History DorkAge / RealLife

22nd Dec '15 10:23:59 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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* Remember all those [[SarcasmMode great]] [[TheAllegedCar cars]] Detroit came out with in TheSeventies? No? A toxic combination of [[http://www.carlustblog.com/2007/12/thoughts-on-ter.html lack of innovation, poor design and quality control,]] Congress relaxing import quotas (allowing foreign automakers to sell more cars in the USA), new emissions and fuel economy regulations, and the Oil Shocks nearly destroyed the industry. It ''did'' destroy the city of UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} itself (and most of UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} for that matter), and to this day, there are many Americans of a certain age who ''still'' refuse to buy domestic. Auto writer Murilee Martin coined the term "Malaise Era" to define the years from 1973 to 1983 when the quality and performance of American cars seemed to be in active decline. While Detroit did start making ''some'' good cars again from the mid '80s onward, they still put out more than the occasional stinker (see: the Chevrolet Cobalt) until the mid '00s, when Detroit realized that they were going to completely lose the market to foreign competitors and upped their game. As of now, there are lots of domestics that are every bit as good as foreign cars (and, in many cases, ''better''), but anyone with any sense will be ''very'' careful about most used domestics from model years prior to 2009 or so.
to:
* Remember all those [[SarcasmMode great]] [[TheAllegedCar cars]] Detroit came out with in TheSeventies? No? A toxic combination of [[http://www.carlustblog.com/2007/12/thoughts-on-ter.html lack of innovation, poor design and quality control,]] Congress relaxing import quotas (allowing foreign automakers to sell more cars in the USA), new emissions and fuel economy regulations, and the Oil Shocks nearly destroyed the industry. It ''did'' destroy the city of UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} itself (and most of UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} for that matter), and to this day, there are many Americans of a certain age who ''still'' refuse to buy domestic. Auto writer Murilee Martin coined the term "Malaise Era" to define the years from 1973 to 1983 when the quality and performance of American cars seemed to be in active decline. While Detroit did start making ''some'' good cars again from the mid '80s onward, onward (cars like the Ford Taurus, Chrysler's "K-cars" and minivans, and GM's Saturn brand and A-body platform showed that they still knew how to innovate), they still put out more than the occasional stinker (see: the Chevrolet Cobalt) until the mid '00s, when Detroit realized that they were going to completely lose the market to foreign competitors and upped their game. As of now, there are lots of domestics that are every bit as good as foreign cars (and, in many cases, ''better''), but anyone with any sense will be ''very'' careful about most used domestics from model years prior to 2009 or so.
22nd Dec '15 10:17:59 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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* Remember all those [[SarcasmMode great]] [[TheAllegedCar cars]] Detroit came out with in TheSeventies? No? A toxic combination of [[http://www.carlustblog.com/2007/12/thoughts-on-ter.html lack of innovation, poor design and quality control,]] Congress relaxing import quotas (allowing foreign automakers to sell and manufacture in the USA), and the Oil Shocks nearly destroyed the industry. It ''did'' destroy the city of UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} itself (and most of UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} for that matter), and to this day, there are many Americans of a certain age who ''still'' refuse to buy domestic. This wasn't limited to the 1970s, either; most 80s domestics were almost as terrible, and while there was some ''marginal'' improvement in the 1990s, terrible domestics were still a thing until at least the mid-2000s, when Detroit realized that they were going to completely lose the market to foreigns and upped their game. As of now, there are lots of domestics that are every bit as good as foreigns (and, in many cases, ''better''), but anyone with any sense will be ''very'' careful about most used domestics from model years prior to 2009 or so.
