History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / ComicBooks

13th Nov '17 5:59:02 PM MagiMecha
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* When ''ComicBook/KingdomCome'' was released, Iris West II, the daughter of Wally West (the third Flash) was identified as being the fourth Flash in the script and concept art of the series, despite having a costume more in line with a Kid Flash (though she seemingly ''was'' an adult). Her follow-up appearances in the brief arc in ''Titans'' and ''The Kingdom'' instead identified her as ''Kid'' Flash. In fact, ''The Kingdom'' makes it a character point that Iris ''desparately'' wants to get her father's blessing to be the Flash.

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* When ''ComicBook/KingdomCome'' was released, Iris West II, the daughter of Wally West (the third Flash) was identified as being the fourth Flash in the script and concept art of the series, despite having a costume more in line with a Kid Flash (though she seemingly ''was'' an adult). Her follow-up appearances in the brief arc in ''Titans'' and ''The Kingdom'' instead identified her as ''Kid'' Flash. In fact, ''The Kingdom'' makes it a character point that Iris ''desparately'' wants to get her father's blessing to be the Flash.Flash.
* ComicBook/ThePunisher was something of an odd case as there was a period in his early days where he actually went about killing innocents [[DisproportionateRetribution for simple crimes such as littering and running a red light]]. It was later retconned into him being drugged.
12th Nov '17 3:10:48 PM DaibhidC
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*** The first Dr. Mid-Nite had nightvision superpowers rather than being a BadassNormal and [[NonIndicativeName wasn't actually a doctor]].
12th Nov '17 8:26:53 AM DLMaximum1
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** When Black Panther first appeared in ''Comicbook/FantasticFour'', there was no indication that T'Challa wasn't the first person to use the identity, and his origin in general was closer to that of Batman (with T'Challa seemingly creating a costumed identity to avenge his murdered father). It was only years later that it was established that the Black Panther was a [[LegacyCharacter Legacy]] identity, and that T'Challa's father had been the previous hero to use the name.

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** When Black Panther first appeared in ''Comicbook/FantasticFour'', there was no indication that T'Challa wasn't the first person to use the identity, and his origin in general was closer to that of Batman (with T'Challa seemingly creating a costumed identity to avenge his murdered father). It was only years later that it was established that the Black Panther was a [[LegacyCharacter Legacy]] identity, and that T'Challa's father had been the previous hero to use wielder of the name.identity.



* HealingFactor characters ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}, Sabretooth and ComicBook/{{Deadpool}} are depicted as sustaining injuries over a length of time in early appearances, compared to later appearances where healing appears near instant. Sabretooth's face was injured in ''The Spectacular Spider-Man vol. 1 #116'' and still scarred by his next appearance in #119. In an ''ComicBook/XForce'' appearance, Deadpool complains his broken jaw left him hospitalized for a few weeks. One can assume characters had weaker healing factors in the past, but newer stories set in the past still depict a near instant healing factor.

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* HealingFactor characters ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}, Sabretooth and ComicBook/{{Deadpool}} are depicted as sustaining injuries over a length of time in early appearances, compared to later appearances where healing appears near instant. Sabretooth's face was injured in ''The Spectacular Spider-Man vol. 1 #116'' Spider-Man'' (vol. 1) #116 and still scarred by his next appearance in #119. In an ''ComicBook/XForce'' appearance, Deadpool complains his broken jaw left him hospitalized for a few weeks. One can assume characters had weaker healing factors in the past, but newer stories set in the past still depict a near instant healing factor.



