History DorkAge / TheDCU

29th Jan '16 5:39:13 PM hamza678
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Speaking of Cass, due to an [[ExecutiveMeddling editorial mandate]], [[ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2000}} Cassandra Cain]] [[FaceHeelTurn turned evil]] after her series was canceled. During this time, she became significantly more articulate (the character was supposed to be illiterate, dyslexic, and almost mute) and {{wangst}}y. Even worse, DC then went and [[AuthorsSavingThrow handed her miniseries to the same writer]] who turned her evil. [[TheyJustDidntCare He not only failed to fix the problems he created, but added even more]]. Fans are still skeptical about her future. ** Since she's been replaced as Batgirl by Stephanie, it's pretty safe to say that this one's going to be a fairly lengthy Dork Age until the smoke clears.
to:
* Speaking of Cass, due to an [[ExecutiveMeddling editorial mandate]], [[ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2000}} Cassandra Cain]] [[FaceHeelTurn turned evil]] after her series was canceled. During this time, she became significantly more articulate (the character was supposed to be illiterate, dyslexic, and almost mute) and {{wangst}}y. Even worse, DC then went and [[AuthorsSavingThrow handed her miniseries to the same writer]] who turned her evil. [[TheyJustDidntCare He not only failed to fix the problems he created, but added even more]]. Fans are still skeptical about her future. ** Since she's been replaced as Batgirl by Stephanie, it's pretty safe to say that this one's going to be a fairly lengthy Dork Age until future. When the smoke clears.character was reintroduced in the ''New 52'', they basically rewrote her character history to avoid that.
22nd Jan '16 3:19:53 PM MyFinalEdits
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Word Cruft and natter
* The infamously bad 1990s ''Bloodlines'' CrisisCrossover, widely seen as the embodiment of everything wrong with the Dark Age of Comics. The plot involves disgusting aliens invading Earth to murder human beings and drain their spinal fluids and somehow this gives the few survivors superpowers in the process. It was meant to profit off the Dark Age phenomenon by creating a new batch of heroes for the era, but just ended up being incredibly [[{{Narm}} Narmy]] and forgettable. The new characters were either stupid-looking NinetiesAntiHeroes or had their potential wasted. It was generally regarded as an embarrassment and mostly ignored afterwards, except for the occasional [[SelfDeprecation insulting remark]] and the vast majority of the ''Bloodlines'' characters getting casually slaughtered during ''Infinite Crisis''. ** Note that there is ''one'' exception to this: {{ComicBook/Hitman}}, who managed to become a beloved CultClassic character thanks to some [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap rescuing]] from Garth Ennis, who reworked the character into a more unique hero who explored darker themes while retaining the DCU's general tone.
to:
* The infamously bad 1990s ''Bloodlines'' CrisisCrossover, widely seen as the embodiment of everything wrong with the Dark Age of Comics.CrisisCrossover. The plot involves disgusting aliens invading Earth to murder human beings and drain their spinal fluids and somehow this gives the few survivors superpowers in the process. It was meant to profit off the Dark Age phenomenon by creating a new batch of heroes for the era, but just ended up being incredibly [[{{Narm}} Narmy]] and forgettable. The new characters were either stupid-looking NinetiesAntiHeroes or had their potential wasted. It was generally regarded as an embarrassment and mostly ignored afterwards, except for the occasional [[SelfDeprecation insulting remark]] and the vast majority of the ''Bloodlines'' characters getting casually slaughtered during ''Infinite Crisis''. ** Note that there is ''one'' exception to this: {{ComicBook/Hitman}}, who managed to become a beloved CultClassic character thanks to some [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap rescuing]] from Garth Ennis, who reworked the character into a more unique hero who explored darker themes while retaining the DCU's general tone.
