History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / ComicBooks

6th May '17 5:23:08 PM comicwriter
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* The Marvel comic ''ComicBook/TheNam'' was originally set in its own universe that was much like ours, with it being repeatedly made clear that superhumans and the like were wholly fictional; one issue even has a character daydream about what it would be like if the Avengers were real and could help win the war. Flagging sales eventually led to the comic being awkwardly integrated into the greater Marvel Universe by having a pre-ComicBook/{{Punisher}} Frank Castle make a few guest appearances, which were followed by a character who originated from ''The 'Nam'' appearing in arcs of both the ''ComicBook/ThePunisherWarJournal'' and ''ComicBook/ThePunisherWarZone''.

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* The Marvel comic ''ComicBook/TheNam'' was originally set in its own universe that was much like ours, with it being repeatedly made clear that superhumans and the like were wholly fictional; one issue even has a character daydream about what it would be like if the Avengers were real and could help win the war. Flagging sales eventually led to the comic being awkwardly integrated into the greater Marvel Universe by having a pre-ComicBook/{{Punisher}} Frank Castle make a few guest appearances, which were followed by a character who originated from ''The 'Nam'' appearing in arcs of both the ''ComicBook/ThePunisherWarJournal'' and ''ComicBook/ThePunisherWarZone''.''ComicBook/ThePunisherWarZone''.
* [[Comicbook/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy Groot]] was actually a ''villain'' in his first appearance, and spoke in complete sentences instead of PokemonSpeak.
22nd Apr '17 12:10:32 PM comicwriter
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* The Infinity Gems were originally called the Soul Gems when they first appeared.
17th Apr '17 9:14:23 PM CL
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* The Marvel comic ''ComicBook/TheNam'' was originally set in its universe that was much like our own, with it being repeatedly made clear that superhumans and the like were wholly fictional; one issue even has a character daydream about what it would be like if the Avengers were real and could help win the war. Flagging sales eventually led to the comic being awkwardly integrated into the greater Marvel Universe by having a pre-ComicBook/{{Punisher}} Frank Castle make a few guest appearances, which were followed by a character who originated from ''The 'Nam'' appearing in arcs of both the ''ComicBook/ThePunisherWarJournal'' and ''ComicBook/ThePunisherWarZone''.

to:

* The Marvel comic ''ComicBook/TheNam'' was originally set in its own universe that was much like our own, ours, with it being repeatedly made clear that superhumans and the like were wholly fictional; one issue even has a character daydream about what it would be like if the Avengers were real and could help win the war. Flagging sales eventually led to the comic being awkwardly integrated into the greater Marvel Universe by having a pre-ComicBook/{{Punisher}} Frank Castle make a few guest appearances, which were followed by a character who originated from ''The 'Nam'' appearing in arcs of both the ''ComicBook/ThePunisherWarJournal'' and ''ComicBook/ThePunisherWarZone''.
17th Apr '17 9:13:09 PM CL
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* Straightforward supervillains appeared to exist in early issues of ''ComicBook/TheBoys'', with A-Train being introduced combating an unnamed one that also possessed super speed, Homelander making reference to the Seven once having a SuperheroTrophyShelf, and it being mentioned that Teenage Kix had sent the "Fearsome Foursome" back to Rikers Island. None are seen or mentioned later on, with the only superhumans seeming to exist being the "heroes" of Vought-American.



* In the early days, the Tiddlers of ''Wham'' (a British comic) had a teacher named Super Sir, who not only approved of their mischief-making, he would join in on it. After a few strips, however, he was replaced with a stereotypical long-suffering put-upon bald bespectacled teacher.

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* In the early days, the Tiddlers of ''Wham'' (a British comic) had a teacher named Super Sir, who not only approved of their mischief-making, he would join in on it. After a few strips, however, he was replaced with a stereotypical long-suffering put-upon bald bespectacled teacher.teacher.
* The Marvel comic ''ComicBook/TheNam'' was originally set in its universe that was much like our own, with it being repeatedly made clear that superhumans and the like were wholly fictional; one issue even has a character daydream about what it would be like if the Avengers were real and could help win the war. Flagging sales eventually led to the comic being awkwardly integrated into the greater Marvel Universe by having a pre-ComicBook/{{Punisher}} Frank Castle make a few guest appearances, which were followed by a character who originated from ''The 'Nam'' appearing in arcs of both the ''ComicBook/ThePunisherWarJournal'' and ''ComicBook/ThePunisherWarZone''.
7th Apr '17 11:42:13 AM comicwriter
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*** ComicBook/{{Catwoman}} did not wear a costume at all, instead using disguises and trickery in her heists, and while she did occasionally wear a mask, it was an actual cat-faced mask as opposed to her better known cowl with cat ears. She didn't even call herself Catwoman originally, instead going by the shorter alias "The Cat;" "Cat-Woman" was just a nickname.
** The modern version of ComicBook/{{Batwoman}} debuted in the series ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'', with a different look than what she'd sport in her ongoing series and ''ComicBook/DetectiveComics'' appearances. Kate was first depicted as having long auburn-red hair, was more into dresses for her fashion sense, and had brown eyes. When her series came around, her skin was dramatically lightened to be a "vampire porcelain white" (to better reflect a redhead's complexion), she was depicted as dressing more punkish, her hair became short and a highly saturated shade of red, and her [[SignificantGreenEyedRedhead eyes were changed to green]].
*** She was also portrayed as a closeted LipstickLesbian, in contrast to her depiction in ''Detective'', where she sports a more masculine dress style and is open about her sexuality.

