History DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale / LiveActionTV

23rd Apr '17 9:01:44 AM HighCrate
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* ''Series/TheKingOfQueens'': Carrie is a pretty major version of this and it was implied that Deacon's wife can be pretty abusive as well. Also one episode had Carrie teach a girlfriend of Spence to be [[DudeNotFunny verbally abusive to]] [[ButtMonkey him.]]
** However, it should be noted that unlike ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' with [[ButtMonkey Raymond]] and [[{{jerkass}} Debra]], Doug was always portrayed as equally strong-willed and just as often meant to be "right" in the plot as Carrie.
** He's also acknowledged by other characters as having the patience of a saint for dealing with Carrie for so long.
** Also there are episodes in which Doug and Carrie realize just how destructive their relationship is and are even visibly disturbed by the revelation.

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* ''Series/TheKingOfQueens'': Carrie is a pretty major version of this and it was implied that Deacon's wife can be pretty abusive as well. Also one episode had Carrie teach a girlfriend of Spence to be [[DudeNotFunny verbally abusive to]] [[ButtMonkey him.]]
** However, it should be noted that unlike ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' with [[ButtMonkey Raymond]] and [[{{jerkass}} Debra]], Doug was always portrayed as equally strong-willed and just as often meant to be "right" in the plot as Carrie.
** He's also acknowledged by other characters as having the patience of a saint for dealing with Carrie for so long.
** Also there are episodes in which Doug and Carrie realize just how destructive their relationship is and are even visibly disturbed by the revelation.
21st Apr '17 8:44:53 PM Fireblood
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* ''Series/TheKingOfQueens'':
** When Doug joins a support group for men in abusive relationships (to get out of the weight loss one, which doesn't serve food), they have him talk about his experience and he relates how Carrie does things like twist his nipples after he angers her over something. He also blames this for his weight. Carrie herself doesn't help this by being her normal obnoxious self when she comes to pick Doug up. After learning what group he's really in, she's of course outraged and notes that Doug was already overweight before she even met him. However, her twisting his nipples is justified by his bad behavior according to her. It's pretty certain however that no one would feel this excused Doug twisting ''her'' nipples.
** The episode ''The Waitress'' definitely comes to mind with this trope. In the episode, Doug has to deal with an incredibly rude waitress who not only does not serve him at the same time as his friend, but ''refuses'' to get his ready chicken wings that remain sitting on the counter. When Doug goes up and gets the chicken wings himself, the restaurant's manager punishes the waitress for not delivering the plate to Doug by sending her home. The waitress then declares she's going to beat Doug up when he leaves and spends the remainder of the episode stalking around the front of the restaurant, waiting for Doug to leave. Not only is this PlayedForLaughs, but nobody calls the cops about this obvious harassment and ''Doug'' is portrayed as being the wrong party. And it's still PlayedForLaughs when the waitress beats him up off-screen!
* ''Series/{{Titus}}'' averts this, with the title character actually showing the after effects of a fight with his ex-girlfriend. [[RealLifeWritesThePlot This was based on an actual relationship]] Creator/ChristopherTitus had, and the episode actually showed him going to her funeral to make sure she was really dead, he was so scared of her. In the stand-up routine the series was based on, he goes into far more detail about the relationship, including the time when the police showed up at the house and arrested ''him'', despite the fact that not only was he the one who'd called them in the first place, but he'd been making such calls on a regular basis. In fact, in one instance he'd even ''claimed to have been the abuser'' just so they'd get him away from her.

