History DorkAge / RealLife

15th Jul '17 10:03:43 AM nombretomado
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* After dominating the electromechanical era (from post-WorldWarII to 1979) and some hits right after that, most notably ''Pinball/BlackHole'' (which charged double per game compared to surrounding releases and was ''still'' popular in every arcade), Creator/{{Gottlieb}} got caught in a dork age from roughly the mid-80's and onwards that they just couldn't shake off. This downturn caused the company to financially trail behind its competitors and go out of business in 1995. The reasons, however, are not entirely clear: Ask 50 pinball fans and they will give you 50 different answers, but they all agree that the Gottlieb machines weren't quite as good. A likely underlying reason is that as Gottlieb's competitors created more intricate rules,[[note]]This was when goal-based gameplay got started, with multiballs and the WizardMode becoming standard[[/note]] deeper integration of their themes,[[note]]Prior to the 80's, designers would create the rules and tack a theme on. In the 80's, the norm became deciding upon a theme, then basing the machine around it[[/note]] and incorporated new technology,[[note]]Resulting in gameplay advances like pre-recorded audio, variable point awards, the ability to save multiple high scores, and the evolution of scoring reels to digital alphanumeric displays and then dot-matrix displays[[/note]] Gottlieb's design team were stuck in electromechanical ways of design had trouble adapting, lagging behind Bally-Williams and Creator/DataEast by two to four years. When Gottlieb ''did'' adapt to the mode-based progression in the 90's, however, the disjointed gameplay, lopsided scoring, and clunky playfield geometry[[note]]This means the angle of the lanes and ramps don't line up with the ball's paths from the flippers, causing the ball to zigzag within a lane by bouncing off the sides, killing its momentum and otherwise just looking poorly-designed[[/note]] earned it few fans. There are a few highlights within this era though, such as ''Pinball/{{Stargate}}'', ''Pinball/{{Rescue 911}}'', and ''Pinball/CueBallWizard''.

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* After dominating the electromechanical era (from post-WorldWarII post-UsefulNotes/WorldWarII to 1979) and some hits right after that, most notably ''Pinball/BlackHole'' (which charged double per game compared to surrounding releases and was ''still'' popular in every arcade), Creator/{{Gottlieb}} got caught in a dork age from roughly the mid-80's and onwards that they just couldn't shake off. This downturn caused the company to financially trail behind its competitors and go out of business in 1995. The reasons, however, are not entirely clear: Ask 50 pinball fans and they will give you 50 different answers, but they all agree that the Gottlieb machines weren't quite as good. A likely underlying reason is that as Gottlieb's competitors created more intricate rules,[[note]]This was when goal-based gameplay got started, with multiballs and the WizardMode becoming standard[[/note]] deeper integration of their themes,[[note]]Prior to the 80's, designers would create the rules and tack a theme on. In the 80's, the norm became deciding upon a theme, then basing the machine around it[[/note]] and incorporated new technology,[[note]]Resulting in gameplay advances like pre-recorded audio, variable point awards, the ability to save multiple high scores, and the evolution of scoring reels to digital alphanumeric displays and then dot-matrix displays[[/note]] Gottlieb's design team were stuck in electromechanical ways of design had trouble adapting, lagging behind Bally-Williams and Creator/DataEast by two to four years. When Gottlieb ''did'' adapt to the mode-based progression in the 90's, however, the disjointed gameplay, lopsided scoring, and clunky playfield geometry[[note]]This means the angle of the lanes and ramps don't line up with the ball's paths from the flippers, causing the ball to zigzag within a lane by bouncing off the sides, killing its momentum and otherwise just looking poorly-designed[[/note]] earned it few fans. There are a few highlights within this era though, such as ''Pinball/{{Stargate}}'', ''Pinball/{{Rescue 911}}'', and ''Pinball/CueBallWizard''.
10th Jul '17 9:26:59 PM Twentington
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* Tropicana orange juice went through a bizarre and brief Dork Age when they hired the Arnell Group (the same people who came up with the term "Pepsi gravity") to redesign their packaging. The [[http://i.bnet.com/blogs/mslk_tropicana_redesign.jpg new design]] was so ugly that it actually caused a 20% drop in sales. Thankfully, it was reverted after just a few months.

