounds like the same band as their other releases.
6th Jan '17 2:58:51 PM MikeK
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Added DiffLines:

** The "Cookie Puss" single is sometimes considered their first foray into hip-hop influenced material, but even that is pretty far from what they'd sound like on their first full album: It was a parody of instrumental breakdance music with no actual rapping, just deliberately amateurish turntablism and samples of things like a Creator/SteveMartin comedy record, earlier songs recorded by the band, and Adam Horowitz making several {{Prank Call}}s to a Carvel ice cream store.
3rd Jan '17 11:31:56 AM Xtifr
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* CountryMusic band Music/{{Lonestar}} was radically different on their first two albums. Besides the fact that John Rich (who was fired from the band in 1998 and became one-half of Big & Rich in 2004) sang lead a few times on said albums, their debut has honky-tonk and country-rock influences not far removed from BrooksAndDunn or Shenandoah; unsurprising, since those two acts and Lonestar were all produced by Don Cook. The second, 1998's ''Crazy Nights'', is more breezy and somewhat {{Eagles}} influenced. From 1999's ''Lonely Grill'' (the first album without Rich) onward, they switched to producer Dann Huff (see Rascal Flatts, above) and dove headfirst into slick country-pop that only got more bombastic and theatrical over time, and Richie [=McDonald=] became the sole lead vocalist. They also became a lot LighterAndSofter, with more songs about family, domestic bliss, and love. It's just hard to believe that their first #1 was the edgy, humorous "No News"; their third was the PowerBallad "Amazed"; and their last two were the soccer mom-friendly, TastesLikeDiabetes "My Front Porch Looking In" and "Mr. Mom". According to band members, their LighterAndSofter sound from "Amazed" onward was the result of ExecutiveMeddling, which ultimately led to [=McDonald=] leaving the group from 2007 to 2011.

to:

* CountryMusic band Music/{{Lonestar}} was radically different on their first two albums. Besides the fact that John Rich (who was fired from the band in 1998 and became one-half of Big & Rich in 2004) sang lead a few times on said albums, their debut has honky-tonk and country-rock influences not far removed from BrooksAndDunn or Shenandoah; unsurprising, since those two acts and Lonestar were all produced by Don Cook. The second, 1998's ''Crazy Nights'', is more breezy and somewhat {{Eagles}} Music/{{Eagles}} influenced. From 1999's ''Lonely Grill'' (the first album without Rich) onward, they switched to producer Dann Huff (see Rascal Flatts, above) and dove headfirst into slick country-pop that only got more bombastic and theatrical over time, and Richie [=McDonald=] became the sole lead vocalist. They also became a lot LighterAndSofter, with more songs about family, domestic bliss, and love. It's just hard to believe that their first #1 was the edgy, humorous "No News"; their third was the PowerBallad "Amazed"; and their last two were the soccer mom-friendly, TastesLikeDiabetes "My Front Porch Looking In" and "Mr. Mom". According to band members, their LighterAndSofter sound from "Amazed" onward was the result of ExecutiveMeddling, which ultimately led to [=McDonald=] leaving the group from 2007 to 2011.
15th Dec '16 5:22:39 PM Twentington
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* Music/CledusTJudd has this in spades. His first release, "Indian In-Laws", doesn't match the source material (Music/TimMcGraw's "Indian Outlaw") as closely as his later parodies do, with many notable music variations from the latter. Its B-side was a rap cover of John Anderson's "Swingin'", something that he never did again. Overall, the first two albums had parodies of songs significantly older than the album's release date (for instance, his first in 1994 parodied "[[Music/{{Eagles}} Hotel California" and "Music/WeAreTheWorld", and the second parodied "The Devil Went Down to Georgia", "[[Music/JohnnyCash Jackson]]", and Sammy Kershaw's 1991 hit "Cadillac Style"). From 1998's ''Did I Shave My Back for This?'' onward, he mostly limited himself to songs within a year or two of the album's release date. The first three albums also have him singing in a [[StylisticSuck slightly off-key, nasal twang]] (which was oddly not the case on "Indian In-Laws" or "Swingin'"), but by ''Juddmental'' his delivery became much more natural.

to:

* Music/CledusTJudd has this in spades. His first release, "Indian In-Laws", doesn't match the source material (Music/TimMcGraw's "Indian Outlaw") as closely as his later parodies do, with many notable music variations from the latter. Its B-side was a rap cover of John Anderson's "Swingin'", something that he never did again. Overall, the first two albums had parodies of songs significantly older than the album's release date (for instance, his first in 1994 parodied "[[Music/{{Eagles}} Hotel California" California]]" and "Music/WeAreTheWorld", and the second parodied "The Devil Went Down to Georgia", "[[Music/JohnnyCash Jackson]]", and Sammy Kershaw's 1991 hit "Cadillac Style"). From 1998's ''Did I Shave My Back for This?'' onward, he mostly limited himself to songs within a year or two of the album's release date. The first three albums also have him singing in a [[StylisticSuck slightly off-key, nasal twang]] (which was oddly not the case on "Indian In-Laws" or "Swingin'"), but by ''Juddmental'' his delivery became much more natural.
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