History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / ComicBooks

24th Jan '16 3:01:10 PM comicwriter
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* When Comicbook/BlackPanther first appeared in ''Comicbook/FantasticFour'', there was no indication that T'Challa wasn't the first person to use the identity, and his origin in general was closer to that of Batman (with T'Challa seemingly creating a costumed identity to avenge his murdered father). It was only years later that it was established that the Black Panther was a [[LegacyCharacter Legacy]] identity, and that T'Challa's father had been the previous hero to use the name.
16th Jan '16 4:28:32 PM nombretomado
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** His trademark [[MadeOfIndestructium Vibranium/Adamantium]] shield was not originally indestructible. When Cap was first reintroduced in ''Comicbook/TheAvengers'' during the 60's, StanLee tried to make him a little more "super" by having Comicbook/IronMan outfit the shield with magnets and transistors so that it could be remote controlled. Lee abandoned this idea after a few issues, and instead decided that from then on, the shield would now be impervious to most forms of damage.
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** His trademark [[MadeOfIndestructium Vibranium/Adamantium]] shield was not originally indestructible. When Cap was first reintroduced in ''Comicbook/TheAvengers'' during the 60's, StanLee Creator/StanLee tried to make him a little more "super" by having Comicbook/IronMan outfit the shield with magnets and transistors so that it could be remote controlled. Lee abandoned this idea after a few issues, and instead decided that from then on, the shield would now be impervious to most forms of damage.
12th Jan '16 4:33:27 PM crazysamaritan
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** On a lesser scale, the Italian character [[ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures Paperinik]], Donald's superhero alter ego: in the early stories he wasn't Disney's LighterAndSofter counterpart to Batman, but Donald using the tools of a disappeared GentlemanThief (and some gadgets provided by Gyro Gearloose) to vent his anger and get revenge on anyone pissing him off too much committing blatantly illegal acts (including [[ImpossibleThief stealing Scrooge's bed while he's sleeping on it]]), and was openly considered the public enemy number 1. Later stories sometimes keep part of the 'avenger of himself and criminal' part (with Angus Fangus in ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures'' [[JerkassHasAPoint devoting his journalistic career to get him arrested]]), but Paperinik has become an obviously more benign character, often working alongside the police supposed to try to arrest him.
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** On a lesser scale, the Italian character [[ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures Paperinik]], Donald's superhero alter ego: in the early stories he wasn't Disney's LighterAndSofter counterpart to Batman, but Donald using the tools of a disappeared GentlemanThief (and some gadgets provided by Gyro Gearloose) to vent his anger and get revenge on anyone pissing him off too much committing blatantly illegal acts (including [[ImpossibleThief [[ImpossibleTheft stealing Scrooge's bed while he's sleeping on it]]), and was openly considered the public enemy number 1. Later stories sometimes keep part of the 'avenger of himself and criminal' part (with Angus Fangus in ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures'' [[JerkassHasAPoint devoting his journalistic career to get him arrested]]), but Paperinik has become an obviously more benign character, often working alongside the police supposed to try to arrest him.
29th Dec '15 8:16:21 AM Anddrix
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** SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom acquired the ability to switch minds with whomever he had eye contact with. This is an ability that he occasionally uses even in the newer comics, but it was an odd concept for the time. A later RetCon stated that only his infamous vanity keeps him from using the ability more often.
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** SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom Doctor Doom acquired the ability to switch minds with whomever he had eye contact with. This is an ability that he occasionally uses even in the newer comics, but it was an odd concept for the time. A later RetCon stated that only his infamous vanity keeps him from using the ability more often.
28th Dec '15 4:02:51 PM Anddrix
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** Early comics had trouble defining what exactly his "spider sense" is and how it works. In one early comic, he was able to use it to "tune in" on the Chameleon's location (clear across New York City in a helicopter) and in another, DoctorDoom was able to use it like a radio signal, transmitting a message directly to Spider-Man using some kind of transmitter hooked up to a spider. (To this day, it's still a bit vaguely defined. The ''ComicBook/SpiderGirl'' comics showed his daughter, having developed her powers earlier, being able to use her spider sense in a few ways her father can't, such as being able to pinpoint the exact source of the danger in a way that sometimes allows her to find a vulnerability in an enemy.)
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** Early comics had trouble defining what exactly his "spider sense" is and how it works. In one early comic, he was able to use it to "tune in" on the Chameleon's location (clear across New York City in a helicopter) and in another, DoctorDoom Doctor Doom was able to use it like a radio signal, transmitting a message directly to Spider-Man using some kind of transmitter hooked up to a spider. (To this day, it's still a bit vaguely defined. The ''ComicBook/SpiderGirl'' comics showed his daughter, having developed her powers earlier, being able to use her spider sense in a few ways her father can't, such as being able to pinpoint the exact source of the danger in a way that sometimes allows her to find a vulnerability in an enemy.)
