History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / Music

17th Feb '18 6:57:49 PM Twentington
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* Music/TaylorSwift's first album was by far her most country-sounding, with a lot more fiddle and banjo. This may be due to her co-writing with Liz Rose, while subsequent albums have largely been self-penned. The pop influence began showing as early as her second album ''Fearless'', and she just continued to get more and more pop until completing the GenreShift with ''1989'' in 2014. They are also an example of Early Installment Weirdness for RecordProducer Nathan Chapman, who used a much softer production style than he would on most of his later production jobs.

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* Music/TaylorSwift's first album was by far her most country-sounding, with a lot more fiddle and banjo. This may be due to her co-writing with Liz Rose, while banjo, and a twangier vocal style. Each subsequent albums have largely been self-penned. The pop influence began showing as early as her second album ''Fearless'', moved her further and she just continued to get more and more pop until completing further away from country, culminating in her abandoning the GenreShift genre entirely with ''1989'' in 2014. They are Her first three albums were produced entirely by Nathan Chapman, with Swift writing either by herself or collaborating with country songwriter Liz Rose, while the pop albums' material been predominantly produced and co-written by Max Martin and Shellback (although the transitory ''Red'' had a myriad of collaborators). The early albums also serve as an example of Early Installment Weirdness for RecordProducer Nathan Chapman, who used a much softer whose production style was noticeably more subdued than he would on most of the electric guitar and drum-machine driven style he'd use on his later production jobs.work with Music/LadyAntebellum and Music/KeithUrban.
17th Feb '18 6:42:46 PM Twentington
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* Sawyer Brown: In the 1980s, this was a very bubblegummy country-pop band, noted for their dance moves, pink tennis shoes, and near-total lack of substance. By ''The Dirt Road'' in 1991, they began changing to a more mature image and sound, helped in part by lead singer Mark Miller co-writing with Mac [=McAnally=]. The change in sound from completely weightless fluff like "Step That Step" or "Betty's Bein' Bad" to the likes of "All These Years" or "Cafe on the Corner" is staggering. Even their lighter material in TheNineties such as "Some Girls Do" or "Thank God for You" still had more lyrical meat and more musical punch.

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* Sawyer Brown: In the 1980s, this was a very bubblegummy country-pop band, noted for their dance moves, pink tennis shoes, and near-total lack of substance. By ''The Dirt Road'' in 1991, they began changing to a more mature image and sound, helped in part by lead singer Mark Miller co-writing and co-producing with Mac [=McAnally=].[=McAnally=], a popular Nashville singer-songwriter and member of Music/JimmyBuffett's Coral Reefer Band. The change in sound from completely weightless fluff like "Step That Step" or "Betty's Bein' Bad" to the likes of "All These Years" or "Cafe on the Corner" is staggering. Even their lighter more upbeat material in TheNineties such as "Some Girls Do" or like "Thank God for You" still had You", or their cover songs such as "Six Days on the Road" and "This Night Won't Last Forever" in this timespan are considerably more lyrical meat mature and more musical punch.polished.
17th Feb '18 5:51:56 PM Twentington
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* Early on, Gary Allan had a softer and less raspy singing voice, and his material tended toward the upbeat more often, with positive songs such as "Her Man", "Right Where I Need to Be", "Tough Little Boys", and "Nothing On but the Radio" (although he still had the occasional downer, most notably "Smoke Rings in the Dark"). Then after his wife's suicide in 2005, he seemed to undergo a nearly-permanent CreatorBreakdown: his voice became raspier and he began singing falsetto more often, while his material became darker and often introspective (such as "Life Ain't Always Beautiful", "Watching Airplanes", or "Every Storm (Runs Out of Rain)").
5th Feb '18 8:37:51 PM Twentington
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* Music/KennyChesney is another pretty extreme example. When he started out in the early-mid 90s, he sang in a very twangy voice, and had a very commercial "neotraditionalist" country sound akin to nearly any other young hunk in a cowboy hat. By the end of the decade, his voice started getting less nasal and his material became slick country-pop that also fit in with the time (interestingly, this transitory era produced two of his biggest hits in "How Forever Feels" and "The Good Stuff"). Starting with 2002's ''No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems'', he moved mostly to where he is now: singing without the slightest hint of twang, and alternating between arena rock, Music/JimmyBuffett-esque beach country, and slow contemplative acoustic numbers. Much of his material since ''When the Sun Goes Down'' has also had an inrospective bent, regardless of tempo, and later albums have found him also dropping the arena rock for the most part.