** [[ArtisticLicenseNuclearPhysics Radiation]] is ubiquitous when it comes to gaining new super powers, treated as a mysterious magical energy when battling the likes of Radioactive Man, with no indication of radiation's adverse effects. The X-men hint the origin of their mutations are tied to the nuclear bomb tests of the nuclear age, a detail ignored in most modern stories aside from the phrase "of the Atom".
** Tales of Suspense #49: "The New Iron Man Meets the Angel!" Witness as Tony Stark (here called Anthony Blake) encounters the Angel! After a nuclear explosion goes off from a Stark Industries atomic bomb test, Iron Man is shielded from the blast by his own armor, saving himself from hitting the ground with his Magnetic Repeller! But not Angel, who becomes evil! Is this a fiendish plot from an evil mutant? No! The radiation convinces Angel he is an Evil Mutant! Angel informs the X-Men he is leaving to become an Evil Mutant since "that's where the action is!" The X-Men use a top-secret device to contact the Avengers "in a secret wavelength used only by the X-Men and other specially licensed crime-fighting organizations". Angel attempts to draw the attention of Evil Mutants by detonating sticks of dynamite in random locations until Iron Man intervenes, then feigns plummeting to death so Angel can change his mind and save him! This heroic act reverses [[ArtisticLicenseNuclearPhysics the corrupting effect]] the radiation had on his personality! (Note: Iron Man is wearing his post ''The Avengers #2'' armor and mentions the X-Men's offer from ''The Avengers #3'', yet the Hulk is still part of the Avengers team in this issue when he should have left by ''The Avengers #2''. So this issue takes place somewhere around then, in reverse order).

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** [[ArtisticLicenseNuclearPhysics Radiation]] is ubiquitous when it comes to gaining new super powers, treated as a mysterious magical energy when battling the likes of Radioactive Man, with no indication of radiation's adverse effects. The X-men X-Men hint the origin of their mutations are tied to the nuclear bomb tests of the nuclear age, a detail ignored in most modern stories aside from the phrase "of the Atom".
** Tales ''Tales of Suspense Suspense'' #49: "The New Iron Man Meets the Angel!" Witness as Tony Stark (here called Anthony Blake) encounters the Angel! After a nuclear explosion goes off from a Stark Industries atomic bomb test, Iron Man is shielded from the blast by his own armor, saving himself from hitting the ground with his Magnetic Repeller! But not Angel, who becomes evil! Is this a fiendish plot from an evil mutant? No! The radiation convinces Angel he is an Evil Mutant! Angel informs the X-Men he is leaving to become an Evil Mutant since "that's where the action is!" The X-Men use a top-secret device to contact the Avengers "in a secret wavelength used only by the X-Men and other specially licensed crime-fighting organizations". Angel attempts to draw the attention of Evil Mutants by detonating sticks of dynamite in random locations until Iron Man intervenes, then feigns plummeting to death so Angel can change his mind and save him! This heroic act reverses [[ArtisticLicenseNuclearPhysics the corrupting effect]] the radiation had on his personality! (Note: Iron Man is wearing his post ''The Avengers #2'' Avengers'' #2 armor and mentions the X-Men's offer from ''The Avengers #3'', Avengers'' #3, yet the Hulk is still part of the Avengers team in this issue when he should have left by ''The Avengers #2''.the previous issue. So this issue takes place somewhere around then, in reverse order).



* In early issues of ComicBook/TheBeano pretty much all the comic's most iconic characters had yet to appear. The only strip in the first issue to survive into TheFifties was Lord Snooty. Early issues also included text stories and adventure strips unlike later ones which only featured humourous comic strips.

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* In early issues of ComicBook/TheBeano ''ComicBook/TheBeano'', pretty much all the comic's most iconic characters had yet to appear. The only strip in the first issue to survive into TheFifties was Lord Snooty. Early issues also included text stories and adventure strips unlike later ones which only featured humourous comic strips.



** In his first albums Adhemar dresses like a baby and acts very obnoxious and egotistically to get his will. This is in sharp contrast with later albums in which he behaves more civilized.

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** In his first albums albums, Adhemar dresses like a baby and acts very obnoxious and egotistically to get his will. This is in sharp contrast with later albums in which he behaves more civilized.



