History DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale / LiveActionTV

24th Aug '16 10:27:33 PM Fireblood
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** When Doug is so traumatized by Carrie's emotional and physical abuse that he ends up talking to a support group for abused men, the episode ends with Carrie giving a speech to the support group about how Doug's actions justified her behavior.

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** When Doug is so traumatized by Carrie's emotional and physical abuse that he ends up talking to joins a support group for abused men, men in abusive relationships (to get out of the episode ends with weight loss one, which doesn't serve food), they have him talk about his experience and he relates how Carrie giving a speech does things like twist his nipples after he angers her over something. He also blames this for his weight. Carrie herself doesn't help this by being her normal obnoxious self when she comes to the support pick Doug up. After learning what group about how Doug's actions he's really in, she's of course outraged and notes that Doug was already overweight before she even met him. However, her twisting his nipples is justified her behavior.by his bad behavior according to her. It's pretty certain however that no one would feel this excused Doug twisting ''her'' nipples.



* ''Series/MemphisBeat'' has an interesting take on this. The trope is initially played straight and PlayedForLaughs, but eventually subverted. One of the male police officers - a very big man and a sort of CloudCuckooLander - is seen apparently taking quite the verbal batterment from his wife on the phone, then later in the episode comes in with odd bandages. Three other officers - Whitehead, Dwight, and their female boss - ask him what happened, and he says, "My wife stabbed me" as though it were no big deal. Dwight and the boss don't so much as bat their eyes, but old-fashioned, curmedgeonly Whitehead tells him he should stand up to his wife. At the end of the episode, Dwight tells the officer he shouldn't let his wife push him around, and the end of the episode shows him standing beside her in the booking line - presumably she's being booked for assault. It went from ActuallyPrettyFunny to TearJerker pretty quickly.

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* ''Series/MemphisBeat'' has an interesting take on this. The trope is initially played straight and PlayedForLaughs, but eventually subverted. One of the male police officers - a very big man and a sort of CloudCuckooLander - is seen apparently taking quite the verbal batterment beating from his wife on the phone, then later in the episode comes in with odd bandages. Three other officers - Whitehead, Dwight, and their female boss - ask him what happened, and he says, "My wife stabbed me" as though it were no big deal. Dwight and the boss don't so much as bat their eyes, but old-fashioned, curmedgeonly Whitehead tells him he should stand up to his wife. At the end of the episode, Dwight tells the officer he shouldn't let his wife push him around, and the end of the episode shows him standing beside her in the booking line - presumably she's being booked for assault. It went from ActuallyPrettyFunny to TearJerker pretty quickly.



** "Taboo" - [[{{Squick}} a man and his 20-year-old daughter]] were having an affair. Despite their protests that it was consensual (arguable but near-impossible to prove) and the DA's assurances that it was [[CrossesTheLineTwice a relatively low-level crime]], Anvilicious Olivia Benson went storming around determined to prosecute the man for incest (ignoring the fact that the adult woman would also have to be prosecuted), attempting to browbeat the girl into admitting that he raped her and had knowledge of the two children of theirs she killed (which he didn't). She even yelled, "SO ELLA [the woman] GETS ATTEMPTED MURDER AND HE GETS OFF?" at one point -- well, yes, Olivia, that is what happens when a woman commits infanticide.
** In a Season 12 episode, Olivia argues that, if a man and woman go upstairs drunk to have sex, it's all the man's fault. Regardless of circumstances. So, if the man and woman go upstairs equally drunk and the man is the same/more affected than the woman, it's the man's fault! If a woman gets slightly drunk and the man is completely hammered to the point of being unable to understand what's going on - it's not woman/male rape, it's the man's fault!