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* Music/KennyChesney is another pretty extreme example. When he started out in the early-mid 90s, he sang in a very twangy voice, and had a very commercial "neotraditionalist" country sound akin to nearly any other young hunk in a cowboy hat. By the end of the decade, his voice started getting less nasal and his material became slick country-pop that also fit in with the time (interestingly, this transitory era produced two of his biggest hits in "How Forever Feels" and "The Good Stuff"). Starting with 2002's ''No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems'', he moved mostly to where he is now: singing without the slightest hint of twang, and alternating between arena rock, Music/JimmyBuffett-esque beach country, and slow contemplative acoustic numbers. Much of his material since ''When the Sun Goes Down'' has also had an inrospective bent, regardless of tempo, and later albums have found him also dropping downplaying the arena rock for the most part.somewhat.
31st Dec '17 11:09:13 PM Twentington
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* Music/LittleBigTown's SelfTitledAlbum from 2002 was a lot more slick and polished, making them sound more like a generic country vocal group than the earthy sound they had on subsequent albums. Also, even though the band was always known for letting [[VocalTagTeam all four members take turns on lead vocals]], both of the album's singles were sung by Kimberly Schlapman (then Kimberly Roads) and Philip Sweet, when all subsequent albums have relied more heavily on singles sung either by Karen Fairchild, or by all four members in polyphony (as exemplified by their BreakthroughHit "Boondocks"). To put this in comparison, Kimberly didn't sing lead on another single until "Sober" eleven years later.

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* Music/LittleBigTown's SelfTitledAlbum from in 2002 was a lot more slick and polished, making them sound more like a generic country vocal group than the earthy sound they had on subsequent albums. Also, even though despite the band was always known for letting [[VocalTagTeam all four members take turns on lead vocals]], group's reputation as a VocalTagTeam, both of the album's singles were sung by Kimberly Schlapman (then Kimberly Roads) and Philip Sweet, when all subsequent albums have relied Sweet -- in comparison, their second through fourth were more heavily on singles sung either by Karen Fairchild, or by all four members in polyphony (as exemplified by varied (with some singles, such as their BreakthroughHit "Boondocks"). To put this "Boondocks", even featuring all four singing in comparison, Kimberly didn't sing polyphony), while the ones after that have relied almost exclusively on lead on another single until "Sober" eleven years later.vocals from Karen Fairchild (including their biggest crossover hits, "Girl Crush" and "Better Man").
31st Dec '17 10:03:37 PM Twentington
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* Music/HunterHayes was originally a Cajun musician who had been playing professionally since age 4 and cut his first album at 8. His major-label debut "Storm Warning" was a punchy country-rock song, but the rest of his major-label career has been defined by lightweight teenpop as exemplified by "Wanted" only one single later.

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* Music/HunterHayes was originally a Cajun musician who had been playing professionally since age 4 and cut his first album at 8. His major-label debut "Storm Warning" was a punchy country-rock song, but the rest of his major-label career has been defined by lightweight teenpop teen pop-styled country as exemplified by "Wanted" only one single later.
31st Dec '17 1:18:42 PM Twentington
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* Music/LittleBigTown's SelfTitledAlbum from 2002 was a lot more slick and polished, making them sound more like a generic country vocal group than the earthy sound they had on subsequent albums. Also, both of the album's singles were sung by Kimberly Schlapman (then Kimberly Roads) and Philip Sweet, when all subsequent albums have put Karen Fairchild or Jimi Westbrook at the front of the VocalTagTeam. (To put this in comparison, Kimberly didn't sing lead on another single until "Sober" eleven years later.)