** Though this persists for much of the comic series, as another story about Han and Jabba uses the same humanoid design as the adaptation of A New Hope. It isn't until Return of the Jedi came out that Jabba was depicted as he is now.
** Jabba's humanoid design was from a scene that was originally deleted, and it was said that it wasn't the final version. At the time, they couldn't do what they wanted to, so it ended up deleted. When the "Special Edition" version of A New Hope came out, the Jabba from ''Return'' was inserted in as a CGI model.

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** Though this persists for much of the comic series, as another story about Han and Jabba uses the same humanoid design as the adaptation of A ''A New Hope. Hope''. It isn't until Return ''Return of the Jedi Jedi'' came out that Jabba was depicted as he is now.
** Jabba's humanoid design was from a scene that was originally deleted, and it was said that it wasn't the final version. At the time, they couldn't do what they wanted to, so it ended up deleted. When the "Special Edition" version of A ''A New Hope Hope'' came out, the Jabba from ''Return'' was inserted in as a CGI model.



** For the first few years of his existence, Thor was more of a standard superhero. While he did face Asgardian villains like Loki and Comicbook/TheEnchantress, he spent a lot of time on Earth, and frequently battled non-Asgardian threats like Mister Hyde, the Wrecker and Absorbing Man, as well as villains from other titles like the Super-Skrull and Magneto. It was not until ''Thor #159'' that readers learned his true origin, and that Donald Blake was simply a false guise created by Odin to teach Thor humility.

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** For the first few years of his existence, Thor was more of a standard superhero. While he did face Asgardian villains like Loki and Comicbook/TheEnchantress, he spent a lot of time on Earth, and frequently battled non-Asgardian threats like Mister Hyde, the Wrecker and Absorbing Man, as well as villains from other titles like the Super-Skrull and Magneto. It was not until ''Thor #159'' ''The Mighty Thor'' #159 that readers learned his true origin, and that Donald Blake was simply a false guise created by Odin to teach Thor humility. humility.
12th Nov '17 8:19:06 AM DLMaximum1
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** Superman was probably the most notably different of these lacking many of his current powers, sporting a different (and often inconsistently illustrated) costume, killing bad guys, and being something of a rebel. But especially weird, given his current international sensibilities, is when we're told that "Superman says 'You Can Slap a Jap'" as seen on many World War 2 era covers.

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** Superman was probably the most notably different of these lacking many of his current powers, sporting a different (and often inconsistently illustrated) costume, killing bad guys, and being something of a rebel. But especially weird, given his current international sensibilities, is when we're told that "Superman says 'You Can Slap a Jap'" as seen on many World War 2 era II-era covers.



** Likewise, as originally written, Harry Osborn was a JerkAss snob rather than Peter's best friend. Gwen Stacy was originally a {{Tsundere}} type character for Peter Parker, berating and mocking him for his "lack of manliness" but still feeling some innate attraction to him and their few interactions were tense and stand-offish. Peter, recovering from the end of his early infatuation with Betty Brant didn't giver her the time of day. Her character mellowed out later on, becoming far more emotional and with less of a hard edged personality.[[note]]The introduction of MJ also saw several aspects of her character change- like her hairstyle and her dance moves- to better match the more popular MJ. And for those who are only familiar with her most recent incarnations where Gwen is a scientific equal to Spider-Man, in her initial comic appearances- even up to her death- she was never depicted as having an interest in science and was only Peter's classmate in one class.[[/note]] This happened almost immediately when John Romita Sr. took over from Ditko. Romita having a Romance Comics background softened Peter's social life and more properly introduced the familiar Spider-Man gang.

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** Likewise, as originally written, Harry Osborn was a JerkAss snob rather than Peter's best friend. Gwen Stacy was originally a {{Tsundere}} type character for Peter Parker, berating and mocking him for his "lack of manliness" but still feeling some innate attraction to him and their few interactions were tense and stand-offish. Peter, recovering from the end of his early infatuation with Betty Brant didn't giver her the time of day. Her character mellowed out later on, becoming far more emotional and with less of a hard edged personality.[[note]]The introduction of MJ also saw several aspects of her character change- change -- like her hairstyle and her dance moves- moves -- to better match the more popular MJ. And for those who are only familiar with her most recent incarnations where Gwen is a scientific equal to Spider-Man, in her initial comic appearances- appearances -- even up to her death- death -- she was never depicted as having an interest in science and was only Peter's classmate in one class.[[/note]] This happened almost immediately when John Romita Sr. took over from Ditko. Romita having a Romance Comics background softened Peter's social life and more properly introduced the familiar Spider-Man gang.