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* Tropicana orange juice went through a bizarre and brief Dork Age when they hired the Arnell Group (the same people who came up with the term "Pepsi gravity") to redesign their packaging. The [[http://i.bnet.com/blogs/mslk_tropicana_redesign.jpg new design]] was so ugly that it actually caused a 20% drop in sales. Thankfully, it was reverted after just a few months.
16th Jun '17 4:17:12 AM Occidensill
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* In TheNewTens, Boeing was in a right mess – caught in a scandal that sent an Air Force official to prison, caught spying on [[TheRival Airbus]], the TroubledProduction and ScheduleSlip of the 787 "[[CoolPlane Dreamliner]]", and the CEO [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking having an affair]].
* Let's face it, OverreactingAirportSecurity, ridiculous fees for everything from checked baggage to peanuts to ''breathing'', and an increasing consolidation into an ever smaller oligopoly so you don't even have the ''illusion'' of choice - there is a reason why 21st century US air travel lets people switch on their NostalgiaFilter when thinking of the good old days of pre 9/11 air travel.



** Some of Apple's more pessimistic fans think it's entered a new Dork Age following the death of Creator/SteveJobs, with OS X 10.10 Yosemite and iOS 8 being the point where the lack of his vision really started to sting. iPad sales are slowing, in part because people don't upgrade tablets nearly as often as they do phones. The biggest thing Yosemite brings to the party is the debut of the Swift programming language, something most users will never write or even see a single line of code in. Nobody seems to know for sure what Apple has in mind for Beats, which it purchased in 2014. Getting a free U2 album? Great. Having it downloaded automatically onto your iTunes library? Not so much. The standard of Apple's ''hardware'' is seen as having held up much better, at least from a technical standpoint, though even there, the design is not without criticism. The current design of the Mac Pro, a black cylinder the approximate size of a mini-beer keg with a ton of expansion possibility, is divisive; while it's generally viewed as an exceptional machine in terms of pure capability, the fact that none of its expansion is internal means lots of dongles and breakout boxes to clutter your desk.\\

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** Some of Apple's more pessimistic fans think it's entered a new Dork Age following
On
the death phone/tablet front, Jony Ive's signature flat, Helvetica-soaked design language (replacing a previous, less-harmonized appearance that a lot of Creator/SteveJobs, with OS X 10.10 Yosemite and iOS 8 being the point where the lack of his vision really started to sting. iPad sales are slowing, in part because people don't upgrade tablets nearly as often as they do phones. found excessively skeuomorphic on both platforms) has been divisive since debuting with iOS 7, while iOS 8 was not only buggy, a class action lawsuit filed at the beginning of 2015 alleged that it was so bloated that it didn't leave enough room for user content. The biggest thing Yosemite brings to iPhone 6's larger size (4.7 and 5.5 inches for the party is the debut of the Swift programming language, something most users will never write or even see a single line of code in. Nobody seems to know for sure what Apple has in mind for Beats, which it purchased in 2014. Getting a free U2 album? Great. Having it downloaded automatically onto your iTunes library? Not so much. The standard of Apple's ''hardware'' is seen as having held up much better, at least from and Plus models) was also contentious. While some were excited that Apple was finally making a technical standpoint, though even there, 'phablet' to compete with similarly large Android offerings, those who liked the design is not without criticism. smaller, older iPhones were dismayed by it -- especially Jobs loyalists, given that Jobs had made a point of never making an iPhone with a screen greater than 3.5 inches, which he felt was the perfect size for a smartphone screen (he derisively [[http://www.cheatsheet.com/technology/5-ways-apple-has-broken-steve-jobss-product-design-rules.html/?a=viewall compared]] larger phones to {{Hummer|Dinger}}s). The current design release of the Mac Pro, a black cylinder "budget" iPhone SE in 2016, combining the approximate power of the 6S with the form and four-inch screen size of a mini-beer keg with a ton of expansion possibility, the 5S, is divisive; while it's generally viewed seen as an exceptional machine in terms of pure capability, the fact attempt to WinBackTheCrowd on that none of its expansion is internal means lots of dongles and breakout boxes to clutter your desk.front...\\



