History DorkAge / TheDCU

16th Sep '17 9:45:17 PM Psychadelico
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* ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice'', like ''Identity Crisis'' above, is frequently-but-not-exclusively considered to be one. Also like ''Identity Crisis'', it was the catalyst for a Dork Age in the [[ComicBook/GreenArrow Arrow Family]], and more specifically Roy Harper (Speedy/Red Arrow/Arsenal), who [[AddledAddict fell back into addiction]] and became DarkerAndEdgier to the point he was killing bums in an alley over the dead cat he had hallucinated was his dead daughter.
11th Sep '17 1:42:35 PM Acomicfan1
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* Franchise/TheFlash's revamps since ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' have been very poorly received, and for good reason:
** First, Wally was PutOnABus and FunPersonified KidHero Bart Allen was hit with forced aging and, worst of all, increasing amounts of {{wangst}}, finally resulting in the decidedly Not-Fun adult that starred in the first ''The Flash: The Fastest Man Alive'' revamp. Both series and character proved to be short-lived, as both were unexpectedly killed off in issue #13 due to negative reception.
** This resulted in the return of not only the previous, popular Flash, Wally West, but the return of popular '90s Flash writer Mark Waid. This version focused on Wally adventuring with his new superpowered [[SpinOffspring kids]]. The resulting series was considered better than the previous attempt, but reception was still lukewarm, with many seeing the kids as a pint-sized SpotlightStealingSquad.
** Then the [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] Flash, Barry Allen, was brought back and revamped by the return of popular '00s Flash writer Creator/GeoffJohns. This has met with mixed results, with the [[ScheduleSlip book being frequently late]] compounding complaints of slow pacing. There were also the problems of villain Professor Zoom being seen as a massive VillainSue, and CharacterShilling for Barry to make newer readers like him, as well as Wally West being DemotedToExtra. This lead up to a Flash-centric crossover, ''ComicBook/{{Flashpoint}}'', which led to a continuity reboot for the whole universe, and the story itself is already not very liked, never mind the wider effects it had.
** The new ComicBook/{{New 52}} Flash book is focusing exclusively on Barry, with several changes made to previous Flash canon such as Iris and Barry no longer being married and the Flash legacy no longer existing. Reviews of the Flash book continue to be mixed at best, despite the creative art style, and complains include flat characterisation of Barry, as well as overall mediocre stories.
** The second New 52 creative team is viewed as much, much worse, possibly the worst since Bart Allen's turn as the Flash. Wally West is reintroduced with ''very'' controversial changes to his character. The plot becomes especially convoluted by focusing on Barry Allen somehow "losing time" when he runs. Eobard Thawne is brought back and many see him as an even worse VillainSue than before, and his characterisation and motivation are wildly inconsistent. And then there's the art, which features Brett Booth trying his hardest to emulate the previous art style, as well as introducing a really, really ugly costume for Barry Allen, one that seems to try to copy the TV show's, which made its costume closer to ''the comics'' at the same time.
** During UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, "helpful alien"-type characters were becoming popular with writers, with Superman battling Mr. Mxyzptlk and Batman putting up with Bat-Mite. So the decision was made to {{retcon}} the lightning bolt that gave Barry Allen his powers, revealing that the imp-like "heavenly help-mate" Mopee had been its true source. Cue massive backlash in the "letters to the editor" page. So hated was this development that it [[CanonDisContinuity has never been mentioned since, at least in-continuity]]. However, once enough time passed, it became a curious bit of nostalgia, and has shown up several times in out-of-continuity works like ''ComicBook/AmbushBug''.

to:

* Franchise/TheFlash's revamps since ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' have been very poorly received, and for good reason:
** First, Wally was PutOnABus and FunPersonified KidHero Bart Allen was hit with forced aging and, worst of all, increasing amounts of {{wangst}}, finally resulting in the decidedly Not-Fun adult that starred in the first ''The Flash: The Fastest Man Alive'' revamp. Both series and character proved to be short-lived, as both were unexpectedly killed off in issue #13 due to negative reception.
** This resulted in the return of not only the previous, popular Flash, Wally West, but the return of popular '90s Flash writer Mark Waid. This version focused on Wally adventuring with his new superpowered [[SpinOffspring kids]]. The resulting series was considered better than the previous attempt, but reception was still lukewarm, with many seeing the kids as a pint-sized SpotlightStealingSquad.
** Then the [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] Flash, Barry Allen, was brought back and revamped by the return of popular '00s Flash writer Creator/GeoffJohns. This has met with mixed results, with the [[ScheduleSlip book being frequently late]] compounding complaints of slow pacing. There were also the problems of villain Professor Zoom being seen as a massive VillainSue, and CharacterShilling for Barry to make newer readers like him, as well as Wally West being DemotedToExtra. This lead up to a Flash-centric crossover, ''ComicBook/{{Flashpoint}}'', which led to a continuity reboot for the whole universe, and the story itself is already not very liked, never mind the wider effects it had.
** The new ComicBook/{{New 52}} Flash book is focusing exclusively on Barry, with several changes made to previous Flash canon such as Iris and Barry no longer being married and the Flash legacy no longer existing. Reviews of the Flash book continue to be mixed at best, despite the creative art style, and complains include flat characterisation of Barry, as well as overall mediocre stories.
** The second New 52 creative team is viewed as much, much worse, possibly the worst since Bart Allen's turn as the Flash. Wally West is reintroduced with ''very'' controversial changes to his character. The plot becomes especially convoluted by focusing on Barry Allen somehow "losing time" when he runs. Eobard Thawne is brought back and many see him as an even worse VillainSue than before, and his characterisation and motivation are wildly inconsistent. And then there's the art, which features Brett Booth trying his hardest to emulate the previous art style, as well as introducing a really, really ugly costume for Barry Allen, one that seems to try to copy the TV show's, which made its costume closer to ''the comics'' at the same time.
**
During UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, "helpful alien"-type characters were becoming popular with writers, with Superman battling Mr. Mxyzptlk and Batman putting up with Bat-Mite. So the decision was made to {{retcon}} the lightning bolt that gave Barry Allen his powers, revealing that the imp-like "heavenly help-mate" Mopee had been its true source. Cue massive backlash in the "letters to the editor" page. So hated was this development that it [[CanonDisContinuity has never been mentioned since, at least in-continuity]]. However, once enough time passed, it became a curious bit of nostalgia, and has shown up several times in out-of-continuity works like ''ComicBook/AmbushBug''.
8th Sep '17 12:41:16 AM AlternativeCola
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** Into another Dork Age. This time, Will Pfeifer wrote largely forgettable stories trying [[WereStillRelevantDammit incredibly hard to be "relevant"]], with the social media side of things amped up in embarrassing ways, characters being downright unlikeable, and an ''ungodly'' amount of focus on CreatorsPet VillainSue Manchester Black, who basically existed to pull off stupid gambits while retaining none of what made him a good villain when he debuted in [[Franchise/{{Superman}} "What's So Funny About Truth, Justice and the American Way"]]. There were also tons of continuity issues with the previous run, which this run for ''some reason'' kept canon. Then Lobdell was brought back for some reason, meaning Pfeifer had to rush whatever he had planned and just ended up dumping most of it. Lobdell proceeded to screw the series once again, and it limped along with some fill-in writers (who wrapped up some lingering plot threats) while it waited for [[spoiler: Tim Drake to die over in ''ComicBook/DetectiveComicsRebirth'']], while the rest of DC's comics had been relaunched under the well-received ComicBook/DCRebirth banner, essentially leaving ''Teen Titans'' as this thing that just ''refused to die''. The series finally came to an end once [[spoiler: Tim apparently died (in actuality, he was beamed into another dimension and being captive under
Mr. Oz)]]. The legacy both series left was being the series that it was seemingly okay to make fun of ''in-universe'', which the subsequent series, ''ComicBook/TeenTitansRebirth'', ''did''.