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* ''Series/TheKingOfQueens'':
''Series/TheKingOfQueens'': Carrie is a pretty major version of this and it was implied that Deacon's wife can be pretty abusive as well. Also one episode had Carrie teach a girlfriend of Spence to be [[DudeNotFunny verbally abusive to]] [[ButtMonkey him.]]
** However, it should be noted that unlike ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' with [[ButtMonkey Raymond]] and [[{{jerkass}} Debra]], Doug was always portrayed as equally strong-willed and just as often meant to be "right" in the plot as Carrie.
** He's also acknowledged by other characters as having the patience of a saint for dealing with Carrie for so long.
** Also there are episodes in which Doug and Carrie realize just how destructive their relationship is and are even visibly disturbed by the revelation.
** When Doug joins a support group for men in abusive relationships (to get out of the weight loss one, which doesn't serve food), they have him talk about his experience and he relates how Carrie does things like twist his nipples after he angers her over something. He also blames this for his weight. Carrie herself doesn't help this by then being her normal obnoxious self when she comes to pick Doug up. After learning what group he's really in, she's of course outraged and notes that Doug was already overweight before she even met him. However, her twisting his nipples is justified by his bad behavior according to her. It's pretty certain however that no one would feel this excused Doug twisting ''her'' nipples.
** The episode ''The Waitress'' "The Waitress" definitely comes to mind with this trope. In the episode, Doug has to deal with an incredibly a very rude waitress who not only does not serve him at the same time as his friend, but ''refuses'' refuses to get his ready chicken wings that remain sitting on the counter. When Doug goes up and gets the chicken wings himself, the restaurant's manager punishes the waitress for not delivering the plate to Doug by sending her home. The waitress then declares she's going to beat Doug up when he leaves and spends the remainder of the episode stalking around the front of the restaurant, waiting for Doug to leave. Not only is this PlayedForLaughs, but nobody calls the cops about this obvious harassment and ''Doug'' Doug is portrayed as being the wrong party. And it's still PlayedForLaughs later when the waitress beats him up off-screen!
* ''Series/{{Titus}}'' averts this, with the title character actually showing the after effects of a fight with his ex-girlfriend. [[RealLifeWritesThePlot This was based on an actual relationship]] Creator/ChristopherTitus had, and the episode actually showed him going to her funeral to make sure she was really dead, he was so scared of her. In the stand-up routine the series was based on, he goes into far more detail about the relationship, including the time when the police showed up at the house and arrested ''him'', despite the fact that not only was he the one who'd called them in the first place, but he'd been making such calls on a regular basis.basis (unfortunately, this can really happen with male abuse victims). In fact, in one instance he'd even ''claimed to have been the abuser'' just so they'd get him away from her.
2nd Apr '17 9:02:55 PM CorahsUncle
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** This story is particularly ironic when you consider that Chris Lassing, Lilly's short-lived partner at the time, was played by Justin Chambers, who later appeared on Grey's Anatomy as Alex, who had a VERY different take on female-on-male abuse (see above).
* A 2011 episode of daytime talk show ''The Talk'' included a discussion about a California man who was castrated by his wife (who he was filing for divorce from), who then threw his severed penis into the garbage disposal to mangle it further. Co-host Sharon Osbourne was quite giddy about the situation, and a large part of the mostly female audience fed off that. Most of the rest of the female co-hosts joined in as well, but eventually former child actress Sarah Gilbert lampshaded the double standard by arguing it was sexist to laugh at his fate when mutilating a woman would not be greeted with such mirth. Sharon refused to yield, continuing to laugh about it.
* In 2015, when [[TheMuppetShow Kermit finally broke up with Miss Piggy]] for good, it [[http://www.newrepublic.com/article/122709/kermit-has-new-girlfriend-good-his-last-one-was-domestic-abuser was]] [[http://www.dailydot.com/opinion/kermit-miss-piggy-breakup-domestic-abuser/ noted]] that their entire relationship with was characterized by physical and emotional abuse on her part, all played as a RunningGag.
* The show ''Series/AgentCarter'' is so boastful about how much more enlightened and feminist it is compared to its own setting that it's literally set the standard that ''saying the wrong thing'' to Peggy Carter or to any woman she cares about in her presence means you should both expect and deserve to be assaulted even if you're not actually supposed to be a villain. Take, for example, how she would often respond to [[StrawMisogynist sexist comments by her colleagues]] [[UnderestimatingBadassery underestimating her talents because she's a woman]] by punching the guys for saying them. Or her reaction to a customer who spent three weeks in a Nazi POW camp making jerkass remarks towards her waitress friend Angie and slapping Angie's ass as she turns to leave: instead of punching, which might've been appropriate in this case, Peggy places a fork right up against a vital artery in his side and ''threatens to pierce it and leave him bleeding to death in minutes unless he tips her friend generously and never returns to the diner again''. The friend is seen smiling about this and it's treated as a badass heroic moment, not as a borderline assault worthy of any sort of reprimand.