On the phone/tablet front, Jony Ive's signature flat, Helvetica-soaked design language (replacing a previous, less-harmonized appearance that a lot of people found excessively skeuomorphic on both platforms) has been divisive since debuting with iOS 7, while iOS 8 was not only buggy, a class action lawsuit filed at the beginning of 2015 alleged that it was so bloated that it didn't leave enough room for user content. The iPhone 6's larger size (4.7 and 5.5 inches for the standard and Plus models) was also contentious. While some were excited that Apple was finally making a 'phablet' to compete with similarly large Android offerings, those who liked the smaller, older iPhones were dismayed by it -- especially Jobs loyalists, given that Jobs had made a point of never making an iPhone with a screen greater than 3.5 inches, which he felt was the perfect size for a smartphone screen (he derisively [[http://www.cheatsheet.com/technology/5-ways-apple-has-broken-steve-jobss-product-design-rules.html/?a=viewall compared]] larger phones to {{Hummer|Dinger}}s). The release of the "budget" iPhone SE in 2016, combining the power of the 6S with the form and four-inch screen size of the 5S, is generally seen as an attempt to WinBackTheCrowd on that front...\\
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** The Internet Explorer browser, from version 6 to roughly version 9. [=IE6=] was the browser with the biggest market share in history for years, mostly because it was the standard for many business users who had software developed that worked great with it but simply wasn't easily ported to something newer. As a result, people kept using [=IE6=], despite it being outdated and insecure. The compatibility requirements put 7 and 8 incredibly behind Chrome and Firefox. [=IE9=] was a return to form, but the bad reputation Internet Explorer earned with 6 was still there. Microsoft would eventually phase out the Internet Explorer themselves, replacing it with Edge in Windows 10.

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** The Internet Explorer browser, from version 6 to roughly version 9. [=IE6=] was the browser with the biggest market share in history for years, mostly because it was the standard for many business users who had software developed that worked great with it but simply wasn't easily ported to something newer. As a result, people kept using [=IE6=], despite it being outdated and insecure.unsecure. The compatibility requirements put 7 and 8 incredibly behind Chrome and Firefox. [=IE9=] was a return to form, but the bad reputation Internet Explorer earned with 6 was still there. Microsoft would eventually phase out the Internet Explorer themselves, replacing it with Edge in Windows 10.



* AMD themselves in the CPU department. Since Bulldozer in 2011, it went downhill BIG time, to the point to not to improve their performance at all in '''6 years'''. Zen is the last shot for them, however looks very promising, enough to not to be far behind Intel.
* Qualcomm fell hard with the Snapdragon 808 and 810 CPU's which got a ''lot'' of overheating problems. They recovered with Kryo architecture, which is a brillant uarchitecture that manages to be competitive for a long time.



* In TheEighties, Coca-Cola decided to change its secret formula that most of the world had been drinking for the better part of a century. Ironically, the "New Coke", as the media dubbed it, tasted more like Coke's chief rival, Pepsi (part of the whole point, actually). Die-hard Coca-Cola drinkers said "TheyChangedItNowItSucks" and Pepsi drinkers kept on drinking Pepsi. This new formula actually made Pepsi the number-one selling soft drink for a while, partly because most of its advertising during the period was [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_hvOBnsirI "Hate the New Coke? Drink Pepsi!"]] Pepsi actually saw the New Coke blunder as such a major win, they gave all their employees a day off in celebration. The original formula returned to the market 80 days after New Coke's debut; the original formula was branded "Coca-Cola Classic" while the new one was branded as simply "Coke." The rest of the decade found Coca-Cola shilling (New) Coke with a YoungerAndHipper advertising campaign starring '80s phenom MaxHeadroom, but with very little impact. New Coke was eventually rebranded (quietly) as "Coke II" but faded to its death in the late 1990s and finally perished in the early 2000s. This debacle became a running joke for ''years''. Even in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'', the "Slurm" episode poked fun at it.