to:

** Into another Dork Age. This time, Will Pfeifer wrote largely forgettable stories trying [[WereStillRelevantDammit incredibly hard to be "relevant"]], with the social media side of things amped up in embarrassing ways, characters being downright unlikeable, and an ''ungodly'' amount of focus on CreatorsPet VillainSue Manchester Black, who basically existed to pull off stupid gambits while retaining none of what made him a good villain when he debuted in [[Franchise/{{Superman}} "What's So Funny About Truth, Justice and the American Way"]]. There were also tons of continuity issues with the previous run, which this run for ''some reason'' kept canon. Then Lobdell was brought back for some reason, meaning Pfeifer had to rush whatever he had planned and just ended up dumping most of it. Lobdell proceeded to screw the series once again, and it limped along with some fill-in writers (who wrapped up some lingering plot threats) while it waited for [[spoiler: Tim Drake to die over in ''ComicBook/DetectiveComicsRebirth'']], while the rest of DC's comics had been relaunched under the well-received ComicBook/DCRebirth banner, essentially leaving ''Teen Titans'' as this thing that just ''refused to die''. The series finally came to an end once [[spoiler: Tim apparently died (in actuality, he was beamed into another dimension and being captive under
under Mr. Oz)]]. The legacy both series left was being the series that it was seemingly okay to make fun of ''in-universe'', which the subsequent series, ''ComicBook/TeenTitansRebirth'', ''did''.
8th Sep '17 12:40:12 AM AlternativeCola
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** Into another Dork Age. This time, Will Pfeifer wrote largely forgettable stories trying [[WereStillRelevantDammit incredibly hard to be "relevant"]], with the social media side of things amped up in embarrassing ways, characters being downright unlikeable, and an ''ungodly'' amount of focus on CreatorsPet VillainSue Manchester Black, who basically existed to pull off stupid gambits while retaining none of what made him a good villain when he debuted in [[Franchise/{{Superman}} "What's So Funny About Truth, Justice and the American Way"]]. There were also tons of continuity issues with the previous run, which this run for ''some reason'' kept canon. Then Lobdell was brought back for some reason, meaning Pfeifer had to rush whatever he had planned and just ended up dumping most of it. Lobdell proceeded to screw the series once again, and it limped along with some fill-in writers (who wrapped up some lingering plot threats) while it waited for [[spoiler: Tim Drake to die over in ''ComicBook/DetectiveComicsRebirth'']], while the rest of DC's comics had been relaunched under the well-received ComicBook/DCRebirth banner, essentially leaving ''Teen Titans'' as this thing that just ''refused to die''. The series finally came to and end once [[spoiler: Tim died]]. The legacy both series left was being the series that it was seemingly okay to make fun of ''in-universe'', which the subsequent series, ''ComicBook/TeenTitansRebirth'', ''did''.

to:

** Into another Dork Age. This time, Will Pfeifer wrote largely forgettable stories trying [[WereStillRelevantDammit incredibly hard to be "relevant"]], with the social media side of things amped up in embarrassing ways, characters being downright unlikeable, and an ''ungodly'' amount of focus on CreatorsPet VillainSue Manchester Black, who basically existed to pull off stupid gambits while retaining none of what made him a good villain when he debuted in [[Franchise/{{Superman}} "What's So Funny About Truth, Justice and the American Way"]]. There were also tons of continuity issues with the previous run, which this run for ''some reason'' kept canon. Then Lobdell was brought back for some reason, meaning Pfeifer had to rush whatever he had planned and just ended up dumping most of it. Lobdell proceeded to screw the series once again, and it limped along with some fill-in writers (who wrapped up some lingering plot threats) while it waited for [[spoiler: Tim Drake to die over in ''ComicBook/DetectiveComicsRebirth'']], while the rest of DC's comics had been relaunched under the well-received ComicBook/DCRebirth banner, essentially leaving ''Teen Titans'' as this thing that just ''refused to die''. The series finally came to and an end once [[spoiler: Tim died]].apparently died (in actuality, he was beamed into another dimension and being captive under
Mr. Oz)]].
The legacy both series left was being the series that it was seemingly okay to make fun of ''in-universe'', which the subsequent series, ''ComicBook/TeenTitansRebirth'', ''did''.
22nd Jul '17 6:27:35 PM MBG
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* It's hard to point to a time in ''ComicBook/TeenTitans'' past [[MyRealDaddy the Wolfman/Perez run]] that fans don't consider to be a DorkAge, but most fans place the beginning of the franchise's biggest and longest DorkAge at sometime around Volume 3 and the GeoffJohns run. Several ''Comicbook/YoungJustice'' characters were derailed for the purpose of "graduating" them to the Titans, which mostly irritated fans of both comics. Though fans enjoyed the return of the book's original title and cast, the novelty wound up wearing off fairly quickly, and the book's quality went downhill even further with the ''One Year Later'' portion and Johns leaving the book, as well as ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' seemingly making the Titans "[[CListFodder the heroes that it's okay to kill]]." The remainder of Volume 3 proved to be a slow decline, with characters being offed for no reason, being pointlessly DarkerAndEdgier, and the few usable plotlines being wasted. ''Villains for Hire'', which featured the gratuitous murder of Ryan Choi and a character who set people on fire with her vagina, was widely considered the nadir of the franchise. The series needed a reboot more than most...

to:

* It's hard to point to a time in ''ComicBook/TeenTitans'' past [[MyRealDaddy the Wolfman/Perez run]] that some group of fans don't doesn't consider to be a DorkAge, but most fans place the beginning of the franchise's biggest and longest DorkAge at sometime around Volume 3 and the GeoffJohns run. Several ''Comicbook/YoungJustice'' characters were derailed for the purpose of "graduating" them to the Titans, which mostly irritated fans of both comics. Though fans enjoyed the return of the book's original title and cast, the novelty wound up wearing off fairly quickly, and the book's quality went downhill even further with the ''One Year Later'' portion and Johns leaving the book, as well as ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' seemingly making the Titans "[[CListFodder the heroes that it's okay to kill]]." The remainder of Volume 3 proved to be a slow decline, with characters being offed for no reason, being pointlessly DarkerAndEdgier, and the few usable plotlines being wasted. ''Villains for Hire'', which featured the gratuitous murder of Ryan Choi and a character who set people on fire with her vagina, was widely considered the nadir of the franchise. The series needed a reboot more than most...
5th Jul '17 9:13:27 AM FuzzyBarbarian
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** Then the team's ''ComicBook/{{New 52}}'' reboot proceeded to take things FromBadToWorse. Written by the largely reviled Scott Lobdell, the series kicked off with a ridiculous, unfocused arc that tried to cross over with about six other books and starred a VillainSue. Several characters had core personality traits ironed out, almost to InNameOnly levels (see Tim Drake above), the costumes were ridiculous, many plotlines felt like an excuse for more fight scenes, and the Titans themselves didn't feel like a team or even like friends. The resulting book didn't make it past thirty issues, and was promptly rebooted.

to:

** Then the team's ''ComicBook/{{New 52}}'' reboot proceeded to take things FromBadToWorse. Written by the largely reviled Scott Lobdell, the series kicked off with a ridiculous, unfocused arc that tried to cross over with about six other books and starred a VillainSue. Several characters had core personality traits ironed out, almost to InNameOnly levels (see Tim Drake above), the costumes were ridiculous, many plotlines felt like an excuse for more fight scenes, the plotlines that actually ''tried'' were awful, convoluted and inconsistent, and the Titans themselves didn't feel like a team or even like friends. The resulting book didn't make it past thirty issues, and was promptly rebooted.rebooted...
** Into another Dork Age. This time, Will Pfeifer wrote largely forgettable stories trying [[WereStillRelevantDammit incredibly hard to be "relevant"]], with the social media side of things amped up in embarrassing ways, characters being downright unlikeable, and an ''ungodly'' amount of focus on CreatorsPet VillainSue Manchester Black, who basically existed to pull off stupid gambits while retaining none of what made him a good villain when he debuted in [[Franchise/{{Superman}} "What's So Funny About Truth, Justice and the American Way"]]. There were also tons of continuity issues with the previous run, which this run for ''some reason'' kept canon. Then Lobdell was brought back for some reason, meaning Pfeifer had to rush whatever he had planned and just ended up dumping most of it. Lobdell proceeded to screw the series once again, and it limped along with some fill-in writers (who wrapped up some lingering plot threats) while it waited for [[spoiler: Tim Drake to die over in ''ComicBook/DetectiveComicsRebirth'']], while the rest of DC's comics had been relaunched under the well-received ComicBook/DCRebirth banner, essentially leaving ''Teen Titans'' as this thing that just ''refused to die''. The series finally came to and end once [[spoiler: Tim died]]. The legacy both series left was being the series that it was seemingly okay to make fun of ''in-universe'', which the subsequent series, ''ComicBook/TeenTitansRebirth'', ''did''.
27th Jun '17 1:22:16 AM FuzzyBarbarian
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* ComicBook/{{Hawkman}}: The era a little after the beginning of the ''Hawkworld'' ongoing and Hawkman's return over in ''JSA''. Namely for how ''amazingly'' convoluted things became, with the Fel Andar retcon that turned him into a supervillain, as well as just being ''the'' era of ContinuitySnarl that pretty much everyone now ignores, yet still has come to define Hawkman in the public consciousness.


to:

* ComicBook/{{Hawkman}}: The For ''ComicBook/{{Hawkman}}'', the era a little after the beginning of the ''Hawkworld'' ongoing and Hawkman's return over in ''JSA''. Namely for how ''amazingly'' convoluted things became, with the Fel Andar retcon that turned him into a supervillain, as well as just being ''the'' era of ContinuitySnarl that pretty much everyone now ignores, yet still has come to define Hawkman in the public consciousness.

consciousness.
27th Jun '17 1:21:11 AM FuzzyBarbarian
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to:

* ComicBook/{{Hawkman}}: The era a little after the beginning of the ''Hawkworld'' ongoing and Hawkman's return over in ''JSA''. Namely for how ''amazingly'' convoluted things became, with the Fel Andar retcon that turned him into a supervillain, as well as just being ''the'' era of ContinuitySnarl that pretty much everyone now ignores, yet still has come to define Hawkman in the public consciousness.

6th May '17 9:24:16 AM Kadorhal
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** The whole idea came from a one-shot [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] "imaginary" (read, non-canon) story published in 1963. In the story, Superman is accidentally split into two Supermen with a hundred times the intelligence of the original. The twin Supermen successfully enlarge Kandor, recreate Krypton, produce an "anti-evil" ray which cures not only comic book villains, but UsefulNotes/FidelCastro and Nikita Khrushchev as well, and finally, the existence of two of them means that one can marry Lana and one Lois, ending the love triangle. Why they thought it would be a good idea to re-visit this in the freakin' '90s is anyone's guess.

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** The whole idea came from a one-shot [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] "imaginary" (read, non-canon) story published in 1963. In the story, Superman is accidentally split into two Supermen with a hundred times the intelligence of the original. The twin Supermen successfully enlarge Kandor, recreate Krypton, produce an "anti-evil" ray which cures not only comic book villains, but UsefulNotes/FidelCastro and Nikita Khrushchev as well, and finally, the existence of two of them means that one can marry Lana and one Lois, ending the love triangle. Why they thought it would be a good idea to re-visit this in the freakin' '90s and try to make such an idea a permanent change is anyone's guess.



** Which of course came after his death and resurrection, which was based off another 1960s "imaginary" story; "The Death of Superman". It's ironic that in the 'Dark Age' they were so crazy for recycling Silver Age whimsy.