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** This story is particularly ironic when you consider that Chris Lassing, Lilly's short-lived partner at the time, was played by Justin Chambers, who later appeared on Grey's Anatomy ''Grey's Anatomy'' as Alex, who had a VERY different take on female-on-male abuse (see above).
* A 2011 episode of daytime talk show ''The Talk'' included a discussion about a California man who was castrated by his wife (who (from whom he was filing for divorce from), divorce), who then threw his severed penis into the garbage disposal to mangle it further. Co-host Sharon Osbourne was quite giddy about the situation, and a large part of the mostly female audience fed off that. Most of the rest of the female co-hosts joined in as well, but eventually former child actress Sarah Gilbert lampshaded the double standard by arguing it was sexist to laugh at his fate when mutilating a woman would not be greeted with such mirth. Sharon refused to yield, continuing to laugh about it.
* In 2015, when [[TheMuppetShow [[Series/TheMuppets Kermit finally broke up with Miss Piggy]] for good, it [[http://www.newrepublic.com/article/122709/kermit-has-new-girlfriend-good-his-last-one-was-domestic-abuser was]] [[http://www.dailydot.com/opinion/kermit-miss-piggy-breakup-domestic-abuser/ noted]] that their entire relationship with was characterized by physical and emotional abuse on her part, all played as a RunningGag.
* The show ''Series/AgentCarter'' is so boastful about how much more enlightened and feminist it is compared to its own setting that it's literally set the standard that ''saying the wrong thing'' to Peggy Carter or to any woman she cares about in her presence means you should both expect and deserve to be assaulted even if you're not actually supposed to be a villain. Take, for example, how she would often respond to [[StrawMisogynist sexist comments by her colleagues]] [[UnderestimatingBadassery underestimating her talents because she's a woman]] by punching the guys for saying them. Or her reaction to a customer who spent three weeks in a Nazi POW camp making jerkass remarks towards her waitress friend Angie and slapping Angie's ass as she turns to leave: instead Instead of punching, which might've been appropriate in this case, Peggy places a fork right up against a vital artery in his side and ''threatens to pierce it and leave him bleeding to death in minutes unless he tips her friend generously and never returns to the diner again''. The friend is seen smiling about this and it's treated as a badass heroic moment, not as a borderline assault worthy of any sort of reprimand.
2nd Apr '17 11:41:22 AM nombretomado
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* Most soap operas are guilty of this (compare the way betrayed wives are allowed to treat cheating husband with the reverse), especially the Australian ones. ''HomeAndAway'' had local cop Angelo Rosetta, who'd been turned into a Type II or III AntiHero, twice assaulted by a woman simply for trying to solve crimes and arresting suspects. He actually tried to charge one of them with assaulting a police officer, only for his fellow officers to let her go on the grounds they liked her more than him. Rival show ''Series/{{Neighbours}}'' isn't as bad on physical violence - case in point, Philip and Loretta Martin's storyline in 1985 - but does seem determined to have its male characters humiliated by the female ones as often as possible. (A 2011 episode saw Doctor Karl Kennedy, the show's regular [[ButtMonkey figure of fun]] [[StrawmanHasAPoint even when he's right]], forced to dress up as a woman in public and loudly declare women were better than men by his wife and her best friend. Which is a normal day for him.)