12th Jan '16 1:06:41 PM chopshop
Is there an issue? Send a Message
to:
* The infamously bad 1990s ''Bloodlines'' CrisisCrossover, widely seen as the embodiment of everything wrong with the Dark Age of Comics. The plot involves disgusting aliens invading Earth to murder human beings and drain their spinal fluids and somehow this gives the few survivors superpowers in the process. It was meant to profit off the Dark Age phenomenon by creating a new batch of heroes for the era, but just ended up being incredibly [[{{Narm}} Narmy]] and forgettable. The new characters were either stupid-looking NinetiesAntiHeroes or had their potential wasted. It was generally regarded as an embarrassment and mostly ignored afterwards, except for the occasional [[SelfDeprecation insulting remark]] and the vast majority of the ''Bloodlines'' characters getting casually slaughtered during ''Infinite Crisis''. ** Note that there is ''one'' exception to this: {{ComicBook/Hitman}}, who managed to become a beloved CultClassic character thanks to some [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap rescuing]] from Garth Ennis, who reworked the character into a more unique hero who explored darker themes while retaining the DCU's general tone.
11th Jan '16 4:16:22 PM chopshop
Is there an issue? Send a Message
to:
* Many consider ''ComicBook/IdentityCrisis'' to be one, due to perceived [[ShockingSwerve Shocking Swerves]] and making things needlessly DarkerAndEdgier, though this isn't universal. What's interesting however, is how ''Identity Crisis'' ended up being more of a lynchpin that accidentally/indirectly caused a bunch of other smaller Dork Ages; Jack Drake being killed off (see ''Robin'' above), Dr. Light being retconned into a rapist (causing horrible VillainDecay, as he devolved into a one-note joke who ranted about rape), Firestorm and Captain Boomerang being killed and [[ReplacementScrappy replaced with new characters]], Jean Loring getting derailed into murderer, Atom going over the DespairEventHorizon, and more.
26th Dec '15 9:22:32 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** The whole idea came from a one-shot [[TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] "imaginary" (read, non-canon) story published in 1963. In the story, Superman is accidentally split into two Supermen with a hundred times the intelligence of the original. The twin Supermen successfully enlarge Kandor, recreate Krypton, produce an "anti-evil" ray which cures not only comic book villains, but UsefulNotes/FidelCastro and Nikita Khrushchev as well, and finally, the existence of two of them means that one can marry Lana and one Lois, ending the love triangle. Why they thought it would be a good idea to re-visit this in the freakin' '90s is anyone's guess.
to:
** The whole idea came from a one-shot [[TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] "imaginary" (read, non-canon) story published in 1963. In the story, Superman is accidentally split into two Supermen with a hundred times the intelligence of the original. The twin Supermen successfully enlarge Kandor, recreate Krypton, produce an "anti-evil" ray which cures not only comic book villains, but UsefulNotes/FidelCastro and Nikita Khrushchev as well, and finally, the existence of two of them means that one can marry Lana and one Lois, ending the love triangle. Why they thought it would be a good idea to re-visit this in the freakin' '90s is anyone's guess.

* Franchise/TheFlash's revamps in the past few years have been very poorly received, and for good reason. First, Wally was PutOnABus and FunPersonified KidHero Bart Allen was hit with forced aging and, worst of all, increasing amounts of {{wangst}}, finally resulting in the decidedly Not-Fun adult that starred in the first ''The Flash: The Fastest Man Alive'' revamp. Both series and character proved to be short-lived, as both were unexpectedly killed off in issue #13. This resulted in the return of not only the previous, popular Flash, Wally West, but the return of popular '90s Flash writer Mark Waid. This version focused on Wally adventuring with his new superpowered [[SpinOffspring kids]]. The resulting series was considered better than the previous attempt, but reception was still lukewarm, with many seeing the kids as a pint-sized SpotlightStealingSquad. Then the [[TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] Flash, Barry Allen, was brought back and revamped by the return of popular '00s Flash writer Creator/GeoffJohns. This has met with mixed results, with the [[ScheduleSlip book being frequently late]] compounding complaints of slow pacing. This lead up to a Flash-centric crossover, ''ComicBook/{{Flashpoint}}'', which led to a continuity reboot for the whole universe. The new, [[ComicBook/{{New 52}} re-re-re-booted]] Flash book is focusing exclusively on Barry, with several changes made to previous Flash canon such as Iris and Barry no longer being married. Wally has recently reappeared in the new 52 and Convergence. Reviews of the Flash book continue to be mixed at best, despite the creative art style of the first post-reboot creative team. The book is still plagued by pacing problems. The Flash comic's Dork Age looks set to continue.
