History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / LiveActionTV

13th Feb '18 8:48:03 AM RedScharlach
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** In Stuart's first appearance he is a socially adept guy with artistic talent and a cool job (Owning the Comicbook store). He impresses Penny and dates her for a short time. Leonard finds him very threatening as a cool, socially adept geek. In later appearances he becomes more and more pathetic, eventually becoming someone the other character look down on as overly pathetic.

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** In Stuart's first appearance he is a socially adept guy with artistic talent and a cool job (Owning the Comicbook store). He impresses Penny and dates her for a short time. Leonard finds him very threatening as a cool, socially adept geek. In later appearances he becomes more and more pathetic, eventually becoming someone the other character characters look down on as overly pathetic.



** The show also differs in its general feel: It had a greater budget than its successors, allowing larger sets, location shooting and a far greater number of actors and extras. When budget cuts were made for Blackadder II, the writers (now including Creator/BenElton) compensated by putting more emphasis on dialog and characterisation, which most fans agree was [[GrowingTheBeard beneficial for the show as a whole]]. As Elton put it, "Rowan Atkinson falling off a horse in the middle distance is no funnier than anyone else falling off a horse in the middle distance. Get in close and he'll make you laugh."

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** The show also differs in its general feel: It had a greater bigger budget than its successors, allowing larger sets, location shooting and a far greater number of actors and extras. When budget cuts were made for Blackadder II, the writers (now including Creator/BenElton) compensated by putting more emphasis on dialog and characterisation, which most fans agree was [[GrowingTheBeard beneficial for the show as a whole]]. As Elton put it, "Rowan Atkinson falling off a horse in the middle distance is no funnier than anyone else falling off a horse in the middle distance. Get in close and he'll make you laugh."



* ''Series/{{Bonanza}}'' depicts the Cartwrights as stand-offish and put-off by outsiders in its earliest episodes. Also, Ben Cartwright tended to be less patient and in fact, harsher, with his sons in general. However, series star Lorne Greene objected after a few early episodes were filmed and recommended that -- because the Cartwrights owned the largest timber and livestock operation in Nevada Territory, they ought to be warming and friendly. The producers ultimately agreed ... and the Cartwright family became the welcoming, heartwarming family a generation of viewers came to know.

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* ''Series/{{Bonanza}}'' depicts the Cartwrights as stand-offish and put-off put off by outsiders in its earliest episodes. Also, Ben Cartwright tended to be less patient and in fact, harsher, with his sons in general. However, series star Lorne Greene objected after a few early episodes were filmed and recommended that -- because the Cartwrights owned the largest timber and livestock operation in Nevada Territory, they ought to be warming and friendly. The producers ultimately agreed ... and the Cartwright family became the welcoming, heartwarming family a generation of viewers came to know.



** Angel's first few appearances has the character affect a rather snarky and smug persona. It isn't until [[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS1E7Angel]] that he became the dark, brooding vampire with a soul. Every appearance thereafter would exhibit the stoic, broody persona that people came to associate with the character.

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** Angel's first few appearances has the character affect a rather snarky and smug persona. It isn't until [[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS1E7Angel]] "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS1E7Angel}} Angel]]" that he became the dark, brooding vampire with a soul. Every appearance thereafter would exhibit the stoic, broody persona that people came to associate with the character.



** Fi switches from an Irish accent to an American one in the second episode of season 1. In universe, she explains it's to blend in. Out of universe, the reason is probably more or less the same; the writers realized she'd have to adopt an American accent for most her undercover work anyway. That, and English actress Gabrielle Anwar's American accent is better than her Irish.

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** Fi switches from an Irish accent to an American one in the second episode of season 1. In universe, she explains it's to blend in. Out of universe, the reason is probably more or less the same; the writers realized she'd have to adopt an American accent for most of her undercover work anyway. That, and English actress Gabrielle Anwar's American accent is better than her Irish.



