History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / LiveActionTV

27th Jun '16 8:43:16 PM dmcreif
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* Season 1 of ''Series/{{Monk}}'' can feel a bit out of place compared to the other seasons. Namely:
**There was a different title card which depicted Monk going through his MorningRoutine while a jazz instrumental by the show's music composer Jeff Beal played in the background. From season 2 onwards, a montage of episode clips was used as well as a new Randy Newman song "It's a Jungle Out There".
**Lieutenant Randy Disher went nameless in the pilot, and Jason Gray-Stanford was credited as "Lt. Deacon" in the credits. Randy Disher became his established name by the third episode.
**Notably, season 1 was shot in Canada (Vancouver for the pilot, Toronto for the rest of the season) while seasons 2-8 were shot in Southern California. As a result, sets like Captain Stottlemeyer's office, Monk's apartment, Sharona's house, and whatnot, look completely different.
**[[CharacterizationMarchesOn Captain Stottlemeyer's relationship with Monk in season 1 is written a lot differently from what later seasons show]]. Namely, from the way Stottlemeyer acts towards Monk in the pilot, you wouldn't think they were close friends but bitter rivals with some sort of past conflict, as shown when Stottlemeyer has Monk removed from the case after Monk's fear of heights allows Ian Sykes to escape; Monk makes a remark suggesting that Stottlemeyer is mad at Monk for something that happened in the past. In later episodes, the background has been retconned so that it seems like Stottlemeyer has always known Monk to be a genius.
** In the pilot, the opening credits sequence didn't just feature the credits for the main cast, but also many of the one-time supporting characters. Interestingly, Stanley Kamel is credited third on the cast listing (as if they were expecting Dr. Kroger to become more of a regular character; it's also noticeable BillingDisplacement as Dr. Kroger only gets a short two minute scene at the beginning and another short one near the end), and Jason-Gray Stanford (Randy) comes after such names as Michael Hogan (Warren St. Claire) and Ben Bass (Gavin Lloyd).
** Monk's personality doesn't seem quite as despairing as it does in later episodes. In fact, it's possible that the writers were thinking that Monk would get reinstated earlier in the show's run (as opposed to in the antepenultimate episode of season 8) and then the show's plotline would be "an OCD detective on the SFPD who solves crimes" rather than being about "a private detective with OCD who the SFPD consult to investigate crimes".
** In the pilot, there appear to be a lot of additional subplots going on around the main murder mystery - Monk trying to solve Trudy's murder, being lost when Sharona quits, etc. Meaning that if you didn't already know who the main characters were (because of seeing later episodes first), you would probably be confused as to who even are the main characters. The pilot seems to have been written when the writers had not yet decided exactly who were going to be the recurring characters or even the weekly characters, other than of course Monk and Sharona.
** Monk's quest to solve Trudy's murder was more prominent in earlier seasons. By season 3, around the time Melora Hardin was cast to play Trudy in flashbacks, Monk's investigation into Trudy's death was seemingly dropped completely although episodes where things from Monk's past with Trudy still came into play.
**During the season 3 mid-hiatus, Bitty Schram left over a pay dispute, causing Sharona to be written out of the show. In her place came Natalie Teeger, played by Traylor Howard. It's pretty noticeable that many of Natalie's first episodes seem to have used scripts that were written with Sharona instead, and they simply switched Sharona out for Natalie without changing the characterization accordingly. This results in a Natalie who acts more like Sharona than like the character we get later on, such as being fussy over money in "Mr. Monk vs. the Cobra". It isn't until some point early in season 4 that the writers were able to firmly get a grasp of what Natalie's character was supposed to be.
*''Series/BlueBloods'':
**The set used for Commissioner Frank Reagan's office looks somewhat different compared to later seasons.
**Danny has two different investigative partners before Jennifer Esposito's Jackie Curatola was firmly established as his partner.
**Season 1 is noticeably absent of Frank's Deputy Commissioner of Public Information Garrett Moore, who wasn't introduced until the antepenultimate episode of the season. Thus, you have other characters like Frank's Deputy Commissioner doing the duties that Garrett does in season 2 onwards.
25th Jun '16 5:57:04 AM Naram-Sin
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* ''Series/SpittingImage'' pales in its first season compared to later seasons. The pilot episode had a laugh track (which was abandoned quickly from the next episode on). Certain puppets look and sound different because the voice actors didn't always comically exaggarate the voices of the lampooned celebrities in the first season. Many episodes in the first season follow plot lines that are continued like a chronological series, while later seasons were always stand alone episodes.