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* In TheEighties, Coca-Cola decided to change its secret formula that most of the world had been drinking the same for the better part of a century. Ironically, the "New Coke", as the media dubbed it, tasted more like Coke's chief rival, Pepsi (part of the whole point, actually). Die-hard Coca-Cola drinkers said "TheyChangedItNowItSucks" and Pepsi drinkers kept on drinking Pepsi. This new formula actually made Pepsi the number-one selling soft drink for a while, partly because most of its advertising during the period was [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_hvOBnsirI "Hate the New Coke? Drink Pepsi!"]] Pepsi actually saw the New Coke blunder as such a major win, they gave all their employees a day off in celebration. The original formula returned to the market 80 days after New Coke's debut; the original formula was branded "Coca-Cola Classic" while the new one was branded as simply "Coke." The rest of the decade found Coca-Cola shilling (New) Coke with a YoungerAndHipper advertising campaign starring '80s phenom MaxHeadroom, but with very little impact. New Coke was eventually rebranded (quietly) as "Coke II" but faded to its death in the late 1990s and finally perished in the early 2000s. This debacle became a running joke for ''years''. Even in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'', the "Slurm" episode poked fun at it.



* In similar soft drink endeavors, at-home soda maker [=SodaStream=], in an attempt to change declining sales in sodas, brought out a brand new "water" marketing campaign. They ALSO changed their entire drink mix lineup and reduced the original "classics", eliminating the soft drink options. They mostly replaced these products with newer "fountain-style" syrups, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks but this has not gone over well.]] Reviews for the new products on their website have hit rock-bottom due to bad tasting drinks and a different bottle design that makes it harder to judge how much syrup to use, and sales have yet to change significantly, meaning the soda machine maker may have well entered a Dork Age as of 2015.



* UsefulNotes/{{Bodybuilding}} went into this once competitions lean towards "big muscles > all other factors". For women, the winners eventually became {{Brawn Hilda}}s instead of [[AmazonianBeauty Amazonian Beauties]], while male winners became freakishly bigger. Early in 2016, a famous former bodybuilder declared his disgust with this trend and suggested a new weight class, "Classic", aimed at bodies more along the lines of Greek statues or Steve Reeves -- and since that former bodybuilder was Creator/ArnoldSchwarzenegger, people listened. It remains to be seen if this helps.



** Those money-losing freight railroads? Yeah they had a massive Dork Age, but after heavy restructuring and rises in gas prices (while most rail transport in the US relies on Diesel, locomotives are much more fuel efficient per unit of weight carried), they have now recovered. Even Warren Buffet, the richest person in the world to have "investment" as the main source of his wealth, has invested in American freight railroads.
* This trope is both played straight and averted with [[http://www.marksandspencer.com Marks & Spencers]]. It is popular opinion that the firm is in this ''right now'' in 2016. Whilst this is up for debate, people are saying that the products aren't as good as they were between 2012-2014 (with [[JustHereForGodzilla the exception of the food and drinks section, and the wines/beers]]. However, the MsFanservice model [[http://asset1.marksandspencer.com/is/image/mands/DS_554288d74667786864e4edbd4cdfd44a_1?$PDP_MAXI_ZOOM_NEW$ as seen on their website]] who has NoNameGiven on the website (but is actually Australian model and expat in the United Kingdom, Lucy Bayet, who is [[AmbiguouslyBrown half-Arabic, half-English Australian]] according to WordOfGod) is generally seen as an an [[AvertedTrope aversion of this trope]].