** In the second episode one of the shape-shifting demons held on the book and tried to get it out of the house by carrying it. Never once did it shock him like the evil sensing and shocking book that would come later. It's heavily implied that the shapeshifter's powers confused the book at first: whilst it allowed him to carry it, the book did refuse to leave the house, flying out of his hands when he tried to force it through the door, and sliding away when he tried to reach for it again. Likewise, the book is shown to be connected to the sisters' powers, and it becomes steadily savvier, and more aggressive to evil as the series goes on. It's therefore implied that it's just the book's defensive capabilities strengthening as the sisters' powers do, as opposed to a complete [[FridgeBrilliance non sequitur]].

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** In the second episode one of the shape-shifting demons held on the book and tried to get it out of the house by carrying it. Never once did it shock him like the evil sensing and shocking book that would come later. It's heavily implied that the shapeshifter's powers confused the book at first: whilst while it allowed him to carry it, the book did refuse to leave the house, flying out of his hands when he tried to force it through the door, and sliding away when he tried to reach for it again. Likewise, the book is shown to be connected to the sisters' powers, and it becomes steadily savvier, and more aggressive to evil as the series goes on. It's therefore implied that it's just the book's defensive capabilities strengthening as the sisters' powers do, as opposed to a complete [[FridgeBrilliance non sequitur]].



** The first season featured spells and potions that were inspired by real life Wicca and neopagan practices (creator Constance M Burge was inspired by ''Film/TheCraft'' which used similar ideas). This was phased out around season 2 and more emphasis was placed on vanquishing potions and the sisters' active powers.

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** The first season featured spells and potions that were inspired by real life real-life Wicca and neopagan practices (creator Constance M Burge was inspired by ''Film/TheCraft'' which used similar ideas). This was phased out around season 2 and more emphasis was placed on vanquishing potions and the sisters' active powers.



** The early Daleks were extremely unpleasant creatures but acted mostly out of paranoia, very old and ancient feuds and naked self interest, also being a lot more talkative and eloquent (a memorable scene where they dictate a letter for Susan to write to the Thals comes to mind; "[[CreepyMonotone WE CAN AL-SO SU-PPLY QUAN-TI-TIES OF FRESH VE-GE-TA-BLES . . .]]"). While they hated their enemies the Thal race, their main reason for wanting to shower their planet with nuclear material was because they were dependent on radiation to survive and needed to do this to terraform their world for them, with the side benefit of killing the Thals. They were also portrayed as being very vulnerable heavily armed, but dependent on powered floors for movement and very weak and pathetic in nature. Later Daleks were much less reasonable and much more angry, with the primary motivation for their evil being genocidal racism against everything that isn't Dalek in origin. They also became a lot less talkative, probably because their screechy voices were just horrible to listen to, and a lot less pitiful. Daleks that showed up later still were even more dangerous, having almost destroyed the nigh-omnipotent Time Lords, and they were now willing to ''play'' pitiful and vulnerable if it was the only way to get what they wanted (such as the one in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E6Dalek "Dalek"]], which [[ImpliedLoveInterest borderline seduces Rose into feeding it energy]]).

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** The early Daleks were extremely unpleasant creatures but acted mostly out of paranoia, very old and ancient feuds and naked self interest, also being a lot more talkative and eloquent (a memorable scene where they dictate a letter for Susan to write to the Thals comes to mind; mind: "[[CreepyMonotone WE CAN AL-SO SU-PPLY QUAN-TI-TIES OF FRESH VE-GE-TA-BLES . . .VE-GE-TA-BLES...]]"). While they hated their enemies the Thal race, their main reason for wanting to shower their planet with nuclear material was because they were dependent on radiation to survive and needed to do this to terraform their world for them, world, with the side benefit of killing the Thals. They were also portrayed as being very vulnerable heavily armed, but dependent on powered floors for movement and very weak and pathetic in nature. Later Daleks were much less reasonable and much more angry, with the primary motivation for their evil being genocidal racism against everything that isn't Dalek in origin. They also became a lot less talkative, probably because their screechy voices were just horrible to listen to, and a lot less pitiful. Daleks that showed up later still were even more dangerous, having almost destroyed the nigh-omnipotent Time Lords, and they were now willing to ''play'' pitiful and vulnerable if it was the only way to get what they wanted (such as the one in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E6Dalek "Dalek"]], which [[ImpliedLoveInterest borderline seduces Rose into feeding it energy]]).



