History DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale / LiveActionTV

2nd Nov '17 11:23:52 AM thecarolinabull01
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* The main characters of ''Series/{{Reba}}'' are predominately female, thus the three male characters, Brock, Van and Jake are frequent targets of the women's frustrations. Brock especially, as both Reba and Barbra Jean frequently hit and bully him, and it's always PlayedForLaughs.

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* The main characters of ''Series/{{Reba}}'' are predominately female, thus the three male characters, Brock, Van and Jake are frequent targets of the women's frustrations. Brock especially, as both Reba and Barbra Jean frequently hit and bully him, and it's always PlayedForLaughs. Van is often slapped around and berated by both Reba and his wife Cheyenne, and Kyra loves to verbally bully Van and Jake.
29th Oct '17 5:37:14 PM Ran57
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* ''Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir'': In "It Had to be You", Will goes on a date with a pretty girl who at first seems rather sweet. However, after one date, she completely changes, speaking to him in a rude, snide voice, she tells him where they will go to college, what jobs they will both have, ''how many kids they will have and what genders'', she tells him what to eat and what ''not'' to eat (saying that if he orders cottage cheese now he'll have a heart attack at middle age and leave her with the kids), and when he looks at the waitress to place his order, she yells at both him ''and'' the waitress. Later, she chooses his wardrobe and buys him a beeper with the obvious intent of keeping track of him 24/7. When Will tells his aunt and uncle about this, they shrug it off, saying that the dictating what jobs and how many children they'll have is a sign that she has goals, and her getting angry over him looking at another girl, and telling him what he can and can't eat is just proof that she doesn't want to lose him, when in RealLife, behavior like this is a HUGE indicator of an abusive relationship. To get rid of her, Will sets things up so that she ends up with Carlton. In reality, Carlton tells her off, politely. When he does, she suddenly does a complete 180 and becomes demure and submissive and polite--by the episode's end, she's hanging on his every word, eagerly promising to handwrite his class notes and send out his mail--and with one disapproving look from him, apologizing and quickly saying she'll deliver it ''door to door''. This has major UnfortunateImplications: Will is told, after the girl becomes Carlton's doormat, that when a girl acts abusive like she did, it's his job to "man up", and show her who the man is in the relationship. Overall, the way it's delivered comes off as more "it's your fault if you're abused because you didn't stand up for yourself". Also, anyone who can change that quickly might well be bipolar.

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* ''Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir'': In "It Had to be You", Will goes on a date with a pretty girl Jazz' sister who at first seems rather sweet. However, after one date, she completely changes, speaking to him in a rude, snide voice, she tells him where they will go to college, what jobs they will both have, ''how how many kids they will have and what genders'', she tells him genders, what to eat and what ''not'' not to eat (saying that if he orders cottage cheese steak now he'll have a heart attack at middle age and leave her with the kids), and when he looks at the waitress to place his order, she yells at both him ''and'' the waitress. Later, she chooses his wardrobe and buys him a beeper with the obvious intent of keeping track of him 24/7. When Will tells his aunt and uncle about this, they initially shrug it off, saying that the dictating what jobs and how many children they'll have is a sign that she has goals, and her getting angry over him looking at another girl, and telling him what he can and can't eat is just proof that she doesn't want to lose him, when in RealLife, behavior like this is a HUGE indicator of an abusive relationship.off. To get rid of her, Will sets things up so that she ends up with Carlton. In reality, Carlton tells her off, politely. off angrily but in a calm manner. When he does, she suddenly does a complete 180 and becomes demure and submissive and polite--by the episode's end, she's hanging on his every word, eagerly promising to handwrite his class apology notes to everyone she has offended and send out his mail--and mail them-and with one disapproving look from him, apologizing and quickly saying she'll deliver it ''door to door''.them herself. This has major UnfortunateImplications: Will is told, after the girl becomes Carlton's doormat, that when a girl acts abusive like she did, it's his job to "man up", and show her who the man is in the relationship. Overall, the way it's delivered comes off as more "it's your fault if you're abused because you didn't stand up for yourself". Also, anyone who can change that quickly might well be bipolar.



* Zigzagged in ''Series/{{Frasier}}''. Maris's emotional and psychological abuse of Niles is PlayedForLaughs early on, but only to the audience. Fraiser and Martin frequently comment to him on how what she does to him is not acceptable and that he has to stand up to her.

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* Zigzagged in ''Series/{{Frasier}}''. Maris's Maris' emotional and psychological abuse of Niles is PlayedForLaughs early on, but only to the audience. Fraiser and Martin frequently comment to him on how what she does to him is not acceptable and that he has to stand up to her.