* The Brazilian distributor of ComicBook/DisneyComics released in 2000 a special celebrating the 50th anniversary of their DonaldDuck magazine. The description of the first issue listed all that could be found weird: differences in language/spelling (apart from the 1950s version being quite formal, Portuguese underwent several orthographic reforms) and character names (biggest one was WesternAnimation/{{Goofy}} being called Dippy - though the story has him being called "a goofy guy"; in one story, Goofy was discovered by talent scouts after they didn't like his original name, ''Dippy Dawg''), unfinished stories (it was published across 3 issues as movie serials were popular in those days), only eight pages in color, and a trivia section filled with ValuesDissonance (telling stories of animals suffering accidents, such as ''j''iraffes being decapitated by telegraphic wires). 10 years later, the collection released to celebrate the 60th anniversary had its first issue come with [[EmbeddedPrecursor a facsimile of Donald Duck #1]], letting readers experience Early Installment Weirdness firsthand.
** On a lesser scale, the Italian character [[ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures Paperinik]], Donald's superhero alter ego: in the early stories he wasn't Disney's LighterAndSofter counterpart to Batman, but Donald using the tools of a disappeared GentlemanThief (and some gadgets provided by Gyro Gearloose) to vent his anger and get revenge on anyone pissing him off too much committing blatantly illegal acts (including [[ImpossibleTheft stealing Scrooge's bed while he's sleeping on it]]), and was openly considered the public enemy number 1. Later stories sometimes keep part of the 'avenger of himself and criminal' part (with Angus Fangus in ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures'' [[JerkassHasAPoint devoting his journalistic career to get him arrested]]), but Paperinik has become an obviously more benign character, often working alongside the police supposed to try to arrest him.
* The early ''Comicbook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'' comics were very comedic and often even stranger than what we have today, with lots of [[NoFourthWall fourth wall demolition]], BetterThanABareBulb, and HurricaneOfPuns. This was more due to following ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfSonicTheHedgehog'' and using a few video game stages in the early days, as well as the fact that Michael Gallagher was the head writer. Sally was seen with varying colors of fur (red fur with blonde hair in her first appearance, pink fur with black hair up until issue 16) and Rotor was known as "Boomer" until about issue 6. Roboticization was shown differently with people with hypnotized eyes instead of out and out robots. The series wouldn't reach the [=SatAM=] levels until Dulcy showed up in issue 28 and a few characters will still seem odd looking back at them (for instance, look at Metal Sonic in issue 25 and look at him today). Once Gallagher backed off as head writer, the series began to resemble what it does now.