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*** ComicBook/{{Catwoman}} did not wear a costume at all, instead using disguises and trickery in her heists, and while she did occasionally wear a mask, it was an actual cat-faced mask as opposed to her better known cowl with cat ears. She didn't even call herself Catwoman originally, instead going by the shorter alias "The Cat;" "Cat-Woman" was just a nickname.
** The modern version of ComicBook/{{Batwoman}} debuted in the series ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'', with a different look than what she'd sport in her ongoing series and ''ComicBook/DetectiveComics'' appearances. Kate was first depicted as having long auburn-red hair, was more into dresses for her fashion sense, and had brown eyes. When her series came around, her skin was dramatically lightened to be a "vampire porcelain white" (to better reflect a redhead's complexion), she was depicted as dressing more punkish, her hair became short and a highly saturated shade of red, and her [[SignificantGreenEyedRedhead eyes were changed to green]].
***
nickname. She was also portrayed as a closeted LipstickLesbian, more overtly villainous, in contrast to her depiction in ''Detective'', where she sports a more masculine dress style and is open about her sexuality. the AntiHero / AntiVillain characterization most modern fans are familiar with.


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* The modern version of ComicBook/{{Batwoman}} debuted in the series ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'', with a different look than what she'd sport in her ongoing series and ''ComicBook/DetectiveComics'' appearances. Kate was first depicted as having long auburn-red hair, was more into dresses for her fashion sense, and had brown eyes. When her series came around, her skin was dramatically lightened to be a "vampire porcelain white" (to better reflect a redhead's complexion), she was depicted as dressing more punkish, her hair became short and a highly saturated shade of red, and her [[SignificantGreenEyedRedhead eyes were changed to green]].
*** She was also portrayed as a closeted LipstickLesbian, in contrast to her depiction in ''Detective'', where she sports a more masculine dress style and is open about her sexuality.
29th Mar '17 12:37:53 PM MadAnthony94
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*** Early Timely (Marvel) Comics did the same. In the very first ComicBook/CaptainAmerica story, the Human Torch is mentioned as being "a hero from the comic books". About a year later, Cap and the Torch met in a crossover story. [[note]] Later works seemed to explain this by having the Marvel Comics company exist _in universe_ , so superheroes can literally read their own comics [[/note]]

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*** Early Timely (Marvel) Comics did the same. In the very first ComicBook/CaptainAmerica story, the Human Torch is mentioned as being "a hero from the comic books". About a year later, Cap and the Torch met in a crossover story. [[note]] Later works seemed to explain this by having the Marvel Comics company exist _in universe_ , ''in universe'', so superheroes can literally read their own comics [[/note]]
29th Mar '17 12:37:38 PM MadAnthony94
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*** Early Timely (Marvel) Comics did the same. In the very first ComicBook/CaptainAmerica story, the Human Torch is mentioned as being "a hero from the comic books". About a year later, Cap and the Torch met in a crossover story. [[note]] Later works seemed to explain this by having the Marvel Comics company exist _in universe_, so superheroes can literally read their own comics [[/note]]

to:

*** Early Timely (Marvel) Comics did the same. In the very first ComicBook/CaptainAmerica story, the Human Torch is mentioned as being "a hero from the comic books". About a year later, Cap and the Torch met in a crossover story. [[note]] Later works seemed to explain this by having the Marvel Comics company exist _in universe_, universe_ , so superheroes can literally read their own comics [[/note]]
29th Mar '17 12:37:00 PM MadAnthony94
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*** Early Timely (Marvel) Comics did the same. In the very first ComicBook/CaptainAmerica story, the Human Torch is mentioned as being "a hero from the comic books". About a year later, Cap and the Torch met in a crossover story.

to:

*** Early Timely (Marvel) Comics did the same. In the very first ComicBook/CaptainAmerica story, the Human Torch is mentioned as being "a hero from the comic books". About a year later, Cap and the Torch met in a crossover story. [[note]] Later works seemed to explain this by having the Marvel Comics company exist _in universe_, so superheroes can literally read their own comics [[/note]]
18th Mar '17 11:26:07 PM JulianLapostat
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** The character of Gwen Stacy was radically different in her earlier depictions. Initially she was depicted as a {{Tsundere}} type character for Peter Parker, berating and mocking him for his "lack of manliness" but still feeling some innate attraction to him that she couldn't describe. Her character mellowed out later on, becoming far more emotional and with less of a hard edged personality. The introduction of MJ also saw several aspects of her character change- like her hairstyle and her dance moves- to better match the more popular MJ. And for those who are only familiar with her most recent incarnations where Gwen is a scientific equal to Spider-Man, in her initial comic appearances- even up to her death- she was never depicted as having an interest in science and was only Peter's classmate in one class.