** Except for two standalone episodes (One of which was feature length), the classic series consisted entirely of multi-part stories. While these were generally called "Story Name, Episode/Part X", the first 2 seasons and most of the 3rd had individual episode titles.

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** Except for two standalone episodes (One (one of which was feature length), the classic series consisted entirely of multi-part stories. While these were generally called "Story Name, Episode/Part X", the first 2 seasons and most of the 3rd had individual episode titles.



** In the pilot, the opening credits sequence didn't just feature the credits for the main cast, but also many of the one-time supporting characters. Interestingly, Stanley Kamel is credited third on the cast listing (as if they were expecting Dr. Kroger to become more of a regular character; it's also noticeable BillingDisplacement as Dr. Kroger only gets a short two minute scene at the beginning and another short one near the end), and Jason-Gray Stanford (Randy) comes after such names as Michael Hogan (Warren St. Claire) and Ben Bass (Gavin Lloyd).

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** In the pilot, the opening credits sequence didn't just feature the credits for the main cast, but also many of the one-time supporting characters. Interestingly, Stanley Kamel is credited third on the cast listing (as if they were expecting Dr. Kroger to become more of a regular character; it's also noticeable BillingDisplacement as Dr. Kroger only gets a short two minute two-minute scene at the beginning and another short one near the end), and Jason-Gray Stanford (Randy) comes after such names as Michael Hogan (Warren St. Claire) and Ben Bass (Gavin Lloyd).



* Anyone going back to watch series 1 of the BritCom ''Series/PeepShow'' will notice the, frankly, ridiculous music the show opens to.

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* Anyone going back to watch series 1 of the BritCom ''Series/PeepShow'' will notice the, frankly, ridiculous music the show opens to.with.



* The first two seasons of ''SexAndTheCity'' seem a little less "chick show" than the later ones, with stories about male, non-love interest friends of theirs, a somewhat more cynical attitude and a lot less emphasis on fashion. The episodes would have one scene of people on the street giving their opinion on the topic of the episode, and Carrie herself broke the fourth wall a couple of times by directly speaking to the audience.

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* The first two seasons of ''SexAndTheCity'' seem a little less "chick show" than the later ones, with stories about male, non-love interest friends of theirs, a somewhat more cynical attitude and a lot less emphasis on fashion. The episodes would have generally include at least one scene of people on the street giving their opinion on the main topic of the episode. In the very first episode, and Carrie herself broke breaks the fourth wall a couple of times by directly speaking to the audience.



** The [[TransatlanticEquivalent Spanish equivalent]], ''[[Series/LesGuignolsDelInfo Las Noticias del Guiñol]]'', started as a section in a talk show with a live audience and had the puppets appearing through a small window in a wall (i.e., like in a literal puppet show). It later became its own show and got longer sketchs, actual sets, special effects, etc.

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** The [[TransatlanticEquivalent Spanish equivalent]], ''[[Series/LesGuignolsDelInfo Las Noticias del Guiñol]]'', started as a section in a talk show with a live audience and had the puppets appearing through a small window in a wall (i.e., like in a literal puppet show). It later became its own show and got longer sketchs, sketches, actual sets, special effects, etc.



--->'''Major Samantha Carter''': . . . and just because my reproductive organs are on the inside rather than the outside, doesn't mean I can't handle anything you can handle.

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--->'''Major Samantha Carter''': . . . Carter''': ...and just because my reproductive organs are on the inside rather than the outside, doesn't mean I can't handle anything you can handle.