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** "Taboo" - [[{{Squick}} a A man and his 20-year-old daughter]] were having an affair. Despite their protests that it was consensual (arguable but near-impossible to prove) and the DA's assurances that it was [[CrossesTheLineTwice a relatively low-level crime]], Anvilicious {{anvilicious}} Olivia Benson went storming around determined to prosecute the man for incest (ignoring the fact that the adult woman would also have to be prosecuted), attempting to browbeat the girl into admitting that he raped her and had knowledge of the two children of theirs she killed (which he didn't). She even yelled, yelled "SO ELLA [the woman] GETS ATTEMPTED MURDER AND HE GETS OFF?" at one point -- well, yes, Olivia, that is what happens when a woman commits infanticide.
** In a Season 12 episode, Olivia argues that, if a man and woman go upstairs drunk to have sex, it's all the man's fault. Regardless of circumstances. So, if the man and woman go upstairs equally drunk and the man is the same/more affected than the woman, it's the man's fault! If a woman gets slightly drunk and the man is completely hammered to the point of being unable to understand what's going on - it's not woman/male male rape, it's the man's fault!



** It also comes up in-universe. In the case of rape, most of the female perps prey on younger males, and if anyone outside SVU comments on it, expect at least a few mentions of how "lucky" the victim is to be having sex with a hot older woman. There's one episode where a teenage boy is raped by a male coach who catfished him by posing as a sexy female teacher known for having sex with her students. His own parents decide not to let him testify once it comes out that he was victimized by a man, specifically because if it had been a woman "that would be one thing, but..." .

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** It also comes up in-universe. In the case of rape, most of the female perps prey on younger males, and if anyone outside SVU comments on it, expect at least a few mentions of how "lucky" the victim is to be having sex with a hot older woman. There's one episode where a teenage boy is raped by a male coach who catfished him by posing as a sexy female teacher known for having sex with her students. His own parents decide not to let him testify once it comes out that he was victimized by a man, specifically because if it had been a woman "that would be one thing, but..." . "



* The Investigation Discovery series, ''Deadly Women'' often subverts this, as many of the women featured in the series had either been psychopathic or sociopathic. The ones who pre-meditated the murders didn't get off as light, but it's not subverted when they actually get off relatively light. Sometimes, it's actually played straight ''and'' subverted at the same time.

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* The Investigation Discovery series, ''Deadly Women'' often subverts this, as many of the women featured in the series had either been psychopathic or sociopathic. The ones who pre-meditated premeditated the murders didn't get off as light, but it's not subverted when they actually get off relatively light. Sometimes, it's actually played straight ''and'' subverted at the same time.



* Something similar happens in an episode of ''Series/PrivatePractice'': an obese teenager reveals that he overeats to protect himself from abuse. Cooper assumes it's the father but, as it turns out, it's actually the mother, and the father is horrified when he finds out.

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* Something similar happens in an episode of ''Series/PrivatePractice'': an An obese teenager reveals that he overeats to protect himself from abuse. Cooper assumes it's the father but, as it turns out, it's actually the mother, and the father is horrified when he finds out.



* On ''Series/TheThinBlueLine'' after Patricia discovers the NotWhatItLooksLike tape mentioned on the main page involving the Mayoress and Inspector Fowler , she goes for the rolling pin, and when he argues against her idea of having kids, she hits him with a fish.

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* On ''Series/TheThinBlueLine'' after Patricia discovers the NotWhatItLooksLike tape mentioned on the main page involving the Mayoress and Inspector Fowler , Fowler, she goes for the rolling pin, and when he argues against her idea of having kids, she hits him with a fish.



* Averted quite seriously ''Series/ColdCase''. After an encounter with a barely coherent, Alzheimer-stricken women calling for her late husband husband at the cemetery where he's buried Lilly reopens his unsolved thirteen year old murder. Though the man's now-adult son seems to be the prime suspect, he eventually reveals their family secret: His mother was a violent drunk who would attack his father, to the extent that he locked himself in his own bedroom out of fear of her. When she finds out he's been seeing someone else, she attacks and kills him with a fireplace poker. Then, in a final humiliation, she forced her then-teenage son to help her dump his body in an alley known as an area for prostitution, leaving him surrounded by drag paraphernalia.
** This story is particularly ironic when you consider that Chris Lassing, Lilly's short-lived partner at the time was played by Justin Chambers, who later appeared on Grey's Anatomy as Alex, who had a VERY different take on female-on-male abuse (see above).
* A 2011 episode of daytime talk show ''The Talk'' included a discussion about a California man who was castrated by his wife (who he was filing a divorce from), who then threw his severed penis into the garbage disposal to mangle it further. Co-host Sharon Osbourne was quite giddy about the situation, and a large part of the mostly female audience fed off that. Most of the rest of the female co-hosts joined in as well, but eventually former child actress Sarah Gilbert lampshaded the double standard by arguing it was sexist to laugh at his fate when mutilating a woman would not be greeted with such mirth. Sharon refused to yield, continuing to laugh about it.