to:
* Remember all those [[SarcasmMode great]] [[TheAllegedCar cars]] Detroit came out with in TheSeventies? No? A toxic combination of [[http://www.carlustblog.com/2007/12/thoughts-on-ter.html lack of innovation, poor design and quality control,]] Congress relaxing import quotas (allowing foreign automakers to sell and manufacture more cars in the USA), new emissions and fuel economy regulations, and the Oil Shocks nearly destroyed the industry. It ''did'' destroy the city of UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} itself (and most of UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} for that matter), and to this day, there are many Americans of a certain age who ''still'' refuse to buy domestic. This wasn't limited to Auto writer Murilee Martin coined the 1970s, either; most 80s domestics were almost as terrible, term "Malaise Era" to define the years from 1973 to 1983 when the quality and while there was some ''marginal'' improvement performance of American cars seemed to be in active decline. While Detroit did start making ''some'' good cars again from the 1990s, terrible domestics were mid '80s onward, they still a thing put out more than the occasional stinker (see: the Chevrolet Cobalt) until at least the mid-2000s, mid '00s, when Detroit realized that they were going to completely lose the market to foreigns foreign competitors and upped their game. As of now, there are lots of domestics that are every bit as good as foreigns foreign cars (and, in many cases, ''better''), but anyone with any sense will be ''very'' careful about most used domestics from model years prior to 2009 or so.
10th Dec '15 7:02:02 AM BabyM
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* Remember all those [[SarcasmMode great]] [[TheAllegedCar cars]] Detroit came out with in TheSeventies? No? A toxic combination of lack of innovation, Congress relaxing import quotas (allowing foreign automakers to sell and manufacture in the USA), and the Oil Shocks nearly destroyed the industry. It ''did'' destroy the city of UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} itself (and most of UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} for that matter), and to this day, there are many Americans of a certain age who ''still'' refuse to buy domestic. This wasn't limited to the 1970s, either; most 80s domestics were almost as terrible, and while there was some ''marginal'' improvement in the 1990s, terrible domestics were still a thing until at least the mid-2000s, when Detroit realized that they were going to completely lose the market to foreigns and upped their game. As of now, there are lots of domestics that are every bit as good as foreigns (and, in many cases, ''better''), but anyone with any sense will be ''very'' careful about most used domestics from model years prior to 2009 or so.
to:
* Remember all those [[SarcasmMode great]] [[TheAllegedCar cars]] Detroit came out with in TheSeventies? No? A toxic combination of [[http://www.carlustblog.com/2007/12/thoughts-on-ter.html lack of innovation, poor design and quality control,]] Congress relaxing import quotas (allowing foreign automakers to sell and manufacture in the USA), and the Oil Shocks nearly destroyed the industry. It ''did'' destroy the city of UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} itself (and most of UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} for that matter), and to this day, there are many Americans of a certain age who ''still'' refuse to buy domestic. This wasn't limited to the 1970s, either; most 80s domestics were almost as terrible, and while there was some ''marginal'' improvement in the 1990s, terrible domestics were still a thing until at least the mid-2000s, when Detroit realized that they were going to completely lose the market to foreigns and upped their game. As of now, there are lots of domestics that are every bit as good as foreigns (and, in many cases, ''better''), but anyone with any sense will be ''very'' careful about most used domestics from model years prior to 2009 or so.

* Lockheed in the TheSeventies decided to [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney bribe various government officials]] and cover up problems with the F-104. As a fighter plane, it was good; as a ''light bomber'', not so much. The scandals almost killed the company.
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* Lockheed in the TheSeventies decided to [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney bribe various government officials]] and cover up problems with the F-104. As a fighter plane, it was good; as a ''light bomber'', not so much. The scandals almost killed the company. The commercial failure of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_L-1011_TriStar L-1011 [=TriStar=]]] didn't help matters any, either.
25th Nov '15 3:19:59 AM TheDoctor1996
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* Moviegoing in India, especially in Mumbai, became truly oppressive in the 21st Century. In most democracies, you saw loosening of censorship over a period of time, but censorship in Indian cinema and UsefulNotes/{{Bollywood}} is comparable to dictatorships and theocracies in terms of restrictions on political content, showing sexuality or bringing anti-authoritarian sentiments. While the latter three loosened somewhat recently, conservatives decided to combat it by putting anti-smoking and anti-alcohol sentiments, this they did by adding messages that came on the screen in big letters any time a character smoke and drank on-screen. Indeed, Creator/WoodyAllen removed ''Film/BlueJasmine'' from Indian screens for these very reasons.