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** The title itself was a reference to David coming back to life ("seven lives" is the Spanish idiom equivalent to "nine lives" - and that's why the logo has [[TheArtifact a black cat]] next to the title). Afterwards, the show took "seven lives" to mean that they followed the lives of seven characters - [[AscendedExtra promoting]] or [[RememberTheNewGuy introducing]] new (but [[SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute suspiciously similar]]) characters as the previous ones left - and became a ''{{Series/Friends}}'' [[FollowTheLeader rip-off]].
* ''Series/SpittingImage'' pales in its first season compared to later seasons. The pilot episode had a laugh track (which was abandoned quickly from the next episode on). Certain puppets look and sound different because the voice actors didn't always comically exaggarate exaggerate the voices of the lampooned celebrities in the first season. Many episodes in the first season follow plot lines that are continued like a chronological series, while later seasons were always stand alone episodes.episodes.
** The [[TransatlanticEquivalent Spanish equivalent]], ''[[Series/LesGuignolsDelInfo Las Noticias del Guiñol]]'', started as a section in a talk show with a live audience and had the puppets appearing through a small window in a wall (i.e., like in a literal puppet show). It later became its own show and got longer sketchs, actual sets, special effects, etc.
25th Jun '16 5:11:28 AM Naram-Sin
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** Even beyond the differences in Sheldon, the first few episodes were very different from what followed. All of the "smart" characters spoke in a "fake geek" dialect, using overly-technical explanations and terms for common things (''everyone'' referred to sex as "coitus", not just Sheldon). And Penny was ''dumb'' not just less-educated than the boys, but truly stupid. While her outfits would remain fairly revealing, in the first few episodes they were practically [[Series/MarriedWithChildren Kelly Bundy]]-worthy.
** It was the other guys in early episodes, rather than Sheldon, who referred to sex as "coitus."

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** Even beyond the differences in Sheldon, the first few episodes were very different from what followed. All of the "smart" characters spoke in a "fake geek" dialect, using overly-technical explanations and terms for common things (''everyone'' (it was the other guys who referred to sex as "coitus", not just Sheldon). And Penny was ''dumb'' not just less-educated than the boys, but truly stupid. While her outfits would remain fairly revealing, in the first few episodes they were practically [[Series/MarriedWithChildren Kelly Bundy]]-worthy.
** It was the other guys in early episodes, rather than Sheldon, who referred to sex as "coitus."
Bundy]]-worthy.



* The Spanish sitcom ''Siete Vidas'' was originally about David, a guy who had just woken up from a coma after several years, and his experiences as he rediscovered his sister, his neighbours and his old love interest. By the second season, the focus had largely moved to the sister and the neighbours, so David and his girlfriend were [[PutOnABus Put On A Plane]] and never heard of again except for Christmas specials.