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* Averted quite seriously ''Series/ColdCase''. After an encounter with a barely coherent, Alzheimer-stricken women calling for her late husband husband at the cemetery where he's buried buried, Lilly reopens his unsolved thirteen year old murder. Though the man's now-adult son seems to be the prime suspect, he eventually reveals their family secret: His his mother was a violent drunk who would attack his father, to the extent that he locked himself in his own bedroom out of fear of her. When she finds found out he's been seeing someone else, she attacks attacked and kills killed him with a fireplace poker. Then, in a final humiliation, she forced her then-teenage son to help her dump his body in an alley known as an area for prostitution, leaving him surrounded by drag paraphernalia.
** This story is particularly ironic when you consider that Chris Lassing, Lilly's short-lived partner at the time time, was played by Justin Chambers, who later appeared on Grey's Anatomy as Alex, who had a VERY different take on female-on-male abuse (see above).
* A 2011 episode of daytime talk show ''The Talk'' included a discussion about a California man who was castrated by his wife (who he was filing a for divorce from), who then threw his severed penis into the garbage disposal to mangle it further. Co-host Sharon Osbourne was quite giddy about the situation, and a large part of the mostly female audience fed off that. Most of the rest of the female co-hosts joined in as well, but eventually former child actress Sarah Gilbert lampshaded the double standard by arguing it was sexist to laugh at his fate when mutilating a woman would not be greeted with such mirth. Sharon refused to yield, continuing to laugh about it.
15th Aug '16 6:10:14 AM TotalDramaRox97
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* Gloriously averted on Series/FearFactor. In the Reality Stars edition, Johnny Fairplay heckles Jonathan & Victoria throughout the entire second stunt which plays a huge part in them quitting. Victoria retaliates by punching Johnny Fairplay square in the chest and Joe Rogan instantaneous calls her out on it. Both Jonathan & Victoria try to justify what Victoria did, but Joe has none of it. And it's implied the only reason they didn't get eliminated for this, is because they had already gotten eliminated when they quit the challenge. Nonetheless it was awesome to see Joe Rogan handle the situation seriously

to:

* Gloriously averted on Series/FearFactor. In the Reality Stars edition, Johnny Fairplay heckles Jonathan & Victoria throughout the entire second stunt which plays a huge part in them quitting. Victoria retaliates by punching Johnny Fairplay square in the chest and Joe Rogan instantaneous calls her out on it. Both Jonathan & Victoria try to justify what Victoria did, but Joe has none of it. And it's implied the only reason they didn't get eliminated for this, is because they had already gotten eliminated when they quit the challenge. Nonetheless it was awesome to see Joe Rogan handle the situation seriously
15th Aug '16 6:08:46 AM TotalDramaRox97
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Added DiffLines:

* Gloriously averted on Series/FearFactor. In the Reality Stars edition, Johnny Fairplay heckles Jonathan & Victoria throughout the entire second stunt which plays a huge part in them quitting. Victoria retaliates by punching Johnny Fairplay square in the chest and Joe Rogan instantaneous calls her out on it. Both Jonathan & Victoria try to justify what Victoria did, but Joe has none of it. And it's implied the only reason they didn't get eliminated for this, is because they had already gotten eliminated when they quit the challenge. Nonetheless it was awesome to see Joe Rogan handle the situation seriously
22nd Jul '16 5:47:21 PM HighCrate
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** In fact, throughout the whole entire series, Bernadette is portrayed as bossy, authoritarian, and mean. So much so, that her own co-workers and supervisors avoid her as much as possible.
22nd Jul '16 4:45:18 PM gman992
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Added DiffLines:

** In fact, throughout the whole entire series, Bernadette is portrayed as bossy, authoritarian, and mean. So much so, that her own co-workers and supervisors avoid her as much as possible.
6th Jun '16 10:51:20 AM HighCrate
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** In "iFight Shelby Marx," Carly, Sam, and Shelby all gang up on Nevel, and it is implied that they beat him up. Some viewers have tried to defend their actions by talking about how Nevel tried to manipulate Shelby into beating up Carly by falsely claiming that Carly had deliberately tried to injure Shelby's grandmother but the fact remains that it would never be considered acceptable if the genders were reversed.
*** Add in that Shelby is a professional fighter, and it could literally be assault with a deadly weapon.

