History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / ComicBooks

18th Apr '18 9:51:16 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* While Creator/NeilGaiman's ''Comicbook/TheSandman'' has always taken place in the Franchise/DCUniverse, early issues were much less shy about depicting the title character interacting with other DC characters. Hell, the first story arc features Dr. Destiny as the BigBad, as well as [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]], [[ComicBook/NewGods Mr. Miracle]], ComicBook/MartianManhunter, ComicBook/{{Etrigan}}, and [[Franchise/{{Batman}} the Scarecrow]] in supporting roles and/or cameos. For the bulk of the series, the Endless and associated characters more or less exist in their own continuity.
** In addition, while the comic was always very dark, the first story arc was closer to a straight-up horror comic.

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* While Creator/NeilGaiman's ''Comicbook/TheSandman'' has always taken place in the Franchise/DCUniverse, early issues were much less shy about depicting the title character interacting with other DC characters. Hell, the first story arc features Dr. Destiny as the BigBad, as well as [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]], [[ComicBook/NewGods Mr. Miracle]], ComicBook/MartianManhunter, ComicBook/{{Etrigan}}, and [[Franchise/{{Batman}} the Scarecrow]] in supporting roles and/or cameos. For the bulk of the series, the Endless and associated characters more or less exist in their own continuity.
**
continuity. In addition, while the comic was always very dark, the first story arc was closer to a straight-up horror comic.
29th Mar '18 2:43:39 AM jormis29
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** Hulk also had an ever-changing number of toes. When he first appeared, he had five toes. When his book was cancelled and he resurfaced in ''Fantastic Four'', he now had three. When he joined the Avengers, he then had four, but went back to three by the second issue, only for this number to vary wildly in each subsequent appearance before the artists finally settled on five in ''Tales to Astonish''. This was the subject in a MythologyGag in ''Ultron Forever'', where the Hulk transported from the past still had three toes.

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** Hulk also had an ever-changing number of toes. When he first appeared, he had five toes. When his book was cancelled and he resurfaced in ''Fantastic Four'', he now had three. When he joined the Avengers, he then had four, but went back to three by the second issue, only for this number to vary wildly in each subsequent appearance before the artists finally settled on five in ''Tales to Astonish''. This was the subject in a MythologyGag in ''Ultron Forever'', ''ComicBook/UltronForever'', where the Hulk transported from the past still had three toes.
28th Feb '18 3:22:47 PM XFllo
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* ''ComicBook/JosieAndThePussycats'' started out under the name ''She's Josie''. Josie's hairstyle was a bouffant rather than a BobHaircut, and she had an AlliterativeName (her surname "[=McCoy=]" was originally "Jones"). Instead of Valerie, they had a friend named Pepper, who was a DeadpanSnarker and a SoapboxSadie. Instead of Alan, we have Albert, who was also a folk singer (though it wasn't a trait of his until the seventh issue). Albert was later phased out for Clyde Didit, a guitarist whose RunningGag was being hit by something he was singing about. When Alan finally made his debut, he had his own band called "Alan & the Jesters", but that didn't last beyond that particular issue. Alexandra was lacking her SkunkStripe, did not have witchcraft or her cat Sebastian, and was much less of a hothead initially. And of course, the Pussycat band itself did not exist until issue 45.

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* ''ComicBook/JosieAndThePussycats'' started out under the name ''She's Josie''. Josie's hairstyle was a bouffant rather than a BobHaircut, bob, and she had an AlliterativeName (her surname "[=McCoy=]" was originally "Jones"). Instead of Valerie, they had a friend named Pepper, who was a DeadpanSnarker and a SoapboxSadie. Instead of Alan, we have Albert, who was also a folk singer (though it wasn't a trait of his until the seventh issue). Albert was later phased out for Clyde Didit, a guitarist whose RunningGag was being hit by something he was singing about. When Alan finally made his debut, he had his own band called "Alan & the Jesters", but that didn't last beyond that particular issue. Alexandra was lacking her SkunkStripe, did not have witchcraft or her cat Sebastian, and was much less of a hothead initially. And of course, the Pussycat band itself did not exist until issue 45.
24th Feb '18 6:35:26 AM MagiMecha
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Added DiffLines:

** The character's personalities were also vastly different at first. Sally acted like a total brat at times with a massive NeverMyFault attitude while Antoine was very much a CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkey. Like his [=SatAM=] counterpart, Snively was initially very loyal to Robotnik and wouldn't become TheStarscream until ''The Death Egg Saga''.
8th Feb '18 7:41:34 AM Cryoclaste
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* Moonstone from the ''Comicbook/{{Thunderbolts}}'' originally appeared in ''CaptainAmerica'' as a gun-toting [[BodyguardBabes henchwoman]] for Doctor Faustus. She didn't have any powers, nor were her trademark scheming and manipulative tendencies apparent.

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* Moonstone from the ''Comicbook/{{Thunderbolts}}'' originally appeared in ''CaptainAmerica'' ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'' as a gun-toting [[BodyguardBabes henchwoman]] for Doctor Faustus. She didn't have any powers, nor were her trademark scheming and manipulative tendencies apparent.
30th Jan '18 8:31:04 PM TheMightyHeptagon
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* ComicBook/ThePunisher was something of an odd case as there was a period in his early days where he actually went about killing innocents [[DisproportionateRetribution for simple crimes such as littering and running a red light]]. It was later retconned into him being drugged.