to:
* Franchise/TheFlash's revamps in the past few years have been very poorly received, and for good reason. First, Wally was PutOnABus and FunPersonified KidHero Bart Allen was hit with forced aging and, worst of all, increasing amounts of {{wangst}}, finally resulting in the decidedly Not-Fun adult that starred in the first ''The Flash: The Fastest Man Alive'' revamp. Both series and character proved to be short-lived, as both were unexpectedly killed off in issue #13. This resulted in the return of not only the previous, popular Flash, Wally West, but the return of popular '90s Flash writer Mark Waid. This version focused on Wally adventuring with his new superpowered [[SpinOffspring kids]]. The resulting series was considered better than the previous attempt, but reception was still lukewarm, with many seeing the kids as a pint-sized SpotlightStealingSquad. Then the [[TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] Flash, Barry Allen, was brought back and revamped by the return of popular '00s Flash writer Creator/GeoffJohns. This has met with mixed results, with the [[ScheduleSlip book being frequently late]] compounding complaints of slow pacing. This lead up to a Flash-centric crossover, ''ComicBook/{{Flashpoint}}'', which led to a continuity reboot for the whole universe. The new, [[ComicBook/{{New 52}} re-re-re-booted]] Flash book is focusing exclusively on Barry, with several changes made to previous Flash canon such as Iris and Barry no longer being married. Wally has recently reappeared in the new 52 and Convergence. Reviews of the Flash book continue to be mixed at best, despite the creative art style of the first post-reboot creative team. The book is still plagued by pacing problems. The Flash comic's Dork Age looks set to continue.

** During TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, "helpful alien"-type characters were becoming popular with writers, with Superman battling Mr. Mxyzptlk and Batman putting up with Bat-Mite. So the decision was made to {{retcon}} the lightning bolt that gave Barry Allen his powers, revealing that the imp-like "heavenly help-mate" Mopee had been its true source. Cue massive backlash in the "letters to the editor" page. So hated was this development that it [[CanonDisContinuity has never been mentioned since, at least in-continuity]]. However, once enough time passed, it became a curious bit of nostalgia, and has shown up several times in out-of-continuity works like ''ComicBook/AmbushBug''.
to:
** During TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, "helpful alien"-type characters were becoming popular with writers, with Superman battling Mr. Mxyzptlk and Batman putting up with Bat-Mite. So the decision was made to {{retcon}} the lightning bolt that gave Barry Allen his powers, revealing that the imp-like "heavenly help-mate" Mopee had been its true source. Cue massive backlash in the "letters to the editor" page. So hated was this development that it [[CanonDisContinuity has never been mentioned since, at least in-continuity]]. However, once enough time passed, it became a curious bit of nostalgia, and has shown up several times in out-of-continuity works like ''ComicBook/AmbushBug''.