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** In "iFight Shelby Marx," Carly, Sam, and Shelby all gang up on Nevel, and it is implied that they beat him up. Some viewers have tried to defend their actions by talking about how Nevel tried to manipulate Shelby into beating up Carly by falsely claiming that Carly had deliberately tried to injure Shelby's grandmother but the fact remains that it would never be considered acceptable if the genders were reversed.
***
reversed. Add in that Shelby is a professional fighter, and it could literally be assault with a deadly weapon.
6th Jun '16 9:43:25 AM cdrood
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Added DiffLines:

*** Add in that Shelby is a professional fighter, and it could literally be assault with a deadly weapon.
25th May '16 9:11:30 PM HighCrate
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* The show ''Series/AgentCarter'' is so boastful about how much more enlightened and feminist it is compared to its own setting that it's literally set the standard that ''saying the wrong thing'' to Peggy Carter or to any woman she cares about in her presence means you should both expect and deserve to be assaulted even if you're not actually supposed to be a villain. Take, for example, how she would often respond to [[StrawMisogynist sexist comments by her colleagues]] [[UnderestimatingBadassery underestimating her talents because she's a woman]] by punching the guys for saying them. Or her reaction to a customer who spent three weeks in a Nazi POW camp making jerkass remarks towards her waitress friend Angie and slapping Angie's ass as she turns to leave: instead of punching, which might've been appropriate in this case, Peggy places a fork right up against a vital artery in his side and ''threatens to pierce it and leave him bleeding to death in minutes unless he tips her friend generously and never returns to the diner again''. The friend is seen smiling about this and it's treated as a badass heroic moment, not as a borderline assault worthy of any sort of reprimand. (This isn't even exclusive to the TV series: this particular version of Peggy Carter debuted in the film ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'' and even there she has a similar moment with the titular hero himself, '''firing a handgun repeatedly at him''' with only with his (then brand new and untested) iconically indestructible shield protecting him from harm.)

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* The show ''Series/AgentCarter'' is so boastful about how much more enlightened and feminist it is compared to its own setting that it's literally set the standard that ''saying the wrong thing'' to Peggy Carter or to any woman she cares about in her presence means you should both expect and deserve to be assaulted even if you're not actually supposed to be a villain. Take, for example, how she would often respond to [[StrawMisogynist sexist comments by her colleagues]] [[UnderestimatingBadassery underestimating her talents because she's a woman]] by punching the guys for saying them. Or her reaction to a customer who spent three weeks in a Nazi POW camp making jerkass remarks towards her waitress friend Angie and slapping Angie's ass as she turns to leave: instead of punching, which might've been appropriate in this case, Peggy places a fork right up against a vital artery in his side and ''threatens to pierce it and leave him bleeding to death in minutes unless he tips her friend generously and never returns to the diner again''. The friend is seen smiling about this and it's treated as a badass heroic moment, not as a borderline assault worthy of any sort of reprimand. (This isn't even exclusive to the TV series: this particular version of Peggy Carter debuted in the film ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'' and even there she has a similar moment with the titular hero himself, '''firing a handgun repeatedly at him''' with only with his (then brand new and untested) iconically indestructible shield protecting him from harm.)
25th May '16 8:39:26 PM TheDogSage
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* The show ''Series/AgentCarter'' is so boastful about how much more enlightened and feminist it is compared to its own setting that it's literally set the standard that ''saying the wrong thing'' to Peggy Carter or to any woman she cares about in her presence means you should both expect and deserve to be assaulted even if you're not actually supposed to be a villain. Take, for example, how she would often respond to [[StrawMisogynist sexist comments by her colleagues]] [[UnderestimatingBadassery underestimating her talents because she's a woman]] by punching the guys for saying them. Or her reaction to a customer who spent three weeks in a Nazi POW camp making jerkass remarks towards her waitress friend Angie and slapping Angie's ass as she turns to leave: instead of punching, which might've been appropriate in this case, Peggy places a fork right up against a vital artery in his side and ''threatens to pierce it and leave him bleeding to death in minutes unless he tips her friend generously and never returns to the diner again''. The friend is seen smiling about this and it's treated as a badass heroic moment, not as a borderline assault worthy of any sort of reprimand. (This isn't even exclusive to the TV series: this particular version of Peggy Carter debuted in the film ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'' and even there she has a similar moment with the titular hero himself.)