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* Music/LittleBigTown's SelfTitledAlbum from 2002 was a lot more slick and polished, making them sound more like a generic country vocal group than the earthy sound they had on subsequent albums. Also, even though the band was always known for letting [[VocalTagTeam all four members take turns on lead vocals]], both of the album's singles were sung by Kimberly Schlapman (then Kimberly Roads) and Philip Sweet, when all subsequent albums have put relied more heavily on singles sung either by Karen Fairchild Fairchild, or Jimi Westbrook at the front of the VocalTagTeam. (To by all four members in polyphony (as exemplified by their BreakthroughHit "Boondocks"). To put this in comparison, Kimberly didn't sing lead on another single until "Sober" eleven years later.)
31st Dec '17 12:49:05 PM Twentington
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** In terms of content, 1986's ''Yoopanese'' has two completely serious songs ("My Shoes" and "Critics Tune"), two songs with surreal science-fiction references ("Robot Girl" and "I Don't Wanna Glow"), and a parody song ("Road to Gwinn", a parody of Music/WillieNelson's "On the Road Again"). It is also their only album besides 1992's ''Yoopy Do Wah'' to have no guest musicians or sketch comedy interludes. ''Culture Shock'' still has surreal sci-fi themes on "Chiquito War", along with another song parody in "Rusty Chevrolet". Both ''Culture Shock'' and ''Camp Fever'' have their respective B-sides dominated by Finnish folk songs.
** Even their sound was different early on. On the first two albums, Lynn Anderson (not the same woman who sang "Rose Garden") largely plays an analog synthesizer instead of more traditional keyboards. "Last Frontier", the opening track to ''Culture Shock'', even has a drum machine! Original and [[ThePeteBest little-known]] bassist Jim Pennell gets two turns on lead vocal, singing "Smeltin' USA" on ''Yoopanese'' and "Chicquito War" on ''Culture Shock''. Pennell's short-lived replacemet, Joe [=DeLongchamp=], sang and wrote the title track to ''Camp Fever''. Finally, most of the B-sides of ''Culture Shock'' and ''Camp Fever'', even beyond the folk song covers, rely on "folksy" instruments such as jugs, spoons, washboards, and gutbucket bass (interestingly, this includes the SignatureSong "Second Week of Deer Camp"). By ''Yoop It Up'', their sound was fully established.

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** In terms of content, 1986's ''Yoopanese'' has two completely serious songs ("My Shoes" and "Critics Tune"), two songs with surreal science-fiction references ("Robot Girl" and "I Don't Wanna Glow"), and a parody song ("Road to Gwinn", a parody of Music/WillieNelson's "On the Road Again"). It is also their only album besides 1992's ''Yoopy Do Wah'' to have no guest musicians or sketch comedy interludes. ''Culture Shock'' still has surreal sci-fi themes on "Chiquito War", along with another song parody in "Rusty Chevrolet".Chevrolet" (although that remains one of their {{signature song}}s). Both ''Culture Shock'' and ''Camp Fever'' have their respective B-sides dominated by Finnish folk songs.
** Even their sound was different early on. On the first two albums, Lynn Anderson (not the same woman who sang "Rose Garden") Garden"; later known as Lynn Coffey) largely plays an analog synthesizer instead of more traditional keyboards. "Last Frontier", the opening track to ''Culture Shock'', even has a drum machine! Original and [[ThePeteBest little-known]] Original bassist Jim Pennell Pennell]] gets two turns on lead vocal, singing "Smeltin' USA" on ''Yoopanese'' and "Chicquito War" on ''Culture Shock''. Pennell's short-lived replacemet, replacement, Joe [=DeLongchamp=], sang and wrote the title track to ''Camp Fever''. Finally, most of the B-sides of ''Culture Shock'' and ''Camp Fever'', even beyond the folk song covers, rely on "folksy" instruments such as jugs, spoons, washboards, and gutbucket bass (interestingly, this includes the SignatureSong "Second Week of Deer Camp").Camp" from the former). By ''Yoop It Up'', their sound was fully established.
31st Dec '17 11:49:58 AM nombretomado
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** Even more jarring is her pre-Gaga work as the namesake of the Stefani Germanotta Band. Their one EP, ''[[http://ladygaga.wikia.com/wiki/Red_and_Blue_(EP) Red and Blue]],'' features mostly (as phrased by [[TheWikiRule Gagapedia]]) "female-vocal ballads with a glam rock edge," very similar in style to her [[RearrangeTheSong acoustic versions]] of "Poker Face" and "Paparazzi". Though the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wy6z23iJMLk title track]] is more in the vein of NoDoubt than anything else.