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* The Spanish sitcom ''Siete Vidas'' was originally about David, [[RipVanWinkle a guy who had just woken up from a coma after several years, years]], and his experiences as he rediscovered his sister, his neighbours and his old love interest. By the second season, the focus had largely moved to the sister and the neighbours, neighbors, so David and his girlfriend were [[PutOnABus Put On A Plane]] and never heard of again except for Christmas specials.
22nd Jun '16 4:58:31 PM Jhamin
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** In Stuart's first appearance he is a socially adept guy with artistic talent and a cool job (Owning the Comicbook store). He impresses Penny and dates her for a short time. Leonard finds him very threatening as a cool, socially adept geek. In later appearances he becomes more and more pathetic, eventually becoming someone the other character look down on as overly pathetic.
22nd Jun '16 4:23:17 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* The first two ''Franchise/SuperSentai'' shows, ''Series/HimitsuSentaiGoranger'' and ''Series/JAKQDengekitai'', did not have the giant robots from subsequent shows. For a while they were not even considered part of the franchise, although this was mainly due to right disputes between Toei and ''Goranger''/''JAKQ'' creator ShotaroIshinomori. Also, in ''Series/BattleFeverJ,'' the third series, the mecha fights were kick-started by the human-sized monster calling his 'little brother' (a giant robotic duplicate) to avenge him as he was dying, (something of the likes wouldn't be seen in the series until more than 30 years later with ''Series/TokumeiSentaiGobusters'') and the Battle Fever Robo was not made from separate vehicles, but was a non-transforming robot stored on a non-transforming airbase. MakeMyMonsterGrow and CombiningMecha debuted in the ''following'' shows.

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* The first two ''Franchise/SuperSentai'' shows, ''Series/HimitsuSentaiGoranger'' and ''Series/JAKQDengekitai'', did not have the giant robots from subsequent shows. For a while they were not even considered part of the franchise, although this was mainly due to right disputes between Toei and ''Goranger''/''JAKQ'' creator ShotaroIshinomori.Creator/ShotaroIshinomori. Also, in ''Series/BattleFeverJ,'' the third series, the mecha fights were kick-started by the human-sized monster calling his 'little brother' (a giant robotic duplicate) to avenge him as he was dying, (something of the likes wouldn't be seen in the series until more than 30 years later with ''Series/TokumeiSentaiGobusters'') and the Battle Fever Robo was not made from separate vehicles, but was a non-transforming robot stored on a non-transforming airbase. MakeMyMonsterGrow and CombiningMecha debuted in the ''following'' shows.
17th Jun '16 4:52:31 PM nombretomado
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* This happens fairly frequently in ''That70sShow'':

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* This happens fairly frequently in ''That70sShow'': ''Series/That70sShow'':
17th Jun '16 1:17:12 AM OlfinBedwere
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** In the first episode or two, Lt. [=LaGuerta=] is portrayed as she is in the source novel, namely as an incompetent detective and glory hound who makes inappropriate advances on Dexter. Captain Matthews, meanwhile, is shown to be a ReasonableAuthorityFigure who is forced to sort things out whenever she screws up. It didn't take the producers too long to figure out that viewers ''might'' have an issue with an incompetent Latina officer having to be constantly babysat by a white man, and so the character dynamic was switched around early in the first season, with [=LaGuerta=] instead becoming a highly competent and dedicated officer (albeit still prone to the occasional bit of publicity-seeking), and Matthews being turned into an ObstructiveBureaucrat and all-around {{Jerkass}}.