to:

* The show ''Series/AgentCarter'' is so boastful about how much more enlightened and feminist it is compared to its own setting that it's literally set the standard that ''saying the wrong thing'' to Peggy Carter or to any woman she cares about in her presence means you should both expect and deserve to be assaulted even if you're not actually supposed to be a villain. Take, for example, how she would often respond to [[StrawMisogynist sexist comments by her colleagues]] [[UnderestimatingBadassery underestimating her talents because she's a woman]] by punching the guys for saying them. Or her reaction to a customer who spent three weeks in a Nazi POW camp making jerkass remarks towards her waitress friend Angie and slapping Angie's ass as she turns to leave: instead of punching, which might've been appropriate in this case, Peggy places a fork right up against a vital artery in his side and ''threatens to pierce it and leave him bleeding to death in minutes unless he tips her friend generously and never returns to the diner again''. The friend is seen smiling about this and it's treated as a badass heroic moment, not as a borderline assault worthy of any sort of reprimand. (This isn't even exclusive to the TV series: this particular version of Peggy Carter debuted in the film ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'' and even there she has a similar moment with the titular hero himself.himself, '''firing a handgun repeatedly at him''' with only with his (then brand new and untested) iconically indestructible shield protecting him from harm.)
17th Apr '16 6:39:52 AM HighCrate
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** Series 8 had two occasions ("Into The Dalek" & "Listen") where Clara smacked the Twelfth Doctor upside his head. It's treated as her just knocking some sense into him in both cases, played seriously in "Into the Dalek" and for laughs in "Listen". But those pale in comparison to a crack she makes in "Kill The Moon", where in the wake of [[spoiler: him leaving a choice that would determine Earth's future in her and humanity's hands, rather than making a decision for them]], she threatens to hit him so hard he'll have to regenerate. In other words, '''she just threatened to beat him to death'''. Imagine if the shoe was on the other foot and the Doctor told Clara that he would smack her so hard that he'd need to find another companion because she'd be indisposed during a rather lengthy stay in hospital. Hooray for our plucky heroine...? To make matters worse, she knew Twelve back when he was Eleven. The only time she laid a hand on Eleven was to help him resist being turned into a Cyberman. Eleven was younger-looking and more amiable than Twelve (DarkerAndEdgier / NoSocialSkills), so are misconceptions of BeautyEqualsGoodness and DarkIsEvil affecting her treatment of the latter?

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** Series 8 had has two occasions ("Into The Dalek" & "Listen") where Clara smacked smacks the Twelfth Doctor upside his head. It's treated as her just knocking some sense into him in both cases, played seriously in "Into the Dalek" and for laughs in "Listen". But those pale in comparison to a crack she makes in "Kill The Moon", where in the wake of [[spoiler: him his leaving a choice that would determine Earth's future in her and humanity's hands, rather than making a decision for them]], she threatens to hit him so hard he'll have to regenerate. In other words, '''she ''she just threatened to beat him to death'''.death''. Imagine if the shoe was on the other foot and the Doctor told Clara that he would smack her so hard that he'd need to find another companion because she'd be indisposed during a rather lengthy stay in hospital. Hooray for our plucky heroine...? To make matters worse, she knew Twelve back when he was Eleven. The only time she laid a hand on Eleven was to help him resist being turned into a Cyberman. Eleven was younger-looking and more amiable than Twelve (DarkerAndEdgier / NoSocialSkills), so are misconceptions of BeautyEqualsGoodness and DarkIsEvil affecting her treatment of the latter?
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