** Very strongly averted with Kirsty Soames's treatment of Tyrone Dobbs. She violently attacked and scarred him -- hitting him, forcing him against walls, slamming his fingers in doors; cut him off from friends, destroyed his sentimental possessions such as photographs, and he stayed with her mostly because he was afraid she would take their daughter Ruby away if he reported her. None of this was played for laughs and Kirsty was portrayed as being a very dangerously violent and unhinged person to the viewer because of it, though most of the other characters had no idea.

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** Very strongly averted with Kirsty Soames's Soames' treatment of Tyrone Dobbs. She violently attacked and scarred him -- hitting him, forcing him against walls, slamming his fingers in doors; cut him off from friends, destroyed his sentimental possessions such as photographs, and he stayed with her mostly because he was afraid she would take their daughter Ruby away if he reported her. None of this was played for laughs and Kirsty was portrayed as being a very dangerously violent and unhinged person to the viewer because of it, though most of the other characters had no idea.
26th Oct '17 8:26:14 PM thecarolinabull01
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* The main characters of ''Series/{{Reba}}'' are predominately female, thus the three male characters, Brock, Van and Jake are frequent targets of the women's frustrations. Brock especially, as both Reba and Barbra Jean frequently hit and bully him, and it's always PlayedForLaughs.
8th Oct '17 1:02:24 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/ThatsMyBush'' inverted this by parodying TheHoneymooners' famous line, "One of these days... to the moon, Alice!" Bush would say, "One of these days, Laura, I'm gonna punch you in the face!". He never hit his wife and in the show itself, it was just supposed to be a joke. It received a lot of complaints from audience members who felt that even joking about such a thing was terrible. The creators of the show [[WesternAnimation/SouthPark (Trey Parker and Matt Stone)]] must've heard said complaints because later episodes change the line to, "I'm gonna punch you in the face! [[CrossesTheLineTwice Then the stomach! Then the face again!"]]

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* ''Series/ThatsMyBush'' inverted this by parodying TheHoneymooners' ''Series/TheHoneymooners''' famous line, "One of these days... to the moon, Alice!" Bush would say, "One of these days, Laura, I'm gonna punch you in the face!". He never hit his wife and in the show itself, it was just supposed to be a joke. It received a lot of complaints from audience members who felt that even joking about such a thing was terrible. The creators of the show [[WesternAnimation/SouthPark (Trey Parker and Matt Stone)]] must've heard said complaints because later episodes change the line to, "I'm gonna punch you in the face! [[CrossesTheLineTwice Then the stomach! Then the face again!"]]
29th Aug '17 5:27:15 PM dbdude01
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* ''Series/DesperateHousewives'' does this a number of times, noticeably with Susan. In one episode, she breaks into another man's car to spy on someone. When he notices this, she uses the automatic windows to crush his head, and make him apologize for all the women he wronged in his life. A police officer stops her, but Susan gets no punishment for her actions. Later, she attacks Paul, only to be stopped when Beth threatens to shoot her. When confronted about it, she brushes it off as if she did nothing, and again, receives no punishment for her actions.

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* ''Series/DesperateHousewives'' does this a number of times, noticeably with Susan. In one episode, she breaks into another man's car to spy on someone. When he notices this, she uses the automatic windows to crush his head, and make him apologize for all the women he wronged in his life. A police officer stops her, but Susan gets no punishment for her actions. Later, she attacks Paul, only to be stopped when Beth threatens to shoot her. When confronted about it, she brushes it off as if she did nothing, and again, receives no punishment for her actions. In the pilot episode, Tom comes home from a business trip to a kid-exhausted Lynette, wanting sex. Lynette is actually up for the sex until they realize they don't have a condom. When Tom suggests chancing it (just a suggestion, he wasn't being forceful or even trying to convince her), Lynette punches his lights out.
23rd Jul '17 10:29:08 PM RainbowPhoenix
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* Discovery ID's ''Wicked Women'' plays this trope straight with their advertising, in which a sexy woman lounges at the side of a pool as her dead husband floats behind her with a knife in his back. Ironically, the programming itself does '''not'''. "Deadly Women" and "Wicked Attraction" - the two shows that fill the "Wicked Women" programming block - are filled with terror and the latter doesn't shy away from portraying women as the instigator in episodes where it appears that the woman was the dominant parter in RealLife - although occasionally parents of the bitches show up to protest that it must have been the evil man who forced their sweet little Angel May to gleefully hack up old people. "Deadly Women" has done several episodes about women who were abusive towards the husbands they eventually murdered, and yes they call it abuse. NeverTrustATrailer.