* The 90s ComicBook/MetalMen series. Given that the Metal Men are basically the [[TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] given shape, that a 1990s comic featuring them would be this is to be expected. It did not disappoint. First, it {{retcon}}ned their origins so they were Doc Magnus's old friends in robot bodies rather than robots. It followed up by killing off Gold, TheLeader, and putting Doc's mind in a robot body as well. Doc's new form was [[{{Unobtainium}} Veridium]], a nonexistent mystery metal that gave him generic energy powers. There's a lot of core aspects to the Metal Men: their AI angle, the simple but strong personalities, the good character dynamic, Doc being the NonActionGuy and TeamDad, and the scientific ([[ArtisticLicenseChemistry on paper, at least]]) use of real metallurgical properties as the basis for the team's powers, and the miniseries threw them out right from the starting line, even before getting into the skeeviness of how [[DeathOfTheHypotenuse Doc was now being set up with the fiancee of his dead brother.]] The series was shoved firmly into CanonDiscontinuity by ''52'', which declared that it was [[AllJustADream all just a hallucination brought on by Doc's loneliness and going off his meds]].
to:
* The 90s ComicBook/MetalMen series. Given that the Metal Men are basically the [[TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] given shape, that a 1990s comic featuring them would be this is to be expected. It did not disappoint. First, it {{retcon}}ned their origins so they were Doc Magnus's old friends in robot bodies rather than robots. It followed up by killing off Gold, TheLeader, and putting Doc's mind in a robot body as well. Doc's new form was [[{{Unobtainium}} Veridium]], a nonexistent mystery metal that gave him generic energy powers. There's a lot of core aspects to the Metal Men: their AI angle, the simple but strong personalities, the good character dynamic, Doc being the NonActionGuy and TeamDad, and the scientific ([[ArtisticLicenseChemistry on paper, at least]]) use of real metallurgical properties as the basis for the team's powers, and the miniseries threw them out right from the starting line, even before getting into the skeeviness of how [[DeathOfTheHypotenuse Doc was now being set up with the fiancee of his dead brother.]] The series was shoved firmly into CanonDiscontinuity by ''52'', which declared that it was [[AllJustADream all just a hallucination brought on by Doc's loneliness and going off his meds]].
7th Nov '15 8:42:35 PM Ugolino
Is there an issue? Send a Message
to:
\n* It's hard to point to a time in ''ComicBook/TeenTitans'' past [[MyRealDaddy the Wolfman/Perez run]] that fans don't consider to be a DorkAge, but most fans place the beginning of the franchise's biggest and longest DorkAge at sometime around Volume 3 and the GeoffJohns run. Several ''Comicbook/YoungJustice'' characters were derailed for the purpose of "graduating" them to the Titans, which mostly irritated fans of both comics. Though fans enjoyed the return of the book's original title and cast, the novelty wound up wearing off fairly quickly, and the book's quality went downhill even further with the ''One Year Later'' portion and Johns leaving the book, as well as ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' seemingly making the Titans "[[CListFodder the heroes that it's okay to kill]]." The remainder of Volume 3 proved to be a slow decline, with characters being offed for no reason, being pointlessly DarkerAndEdgier, and the few usable plotlines being wasted. ''Villains for Hire'', which featured the gratuitous murder of Ryan Choi and a character who set people on fire with her vagina, was widely considered the nadir of the franchise. The series needed a reboot more than most... ** Then the team's ''ComicBook/{{New 52}}'' reboot proceeded to take things FromBadToWorse. Written by the largely reviled Scott Lobdell, the series kicked off with a ridiculous, unfocused arc that tried to cross over with about six other books and starred a VillainSue. Several characters had core personality traits ironed out, almost to InNameOnly levels (see Tim Drake above), the costumes were ridiculous, many plotlines felt like an excuse for more fight scenes, and the Titans themselves didn't feel like a team or even like friends. The resulting book didn't make it past thirty issues, and was promptly rebooted.
