History DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale / LiveActionTV

23rd Jul '17 10:29:08 PM RainbowPhoenix
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* Discovery ID's ''Wicked Women'' plays this trope straight with their advertising, in which a sexy woman lounges at the side of a pool as her dead husband floats behind her with a knife in his back. Ironically, the programming itself does '''not'''. "Deadly Women" and "Wicked Attraction" - the two shows that fill the "Wicked Women" programming block - are filled with terror and the latter doesn't shy away from portraying women as the instigator in episodes where it appears that the woman was the dominant parter in RealLife - although occasionally parents of the bitches show up to protest that it must have been the evil man who forced their sweet little Angel May to gleefully hack up old people. "Deadly Women" has done several episodes about women who were abusive towards the husbands they eventually murdered, and yes they call it abuse. NeverTrustATrailer.

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* Discovery ID's ''Wicked Women'' plays this trope straight with their advertising, in which a sexy woman lounges at the side of a pool as her dead husband floats behind her with a knife in his back. Ironically, the programming itself does '''not'''. "Deadly Women" and "Wicked Attraction" - the two shows that fill the "Wicked Women" programming block - are filled with terror and the latter doesn't shy away from portraying women as the instigator in episodes where it appears that the woman was the dominant parter in RealLife - although occasionally parents of the bitches show up to protest that it must have been the evil man who forced their sweet little Angel May to gleefully hack up old people. "Deadly Women" has done several episodes about women who were abusive towards the husbands husbands, and in some cases wives, they eventually murdered, and yes they call it abuse. NeverTrustATrailer.
12th Jul '17 8:24:14 PM Siggu
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** It becomes a DiscussedTrope in one episode. El Chavo claims men must not hurt women[[note]]Quico was trying to hurt La Chilindrina as he spoke[[/note]], but Doña Florinda says it only applies if women earn their respect, and don't take advantage of that to hurt men without fear of retaliation. [[{{Hypocrite}} Naturally, she's one of those women]], even admitting it in front of Don Ramón, when he reminds her of what she said.
22nd Jun '17 5:07:04 PM PrincessGaySex
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* In ''Series/ParksAndRec'', Mona-Lisa Saperstein starts dating Tom for a few episodes. Their relationship is clearly shown to include financial, emotional, and sexual abuse, and he repeatedly tries to break up with her and gets intimidated or tricked into staying. Not only is this played for laughs, but it frames ''Tom'' as weak and cowardly for not being able to face her properly.
19th Jun '17 6:08:33 AM Rebu
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* ''Series/{{Cops}}'' tends to highlight domestic abuse cases where the woman is clearly in the wrong but the man is still to blame. One episode had the girlfriend accusing her boyfriend of hitting her. While the boyfriend was bloodied, scratched up, and his shirt was ripped apart, the girlfriend didn't have a mark on her. Even more outrageous was the discovery of drugs in the boyfriend's car ''when we see the girlfriend put the bag in the car on camera behind the cops backs''. Still, it's the boyfriend who's arrested for assault and drug possession, though the girlfriend was clearly the aggressor and had planted evidence deliberately in his car. This is, sadly, all-too-often TruthInTelevision, as statistically authorities are ''far'' more likely to take the woman's side in a domestic disturbance call, regardless of the evidence.

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* ''Series/{{Cops}}'' tends to highlight domestic abuse cases where the woman is clearly in the wrong but the man is still to blame. One episode had the girlfriend accusing her boyfriend of hitting her. While the boyfriend was bloodied, scratched up, and his shirt was ripped apart, the girlfriend didn't have a mark on her. Even more outrageous was the discovery of drugs in the boyfriend's car ''when we see the girlfriend put the bag in the car on camera behind the cops backs''. Still, it's the boyfriend who's arrested for assault and drug possession, though the girlfriend was clearly the aggressor and had planted evidence deliberately in his car. This is, sadly, all-too-often TruthInTelevision, as statistically authorities are ''far'' more likely to take the woman's side in a domestic disturbance call, regardless of the evidence. [[note]]Police policies often say to consider the height and weight of the parties involved to help determine the "Primary/Predominant Aggressor". In your average heterosexual relationship, the man is bigger.[[/note]]
17th Jun '17 6:53:50 AM ironballs16
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* ''Series/{{Titus}}'' averts this, with the title character actually showing the after effects of a fight with his ex-girlfriend. [[RealLifeWritesThePlot This was based on an actual relationship]] Creator/ChristopherTitus had, and the episode actually showed him going to her funeral to make sure she was really dead, he was so scared of her. In the stand-up routine the series was based on, he goes into far more detail about the relationship, including the time when the police showed up at the house and arrested ''him'', despite the fact that not only was he the one who'd called them in the first place, but he'd been making such calls on a regular basis (unfortunately, this can really happen with male abuse victims). In fact, in one instance he'd even ''claimed to have been the abuser'' just so they'd get him away from her.