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* Discovery ID's ''Wicked Women'' plays this trope straight with their advertising, in which a sexy woman lounges at the side of a pool as her dead husband floats behind her with a knife in his back. Ironically, the programming itself does '''not'''. "Deadly Women" and "Wicked Attraction" - the two shows that fill the "Wicked Women" programming block - are filled with terror and the latter doesn't shy away from portraying women as the instigator in episodes where it appears that the woman was the dominant parter in RealLife - although occasionally parents of the bitches show up to protest that it must have been the evil man who forced their sweet little Angel May to gleefully hack up old people. "Deadly Women" has done several episodes about women who were abusive towards the husbands husbands, and in some cases wives, they eventually murdered, and yes they call it abuse. NeverTrustATrailer.
12th Jul '17 8:24:14 PM Siggu
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** It becomes a DiscussedTrope in one episode. El Chavo claims men must not hurt women[[note]]Quico was trying to hurt La Chilindrina as he spoke[[/note]], but Doña Florinda says it only applies if women earn their respect, and don't take advantage of that to hurt men without fear of retaliation. [[{{Hypocrite}} Naturally, she's one of those women]], even admitting it in front of Don Ramón, when he reminds her of what she said.
22nd Jun '17 5:07:04 PM PrincessGaySex
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* In ''Series/ParksAndRec'', Mona-Lisa Saperstein starts dating Tom for a few episodes. Their relationship is clearly shown to include financial, emotional, and sexual abuse, and he repeatedly tries to break up with her and gets intimidated or tricked into staying. Not only is this played for laughs, but it frames ''Tom'' as weak and cowardly for not being able to face her properly.
19th Jun '17 6:08:33 AM Rebu
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* ''Series/{{Cops}}'' tends to highlight domestic abuse cases where the woman is clearly in the wrong but the man is still to blame. One episode had the girlfriend accusing her boyfriend of hitting her. While the boyfriend was bloodied, scratched up, and his shirt was ripped apart, the girlfriend didn't have a mark on her. Even more outrageous was the discovery of drugs in the boyfriend's car ''when we see the girlfriend put the bag in the car on camera behind the cops backs''. Still, it's the boyfriend who's arrested for assault and drug possession, though the girlfriend was clearly the aggressor and had planted evidence deliberately in his car. This is, sadly, all-too-often TruthInTelevision, as statistically authorities are ''far'' more likely to take the woman's side in a domestic disturbance call, regardless of the evidence.

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* ''Series/{{Cops}}'' tends to highlight domestic abuse cases where the woman is clearly in the wrong but the man is still to blame. One episode had the girlfriend accusing her boyfriend of hitting her. While the boyfriend was bloodied, scratched up, and his shirt was ripped apart, the girlfriend didn't have a mark on her. Even more outrageous was the discovery of drugs in the boyfriend's car ''when we see the girlfriend put the bag in the car on camera behind the cops backs''. Still, it's the boyfriend who's arrested for assault and drug possession, though the girlfriend was clearly the aggressor and had planted evidence deliberately in his car. This is, sadly, all-too-often TruthInTelevision, as statistically authorities are ''far'' more likely to take the woman's side in a domestic disturbance call, regardless of the evidence. [[note]]Police policies often say to consider the height and weight of the parties involved to help determine the "Primary/Predominant Aggressor". In your average heterosexual relationship, the man is bigger.[[/note]]
17th Jun '17 6:53:50 AM ironballs16
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* ''Series/{{Titus}}'' averts this, with the title character actually showing the after effects of a fight with his ex-girlfriend. [[RealLifeWritesThePlot This was based on an actual relationship]] Creator/ChristopherTitus had, and the episode actually showed him going to her funeral to make sure she was really dead, he was so scared of her. In the stand-up routine the series was based on, he goes into far more detail about the relationship, including the time when the police showed up at the house and arrested ''him'', despite the fact that not only was he the one who'd called them in the first place, but he'd been making such calls on a regular basis (unfortunately, this can really happen with male abuse victims). In fact, in one instance he'd even ''claimed to have been the abuser'' just so they'd get him away from her.

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* ''Series/{{Titus}}'' averts this, with the title character actually showing the after effects of a fight with his ex-girlfriend. [[RealLifeWritesThePlot This was based on an actual relationship]] Creator/ChristopherTitus had, and the episode actually showed him going to her funeral to make sure she was really dead, he was so scared of her. In the stand-up routine the series was based on, he goes into far more detail about the relationship, including the time when the police showed up at the house and arrested ''him'', despite the fact that not only was he the one who'd called them in the first place, but he'd been making such calls on a regular basis (unfortunately, this can really happen with male abuse victims). In fact, in one that instance he'd even ''claimed to have been the abuser'' just so they'd get him away from her.
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