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* Moviegoing in India, especially in Mumbai, became truly oppressive in the 21st Century. In most democracies, you saw loosening of censorship over a period of time, but censorship in Indian cinema and UsefulNotes/{{Bollywood}} is comparable to dictatorships and theocracies in terms of restrictions on political content, showing sexuality or bringing anti-authoritarian sentiments. While the latter three loosened somewhat recently, conservatives decided to combat it by putting anti-smoking and anti-alcohol sentiments, this they did by adding messages that came on the screen in big letters any time a character smoke and drank on-screen. Indeed, Creator/WoodyAllen removed ''Film/BlueJasmine'' from Indian screens for these very reasons.reasons. * English cuisine went through its Dork Age in the 20th century. Until the industrial revolution the cuisine of England was well regarded throughout Europe, but due to the industrial revolution and the two world wars the cuisine of England saw a drastic decline in quality and reputation when mass produced food became popular. Since the 1970s the Dork Age has started to decline but the reputation still persists.
8th Nov '15 11:53:48 PM jameygamer
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* In similar soft drink endeavors, at-home soda maker [=SodaStream=], in an attempt to change declining sales in sodas, brought out a brand new "water" marketing campaign. They ALSO changed their entire drink mix lineup and reduced the original "classics" to only cola, lemon-lime, and a few others. They mostly replaced these products with newer "fountain-style" syrups, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks but this has not gone over well.]] Reviews for the new products on their website have hit rock-bottom due to bad tasting drinks and a different bottle design that makes it harder to judge how much syrup to use, and sales have yet to change significantly, meaning the soda machine maker may have well entered a Dork Age as of 2015.
to:
* In similar soft drink endeavors, at-home soda maker [=SodaStream=], in an attempt to change declining sales in sodas, brought out a brand new "water" marketing campaign. They ALSO changed their entire drink mix lineup and reduced the original "classics" to only cola, lemon-lime, and a few others. "classics", eliminating the soft drink options They mostly replaced these products with newer "fountain-style" syrups, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks but this has not gone over well.]] Reviews for the new products on their website have hit rock-bottom due to bad tasting drinks and a different bottle design that makes it harder to judge how much syrup to use, and sales have yet to change significantly, meaning the soda machine maker may have well entered a Dork Age as of 2015.
27th Oct '15 8:23:37 PM Yalsaris63
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* The Ford Mustang II, 1974-78. Basically a [[EveryCarIsAPinto Pinto]] with a fancier body, no V8 option, and enough mid '70s chrome, vinyl, and fake wood for a much larger car. Ford was returning the car to its roots as basically an economy car with a big engine after the previous car had gotten larger and become decent road racing platform. Sales for the Mustang II were actually much better than the late 60s/early 70s Mustangs, but it [[BaseBreaker alienated enthusiasts]]. Even after it got a V8, never before or since have so many car guys been so disappointed to see their favorite sports car get ''lighter and more nimble''... Meanwhile, to add insult to injury, the Mustang's [[TheRival rivals]], the Chevrolet Camaro/Pontiac Firebird twins, underwent something of a GoldenAge in the '70s. While they too felt the effects of the new standards (they were nearly killed in 1972 due to a UAW strike concerning the new regulations), their performance didn't suffer nearly as badly as the Mustang's, and their bodywork wasn't nearly as garish as other cars during the era. The Camaro and, to a lesser extent, the Firebird outsold the Mustang by 1977, because they were some of the only cars at the time worth getting for sports car/post-muscle car enthusiasts. To this day, the Camaro and Firebird are probably the only American performance cars to not have their legacy stained by WTH engineering/designing departments even during TheSeventies. The only low point in the Camaro's career was the [[TheAllegedCar Iron Duke design]] of TheEighties, but that was a separate model and did rather little to hurt the Camaro's popularity.