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16th Jun '17 3:33:33 AM Occidensill
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Back to Main/DorkAge



* In the Eastern Bloc itself this DorkAge of architecture lasted until the fall of communism. Even after that new aesthetic influences reach the urban landscape rather slowly, thus the depressing views of endless concrete blocks and boxy, edgy monuments are there to stay. Yet in some former communist states what structures have been built, while decidedly ungainly and undesired (some monuments are known under {{Fan Nickname}}s such as 'seven-winged five-dick' owing to their lack of aesthetics), are now left in a state of decay due to intense corruption after the HoleInFlag revolutions, with no intention to improve or replace them. This has led to a sentiment along the lines of "at least they used to build stuff back then and put some flowers around it" -- that the architectural DorkAge was followed by [[SerialEscalation an even bigger]] DorkAge.

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* In the Eastern Bloc itself this DorkAge Dork Age of architecture lasted until the fall of communism. Even after that new aesthetic influences reach the urban landscape rather slowly, thus the depressing views of endless concrete blocks and boxy, edgy monuments are there to stay. Yet in some former communist states what structures have been built, while decidedly ungainly and undesired (some monuments are known under {{Fan Nickname}}s such as 'seven-winged five-dick' owing to their lack of aesthetics), are now left in a state of decay due to intense corruption after the HoleInFlag revolutions, with no intention to improve or replace them. This has led to a sentiment along the lines of "at least they used to build stuff back then and put some flowers around it" -- that the architectural DorkAge Dork Age was followed by [[SerialEscalation an even bigger]] DorkAge.Dork Age.



* Tropicana orange juice went through a bizarre and brief DorkAge when they hired the Arnell Group (the same people who came up with the term "Pepsi gravity") to redesign their packaging. The [[http://i.bnet.com/blogs/mslk_tropicana_redesign.jpg new design]] was so ugly that it actually caused a 20% drop in sales. Thankfully, it was reverted after just a few months.

to:

* Tropicana orange juice went through a bizarre and brief DorkAge Dork Age when they hired the Arnell Group (the same people who came up with the term "Pepsi gravity") to redesign their packaging. The [[http://i.bnet.com/blogs/mslk_tropicana_redesign.jpg new design]] was so ugly that it actually caused a 20% drop in sales. Thankfully, it was reverted after just a few months.
26th May '17 1:49:53 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* In the early 1990s, UsefulNotes/LasVegas was facing stiff competition from not only [[{{Joisey}} Atlantic City]] drawing away gamblers on the East Coast (at its height, AC had over twice as many tourists as Vegas), but the looming threat of [[TheRez Indian casinos]], legalized in 1988[[note]] Technically, Indian casinos had been legal since 1976, with the case of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bryan_v._Itasca_County Bryan v. Itasca County]]'' serving as the precedent for the first attempts at opening casinos in TheEighties, but the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 ended the legal grey area that it existed in[[/note]], drawing away gamblers from Middle America as well. As a survival mechanism, Las Vegas began its now-infamous attempt to expand its appeal to tourists by rebranding the city as a destination for ''family vacations''. Every Strip hotel built over 1990-93 had at least one theme park-esque attraction the new [=MGM=] Grand had an actual theme park and theme.\\

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* In the early 1990s, UsefulNotes/LasVegas was facing stiff competition from not only [[{{Joisey}} Atlantic City]] drawing away gamblers on the East Coast (at its height, AC had over twice as many tourists as Vegas), but the looming threat of [[TheRez Indian casinos]], {{Native American casino}}s, legalized in 1988[[note]] Technically, Indian casinos had been legal since 1976, with the case of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bryan_v._Itasca_County Bryan v. Itasca County]]'' serving as the precedent for the first attempts at opening casinos in TheEighties, but the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 ended the legal grey area that it existed in[[/note]], drawing away gamblers from Middle America as well. As a survival mechanism, Las Vegas began its now-infamous attempt to expand its appeal to tourists by rebranding the city as a destination for ''family vacations''. Every Strip hotel built over 1990-93 had at least one theme park-esque attraction and theme, with the new [=MGM=] MGM Grand had an actual boasting a full-blown theme park and theme.park.\\