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* ''Series/{{Titus}}'' averts this, with the title character actually showing the after effects of a fight with his ex-girlfriend. [[RealLifeWritesThePlot This was based on an actual relationship]] Creator/ChristopherTitus had, and the episode actually showed him going to her funeral to make sure she was really dead, he was so scared of her. In the stand-up routine the series was based on, he goes into far more detail about the relationship, including the time when the police showed up at the house and arrested ''him'', despite the fact that not only was he the one who'd called them in the first place, but he'd been making such calls on a regular basis (unfortunately, this can really happen with male abuse victims). In fact, in one that instance he'd even ''claimed to have been the abuser'' just so they'd get him away from her.
2nd May '17 10:02:31 AM whisperhugscoundrel
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** Played straight in one of the minis. Zoe was revealed to have tried to punch Zig in the face because he stood her up and instead hit Miles because he ducked, causing Zig to react with laughter.
23rd Apr '17 9:01:44 AM HighCrate
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* ''Series/TheKingOfQueens'': Carrie is a pretty major version of this and it was implied that Deacon's wife can be pretty abusive as well. Also one episode had Carrie teach a girlfriend of Spence to be [[DudeNotFunny verbally abusive to]] [[ButtMonkey him.]]
** However, it should be noted that unlike ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' with [[ButtMonkey Raymond]] and [[{{jerkass}} Debra]], Doug was always portrayed as equally strong-willed and just as often meant to be "right" in the plot as Carrie.
** He's also acknowledged by other characters as having the patience of a saint for dealing with Carrie for so long.
** Also there are episodes in which Doug and Carrie realize just how destructive their relationship is and are even visibly disturbed by the revelation.

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* ''Series/TheKingOfQueens'': Carrie is a pretty major version of this and it was implied that Deacon's wife can be pretty abusive as well. Also one episode had Carrie teach a girlfriend of Spence to be [[DudeNotFunny verbally abusive to]] [[ButtMonkey him.]]
** However, it should be noted that unlike ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' with [[ButtMonkey Raymond]] and [[{{jerkass}} Debra]], Doug was always portrayed as equally strong-willed and just as often meant to be "right" in the plot as Carrie.
** He's also acknowledged by other characters as having the patience of a saint for dealing with Carrie for so long.
** Also there are episodes in which Doug and Carrie realize just how destructive their relationship is and are even visibly disturbed by the revelation.
21st Apr '17 8:44:53 PM Fireblood
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* ''Series/TheKingOfQueens'':
** When Doug joins a support group for men in abusive relationships (to get out of the weight loss one, which doesn't serve food), they have him talk about his experience and he relates how Carrie does things like twist his nipples after he angers her over something. He also blames this for his weight. Carrie herself doesn't help this by being her normal obnoxious self when she comes to pick Doug up. After learning what group he's really in, she's of course outraged and notes that Doug was already overweight before she even met him. However, her twisting his nipples is justified by his bad behavior according to her. It's pretty certain however that no one would feel this excused Doug twisting ''her'' nipples.
** The episode ''The Waitress'' definitely comes to mind with this trope. In the episode, Doug has to deal with an incredibly rude waitress who not only does not serve him at the same time as his friend, but ''refuses'' to get his ready chicken wings that remain sitting on the counter. When Doug goes up and gets the chicken wings himself, the restaurant's manager punishes the waitress for not delivering the plate to Doug by sending her home. The waitress then declares she's going to beat Doug up when he leaves and spends the remainder of the episode stalking around the front of the restaurant, waiting for Doug to leave. Not only is this PlayedForLaughs, but nobody calls the cops about this obvious harassment and ''Doug'' is portrayed as being the wrong party. And it's still PlayedForLaughs when the waitress beats him up off-screen!
* ''Series/{{Titus}}'' averts this, with the title character actually showing the after effects of a fight with his ex-girlfriend. [[RealLifeWritesThePlot This was based on an actual relationship]] Creator/ChristopherTitus had, and the episode actually showed him going to her funeral to make sure she was really dead, he was so scared of her. In the stand-up routine the series was based on, he goes into far more detail about the relationship, including the time when the police showed up at the house and arrested ''him'', despite the fact that not only was he the one who'd called them in the first place, but he'd been making such calls on a regular basis. In fact, in one instance he'd even ''claimed to have been the abuser'' just so they'd get him away from her.