to:
* The Ford Mustang II, 1974-78. Basically a [[EveryCarIsAPinto Pinto]] with a fancier body, no V8 option, and enough mid '70s chrome, vinyl, and fake wood for a much larger car. Ford was returning the car to its roots as basically an economy car with a big engine after the previous car had gotten larger and become decent road racing platform. Sales for the Mustang II were actually much better than the late 60s/early 70s Mustangs, but it [[BaseBreaker alienated enthusiasts]]. Even after it got a V8, never before or since have so many car guys been so disappointed to see their favorite sports car get ''lighter and more nimble''... Meanwhile, to add insult to injury, the Mustang's [[TheRival rivals]], the Chevrolet Camaro/Pontiac Firebird twins, underwent something of a GoldenAge in the '70s. While they too felt the effects of the new standards (they were nearly killed in 1972 due to a UAW strike concerning the new regulations), their performance didn't suffer nearly as badly as the Mustang's, and their bodywork wasn't nearly as garish as other cars during the era. The Camaro and, to a lesser extent, the Firebird outsold the Mustang by 1977, because they were some of the only cars at the time worth getting for sports car/post-muscle car enthusiasts. To this day, the Camaro and Firebird are probably the only American performance cars to not have their legacy stained by WTH engineering/designing engineering/[[WTHCostumingDepartment designing]] departments even during TheSeventies. The only low point in the Camaro's career was the [[TheAllegedCar Iron Duke design]] of TheEighties, but that was a separate model and did rather little to hurt the Camaro's popularity.
20th Oct '15 12:03:47 PM jameygamer
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* In similar soft drink endeavors, at-home soda maker [=SodaStream=], in an attempt to change declining sales in sodas, brought out a brand new "water" marketing campaign. They ALSO changed their entire drink mix lineup and reduced the original "classics" to only cola, lemon-lime, and a few others. They mostly replaced these products with newer "fountain-style" syrups, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks but this has not gone over well.]] Reviews for the new products on their website have hit rock-bottom due to bad tasting drinks, and sales have yet to change significantly, meaning the soda machine maker may have well entered a Dork Age as of 2015.
to:
* In similar soft drink endeavors, at-home soda maker [=SodaStream=], in an attempt to change declining sales in sodas, brought out a brand new "water" marketing campaign. They ALSO changed their entire drink mix lineup and reduced the original "classics" to only cola, lemon-lime, and a few others. They mostly replaced these products with newer "fountain-style" syrups, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks but this has not gone over well.]] Reviews for the new products on their website have hit rock-bottom due to bad tasting drinks, drinks and a different bottle design that makes it harder to judge how much syrup to use, and sales have yet to change significantly, meaning the soda machine maker may have well entered a Dork Age as of 2015.
20th Oct '15 12:15:36 AM jameygamer
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* In similar soft drink endeavors, at-home soda maker SodaStream, in an attempt to change declining sales in sodas, brought out a brand new "water" marketing campaign. They ALSO changed their entire drink mix lineup and reduced the original "classics" to only cola, lemon-lime, and a few others. They mostly replaced these products with newer "fountain-style" syrups, but this has not gone over well. Reviews for the new products on their website have hit rock-bottom, and sales have yet to change significantly, meaning the soda machine maker may have well entered a Dork Age as of 2015.
to:
* In similar soft drink endeavors, at-home soda maker SodaStream, [=SodaStream=], in an attempt to change declining sales in sodas, brought out a brand new "water" marketing campaign. They ALSO changed their entire drink mix lineup and reduced the original "classics" to only cola, lemon-lime, and a few others. They mostly replaced these products with newer "fountain-style" syrups, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks but this has not gone over well. well.]] Reviews for the new products on their website have hit rock-bottom, rock-bottom due to bad tasting drinks, and sales have yet to change significantly, meaning the soda machine maker may have well entered a Dork Age as of 2015.
20th Oct '15 12:12:12 AM jameygamer
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Added DiffLines:
* In similar soft drink endeavors, at-home soda maker SodaStream, in an attempt to change declining sales in sodas, brought out a brand new "water" marketing campaign. They ALSO changed their entire drink mix lineup and reduced the original "classics" to only cola, lemon-lime, and a few others. They mostly replaced these products with newer "fountain-style" syrups, but this has not gone over well. Reviews for the new products on their website have hit rock-bottom, and sales have yet to change significantly, meaning the soda machine maker may have well entered a Dork Age as of 2015.