This backfired badly. Adult tourists who preferred to gamble and party without dodging kids were upset, hotel-casino staffs trained to operate adult-oriented resorts [[CripplingOverspecialization couldn't handle the unique needs of families]], cases of parents rushing off to the gaming tables and leaving their kids to fend for themselves made the news one abandoned child ended up kidnapped and ''murdered'' and the theme parks turned out to be a bomb. (To [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chmQXcE8zeU&list=FLlgPdk1ZJRfvzF_byN3QZtw&index=7 quote]] [[WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy Brian Griffin]]: "The town of Vegas has got a different face / Because it's a family place / With lots to do. / While in TheFifties a man could mingle with scores / Of all the seediest whores, / Well now his children can too!")\\
\\
This age ended with the opening of the Bellagio in 1998, which was explicitly geared towards a very classy and very adult clientele with its fine art gallery, conservatory, resident Creator/CirqueDuSoleil show, and high-stakes poker tables. While the hotels that opened to serve families are still around, and Vegas still markets itself as being about more than just gambling, said hotels have been progressively de-themed and the city's entertainment mix now mostly excludes families.

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This backfired badly. Adult tourists who preferred to gamble and party without dodging kids were upset, hotel-casino staffs trained to operate adult-oriented resorts [[CripplingOverspecialization couldn't handle the unique needs of families]], cases of parents rushing off to the gaming tables and leaving their kids to fend for themselves made the news - one abandoned child ended up kidnapped and ''murdered'' - and the theme parks turned out to be a bomb. (To [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chmQXcE8zeU&list=FLlgPdk1ZJRfvzF_byN3QZtw&index=7 quote]] [[WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy Brian Griffin]]: "The town of Vegas has got a different face / Because it's a family place / With lots to do. / While bomb that closed in TheFifties a man could mingle with scores / Of all the seediest whores, / Well now his children can too!")\\
\\
2002. This age ended with the opening of the Bellagio in 1998, which was explicitly geared towards a very classy and very adult clientele with its fine art gallery, conservatory, resident Creator/CirqueDuSoleil show, and high-stakes poker tables. While the hotels that opened to serve families are still around, and Vegas still markets itself as being about more than just gambling, said hotels have been progressively de-themed and the city's entertainment mix now mostly excludes families.


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** The song [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chmQXcE8zeU "You've Got a Lot to See"]] from the ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode [[Recap/FamilyGuyS3E17BrianWallowsAndPetersSwallows "Brian Wallows and Peter's Swallows"]] skewered the 'new' Vegas. To quote Brian Griffin:
-->"The town of Vegas has got a different face / Because it's a family place / With lots to do. / While in TheFifties a man could mingle with scores / Of all the seediest whores, / Well now his children can too!"
** The film ''Film/VegasVacation'' in 1997 parodied the family era of Las Vegas, with Clark Griswold taking his wife and kids on a trip to Vegas with his bonus check. Without parental supervision, Rusty [[MinorWithFakeID gets a fake ID]] and becomes a high roller, while Audrey gets a job as a stripper thanks to the influence of Cousin Eddie's trashy daughter Vicki.
19th May '17 9:19:05 PM Sylderon
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* One can't help but get the impression that architectural schools were infiltrated by the KGB during the Cold War, placing in vogue the Stalinist trend known as Brutalism - which produced ominous, concrete blocks of pure authoritarian coldness.[[note]]While the visuals might indeed be brutal, that's not where the name originated, rather from ''beton brut'', French for "raw/undecorated concrete".[[/note]] The future seemed bleak for decades, until Postmodernism rode in from the West, kicked out the commies, and saved the day. The legacy of this jarring midcentury trend can be seen today on public urban buildings and state university campuses. The city of Boston, unfortunately, fell victim to Brutalism when a new city hall was commissioned. The chaotic, faded mess that ensued elicits near-universal disgust from visitors, and remains a testament to the failures of The Eastern Bloc, and its Western sympathizers. The only city to actually get the concept of Brutalism the right way was none other than America's capital, DC, in the form of the [[UsefulNotes/WashingtonMetro Washington Metro]] Underground System. Its uniquely carved concrete walls and ceilings that interlock with each other in archs at every hallway and mezzanine prove that [[TropesAreNotBad Brutalism isn't always a regression of aesthetics]]. In fact, the architecture in the [=WMATA=] underground would be something that the UsefulNotes/{{Moscow}} [[UsefulNotes/MoscowMetro Metro]] would dream of looking like, had it curiously not been designed with the more uncharacteristically ''beautiful'' baroque architecture that permeates every surrounding station in a country that isn't known for "bourgeoise" aesthetics. One of the big downsides of concrete is that it does not age gracefully in a temperate climate, much less in one with any degree of air pollution. This problem is of course less notable in "indoor" spaces such as Washington Metro.