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* Most soap operas are guilty of this (compare the way betrayed wives are allowed to treat cheating husband with the reverse), especially the Australian ones. ''HomeAndAway'' ''Series/HomeAndAway'' had local cop Angelo Rosetta, who'd been turned into a Type II or III AntiHero, twice assaulted by a woman simply for trying to solve crimes and arresting suspects. He actually tried to charge one of them with assaulting a police officer, only for his fellow officers to let her go on the grounds they liked her more than him. Rival show ''Series/{{Neighbours}}'' isn't as bad on physical violence - case in point, Philip and Loretta Martin's storyline in 1985 - but does seem determined to have its male characters humiliated by the female ones as often as possible. (A 2011 episode saw Doctor Karl Kennedy, the show's regular [[ButtMonkey figure of fun]] [[StrawmanHasAPoint even when he's right]], forced to dress up as a woman in public and loudly declare women were better than men by his wife and her best friend. Which is a normal day for him.)
25th Mar '17 11:06:18 PM XTC
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* The ''entire'' premise of ''Series/CrazyExGirlfriend'', telegraphed by the show's name, is that a woman under medical care for mental issues becomes obsessed with a guy she dated for five minutes when she suddenly runs into him years later, stops taking her medication, moves across the country to follow and stalk him without his knowledge, in order to force him to fall in love with her. Also, [[PlayedForLaughs this is a musical comedy]], to the point where her mental instability manifests as schizophrenic hallucinatory dance sequences. But, it's ''somehow'' cute. If you flip the genders over, it would be a psychological thriller with her as the villain.
12th Mar '17 8:29:33 PM CorahsUncle
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* Gloriously averted on ''Series/FearFactor''. In the Reality Stars edition, Johnny Fairplay heckles Jonathan & Victoria throughout the entire second stunt which plays a huge part in them quitting. Victoria retaliates by punching Johnny Fairplay square in the chest and Joe Rogan instantaneous calls her out on it. Both Jonathan and Victoria try to justify what Victoria did, but Joe has none of it. And it's implied the only reason they didn't get eliminated for this, is that they had already been eliminated when they quit the challenge.

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* Gloriously averted on ''Series/FearFactor''. In the Reality Stars edition, Johnny Fairplay heckles Jonathan & Victoria throughout the entire second stunt which plays a huge part in them quitting. Victoria retaliates by punching Johnny Fairplay square in the chest and Joe Rogan instantaneous instantaneously calls her out on it. Both Jonathan and Victoria try to justify what Victoria did, but Joe has none of it. And it's implied the only reason they didn't get eliminated for this, is that they had already been eliminated when they quit the challenge.



* Subverted in the ''Series/TheBorgias'' when fourteen-year-old Lucretia's [[MaritalRapeLicense husband]] abuses and rapes her onscreen, more than once, but her thirteen-year-old brother Joffre consummating his marriage with a much older woman is not shown—one was obviously seen as fit to show, and one as not.
** While neither are played for laughs, this is probably because Holliday Grainger was twenty-three when she acted her part, whereas Aidan Alexander was actually fourteen.

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* Subverted in the ''Series/TheBorgias'' when fourteen-year-old 14-year-old Lucretia's [[MaritalRapeLicense husband]] abuses and rapes her onscreen, more than once, but her thirteen-year-old brother Joffre 13-year-old brother, Joffre, consummating his marriage with a much older woman is not shown—one shown. The former was obviously seen as fit to show, and one the latter as not.
** While neither are is played for laughs, this is probably because Holliday Grainger was twenty-three 23 when she acted her part, whereas Aidan Alexander was actually fourteen.14.
3rd Mar '17 9:19:35 AM wiserlynn
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** In the fourth episode, Ted dates a girl who, it transpires, studies Krav Maga. He acts like a jerk towards her, but the public beating she doles out to him at the episode's end - during which no one in the crowded restaurant attempts to help or intervene - is hardly justified. To make matters worse, when he tells his friends, ''and his children'', what happened, all any of them do is laugh because he 'got beat [sic] up by a girl'. Even worse, in the 21st episode of season 5 Ted reveals that the crowd in the restaurant ''cheered her on''. Furthermore, for don't know, the premise behind Krav Maga is that, in a real fight, no quarter is given to the enemy. You fight to inflict maximum pain and damage in order to accomplish your goal and ensure your safety. Everything is permitted, including eye-gouching and {{Groin Attack}}s.