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** In the first episode or two, Lt. [=LaGuerta=] is portrayed as she is in the source novel, namely as an incompetent detective and glory hound who makes inappropriate advances on Dexter. Captain Matthews, meanwhile, is shown to be a ReasonableAuthorityFigure who is forced to sort things out whenever she screws up. It didn't take the producers too long to figure out that viewers ''might'' have an issue with an incompetent Latina officer having to be constantly babysat by a white man, and so the character dynamic was switched around early in the first season, with [=LaGuerta=] instead becoming a highly competent and dedicated officer (albeit still prone to the occasional bit of publicity-seeking), and Matthews being turned into an ObstructiveBureaucrat and all-around {{Jerkass}}. In the show's latter seasons their characterisations drifted to somewhere in the middle of the two extremes, with [=LaGuerta=] still being shown as generally competent, but increasingly power-hungry and prone to making bad judgement calls under pressure, and Matthews mellowing out somewhat.
5th Jun '16 9:26:12 PM apeman33
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* ''Wheeler Dealers'', an automotive restoration show that airs on Discovery networks in the UK and Velocity in the US, has steadily evolved over time. In the first several seasons...
** Each car was fixed and sold over two half-hour shows instead of a single hour-long show.
** The budget was tiny, starting at just 1,000 pounds. Budgets now start as high as 20,000-25,000 pounds.
** Mike and Edd seldom interacted. Instead of taking the car to be worked on directly to the shop, they met at a random site where Mike handed off the car to Edd. Now, Mike takes the car directly to the workshop, where he and Edd discuss options.
** There was a segment around the beginning of the second half-hour where Mike found an original or fully-restored version of the car they were working on and test drove it. That's been dropped and replaced with segments in which Mike takes parts to be restored by specialists.
** Edd didn't join Mike on the final test drive before the sale for the first several seasons.
** There were more occasions where they lost money on the car. One first-season episode saw the dealers purchase a car for 400 pounds, spend 945 on fixing it and sell it for just 700 because the paint over the repaired wings (fenders) didn't come out as it should due to the low budget.
** Edd had a more stilted delivery and never did studio voice overs. All his narration was delivered as he worked on the car.
31st May '16 1:12:01 PM Silverblade2
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* Several minor characters from the books, such as Jeyne Poole, were given minor cameo parts, many of whom the show subsequently dropped, giving their plotlines to other characters.

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* ** Several minor characters from the books, such as Jeyne Poole, were given minor cameo parts, many of whom the show subsequently dropped, giving their plotlines to other characters.
31st May '16 10:08:38 AM KizunaTallis
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** The characterizations are different. Leslie Knope is awkward, overbearing, and somewhat incompetent; Andy is a lazy JerkAss rather than the affable ManChild of the later seasons. It's obvious that the characters are based on characters from ''The Office'', where Leslie is Michael Scott, Ann is Pam, Ron is Dwight, Mark is Jim Halpert, Andy is Roy Anderson, Tom is Ryan Howard, April is Angela Martin (with some Ryan mixed in) and Jerry is Kevin and Toby rolled into one.
** There's a heavy focus on the government aspect of the show. This was the result of the show starting off as a clone of ''The Office'' before it found its own voice and style.
** The show also started off as fairly bleak and cynical, with the premise essentially being "there's only one person in the government who cares, but she's an overly idealistic doofus who will never accomplish anything." When Leslie was made more competent in the second season, it made her idealism seem more justified and propelled the show to the opposite end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism from where it had started.
** The show was originally going to have recurring Pawnee residents appear during town hall meetings. These characters appear in early episodes but quickly vanish as the idea got dropped.

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** [[CharacterizationMarchesOn The characterizations are different. start off very different]]. Leslie Knope is awkward, overbearing, and somewhat incompetent; incompetent, Andy is a lazy JerkAss rather than the affable ManChild of the later seasons. seasons, Tom was Leslie's straitlaced NumberTwo rather than the "swag" obsessed JerkWithAHeartOfGold he later becomes, among others. It's obvious that the characters are [[{{Expy}} based on characters characters]] from ''The Office'', ''Series/TheOfficeUS'', where Leslie is Michael Scott, Ann is Pam, Ron is Dwight, Mark is Jim Halpert, Andy is Roy Anderson, Tom is Ryan Howard, April is Angela Martin (with some Ryan mixed in) and Jerry is Kevin and Toby rolled into one.
** There's
one. There was also a heavy heavier focus on the government aspect of the show. This was Both were the result of the show starting fact that ''Parks'' started off as a clone of ''The Office'' before it found its own voice and style.
** The show show's tone also started off as fairly bleak and cynical, with the premise essentially being "there's only one person in the government who actually cares, but she's an overly idealistic doofus who will never accomplish anything." When Leslie was made more competent in the second season, it made her idealism seem more justified and propelled the show to the opposite end of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism from where it had started.
** The show was originally going to have recurring Pawnee residents appear during town hall meetings. These characters appear in early episodes but quickly vanish vanished as the idea got dropped.
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