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* One can't help but get the impression that architectural schools were infiltrated by the KGB during the Cold War, placing in vogue the Stalinist trend known as Brutalism - which produced ominous, concrete blocks of pure authoritarian coldness.[[note]]While the visuals might indeed be brutal, that's not where the name originated, rather from ''beton brut'', French for "raw/undecorated concrete". Furthermore, Brutalism was as much a negative reaction to pre-war extravagance of design as it was a style born of necessity to quickly rebuild the ravaged cities of Europe and take advantage of the new possibilities of concrete. In Stalin's defense, the preferred style of architecture under his regime (when it wasn't constrained by wartime and postwar shortages) was [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Sisters_(Moscow) much more ornate]].[[/note]] The future seemed bleak for decades, until Postmodernism rode in from the West, kicked out the commies, and saved the day. The legacy of this jarring midcentury trend can be seen today on public urban buildings and state university campuses. The city of Boston, unfortunately, fell victim to Brutalism when a new city hall was commissioned. The chaotic, faded mess that ensued elicits near-universal disgust from visitors, and remains a testament to the failures of The Eastern Bloc, and its Western sympathizers. The only city to actually get the concept of Brutalism the right way was none other than America's capital, DC, in the form of the [[UsefulNotes/WashingtonMetro Washington Metro]] Underground System. Its uniquely carved concrete walls and ceilings that interlock with each other in archs at every hallway and mezzanine prove that [[TropesAreNotBad Brutalism isn't always a regression of aesthetics]]. In fact, the architecture in the [=WMATA=] underground would be something that the UsefulNotes/{{Moscow}} [[UsefulNotes/MoscowMetro Metro]] would dream of looking like, had it curiously not been designed with the more uncharacteristically ''beautiful'' baroque architecture that permeates every surrounding station in a country that isn't known for "bourgeoise" aesthetics. One of the big downsides of concrete is that it does not age gracefully in a temperate climate, much less in one with any degree of air pollution. This problem is of course less notable in "indoor" spaces such as Washington Metro.
19th May '17 8:02:23 AM Sylderon
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* One can't help but get the impression that architectural schools were infiltrated by the KGB during the Cold War, placing in vogue the Stalinist trend known as Brutalism - which produced ominous, concrete blocks of pure authoritarian coldness. The future seemed bleak for decades, until Postmodernism rode in from the West, kicked out the commies, and saved the day. The legacy of this jarring midcentury trend can be seen today on public urban buildings and state university campuses. The city of Boston, unfortunately, fell victim to Brutalism when a new city hall was commissioned. The chaotic, faded mess that ensued elicits near-universal disgust from visitors, and remains a testament to the failures of The Eastern Bloc, and its Western sympathizers. The only city to actually get the concept of Brutalism the right way was none other than America's capital, DC, in the form of the [[UsefulNotes/WashingtonMetro Washington Metro]] Underground System. Its uniquely carved concrete walls and ceilings that interlock with each other in archs at every hallway and mezzanine prove that [[TropesAreNotBad Brutalism isn't always a regression of aesthetics]]. In fact, the architecture in the [=WMATA=] underground would be something that the UsefulNotes/{{Moscow}} [[UsefulNotes/MoscowMetro Metro]] would dream of looking like, had it curiously not been designed with the more uncharacteristically ''beautiful'' baroque architecture that permeates every surrounding station in a country that isn't known for "bourgeoise" aesthetics. One of the big downsides of concrete is that it does not age gracefully in a temperate climate, much less in one with any degree of air pollution. This problem is of course less notable in "indoor" spaces such as Washington Metro.