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* The Brazilian distributor of ComicBook/DisneyComics released in 2000 a special celebrating the 50th anniversary of their DonaldDuck magazine. The description of the first issue listed all that could be found weird: differences in language/spelling (apart from the 1950s version being quite formal, Portuguese underwent several orthographic reforms) and character names (biggest one was WesternAnimation/{{Goofy}} being called Dippy - though the story has him being called "a goofy guy"; in one story, Goofy was discovered by talent scouts after they didn't like his original name, ''Dippy Dawg''), unfinished stories (it was published across 3 issues as movie serials were popular in those days), only eight pages in color, and a trivia section filled with ValuesDissonance (telling stories of animals suffering accidents, such as ''j''iraffes being decapitated by telegraphic wires). 10 years later, the collection released to celebrate the 60th anniversary had its first issue come with [[EmbeddedPrecursor a facsimile of Donald Duck ''Donald Duck'' #1]], letting readers experience Early Installment Weirdness firsthand.
** On a lesser scale, the Italian character [[ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures Paperinik]], Donald's superhero alter ego: in the early stories stories, he wasn't Disney's LighterAndSofter counterpart to Batman, but Donald using the tools of a disappeared GentlemanThief (and some gadgets provided by Gyro Gearloose) to vent his anger and get revenge on anyone pissing him off too much committing blatantly illegal acts (including [[ImpossibleTheft stealing Scrooge's bed while he's sleeping on it]]), and was openly considered the public enemy number 1. Later stories sometimes keep part of the 'avenger of himself and criminal' part (with Angus Fangus in ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures'' [[JerkassHasAPoint devoting his journalistic career to get him arrested]]), but Paperinik has become an obviously more benign character, often working alongside the police supposed to try to arrest him.
* The early ''Comicbook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'' comics were very comedic and often even stranger than what we have today, with lots of [[NoFourthWall fourth wall demolition]], BetterThanABareBulb, and HurricaneOfPuns. This was more due to following ''WesternAnimation/AdventuresOfSonicTheHedgehog'' and using a few video game stages in the early days, as well as the fact that Michael Gallagher was the head writer. Sally was seen with varying colors of fur (red fur with blonde hair in her first appearance, pink fur with black hair up until issue 16) #16) and Rotor was known as "Boomer" until about issue 6.#6. Roboticization was shown differently with people with hypnotized eyes instead of out and out robots. The series wouldn't reach the [=SatAM=] levels until Dulcy showed up in issue 28 and a few characters will still seem odd looking back at them (for instance, look at Metal Sonic in issue 25 #25 and look at him today). Once Gallagher backed off stepped down as head writer, the series began to resemble what it does now.



* ''ComicBook/SonicTheComic'' was just as bad. For a while it was full of one-shots that barely related to each other (often featuring OffModel drawings). It took several issues for it to become plot-orientated, and even afterwards it took a while for it to drop the oneshot routine.

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* ''ComicBook/SonicTheComic'' was just as bad. For a while it was full of one-shots that barely related to each other (often featuring OffModel drawings). It took several issues for it to become plot-orientated, and even afterwards it took a while for it to drop the oneshot one-shot routine.



* Asbestos was all the rage when it came to thwarting those with fire-based powers. ''Captain America Comics #63'', ''Invaders #22'', and ''Human Torch Comics #27'' have the Asbestos Lady, who wore asbestos lined clothes and fired a gun with asbestos-lined bullets. In ''Strange Tales #111'', the Human Torch fights the Asbestos Man, a chemist who has made a suit and shield of "super-asbestos". The Terrible Trio in ''Strange Tales #122'' captures Johnny Storm with an asbestos rope and blanket, keeping him in an asbestos trailer. In ''The Avengers #206'', The Avengers wear asbestos suits to confront the villain Pyron the Thermal Man.
* ''Human Torch #38'': Professor Marko's Hydromatic Vacuum attempts to suck out all the air in the world, and is almost successful as people throughout the world gasp for air.

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* Asbestos was all the rage when it came to thwarting those with fire-based powers. ''Captain America Comics #63'', ''Invaders #22'', Comics'' #63, ''Invaders'' #22, and ''Human Torch Comics #27'' Comics'' #27 have the Asbestos Lady, who wore asbestos lined clothes and fired a gun with asbestos-lined bullets. In ''Strange Tales #111'', Tales'' #111, the Human Torch fights the Asbestos Man, a chemist who has made a suit and shield of "super-asbestos". The Terrible Trio in ''Strange Tales #122'' Tales'' #122 captures Johnny Storm with an asbestos rope and blanket, keeping him in an asbestos trailer. In ''The Avengers #206'', Avengers'' #206, The Avengers wear asbestos suits to confront the villain Pyron the Thermal Man.
* ''Human Torch #38'': Torch'' #38: Professor Marko's Hydromatic Vacuum attempts to suck out all the air in the world, and is almost successful as people throughout the world gasp for air.