20th Dec '15 7:39:33 PM nombretomado
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** The idea that the shield was made of Vibranium and Adamantium is itself a retcon, as Captain America was created ''decades'' before either of those fictional metals were introduced in the MarvelUniverse. Exactly ''what'' the shield was made of wasn't established until many years after Cap's SilverAge revivial.
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** The idea that the shield was made of Vibranium and Adamantium is itself a retcon, as Captain America was created ''decades'' before either of those fictional metals were introduced in the MarvelUniverse. Exactly ''what'' the shield was made of wasn't established until many years after Cap's SilverAge revivial.[[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] revival.

* Upon reading [[http://www.reading-room.net/SC22/SC22p1.html the first]] [[TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' story, you get the impression that the Green Lantern Corps (referred to only as space-patrolmen in the story) do not generally call themselves Green Lanterns -- in fact, "Green Lantern" was only an alias Hal adopts for himself.
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* Upon reading [[http://www.reading-room.net/SC22/SC22p1.html the first]] [[TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' story, you get the impression that the Green Lantern Corps (referred to only as space-patrolmen in the story) do not generally call themselves Green Lanterns -- in fact, "Green Lantern" was only an alias Hal adopts for himself.

* HealingFactor characters {{Wolverine}}, Sabretooth and {{Deadpool}} are depicted as sustaining injuries over a length of time in early appearances, compared to later appearances where healing appears near instant. Sabretooth's face was injured in ''The Spectacular Spider-Man vol. 1 #116'' and still scarred by his next appearance in #119. In an ''[[ComicBook/{{XForce}} X-Force]]'' appearance, Deadpool complains his broken jaw left him hospitalized for a few weeks. One can assume characters had weaker healing factors in the past, but newer stories set in the past still depict a near instant healing factor. * This can be applied era to era in comics but especially the SilverAge which generally has the silliest and most over the top plots and really sticks out from the other eras with many of the most popular characters of today being invented or taking on their most recognizable forms in that era.
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* HealingFactor characters {{Wolverine}}, ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}, Sabretooth and {{Deadpool}} SelfDemonstrating/{{Deadpool}} are depicted as sustaining injuries over a length of time in early appearances, compared to later appearances where healing appears near instant. Sabretooth's face was injured in ''The Spectacular Spider-Man vol. 1 #116'' and still scarred by his next appearance in #119. In an ''[[ComicBook/{{XForce}} X-Force]]'' ''ComicBook/XForce'' appearance, Deadpool complains his broken jaw left him hospitalized for a few weeks. One can assume characters had weaker healing factors in the past, but newer stories set in the past still depict a near instant healing factor. * This can be applied era to era in comics but especially the SilverAge UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|of Comic Books}} which generally has the silliest and most over the top plots and really sticks out from the other eras with many of the most popular characters of today being invented or taking on their most recognizable forms in that era.
24th Nov '15 1:04:45 PM StFan
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* ''ComicStrip/DeKiekeboes'': The early albums look nothing like the series today. Kiekeboe is long and thin, Charlotte is a DamselInDistress and most of the comedy is more like a typical children's comic strip of that time, with a lot of unneccessary exposition and not so clever puns as in later stories.
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* ''ComicStrip/DeKiekeboes'': ''ComicBook/DeKiekeboes'': The early albums look nothing like the series today. Kiekeboe is long and thin, Charlotte is a DamselInDistress and most of the comedy is more like a typical children's comic strip of that time, with a lot of unneccessary exposition and not so clever puns as in later stories.
2nd Nov '15 5:28:52 PM comicwriter
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* Before he was {{Wolverine}}'s ArchNemesis and one of the X-Men's most iconic baddies, Sabretooth started off as an IronFist villain, and not a particularly memorable one at that. He was partnered with Constricter, there were no hints at his mysterious backstory or connection to Wolverine, and he didn't have a healing factor either. He was also much less of a threat, getting his ass handed to him by characters like Black Cat. It wasn't until the 1986 "Mutant Massacre" crossover (Sabretooth was introduced in 1977) that he began to become the villain we know today. It was the first story to have him fight Wolverine on panel, as well as the first one to reference their mysterious shared past. He was also played up as a much more powerful and intimidating character than he'd been previously, and was finally confirmed to possess a healing factor like Logan's. Those early issues are so jarring by comparison that ChrisClaremont actually considered {{Retcon}}ning all of Sabretooth's early appearances into [[ActuallyADoombot clones created by Nathaniel Essex]].