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** The character famous quote "With Great Power ComesGreatResponsibility" is the end-caption of Amazing Fantasy #15 and is voiced by the narrator of the comic rather than Uncle Ben himself. The attribution of the quote to Uncle Ben came decades later thanks to PopCulturalOsmosis and in the early issues of the Stan Lee[=/=]Steve Ditko era, Spider-Man didn't dwell too much on the guilt to moroseness as later versions imply. Peter's characterization in the original comics while still a MotorMouth in costume was also on a personal level, aloof and cold, and many characters noted that Peter because of his adventures as Spider-Man came off as having NoSocialSkills (especially apparent in the "If This Be My Destiny" storyline) and a FriendlessBackground. Later adaptations such as Franchise/SpiderManTrilogy and Film/SpiderManHomecoming have Peter have one or two friends (Harry and Ned Leeds) but this was not the case originally.
** Likewise, as originally written, Harry Osborn was a JerkAss snob rather than Peter's best friend.
Gwen Stacy was radically different in her earlier depictions. Initially she was depicted as originally a {{Tsundere}} type character for Peter Parker, berating and mocking him for his "lack of manliness" but still feeling some innate attraction to him that she couldn't describe.and their few interactions were tense and stand-offish. Peter, recovering from the end of his early infatuation with Betty Brant didn't giver her the time of day. Her character mellowed out later on, becoming far more emotional and with less of a hard edged personality. The [[note]]The introduction of MJ also saw several aspects of her character change- like her hairstyle and her dance moves- to better match the more popular MJ. And for those who are only familiar with her most recent incarnations where Gwen is a scientific equal to Spider-Man, in her initial comic appearances- even up to her death- she was never depicted as having an interest in science and was only Peter's classmate in one class.[[/note]] This happened almost immediately when John Romita Sr. took over from Ditko. Romita having a Romance Comics background softened Peter's social life and more properly introduced the familiar Spider-Man gang.
** The Green Goblin in the original stories was a mysterious, dangerous and entertaining villain whose schemes involved taking over the underworld of New York for some reason or the other. His first appearance was a wacky adventure where he posed as Spider-Man's friend and convinced him to appear in a movie production which turned out to be a trap to kill him. He appeared in fewer issues than other villains but was easily Spider-Man's most popular villain. Much controversy has spread over the years if Ditko intended Osborn to be the Green Goblin, since Ditko left on the issue directly before TheReveal, though Ditko insisted that wasn't the reason for his departure. But more or less, the original version of Goblin was a Joker-esque madman who launched zany schemes without any of the deeper and byzantine motives and schemes that later writers would provide him.
13th Mar '17 9:11:44 PM QuintanaDS
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* Before he was ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}'s ArchNemesis and one of the X-Men's most iconic baddies, Comicbook/{{Sabretooth}} started off as an [[ComicBook/ImmortalIronFist Iron Fist]] villain. He was partnered with Constrictor in his second appearance (in which he was already much less efficient than in his first one), there were no hints at his mysterious backstory or connection to Wolverine, and he didn't have a healing factor either. He was also much less of a threat when he wasn't written by Chris Claremont, getting his ass handed to him by characters like Comicbook/BlackCat. It wasn't until the 1986 "Mutant Massacre" crossover (Sabretooth was introduced in 1977) that he began to become the villain we know today. It was the first story to have him fight Wolverine on panel, as well as the first one to reference their mysterious shared past. He was also played up as a much more powerful and intimidating character than he'd been previously, and was finally confirmed to possess a healing factor like Logan's. Those early issues are so jarring by comparison that Creator/ChrisClaremont actually considered {{Retcon}}ning all of Sabretooth's early appearances (except for the very first one) into [[ActuallyADoombot clones created by Nathaniel Essex]].

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* Before he was ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}'s ArchNemesis and one of the X-Men's most iconic baddies, Comicbook/{{Sabretooth}} started off as an [[ComicBook/ImmortalIronFist Iron Fist]] villain. He was partnered with Constrictor in his second appearance (in which he was already much less efficient than in his first one), there were no hints at his mysterious backstory or connection to Wolverine, and he didn't have a healing factor either. He was also much less of a threat when he wasn't written by Chris Claremont, Creator/ChrisClaremont, getting his ass handed to him by characters like Comicbook/BlackCat. It wasn't until the 1986 "Mutant Massacre" crossover (Sabretooth was introduced in 1977) that he began to become the villain we know today. It was the first story to have him fight Wolverine on panel, as well as the first one to reference their mysterious shared past. He was also played up as a much more powerful and intimidating character than he'd been previously, and was finally confirmed to possess a healing factor like Logan's. Those early issues are so jarring by comparison A possible explanation for the differences in portrayal is that Creator/ChrisClaremont Chris Claremont actually considered {{Retcon}}ning had plans to reveal that all of Sabretooth's early appearances (except for the very first one) into were actually [[ActuallyADoombot clones created by Nathaniel Essex]].
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