to:

** In the fourth episode, Ted dates a girl who, it transpires, studies Krav Maga. He acts like a jerk towards her, but the public beating she doles out to him at the episode's end - during which no one in the crowded restaurant attempts to help or intervene - is hardly justified. To make matters worse, when he tells his friends, ''and his children'', what happened, all any of them do is laugh because he 'got beat [sic] up by a girl'. Even worse, in the 21st episode of season 5 Ted reveals that the crowd in the restaurant ''cheered her on''. Furthermore, for don't know, the premise behind Krav Maga is that, in a real fight, no quarter is given to the enemy. You fight to inflict maximum pain and damage in order to accomplish your goal and ensure your safety. Everything is permitted, including eye-gouching and {{Groin Attack}}s.
19th Feb '17 8:47:46 PM _ballerina_
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Added DiffLines:

* Subverted in the ''Series/TheBorgias'' when fourteen-year-old Lucretia's [[MaritalRapeLicense husband]] abuses and rapes her onscreen, more than once, but her thirteen-year-old brother Joffre consummating his marriage with a much older woman is not shown—one was obviously seen as fit to show, and one as not.
**While neither are played for laughs, this is probably because Holliday Grainger was twenty-three when she acted her part, whereas Aidan Alexander was actually fourteen.
17th Feb '17 4:05:02 AM Morgenthaler
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* In season 1 of ''Series/TeenWolf'' [[KnightTemplar evil]] [[TheHunter werewolf hunter]] Kate Argent first corners and tortures Derek Hale, also making suggestive comments. Then, later in the season, she captures and tortures Derek in a deliberately erotic way. Apparently, she had once seduced him when he was a teenager and continued to enjoy "playing" with him as an adult despite her belief that [[FantasticRacism werewolves are not human]]. He is [[{{Fanservice}} shirtless]] during both times. If their genders were reversed there is ''no way'' that these kinds of scenes would have been allowed on a show targeted at a teenage audience.

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* In season 1 of ''Series/TeenWolf'' [[KnightTemplar evil]] [[TheHunter [[HunterOfMonsters werewolf hunter]] Kate Argent first corners and tortures Derek Hale, also making suggestive comments. Then, later in the season, she captures and tortures Derek in a deliberately erotic way. Apparently, she had once seduced him when he was a teenager and continued to enjoy "playing" with him as an adult despite her belief that [[FantasticRacism werewolves are not human]]. He is [[{{Fanservice}} shirtless]] during both times. If their genders were reversed there is ''no way'' that these kinds of scenes would have been allowed on a show targeted at a teenage audience.
12th Feb '17 8:32:27 PM CorahsUncle
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** In the 4th episode, Ted dates a girl who, it transpires, studies Krav Maga. He acts like a jerk towards her, but the public beating she doles out to him at the episode's end - during which no one in the crowded restaurant attempts to help or intervene - is hardly justified. To make matters worse, when he tells his friends, ''and his children'', what happened, all any of them do is laugh because he 'got beat [sic] up by a girl'. Even worse, in the 21st episode of season 5 Ted reveals that the crowd in the restaurant ''cheered her on''. Furthermore, for don't know, the premise behind Krav Maga is that, in a real fight, no quarter is given to the enemy. You fight to inflict maximum pain and damage in order to accomplish your goal and ensure your safety. Everything is permitted, including eye-gouching and {{Groin Attack}}s.

to:

** In the 4th fourth episode, Ted dates a girl who, it transpires, studies Krav Maga. He acts like a jerk towards her, but the public beating she doles out to him at the episode's end - during which no one in the crowded restaurant attempts to help or intervene - is hardly justified. To make matters worse, when he tells his friends, ''and his children'', what happened, all any of them do is laugh because he 'got beat [sic] up by a girl'. Even worse, in the 21st episode of season 5 Ted reveals that the crowd in the restaurant ''cheered her on''. Furthermore, for don't know, the premise behind Krav Maga is that, in a real fight, no quarter is given to the enemy. You fight to inflict maximum pain and damage in order to accomplish your goal and ensure your safety. Everything is permitted, including eye-gouching and {{Groin Attack}}s.



** S3 Ep14, "Light Sleeper" {{averts}} this. The initial suspect in the murder of a Korean woman is her Marine husband. Their neighbor claims she frequently heard them screaming at each other, leading her to believe that husband was abusive. However, the husband reveals to Gibbs that she was the abusive one and proves by lifting up his shirt to reveal a large burn mark where she hit him with an iron. [[spoiler:The woman is later revealed to have been a North Korean sleeper agent.]]

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** S3 Ep14, Episode 14, "Light Sleeper" {{averts}} Sleeper", {{avert|edTrope}}s this. The initial suspect in the murder of a Korean woman is her Marine husband. Their neighbor claims she frequently heard them screaming at each other, leading her to believe that husband was abusive. However, the husband reveals to Gibbs that she was the abusive one and proves by lifting up his shirt to reveal a large burn mark where she hit him with an iron. [[spoiler:The woman is later revealed to have been a North Korean sleeper agent.]]



* Played straight in the US version of ''Series/{{Shameless}}''. After Steve pulls a terribly stupid prank Fiona actually punches him in the face, knocking him down. Because the prank was stupid, it's treated as though he deserved the beating and at no point does she apologize (he in fact must apologize to her for the prank with the physical abuse a non-issue).

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* Played straight in the US U.S. version of ''Series/{{Shameless}}''. After Steve pulls a terribly stupid prank Fiona actually punches him in the face, knocking him down. Because the prank was stupid, it's treated as though he deserved the beating and at no point does she apologize (he in fact must apologize to her for the prank with the physical abuse a non-issue).



* ''Series/{{The Office| US}}''
** In the episode "Test the Store," Andy gets punched by a young girl, and when the office finds out, they ridicule him. The girl's mother forces her to apologize. But, Andy later gets punched by Kelly, and it's again PlayedForLaughs.

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* ''Series/{{The Office| US}}''
Office|US}}''
** In the episode "Test the Store," Store", Andy gets punched by a young girl, and when the office finds out, they ridicule him. The girl's mother forces her to apologize. But, Andy later gets punched by Kelly, and it's again PlayedForLaughs.



* The Investigation Discovery series, ''Deadly Women'' often subverts this, as many of the women featured in the series had either been psychopathic or sociopathic. The ones who premeditated the murders didn't get off as light, but it's not subverted when they actually get off relatively light. Sometimes, it's actually played straight ''and'' subverted at the same time.

to:

* The Investigation Discovery series, series ''Deadly Women'' often subverts this, as many of the women featured in the series had either been psychopathic or sociopathic. The ones who premeditated the murders didn't get off as light, but it's not subverted when they actually get off relatively light. Sometimes, it's actually played straight ''and'' subverted at the same time.



--> "Not to go all schoolyard on you, but you hit me first. In case you've forgotten - you're a little bit stronger than I am."

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--> "Not -->"Not to go all schoolyard on you, but you hit me first. In case you've forgotten - you're a little bit stronger than I am."