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* Before he was {{Wolverine}}'s ArchNemesis and one of the X-Men's most iconic baddies, Sabretooth started off as an IronFist [[ImmortalIronFist Iron Fist]] villain, and not a particularly memorable one at that. He was partnered with Constricter, there were no hints at his mysterious backstory or connection to Wolverine, and he didn't have a healing factor either. He was also much less of a threat, getting his ass handed to him by characters like Black Cat. It wasn't until the 1986 "Mutant Massacre" crossover (Sabretooth was introduced in 1977) that he began to become the villain we know today. It was the first story to have him fight Wolverine on panel, as well as the first one to reference their mysterious shared past. He was also played up as a much more powerful and intimidating character than he'd been previously, and was finally confirmed to possess a healing factor like Logan's. Those early issues are so jarring by comparison that ChrisClaremont actually considered {{Retcon}}ning all of Sabretooth's early appearances into [[ActuallyADoombot clones created by Nathaniel Essex]].
2nd Nov '15 5:26:20 PM comicwriter
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*** There are a lot of other weird things that happen before Hulk hits his stride, him changing via machine, Hulk's intelligence level going up to near Banner and down to inhuman stupidity. The early issues also make the Hulk quite misanthropic (an '''extremely''' bad thing when coupled with Banner's brains) and Rick Jones was the KidWithTheLeash who kept him from actually ''trying to end the world'' at least once. It takes them awhile before the character is associated with anger, around his first visit with the Inhumans where they establish that his strength increases with his rage.
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*** There are a lot of other weird things that happen before Hulk hits his stride, him changing via machine, Hulk's intelligence level going up to near Banner and down to inhuman stupidity. The early issues also make the Hulk quite misanthropic (an '''extremely''' bad thing when coupled with Banner's brains) and Rick Jones was the KidWithTheLeash who kept him from actually ''trying to end the world'' at least once. It takes them awhile before the character is associated with anger, around his first visit with the Inhumans TheInhumans where they establish that his strength increases with his rage.

* HealingFactor characters {{Wolverine}}, Sabretooth and {{Deadpool}] are depicted as sustaining injuries over a length of time in early appearances, compared to later appearances where healing appears near instant. Sabretooth's face was injured in ''The Spectacular Spider-Man vol. 1 #116'' and still scarred by his next appearance in #119. In an ''[[ComicBook/{{XForce}} X-Force]]'' appearance, Deadpool complains his broken jaw left him hospitalized for a few weeks. One can assume characters had weaker healing factors in the past, but newer stories set in the past still depict a near instant healing factor.
to:
* HealingFactor characters {{Wolverine}}, Sabretooth and {{Deadpool}] {{Deadpool}} are depicted as sustaining injuries over a length of time in early appearances, compared to later appearances where healing appears near instant. Sabretooth's face was injured in ''The Spectacular Spider-Man vol. 1 #116'' and still scarred by his next appearance in #119. In an ''[[ComicBook/{{XForce}} X-Force]]'' appearance, Deadpool complains his broken jaw left him hospitalized for a few weeks. One can assume characters had weaker healing factors in the past, but newer stories set in the past still depict a near instant healing factor.
2nd Nov '15 5:25:36 PM comicwriter
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* Healing-factor characters Wolverine, Sabretooth and Deadpool are depicted as sustaining injuries over a length of time in early appearances, compared to later appearances where healing appears near instant. Sabretooth's face was injured in ''The Spectacular Spider-Man vol. 1 #116'' and still scarred by his next appearance in #119. In an ''[[ComicBook/{{XForce}} X-Force]]'' appearance, Deadpool complains his broken jaw left him hospitalized for a few weeks. One can assume characters had weaker healing factors in the past, but newer stories set in the past still depict a near instant healing factor.
to:
* Healing-factor HealingFactor characters Wolverine, {{Wolverine}}, Sabretooth and Deadpool {{Deadpool}] are depicted as sustaining injuries over a length of time in early appearances, compared to later appearances where healing appears near instant. Sabretooth's face was injured in ''The Spectacular Spider-Man vol. 1 #116'' and still scarred by his next appearance in #119. In an ''[[ComicBook/{{XForce}} X-Force]]'' appearance, Deadpool complains his broken jaw left him hospitalized for a few weeks. One can assume characters had weaker healing factors in the past, but newer stories set in the past still depict a near instant healing factor.