** Characterization and character traits would change dramatically after the first season. Picard wasn't just aloof and prim, but an outright asshole boss-from-Hell. Riker was a randy Kirk clone, Worf is considerably more feral. Data frequently ''smiles'' and openly shows amazement, befuddlement, etc, and his makeup is more mime-like, creating a sort of UncannyValley effect. Troi's ability to sense emotions in others initially meant she herself felt the emotions, which could have the side-effect of incapacitating her (this was dropped after the pilot). Wesley's first-season persona, a whiny, annoying child, stuck in viewers' heads, and even after the character matured he still couldn't shake being the show's [[TheScrappy scrappy]].

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** Characterization and character traits would change dramatically after the first season. Picard wasn't just aloof and prim, but an outright asshole boss-from-Hell. Riker was a randy Kirk clone, Worf is considerably more feral. Data frequently ''smiles'' and openly shows amazement, befuddlement, etc, etc., and his makeup is more mime-like, creating a sort of UncannyValley effect. Troi's ability to sense emotions in others initially meant she herself felt the emotions, which could have the side-effect of incapacitating her (this was dropped after the pilot). Wesley's first-season persona, a whiny, annoying child, stuck in viewers' heads, and even after the character matured he still couldn't shake being the show's [[TheScrappy scrappy]].



** The first Ferengi episode had them wildly hopping around the set like mad monkeys, and the pilot episode implied they ate people. Ferengi also had superhuman strength, and were unafraid of getting into physical altercations with the Enterprise Crew. Later seasons, and the later series as a whole, seems to ignore this, portraying them instead to be meek and weak cowards who prefer subterfuge and hired muscle in order to do their dirty work.

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** The first Ferengi episode had them wildly hopping around the set like mad monkeys, and the pilot episode implied they ate people. Ferengi also had superhuman strength, and were unafraid of getting into physical altercations with the Enterprise Crew.crew. Later seasons, and the later series as a whole, seems to ignore this, portraying them instead to be meek and weak cowards who prefer subterfuge and hired muscle in order to do their dirty work.
11th Feb '18 6:04:05 PM nombretomado
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* ''ThePeoplesCourt'': The first couple of seasons of the original 1981 series especially the very earliest episodes  were markedly different than the show as seen today. Many cases were simple arbitrations, with rather bland, dull cases being heard. The litigants simply answered the judge's questions and rarely if ever tried to interrupt the other litigant, call him names or interrupt the judge while he was talking. Judge Joseph Wapner himself far more patient than current Judge Marilyn Milian rarely if ever accused litigants of outright lying, although he would call them on testimony he thought didn't seem to fit the evidence or if a litigant lacked crucial evidence (such as a dated receipt) that ultimately cost them the case. When the judge delivered his decision, the litigants except to answer a direct question he might ask them simply listened respectfully, and while some of the litigants were understandably disappointed with the outcome  although there were always a few exceptions they generally accepted Wapner's decision in good stride or chalked it up as a lesson learned. Once the show became a hit and logged time on the air, a few scattered episodes with litigants similar to the current series made it to air, but overall the Wapner-era shows were far more sedate and Wapner rarely needed to raise his voice or put wayward litigants in their place.

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* ''ThePeoplesCourt'': ''Series/ThePeoplesCourt'': The first couple of seasons of the original 1981 series especially the very earliest episodes  were markedly different than the show as seen today. Many cases were simple arbitrations, with rather bland, dull cases being heard. The litigants simply answered the judge's questions and rarely if ever tried to interrupt the other litigant, call him names or interrupt the judge while he was talking. Judge Joseph Wapner himself far more patient than current Judge Marilyn Milian rarely if ever accused litigants of outright lying, although he would call them on testimony he thought didn't seem to fit the evidence or if a litigant lacked crucial evidence (such as a dated receipt) that ultimately cost them the case. When the judge delivered his decision, the litigants except to answer a direct question he might ask them simply listened respectfully, and while some of the litigants were understandably disappointed with the outcome  although there were always a few exceptions they generally accepted Wapner's decision in good stride or chalked it up as a lesson learned. Once the show became a hit and logged time on the air, a few scattered episodes with litigants similar to the current series made it to air, but overall the Wapner-era shows were far more sedate and Wapner rarely needed to raise his voice or put wayward litigants in their place.
6th Feb '18 9:02:24 PM MagnusForce
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Added DiffLines:

* Everyone knows the ''Franchise/UltraSeries'' is all about giant monsters battling the heroic Ultramen, but less known is that Ultraman wasn't a part of the franchise until the ''second'' [[Series/{{Ultraman}} series]]. Indeed, ''Series/UltraQ'', the first installment in the ''Ultra Series'' features no superhero action, but instead sees a motley group of ordinary folks who come across all sorts of strange encounters with {{kaiju}}, aliens, and even weirder phenomenon in the style of ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' and Japan's sci-fi films of the period. And then after ''Ultraman'' came ''Series/UltraSeven'', which eschewed the rampaging kaiju for alien invaders in stories closer to ''Franchise/StarTrek'' or ''Series/DoctorWho'' than to ''Ultraman'' and ''Godzilla''. The ''Ultra Series'' as known today only began to take shape with ''Series/ReturnOfUltraman''.
5th Feb '18 5:44:40 PM LinTaylor
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*** Series/KamenRiderBuild's early cameos are a particularly extreme example. He talks in a far more analytical manner, shows up to take some of [[Series/KamenRiderExAid Ex-Aid]]'s power for his research, and doesn't take "no" for an answer -- which includes beating up Para-DX (while dismissing him as irrelevant) when he tries to intervene. This is of course a far cry from the BunnyEarsLawyer ScienceHero he is in his home series, but this may have been wholly intentional: [[spoiler:''Build'' eventually reveals that the protagonist was an amoral MadScientist who only became a good guy after [[EasyAmnesia his memories were erased]], which lead to speculation that the writers intentionally showed him in his original {{Jerkass}} personality during these cameos in order to [[{{Foreshadowing}} Foreshadow]] the amnesia plot.]]

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*** Series/KamenRiderBuild's early cameos are a particularly extreme example. He talks in a far more analytical manner, shows up to take some of [[Series/KamenRiderExAid Ex-Aid]]'s power for his research, and doesn't take "no" for an answer -- which includes beating up Para-DX (while dismissing him as irrelevant) when he tries to intervene. This is of course a far cry from the BunnyEarsLawyer ScienceHero he is in his home series, but this may have been was wholly intentional: [[spoiler:''Build'' eventually reveals that the protagonist was an amoral MadScientist who only became a good guy after [[EasyAmnesia his memories were erased]], which lead to speculation and the crossover film ''Heisei Generations Final'' confirms that the writers intentionally showed him he was still in his original {{Jerkass}} personality during these cameos in order to [[{{Foreshadowing}} Foreshadow]] when he harassed Ex-Aid; when Para-DX shows up itching for revenge, the amnesia plot.now-amnesiac and heroic Build has no idea why he's so pissed off.]]
4th Feb '18 7:36:24 AM SeptimusHeap
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** [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome Their youngest daughter disappears from the show without mention.]] Also, the show's focus was much more on Harriet early on as it was her character being imported from ''PerfectStrangers''. Later even among the original cast she was losing out to Carl due to the humorous dynamic he had with Urkel.

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** [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome Their youngest daughter disappears from the show without mention.]] Also, the show's focus was much more on Harriet early on as it was her character being imported from ''PerfectStrangers''.''Series/PerfectStrangers''. Later even among the original cast she was losing out to Carl due to the humorous dynamic he had with Urkel.
1st Feb '18 3:51:20 PM CombativeBoil
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* ''Series/CriminalMinds'': It's very clear that the writers were still getting a hang of the series' tone and pace when the pilot was scripted. The most jarring difference for regular viewers is the appearance of voice-over quotes outside of their usual BookEnds, as well as an out-of-place ending scene that feels like it got spliced in from a completely different series. Characterization is also still finding its footing: Hotch actually ''smiles'' while on the job, Morgan's dressed to the nines rather than the casual look he'd take on in later episodes, and Reid's "autistic tendencies" are much more obvious. All this gets smoothed over by about four episodes in.