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* ''Series/TheKingOfQueens'':
''Series/TheKingOfQueens'': Carrie is a pretty major version of this and it was implied that Deacon's wife can be pretty abusive as well. Also one episode had Carrie teach a girlfriend of Spence to be [[DudeNotFunny verbally abusive to]] [[ButtMonkey him.]]
** However, it should be noted that unlike ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' with [[ButtMonkey Raymond]] and [[{{jerkass}} Debra]], Doug was always portrayed as equally strong-willed and just as often meant to be "right" in the plot as Carrie.
** He's also acknowledged by other characters as having the patience of a saint for dealing with Carrie for so long.
** Also there are episodes in which Doug and Carrie realize just how destructive their relationship is and are even visibly disturbed by the revelation.
** When Doug joins a support group for men in abusive relationships (to get out of the weight loss one, which doesn't serve food), they have him talk about his experience and he relates how Carrie does things like twist his nipples after he angers her over something. He also blames this for his weight. Carrie herself doesn't help this by then being her normal obnoxious self when she comes to pick Doug up. After learning what group he's really in, she's of course outraged and notes that Doug was already overweight before she even met him. However, her twisting his nipples is justified by his bad behavior according to her. It's pretty certain however that no one would feel this excused Doug twisting ''her'' nipples.
** The episode ''The Waitress'' "The Waitress" definitely comes to mind with this trope. In the episode, Doug has to deal with an incredibly a very rude waitress who not only does not serve him at the same time as his friend, but ''refuses'' refuses to get his ready chicken wings that remain sitting on the counter. When Doug goes up and gets the chicken wings himself, the restaurant's manager punishes the waitress for not delivering the plate to Doug by sending her home. The waitress then declares she's going to beat Doug up when he leaves and spends the remainder of the episode stalking around the front of the restaurant, waiting for Doug to leave. Not only is this PlayedForLaughs, but nobody calls the cops about this obvious harassment and ''Doug'' Doug is portrayed as being the wrong party. And it's still PlayedForLaughs later when the waitress beats him up off-screen!
* ''Series/{{Titus}}'' averts this, with the title character actually showing the after effects of a fight with his ex-girlfriend. [[RealLifeWritesThePlot This was based on an actual relationship]] Creator/ChristopherTitus had, and the episode actually showed him going to her funeral to make sure she was really dead, he was so scared of her. In the stand-up routine the series was based on, he goes into far more detail about the relationship, including the time when the police showed up at the house and arrested ''him'', despite the fact that not only was he the one who'd called them in the first place, but he'd been making such calls on a regular basis.basis (unfortunately, this can really happen with male abuse victims). In fact, in one instance he'd even ''claimed to have been the abuser'' just so they'd get him away from her.
2nd Apr '17 9:02:55 PM CorahsUncle
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** This story is particularly ironic when you consider that Chris Lassing, Lilly's short-lived partner at the time, was played by Justin Chambers, who later appeared on Grey's Anatomy as Alex, who had a VERY different take on female-on-male abuse (see above).
* A 2011 episode of daytime talk show ''The Talk'' included a discussion about a California man who was castrated by his wife (who he was filing for divorce from), who then threw his severed penis into the garbage disposal to mangle it further. Co-host Sharon Osbourne was quite giddy about the situation, and a large part of the mostly female audience fed off that. Most of the rest of the female co-hosts joined in as well, but eventually former child actress Sarah Gilbert lampshaded the double standard by arguing it was sexist to laugh at his fate when mutilating a woman would not be greeted with such mirth. Sharon refused to yield, continuing to laugh about it.
* In 2015, when [[TheMuppetShow Kermit finally broke up with Miss Piggy]] for good, it [[http://www.newrepublic.com/article/122709/kermit-has-new-girlfriend-good-his-last-one-was-domestic-abuser was]] [[http://www.dailydot.com/opinion/kermit-miss-piggy-breakup-domestic-abuser/ noted]] that their entire relationship with was characterized by physical and emotional abuse on her part, all played as a RunningGag.
* The show ''Series/AgentCarter'' is so boastful about how much more enlightened and feminist it is compared to its own setting that it's literally set the standard that ''saying the wrong thing'' to Peggy Carter or to any woman she cares about in her presence means you should both expect and deserve to be assaulted even if you're not actually supposed to be a villain. Take, for example, how she would often respond to [[StrawMisogynist sexist comments by her colleagues]] [[UnderestimatingBadassery underestimating her talents because she's a woman]] by punching the guys for saying them. Or her reaction to a customer who spent three weeks in a Nazi POW camp making jerkass remarks towards her waitress friend Angie and slapping Angie's ass as she turns to leave: instead of punching, which might've been appropriate in this case, Peggy places a fork right up against a vital artery in his side and ''threatens to pierce it and leave him bleeding to death in minutes unless he tips her friend generously and never returns to the diner again''. The friend is seen smiling about this and it's treated as a badass heroic moment, not as a borderline assault worthy of any sort of reprimand.