7th Nov '15 6:50:39 PM Ugolino
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Tim hasn't fared too well in the New 52, either, with most of his backstory and character traits being jettisoned in the reboot. To whit: He's a former athlete instead of a PlayfulHacker, he doesn't have any of his usual supporting cast or family, he acts and sounds a lot dumber, his costume doesn't look remotely similar, he didn't discover Batman's identity (which Tim Drake fans will remember as the defining trait of his character; it's be like doing a Batman reboot where his parents are still alive), and to cap it all off, Tim Drake apparently isn't even his real name. This last bit has led to particularly bitter fans calling him "the imposter," avidly hoping for the "real" Tim Drake to return at some point.
to:
** Tim hasn't fared too well in the New 52, either, with most of his backstory and character traits being jettisoned in the reboot. To whit: He's a former athlete instead of a PlayfulHacker, he doesn't have any of his usual supporting cast or family, he acts and sounds a lot dumber, his costume doesn't look remotely similar, he didn't discover Batman's identity (which Tim Drake fans will remember as the defining trait of his character; it's it'd be like doing a Batman reboot where his parents are still alive), and to cap it all off, Tim Drake apparently isn't even his real name. This last bit has led to particularly bitter fans calling him "the imposter," avidly hoping for the "real" Tim Drake to return at some point.
7th Nov '15 2:24:52 AM Ugolino
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Tim hasn't fared too well in the New 52, either, with most of his backstory and character traits being jettisoned in the reboot. Some have even come to calling him "the imposter."
to:
** Tim hasn't fared too well in the New 52, either, with most of his backstory and character traits being jettisoned in the reboot. Some To whit: He's a former athlete instead of a PlayfulHacker, he doesn't have any of his usual supporting cast or family, he acts and sounds a lot dumber, his costume doesn't look remotely similar, he didn't discover Batman's identity (which Tim Drake fans will remember as the defining trait of his character; it's be like doing a Batman reboot where his parents are still alive), and to cap it all off, Tim Drake apparently isn't even come his real name. This last bit has led to particularly bitter fans calling him "the imposter."imposter," avidly hoping for the "real" Tim Drake to return at some point.
7th Oct '15 5:25:20 PM Blazer
Is there an issue? Send a Message
to:
\n* The post-''ComicBook/{{Convergence}}'' DC titles have not been looked favorably upon. The basic idea was to attempt to perform a "Batgirling" of certain characters in the vein of what happened to Barbara Gordon in ''ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2011}}''. Suddenly, you got a Batman who rides PoweredArmor and is a member of the GCPD [[spoiler:(Spoiler Alert: It's James Gordon)]], [[ComicBook/SupermanTruth a Superman with an exposed identity, very little powers and a popularity level so low, you'd think he was Spider-Man]] and a Hal Jordon who is running around as a renegade with a BadassLongcoat and a goofy green energy gauntlet. The idea seemed so poorly handled that, six months later, a major handful of titles not connected to established characters were cancelled and many others are starting to shift back into their regular roles.
15th Sep '15 10:41:30 AM AndyLA
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Then there is also the related mini-series, ''Comicbook/CaptainCarrotAndHisAmazingZooCrew: Final Ark'', where the senior editors order the furry heroes to be exiled from their world and [[PutOnABusToHell horrifically trapped as regular animals on the primary Earth]]. Though this was later undone by Grant Morrison during ''Final Crisis'', though the company didn't do anything with the Zoo Crew by the time of the reboot. Currently, several new characters with [[ShoutOut more than a passing familiar look to members of the Zoo Crew]] have appeared as alien beings in the ''Threshold'' series.
to:
* Then there is also the related mini-series, ''Comicbook/CaptainCarrotAndHisAmazingZooCrew: Final Ark'', where the senior editors order the furry heroes to be exiled from their world and [[PutOnABusToHell horrifically trapped as regular animals on the primary Earth]]. Though this was later undone by Grant Morrison during ''Final Crisis'', though the company didn't do anything with the Zoo Crew by the time of the reboot.reboot (it wouldn't be until ''Comicbook/{{Convergence}}'' that DC decided to bring them back). Currently, several new characters with [[ShoutOut more than a passing familiar look to members of the Zoo Crew]] have appeared as alien beings in the ''Threshold'' series.
This list shows the last 10 events of 94. Show all.