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** Which of course came after [[ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman his death and resurrection, resurrection]], which was based off another 1960s "imaginary" story; story, "The Death of Superman". It's ironic that in the 'Dark Age' they were so crazy for recycling Silver Age whimsy.



* Pretty much every single time Chuck Austen gets his claws on a mainstream comic, one of these results ([[DorkAge/{{Marvel}} go to the Marvel section]] for what he did to ''Uncanny Franchise/XMen''). A particularly JustForFun/{{egregious}} one, though, was probably his run on ''Action Comics'', where he seemed to really want Franchise/{{Superman}} to be a violent asshole somewhat like the Golden Age Batman. And he was loudly adamant that Clark Kent should dump ComicBook/LoisLane because she was a gold-digging, power-hungry whore who was only sleeping with him because he was Superman... ''[[CriticalResearchFailure even though Lois fell in love with and became engaged to Clark long before she ever found out he was Superman]]'' (although to be fair, is this how most superhero fans see Lois Lane). This led to loads of DerailingLoveInterests in favor of ComicBook/LanaLang, who came off as a pathetic sociopathic {{stalker|WithACrush}} and made the elder Kents into {{jerkass}} MeddlingParents. Needless to say, the entire run was hustled into CanonDiscontinuity faster than a speeding bullet when Austen got booted off the title.

to:

* Pretty much every single time Chuck Austen gets his claws on a mainstream comic, one of these results ([[DorkAge/{{Marvel}} go to the Marvel section]] for what he did to ''Uncanny Franchise/XMen''). A particularly JustForFun/{{egregious}} one, though, was probably his run on ''Action Comics'', where he seemed to really want Franchise/{{Superman}} to be a violent asshole somewhat like the Golden Age Batman. And he was loudly adamant that Clark Kent should dump ComicBook/LoisLane because she was a gold-digging, power-hungry whore who was only sleeping with him because he was Superman... ''[[CriticalResearchFailure even though Lois fell in love with and became engaged to Clark long before she ever found out he was Superman]]'' (although to be fair, is this is how most superhero fans see Lois Lane). This led to loads of DerailingLoveInterests in favor of ComicBook/LanaLang, who came off as a pathetic sociopathic {{stalker|WithACrush}} and made the elder Kents into {{jerkass}} MeddlingParents. Needless to say, the entire run was hustled into CanonDiscontinuity faster than a speeding bullet when Austen got booted off the title.
16th Apr '17 4:47:05 PM MasterHero
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* The post-''ComicBook/{{Convergence}}'' DC titles have not been looked favorably upon. The basic idea was to attempt to perform a "Batgirling" of certain characters in the vein of what happened to Barbara Gordon in ''ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2011}}''. Suddenly, you got a Batman who rides PoweredArmor and is a member of the GCPD (It's James Gordon), [[ComicBook/SupermanTruth a Superman with an exposed identity, very little powers and a popularity level so low, you'd think he was Spider-Man]] and a Hal Jordan who is running around as a renegade with a BadassLongcoat and a goofy green energy gauntlet. While some titles proved to be beloved, such as ''ComicBook/SupermanLoisAndClark'', the line as a whole fell flat on its face, leading to the soft reboot of ''ComicBook/DCRebirth''.

to:

* The ''ComicBook/DCYou'', the post-''ComicBook/{{Convergence}}'' DC titles have status quo, has not been looked favorably upon. The basic idea was to attempt to perform a "Batgirling" of certain characters in the vein of what happened to Barbara Gordon in ''ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2011}}''. Suddenly, you got a Batman who rides PoweredArmor and is a member of the GCPD (It's James Gordon), [[ComicBook/SupermanTruth a Superman with an exposed identity, very little powers and a popularity level so low, you'd think he was Spider-Man]] and a Hal Jordan who is running around as a renegade with a BadassLongcoat and a goofy green energy gauntlet. While some titles proved to be beloved, such as ''ComicBook/SupermanLoisAndClark'', the line as a whole fell flat on its face, leading to the soft reboot of ''ComicBook/DCRebirth''.
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