** Tales of Suspense #49: "The New Iron Man Meets the Angel!" Witness as Tony Stark (here called Anthony Blake) encounters the Angel! After a nuclear explosion goes off from a Stark Industries atomic bomb test, Iron Man is shielded from the blast by his own armor, saving himself from hitting the ground with his Magnetic Repeller! But not Angel, who becomes evil! Is this a fiendish plot from an evil mutant? No! The radiation convinces Angel he is an Evil Mutant! Angel informs the X-men he is leaving to become an Evil Mutant since "that's where the action is!" The X-men use a top-secret device to contact the Avengers "in a secret wavelength used only by the X-Men and other specially licensed crime-fighting organizations". Angel attempts to draw the attention of Evil Mutants by detonating sticks of dynamite in random locations until Iron Man intervenes, then feigns plummeting to death so Angel can change his mind and save him! This heroic act reverses [[ArtisticLicenseNuclearPhysics the corrupting effect]] the radiation had on his personality! (Note: Iron Man is wearing his post ''The Avengers #2'' armor and mentions the X-men's offer from ''The Avengers #3'', yet the Hulk is still part of the Avengers team in this issue when he should have left by ''The Avengers #2''. So this issue takes place somewhere around then, in reverse order).
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** Tales of Suspense #49: "The New Iron Man Meets the Angel!" Witness as Tony Stark (here called Anthony Blake) encounters the Angel! After a nuclear explosion goes off from a Stark Industries atomic bomb test, Iron Man is shielded from the blast by his own armor, saving himself from hitting the ground with his Magnetic Repeller! But not Angel, who becomes evil! Is this a fiendish plot from an evil mutant? No! The radiation convinces Angel he is an Evil Mutant! Angel informs the X-men X-Men he is leaving to become an Evil Mutant since "that's where the action is!" The X-men X-Men use a top-secret device to contact the Avengers "in a secret wavelength used only by the X-Men and other specially licensed crime-fighting organizations". Angel attempts to draw the attention of Evil Mutants by detonating sticks of dynamite in random locations until Iron Man intervenes, then feigns plummeting to death so Angel can change his mind and save him! This heroic act reverses [[ArtisticLicenseNuclearPhysics the corrupting effect]] the radiation had on his personality! (Note: Iron Man is wearing his post ''The Avengers #2'' armor and mentions the X-men's X-Men's offer from ''The Avengers #3'', yet the Hulk is still part of the Avengers team in this issue when he should have left by ''The Avengers #2''. So this issue takes place somewhere around then, in reverse order).

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** Tales * Before he was {{Wolverine}}'s ArchNemesis and one of Suspense #49: "The New Iron Man Meets the Angel!" Witness as Tony Stark (here called Anthony Blake) encounters the Angel! After a nuclear explosion goes X-Men's most iconic baddies, Sabretooth started off from as an IronFist villain, and not a Stark Industries atomic bomb test, Iron Man is shielded from the blast by his own armor, saving himself from hitting the ground particularly memorable one at that. He was partnered with Constricter, there were no hints at his Magnetic Repeller! But not Angel, who becomes evil! Is this a fiendish plot from an evil mutant? No! The radiation convinces Angel mysterious backstory or connection to Wolverine, and he is an Evil Mutant! Angel informs didn't have a healing factor either. He was also much less of a threat, getting his ass handed to him by characters like Black Cat. It wasn't until the X-men 1986 "Mutant Massacre" crossover (Sabretooth was introduced in 1977) that he is leaving began to become an Evil Mutant since "that's where the action is!" The X-men use a top-secret device to contact villain we know today. It was the Avengers "in a secret wavelength used only by the X-Men and other specially licensed crime-fighting organizations". Angel attempts first story to draw the attention of Evil Mutants by detonating sticks of dynamite in random locations until Iron Man intervenes, then feigns plummeting to death so Angel can change his mind and save him! This heroic act reverses [[ArtisticLicenseNuclearPhysics the corrupting effect]] the radiation had on his personality! (Note: Iron Man is wearing his post ''The Avengers #2'' armor and mentions the X-men's offer from ''The Avengers #3'', yet the Hulk is still part of the Avengers team in this issue when he should have left him fight Wolverine on panel, as well as the first one to reference their mysterious shared past. He was also played up as a much more powerful and intimidating character than he'd been previously, and was finally confirmed to possess a healing factor like Logan's. Those early issues are so jarring by ''The Avengers #2''. So this issue takes place somewhere around then, in reverse order).comparison that ChrisClaremont actually considered {{Retcon}}ning all of Sabretooth's early appearances into [[ActuallyADoombot clones created by Nathaniel Essex]].
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