23rd Sep '15 10:35:19 AM Twentington
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* Hardee's went through a similar dip around the same time. The chain, already taxed by buying out other chains (most prominently Burger Chef and Sandy's), attempted to cut costs buy using frozen instead of charbroiled meat patties. A 1990 buyout/conversion of Roy Rogers restaurants (based in the Northeast, where the Hardee's name was totally unfamiliar) was met with such backlash that most of them were quickly reverted. [[http://www.ourstate.com/hardees/ Issues with quality control and constant menu changes]] brought the chain to its nadir in 1997, when tons of locations were closed (most of the franchises in Detroit were sold to Wendy's or Canadian chain Tim Hortons, giving the latter its second successful American market), and the remainder was sold to California-based Carl's Jr. For the next six years, Carl's Jr. struggled in attempts to merge the two chains by keeping Hardee's still-successful breakfast menu and Carl's Jr.'s lunch/dinner menu and logo. The change was rough and slow, resulting in a schizophrenic mess of stores; some as late as 2003 still had the pre-Carl's Jr. menu and orange-and-brown signage. But by the mid-2000s, one last ReTool of the menu to focus on "Thickburgers" seemed to finally turn things around and re-establish the chain with a more "upscale" image than UsefulNotes/McDonalds, Burger King, or Wendy's. As of TheNewTens, Hardee's/Carl's Jr. has once again been in expansion mode, gradually filling in markets that had been abandoned in the 90s or earlier, such as Chicago. * Wendy's went through a similar [[http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/wendy-s-international-inc-history/ plunge]] in TheEighties, due mainly to poor upkeep of its stores that created cleanliness issues, as well as a failed attempt to adopt a breakfast menu (unlike UsefulNotes/McDonalds or Burger King, Wendy's never fully got on board with breakfast, and it was only available at a handful of locations {mostly in 24-hour truckstops} before quietly being dropped in 2014). However, it was not a long-lived or detrimental decline like Hardee's suffered by TheNineties, the chain recovered from its eighties slump, thanks to storewide renovations and a highly popular series of ads featuring founder Dave Thomas. By the mid-90s, Wendy's was considered the best in quality and service among the "big three" burger chains, and despite closing most of its international locations later in the decade, it has mostly remained at a solid #3 ever since.
to:
* Hardee's went through a similar dip around the same time. The chain, already taxed by buying out other chains (most prominently Burger Chef and Sandy's), attempted to cut costs buy using frozen instead of charbroiled meat patties. A 1990 buyout/conversion of Roy Rogers restaurants (based in the Northeast, where the Hardee's name was totally unfamiliar) was met with such backlash that most of them were quickly reverted. [[http://www.ourstate.com/hardees/ Issues with quality control and constant menu changes]] brought the chain to its nadir in 1997, when tons of locations were closed (most of the franchises in Detroit were sold to Wendy's or Canadian chain Tim Hortons, giving the latter its second successful American market), and the remainder was sold to California-based Carl's Jr. For the next six years, Carl's Jr. struggled in attempts to merge the two chains by keeping Hardee's still-successful breakfast menu and Carl's Jr.'s lunch/dinner menu and logo. The change was rough and slow, at first, resulting in a schizophrenic mess of stores; stores, with some as late as 2003 still had having the pre-Carl's Jr. pre-1997 menu and orange-and-brown signage.logo. But by the mid-2000s, one last ReTool of the menu to focus on "Thickburgers" seemed to finally turn things around and re-establish the chain with a more "upscale" image than UsefulNotes/McDonalds, Burger King, or Wendy's. As of TheNewTens, Hardee's/Carl's Jr. has once again been in expansion mode, gradually filling in markets that had been abandoned in the 90s or earlier, such as Chicago. * Wendy's went through a similar [[http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/wendy-s-international-inc-history/ plunge]] in TheEighties, due mainly to poor upkeep of its stores that created cleanliness issues, as well as a failed attempt to adopt a breakfast menu (unlike UsefulNotes/McDonalds or Burger King, Wendy's never fully got on board with breakfast, and it was only available at a handful of locations {mostly in 24-hour truckstops} before quietly being dropped in 2014). However, it was not a long-lived or detrimental decline like Hardee's suffered by TheNineties, the chain recovered from its eighties slump, thanks to storewide renovations and a highly popular series of ads featuring founder Dave Thomas. By the mid-90s, Wendy's was considered the best in quality and service among the "big three" burger chains, and despite closing most of its international locations later in the decade, it has mostly remained at been a solid #3 ever since.
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