* In Series/{{Becker}}, at one point a woman with a history of serious violence is reported to be targeting Reggie by Bob (at the partial encouragement of Bob). It later transpires that the woman has no ill-will towards Reggie, and was simply talking herself up in order to impress Bob into a relationship - he has no interest in her. Reggie instructs the woman to effectively bully Bob into a relationship. Later on, we see her seemingly physically forcing Bob into a date, in which he is clearly unwilling and crying, all PlayedForLaughs. While Bob is hardly an innocent victim, if the genders were reversed it would be downright horrifying.
* ''Series/TheMrPotatoHeadShow'': Queenie Sweet Potato gets away with slapping Mr. Potato Head often. [[DownplayedTrope Downplayed]] in that he never seems to find the slaps very painful.
* Gloriously averted on Series/FearFactor. In the Reality Stars edition, Johnny Fairplay heckles Jonathan & Victoria throughout the entire second stunt which plays a huge part in them quitting. Victoria retaliates by punching Johnny Fairplay square in the chest and Joe Rogan instantaneous calls her out on it. Both Jonathan & Victoria try to justify what Victoria did, but Joe has none of it. And it's implied the only reason they didn't get eliminated for this, is because they had already gotten eliminated when they quit the challenge.
* Zigzagged, and ultimately averted in Series/OrphanBlack. While she did believe that he was her monitor, it doesn't alter the fact that Alison was physically abusive to Donnie. Alison hit him with a gold club, repeatedly slapped him across the face, and tortured him with a glue gun. While Alison is not portrayed in the right, the scene is played with a far more comedic tone than if it were the other way around. However, Sarah and Felix are shocked when they find out about this. Later Donnie brings it up at the intervention and the priest encourages him not to hold back when calling her out on it. Eventually, Donnie checks Allison into rehab due to her violent and abusive behavior.

to:

* In Series/{{Becker}}, ''Series/{{Becker}}'', at one point a woman with a history of serious violence is reported to be targeting Reggie by Bob (at the partial encouragement of Bob). It later transpires that the woman has no ill-will towards Reggie, and was simply talking herself up in order to impress Bob into a relationship - he has no interest in her. Reggie instructs the woman to effectively bully Bob into a relationship. Later on, Later, we see her seemingly physically forcing Bob into a date, in which he is clearly unwilling and crying, all PlayedForLaughs. While Bob is hardly an innocent victim, if the genders were reversed it would be downright horrifying.
* ''Series/TheMrPotatoHeadShow'': Queenie Sweet Potato gets away with slapping Mr. Potato Head often. [[DownplayedTrope Downplayed]] {{Downplayed|Trope}} in that he never seems to find the slaps very painful.
* Gloriously averted on Series/FearFactor.''Series/FearFactor''. In the Reality Stars edition, Johnny Fairplay heckles Jonathan & Victoria throughout the entire second stunt which plays a huge part in them quitting. Victoria retaliates by punching Johnny Fairplay square in the chest and Joe Rogan instantaneous calls her out on it. Both Jonathan & and Victoria try to justify what Victoria did, but Joe has none of it. And it's implied the only reason they didn't get eliminated for this, is because that they had already gotten been eliminated when they quit the challenge.
* Zigzagged, and ultimately averted averted, in Series/OrphanBlack.''Series/OrphanBlack''. While she did believe that he was her monitor, it doesn't alter the fact that Alison was physically abusive to Donnie. Alison hit him with a gold golf club, repeatedly slapped him across the face, and tortured him with a glue gun. While Alison is not portrayed in the right, the scene is played with a far more comedic tone than if it were the other way around. However, Sarah and Felix are shocked when they find out about this. Later Donnie brings it up at the intervention and the priest encourages him not to hold back when calling her out on it. Eventually, Donnie checks Allison into rehab due to her violent and abusive behavior.behavior.
* In what little of ''Series/ShortRibbs'' has surfaced on [=YouTube=], Creator/PattyMaloney will readily whack a man who gets out of line. For instance, in a supermarket sketch that spoofs the "Don't Squeeze the Charmin" commercials, she slaps Creator/BillyBarty when he gets too attracted to her strawberry print dress.
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