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** Even more jarring is her pre-Gaga work as the namesake of the Stefani Germanotta Band. Their one EP, ''[[http://ladygaga.wikia.com/wiki/Red_and_Blue_(EP) Red and Blue]],'' features mostly (as phrased by [[TheWikiRule Gagapedia]]) "female-vocal ballads with a glam rock edge," very similar in style to her [[RearrangeTheSong acoustic versions]] of "Poker Face" and "Paparazzi". Though the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wy6z23iJMLk title track]] is more in the vein of NoDoubt Music/NoDoubt than anything else.
30th Dec '17 2:13:11 PM Twentington
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* Music/DaYoopers: The Michigan-based group, known mainly for their novelty songs about the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and frequent use of guest musicians, are rife with weirdness on their first two albums:
** 1986's ''Yoopanese'' has two completely serious songs ("My Shoes" and "Critics Tune"), two songs with surreal science-fiction references ("Robot Girl" and "I Don't Wanna Glow"), and a parody song ("Road to Gwinn", a parody of Music/WillieNelson's "On the Road Again"). It is also their only album besides 1992's ''Yoopy Do Wah'' to have no musical guests or sketch comedy interludes.
** ''Culture Shock'' still has surreal sci-fi themes on "Chiquito War", along with another song parody in "Rusty Chevrolet". In addition, the second half of the album is dominated by a more "folksy" sound (to the point that it includes covers of Finnish folk songs).
** The first two albums also have more unusual arrangements, as Lynn Anderson (not the same woman who sang "Rose Garden") largely plays an analog synthesizer instead of more traditional keyboards. "Last Frontier", the opening track to ''Culture Shock'', even has a drum machine! Original and [[ThePeteBest little-known]] bassist Jim Pennell also gets two turns on lead vocal, singing "Smeltin' USA" on ''Yoopanese'' and "Chicquito War" on ''Culture Shock''. Finally, most of the B-side of ''Culture Shock'' relies on "folksy" instruments such as jugs, spoons, and gutbucket bass (interestingly, this includes the SignatureSong "Second Week of Deer Camp"). By ''Camp Fever'', they had mostly shifted to their more conventional sound, although even that album still had a couple folk songs.

to:

* Music/DaYoopers: The Michigan-based group, known mainly for their novelty songs about the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and frequent use of guest musicians, are rife with weirdness on their first two albums:
** In terms of content, 1986's ''Yoopanese'' has two completely serious songs ("My Shoes" and "Critics Tune"), two songs with surreal science-fiction references ("Robot Girl" and "I Don't Wanna Glow"), and a parody song ("Road to Gwinn", a parody of Music/WillieNelson's "On the Road Again"). It is also their only album besides 1992's ''Yoopy Do Wah'' to have no musical guests guest musicians or sketch comedy interludes.
**
interludes. ''Culture Shock'' still has surreal sci-fi themes on "Chiquito War", along with another song parody in "Rusty Chevrolet". In addition, the second half of the album is Both ''Culture Shock'' and ''Camp Fever'' have their respective B-sides dominated by a more "folksy" sound (to the point that it includes covers of Finnish folk songs).
songs.
** The Even their sound was different early on. On the first two albums also have more unusual arrangements, as albums, Lynn Anderson (not the same woman who sang "Rose Garden") largely plays an analog synthesizer instead of more traditional keyboards. "Last Frontier", the opening track to ''Culture Shock'', even has a drum machine! Original and [[ThePeteBest little-known]] bassist Jim Pennell also gets two turns on lead vocal, singing "Smeltin' USA" on ''Yoopanese'' and "Chicquito War" on ''Culture Shock''. Pennell's short-lived replacemet, Joe [=DeLongchamp=], sang and wrote the title track to ''Camp Fever''. Finally, most of the B-side B-sides of ''Culture Shock'' relies and ''Camp Fever'', even beyond the folk song covers, rely on "folksy" instruments such as jugs, spoons, washboards, and gutbucket bass (interestingly, this includes the SignatureSong "Second Week of Deer Camp"). By ''Camp Fever'', they had mostly shifted to ''Yoop It Up'', their more conventional sound, although even that album still had a couple folk songs.sound was fully established.
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