* After his first appearance in Tales of Suspense #39, ComicBook/IronMan spent the next few issues traveling back in time to visit Cleopatra, fighting a robot caveman built by aliens, preventing a race of people who lived inside the Earth from invading the surface world, and having several other wacky adventures. It wasn't until Tales of Suspense #45 (the first appearance of Pepper Potts, Happy Hogan, and supervillain Blizzard) that he started to edge more towards superhero territory.

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* After his first appearance in Tales ''Tales of Suspense Suspense'' #39, ComicBook/IronMan spent the next few issues traveling back in time to visit Cleopatra, fighting a robot caveman built by aliens, preventing a race of people who lived inside the Earth from invading the surface world, and having several other wacky adventures. It wasn't until Tales ''Tales of Suspense Suspense'' #45 (the first appearance of Pepper Virginia "Pepper" Potts, Happy Harold "Happy" Hogan, and supervillain Blizzard) that he started to edge more towards superhero territory.



* Notably, Bruce Banner originally turned into the ComicBook/IncredibleHulk at night. He was also originally coloured grey, but this changed to green, as grey was hard to reproduce consistently in the 1960's.

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* Notably, Bruce Banner originally turned into the ComicBook/IncredibleHulk at night. He was also originally coloured colored grey, but this changed to green, as grey was hard to reproduce consistently in the 1960's.
13th Oct '17 9:35:04 AM comicwriter
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Added DiffLines:

** When Valkyrie first appeared in ''Comicbook/TheAvengers'', she was actually a StrawFeminist and a ''villain'', and turned out to merely be a disguise used by Amora the Enchantress. It wouldn't be until a few years later in an issue of ''Comicbook/TheDefenders'' that Valkyrie was established as an actual Asgardian hero.
12th Oct '17 6:41:03 PM comicwriter
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Added DiffLines:

* In [[Comicbook/MsMarvel2014 Kamala Khan]]'s EarlyBirdCameo in ''Captain Marvel'' #17, her powers are depicted more along the lines of HulkingOut rather than making her a [[RubberMan Rubber Girl]]. According to Creator/GWillowWilson, this is because the more surreal and cartoonish depiction of Kamala's powers wouldn't be nailed down until Adrian Alphona came aboard to draw her solo book.
3rd Oct '17 9:29:20 AM Kayube
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** This also extends to its video game tie-ins. Prior to the ContinuityReboot, video game events were done in BroadStrokes; for instance, ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog3'' was translated in issue #13 as Robotnik and Snively stranded on the Floating Island, stealing its singular Chaos Emerald without the Death Egg showing up at all (it wouldn't show up for another two years). After the ContinuityReboot, WordOfGod states that ''all'' video games, with the exceptions of ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'' (which is its current storyline), ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld'' and ''VideoGame/SonicChronicles'' are canon and happened the way they did in the games.

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** This also extends to its video game tie-ins. Prior to the ContinuityReboot, video game events were done in BroadStrokes; for instance, ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog3'' was translated in issue #13 as Robotnik and Snively stranded on the Floating Island, stealing its singular Chaos Emerald without the Death Egg showing up at all (it wouldn't show up for another two years). After the ContinuityReboot, WordOfGod states that ''all'' video games, with the exceptions of ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'' (which is its current storyline), ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'', ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld'' and ''VideoGame/SonicChronicles'' are canon and happened the way they did in the games.
19th Sep '17 2:38:05 AM Doug86
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** Comicbook/GreenArrow originally had a different costume, brown hair, and no goatee. He also had a more boring personality, lacking the inclination towards social justice that would define the character starting in TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks. Additionally, like many Golden Age heroes, he had no qualms about killing bad guys.