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* ComicBook/ThePunisher was something of an odd case as there was a period in his early days where he actually went about killing innocents [[DisproportionateRetribution for simple crimes such as littering and running a red light]]. It was later retconned into him being drugged.drugged.
* How many Creator/MarvelComics fans remember that [[ComicBook/AntMan Dr. Hank Pym]]'s first appearance was in [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/marveldatabase/images/a/a2/Tales_to_Astonish_Vol_1_27.png/revision/latest?cb=20160104134353 a one-off horror story]] about a scientist who accidentally shrinks himself and gets trapped in an anthill? In the story, called "The Man in the Ant Hill", Pym shrinks himself using an experimental "reducing serum" rather than with [[ClothesMakeTheSuperman a suit]], he doesn't call himself "Ant-Man", he doesn't wear a costume, he can't control ants, and--most jarringly--he pours his shrinking concoction down the drain at the end of the story, concluding that it's far too dangerous to let other people use it. Reading it today, it's almost hard to believe that the hapless scientist in the story would later become a founding member of ComicBook/{{the Avengers}}.
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17th Jan '18 9:40:27 PM comicwriter
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* Comicbook/{{Thanos}} was much slimmer in his first appearance, and had an outfit similar to Comicbook/{{Darkseid}}'s, complete with bare legs and a sleeveless top. Also, the Titans were uniformly shown to have purple skin, while later stories would establish that most Titans resembled humans, and that Thanos' odd skin color was the result of his Deviant genes. These early appearances also portrayed Thanos as more of a generic galactic conqueror, which today would seem at odds with his more ponderous and complex characterization.

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* Comicbook/{{Thanos}} was much slimmer in his first appearance, and had an outfit similar to Comicbook/{{Darkseid}}'s, complete with bare legs and a sleeveless top. Also, the Titans were uniformly shown to have purple skin, while later stories would establish that most Titans resembled humans, and that Thanos' odd skin color was the result of his Deviant genes. His backstory was also slightly different, with him being the grandson of the Titan Kronos from Greek mythology. Subsequent {{Retcon}}s would instead have Kronos be an [[Comicbook/TheEternals Eternal]], removing Thanos' connection to the Greek pantheon. These early appearances also portrayed Thanos as more of a generic galactic conqueror, which today would seem at odds with his more ponderous and complex characterization.
12th Jan '18 3:52:35 PM comicwriter
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* Comicbook/{{Thanos}} was much slimmer in his first appearance, and had an outfit similar to Comicbook/{{Darkseid}}'s, complete with bare legs and a sleeveless top. Also, the Titans were uniformly shown to have purple skin, while later stories would establish that most Titans resembled humans, and that Thanos' odd skin color was the result of his Deviant genes.

to:

* Comicbook/{{Thanos}} was much slimmer in his first appearance, and had an outfit similar to Comicbook/{{Darkseid}}'s, complete with bare legs and a sleeveless top. Also, the Titans were uniformly shown to have purple skin, while later stories would establish that most Titans resembled humans, and that Thanos' odd skin color was the result of his Deviant genes. These early appearances also portrayed Thanos as more of a generic galactic conqueror, which today would seem at odds with his more ponderous and complex characterization.
12th Jan '18 2:29:58 AM Nyte
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* Creator/ImageComics' early days in TheNineties where they codified the NinetiesAntiHero and had a ClicheStorm that embodied UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks could be seen as this. Since then, they've [[GrowingTheBeard greatly diversified their lineup]] with hits such as ''ComicBook/{{Bone}}'', ''ComicBook/TheWalkingDead'', ''ComicBook/{{Invincible}}'', ''Film/{{Kingsman}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Saga}}'', among many others. While DarkerAndEdgier compared to Marvel and DC, isn't to the over-the-top extreme like it was in the '90s. This also had the effect of making series introduced back then, such as ''ComicBook/{{Spawn}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Witchblade}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Youngblood}}'', and ''ComicBook/SavageDragon'' look rather [[TheArtifact out of place]] today.



* ComicBook/{{Deadshot}} made his first appearance as villain in a 1950 Batman story wearing an unrecognisable suit and having none of his later attributes. It wasn't until Steve Englehart's run on ''Detective Comics'' that he was given his design and personality that would make him the face of the ComicBook/SuicideSquad.

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* ComicBook/{{Deadshot}} made his first appearance as a villain in a 1950 Batman story wearing an unrecognisable suit and having none of his later attributes. It wasn't until Steve Englehart's run on ''Detective Comics'' that he was given his design and personality that would make him the face of the ComicBook/SuicideSquad.
5th Jan '18 9:38:46 PM nombretomado
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*** There are a lot of other weird things that happen before Hulk hits his stride, like him changing via machine, and Hulk's intelligence level going up to near Banner and down to inhuman stupidity. The early issues also make the Hulk quite misanthropic (an '''extremely''' bad thing when coupled with Banner's brains) and Rick Jones was the KidWithTheLeash who kept him from actually ''trying to end the world'' at least once. It takes them awhile before the character is associated with anger, around his first visit with TheInhumans where they establish that his strength increases with his rage. The situation with the Hulk's intelligence was {{Lampshaded}} in an issue of Creator/MarkWaid's ''Avengers'' run, where the Silver Age Hulk doesn't understand why the present-day Spider-Man keeps trying to use HulkSpeak to communicate with him.

to:

*** There are a lot of other weird things that happen before Hulk hits his stride, like him changing via machine, and Hulk's intelligence level going up to near Banner and down to inhuman stupidity. The early issues also make the Hulk quite misanthropic (an '''extremely''' bad thing when coupled with Banner's brains) and Rick Jones was the KidWithTheLeash who kept him from actually ''trying to end the world'' at least once. It takes them awhile before the character is associated with anger, around his first visit with TheInhumans ComicBook/TheInhumans where they establish that his strength increases with his rage. The situation with the Hulk's intelligence was {{Lampshaded}} in an issue of Creator/MarkWaid's ''Avengers'' run, where the Silver Age Hulk doesn't understand why the present-day Spider-Man keeps trying to use HulkSpeak to communicate with him.
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