to:

** This story is particularly ironic when you consider that Chris Lassing, Lilly's short-lived partner at the time, was played by Justin Chambers, who later appeared on Grey's Anatomy ''Grey's Anatomy'' as Alex, who had a VERY different take on female-on-male abuse (see above).
* A 2011 episode of daytime talk show ''The Talk'' included a discussion about a California man who was castrated by his wife (who (from whom he was filing for divorce from), divorce), who then threw his severed penis into the garbage disposal to mangle it further. Co-host Sharon Osbourne was quite giddy about the situation, and a large part of the mostly female audience fed off that. Most of the rest of the female co-hosts joined in as well, but eventually former child actress Sarah Gilbert lampshaded the double standard by arguing it was sexist to laugh at his fate when mutilating a woman would not be greeted with such mirth. Sharon refused to yield, continuing to laugh about it.
* In 2015, when [[TheMuppetShow [[Series/TheMuppets Kermit finally broke up with Miss Piggy]] for good, it [[http://www.newrepublic.com/article/122709/kermit-has-new-girlfriend-good-his-last-one-was-domestic-abuser was]] [[http://www.dailydot.com/opinion/kermit-miss-piggy-breakup-domestic-abuser/ noted]] that their entire relationship with was characterized by physical and emotional abuse on her part, all played as a RunningGag.
* The show ''Series/AgentCarter'' is so boastful about how much more enlightened and feminist it is compared to its own setting that it's literally set the standard that ''saying the wrong thing'' to Peggy Carter or to any woman she cares about in her presence means you should both expect and deserve to be assaulted even if you're not actually supposed to be a villain. Take, for example, how she would often respond to [[StrawMisogynist sexist comments by her colleagues]] [[UnderestimatingBadassery underestimating her talents because she's a woman]] by punching the guys for saying them. Or her reaction to a customer who spent three weeks in a Nazi POW camp making jerkass remarks towards her waitress friend Angie and slapping Angie's ass as she turns to leave: instead Instead of punching, which might've been appropriate in this case, Peggy places a fork right up against a vital artery in his side and ''threatens to pierce it and leave him bleeding to death in minutes unless he tips her friend generously and never returns to the diner again''. The friend is seen smiling about this and it's treated as a badass heroic moment, not as a borderline assault worthy of any sort of reprimand.
2nd Apr '17 11:41:22 AM nombretomado
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* Most soap operas are guilty of this (compare the way betrayed wives are allowed to treat cheating husband with the reverse), especially the Australian ones. ''HomeAndAway'' had local cop Angelo Rosetta, who'd been turned into a Type II or III AntiHero, twice assaulted by a woman simply for trying to solve crimes and arresting suspects. He actually tried to charge one of them with assaulting a police officer, only for his fellow officers to let her go on the grounds they liked her more than him. Rival show ''Series/{{Neighbours}}'' isn't as bad on physical violence - case in point, Philip and Loretta Martin's storyline in 1985 - but does seem determined to have its male characters humiliated by the female ones as often as possible. (A 2011 episode saw Doctor Karl Kennedy, the show's regular [[ButtMonkey figure of fun]] [[StrawmanHasAPoint even when he's right]], forced to dress up as a woman in public and loudly declare women were better than men by his wife and her best friend. Which is a normal day for him.)

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* Most soap operas are guilty of this (compare the way betrayed wives are allowed to treat cheating husband with the reverse), especially the Australian ones. ''HomeAndAway'' ''Series/HomeAndAway'' had local cop Angelo Rosetta, who'd been turned into a Type II or III AntiHero, twice assaulted by a woman simply for trying to solve crimes and arresting suspects. He actually tried to charge one of them with assaulting a police officer, only for his fellow officers to let her go on the grounds they liked her more than him. Rival show ''Series/{{Neighbours}}'' isn't as bad on physical violence - case in point, Philip and Loretta Martin's storyline in 1985 - but does seem determined to have its male characters humiliated by the female ones as often as possible. (A 2011 episode saw Doctor Karl Kennedy, the show's regular [[ButtMonkey figure of fun]] [[StrawmanHasAPoint even when he's right]], forced to dress up as a woman in public and loudly declare women were better than men by his wife and her best friend. Which is a normal day for him.)
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