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* ''Series/CriminalMinds'': It's very clear that the writers were still getting a hang of the series' tone and pace when the pilot was scripted. The most jarring difference for regular viewers is the appearance of voice-over quotes outside of their usual BookEnds, as well as an out-of-place a {{Cliffhanger}} ending scene that feels like it got spliced in from featured a completely different series.new criminal after the main plot had been resolved. Characterization is also still finding its footing: Hotch actually ''smiles'' while on the job, Morgan's dressed to the nines rather than the casual look he'd take on in later episodes, and Reid's "autistic tendencies" are much more obvious. All this gets smoothed over by about four episodes in.
26th Jan '18 5:05:19 PM dbdude01
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** In the early episode, Stephanie Beatriz used her natural voice to play Rosa Diaz. Over the course of the first season, Diaz's voice gradually got lower and stayed that way.

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** In the early episode, episodes, Stephanie Beatriz used her natural voice to play Rosa Diaz. Over the course of the first season, Diaz's voice gradually got lower and stayed that way.
25th Jan '18 11:07:16 PM dbdude01
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Added DiffLines:

** In the early episode, Stephanie Beatriz used her natural voice to play Rosa Diaz. Over the course of the first season, Diaz's voice gradually got lower and stayed that way.
23rd Jan '18 12:16:49 PM MadRedX12
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** Early episodes are more sci-fi horror than the conventional toku we know today. The famous Rider Kick hadn't even been established yet, and thus Hongo would defeat his enemies with really anything, including a "Rider Throw". (That is, ''tossing your opponent off of a roof to go 'splat.''')

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** Early episodes are more sci-fi horror ([[{{Narm}} or]] [[SpecialEffectsFailure at]] [[NoBudget least]], they were meant to be) than the conventional toku we know today. The famous Rider Kick hadn't even been established yet, and thus Hongo would defeat his enemies with really anything, including a "Rider Throw". (That is, ''tossing your opponent off of a roof to go 'splat.''')
12th Jan '18 7:36:36 PM donwarr1995
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/TheGreatBritishBakeOff'':
** The first couple series are much more [[SeriousBusiness subdued and conventionally focussed on the competition aspect]]. In place of the hosts' comedy bits and enthusiastically dubious 'help', we get the judges giving contestants long, earnest lectures on technique. Sue has also [[http://www.cosmopolitan.co.uk/entertainment/news/a38850/mel-and-sue-nearly-quit-the-great-british-bake-off/ claimed in interviews]] that she and Mel nearly quit early on over demands that they stir up weepy melodrama as per more traditional reality competitions. At any rate, the now-signature lightheartedness erupts in series 3 so fully formed that it's clear a deliberate decision was taken ''some''where to loosen things up.
** Mel and Sue didn't do the voiceovers in the first series; a male narrator, Stephen Noonan, did them instead. The duo also initially shared some of their current hosting chores with Paul, who's seen in several series 1 episodes calling time ("Ten minutes left!") and otherwise encouraging the contestants to get a move on.
** The first series took the contestants all over the country -- to places as far apart as Mousehole in Cornwall and Scone in Perth & Kinross. This aspect was dropped from subsequent series as it was pretty much pointless (not to say expensive).
** Although the Showstopper has always been the final round, it didn't gain the name until series 2. In the first series it was just called "the final challenge". Likewise the "Star Baker" award didn't get introduced until series 2.
** Mary Berry wearing spectacles in the first few series.
** Mary and Paul are far more likely to disagree with each other over a bake in the first few series, though never to the point where it impedes the judging. Mary also more frequently takes light-hearted jabs at Paul's mannerisms and harsh critiquing methods. Later series have them working more in unison, with disagreements being extremely rare.
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