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** Comicbook/GreenArrow originally had a different costume, brown hair, and no goatee. He also had a more boring personality, lacking the inclination towards social justice that would define the character starting in TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks.UsefulNotes/TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks. Additionally, like many Golden Age heroes, he had no qualms about killing bad guys.
11th Sep '17 12:31:07 PM MMTrigger
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*** Clark Kent and Lois Lane didn't originally work for the Daily Planet in the fictional Metropolis. Instead, they worked fora newspaper company who's exact name was often ambiguous, at one point even being the Evening News in Cleveland, Ohio.
*** Initially, it was said that Superman's fantastic abilities were inherent to all indigenous Kryptonians. Subsequent retellings would establish that this was not the case, with Superman's powers instead being explained as the product of Earth's yellow sun and weaker gravity.
*** ComicBook/LexLuthor used to be a typical MadScientist who used his skills to commit crimes, rather than a CorruptCorporateExecutive who moonlights as a supervillain. His motivation for battling Superman was also a lot less complex and more petty, essentially amounting to "I'm bald because of you! SCREW YOU!".

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*** Clark Kent and Lois Lane didn't originally work for the Daily Planet in the fictional Metropolis. Instead, they worked fora for a newspaper company who's exact name was often ambiguous, at one point even being the Evening News in Cleveland, Ohio.
*** Initially, it was said that Superman's fantastic abilities were inherent to all indigenous Kryptonians. Subsequent retellings re-tellings would establish that this was not the case, with Superman's powers instead being explained as the product of Earth's yellow sun and weaker gravity.
*** ComicBook/LexLuthor used to be a typical MadScientist who used his skills to commit crimes, rather than a CorruptCorporateExecutive who moonlights as a supervillain. His motivation for battling Superman was also a lot less complex and more petty, essentially amounting to "I'm bald because of you! SCREW YOU!". [[note]]This origin was from the SilverAge, where Lex and Superboy were friends. In gratitude for setting up a lab, Lex discovered a cure for Kryptonite and created an artificial lifeform, but accidentally set off a fire. Without realizing Lex was trapped inside, Clark used his super breath to blow out the fire, causing chemical fumes that made Lex bald, killed the lifeform, and drove him insane.[[/note]]
10th Sep '17 9:59:32 AM nombretomado
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* The Brazilian distributor of ComicBook/DisneyComics released in 2000 a special celebrating the 50th anniversary of their DonaldDuck magazine. The description of the first issue listed all that could be found weird: differences in language/spelling (apart from the 1950s version being quite formal, Portuguese underwent several orthographic reforms) and character names (biggest one was {{Goofy}} being called Dippy - though the story has him being called "a goofy guy"; in one story, Goofy was discovered by talent scouts after they didn't like his original name, ''Dippy Dawg''), unfinished stories (it was published across 3 issues as movie serials were popular in those days), only eight pages in color, and a trivia section filled with ValuesDissonance (telling stories of animals suffering accidents, such as ''j''iraffes being decapitated by telegraphic wires). 10 years later, the collection released to celebrate the 60th anniversary had its first issue come with [[EmbeddedPrecursor a facsimile of Donald Duck #1]], letting readers experience Early Installment Weirdness firsthand.

to:

* The Brazilian distributor of ComicBook/DisneyComics released in 2000 a special celebrating the 50th anniversary of their DonaldDuck magazine. The description of the first issue listed all that could be found weird: differences in language/spelling (apart from the 1950s version being quite formal, Portuguese underwent several orthographic reforms) and character names (biggest one was {{Goofy}} WesternAnimation/{{Goofy}} being called Dippy - though the story has him being called "a goofy guy"; in one story, Goofy was discovered by talent scouts after they didn't like his original name, ''Dippy Dawg''), unfinished stories (it was published across 3 issues as movie serials were popular in those days), only eight pages in color, and a trivia section filled with ValuesDissonance (telling stories of animals suffering accidents, such as ''j''iraffes being decapitated by telegraphic wires). 10 years later, the collection released to celebrate the 60th anniversary had its first issue come with [[EmbeddedPrecursor a facsimile of Donald Duck #1]], letting readers experience Early Installment Weirdness firsthand.
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