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* One can't help but get the impression that architectural schools were infiltrated by the KGB during the Cold War, placing in vogue the Stalinist trend known as Brutalism - which produced ominous, concrete blocks of pure authoritarian coldness. [[note]]While the visuals might indeed be brutal, that's not where the name originated, rather from ''beton brut'', French for "raw/undecorated concrete".[[/note]] The future seemed bleak for decades, until Postmodernism rode in from the West, kicked out the commies, and saved the day. The legacy of this jarring midcentury trend can be seen today on public urban buildings and state university campuses. The city of Boston, unfortunately, fell victim to Brutalism when a new city hall was commissioned. The chaotic, faded mess that ensued elicits near-universal disgust from visitors, and remains a testament to the failures of The Eastern Bloc, and its Western sympathizers. The only city to actually get the concept of Brutalism the right way was none other than America's capital, DC, in the form of the [[UsefulNotes/WashingtonMetro Washington Metro]] Underground System. Its uniquely carved concrete walls and ceilings that interlock with each other in archs at every hallway and mezzanine prove that [[TropesAreNotBad Brutalism isn't always a regression of aesthetics]]. In fact, the architecture in the [=WMATA=] underground would be something that the UsefulNotes/{{Moscow}} [[UsefulNotes/MoscowMetro Metro]] would dream of looking like, had it curiously not been designed with the more uncharacteristically ''beautiful'' baroque architecture that permeates every surrounding station in a country that isn't known for "bourgeoise" aesthetics. One of the big downsides of concrete is that it does not age gracefully in a temperate climate, much less in one with any degree of air pollution. This problem is of course less notable in "indoor" spaces such as Washington Metro.
27th Mar '17 9:27:23 PM Twentington
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* The Ford Mustang II, 1974-78. Basically a [[EveryCarIsAPinto Pinto]] with a fancier body, no V8 option, and enough mid '70s chrome, vinyl, and fake wood for a much larger car. Ford was returning the car to its roots as basically an economy car with a big engine after the previous car had gotten larger and become a decent road racing platform. Sales for the Mustang II were actually much better than the late 60s/early 70s Mustangs, but it alienated enthusiasts. Even after it got a V8, any performance benefits gained from the lighter, more nimble body were negated as Ford [[{{Nerf}} nerfed]] its engines in response to emissions regulations and fuel economy concerns; this lead to disgruntled fans calling it the "Disgustang". Meanwhile, to add insult to injury, the Mustang's [[TheRival rivals]], the Chevrolet Camaro/Pontiac Firebird twins, underwent something of a GoldenAge in the '70s. While they too felt the effects of the new standards (they were nearly killed in 1972 due to a UAW strike concerning the new regulations), their performance didn't suffer nearly as badly as the Mustang's, and their bodywork wasn't nearly as garish as other cars during the era. The Camaro and, to a lesser extent, the Firebird outsold the Mustang by 1977, because they were some of the only cars at the time worth getting for sports car/post-muscle car enthusiasts (especially made all the more apparent with the release of ''Film/SmokeyAndTheBandit'', [[TheRedStapler which really boosted sales of the Camaro and the Firebird that year]]). To this day, the Camaro and Firebird are probably the only American performance cars to not have their legacy stained by WTH engineering/[[WTHCostumingDepartment designing]] departments even during TheSeventies. The only low point in the Camaro's career was the [[TheAllegedCar Iron Duke design]] of TheEighties, but that was a separate model and did rather little to hurt the Camaro's popularity[[note]]the Iron Duke engine option for both the Camaro and Firebird models would last from 1982 to 1984, and customers would rather choose the more powerful (though still rather flaccid by 80s standards at the time) V6 and V8 options for personal preferences[[/note]].

to:

* The Ford Mustang II, 1974-78. Basically a [[EveryCarIsAPinto Pinto]] with a fancier body, no V8 option, and enough mid '70s chrome, vinyl, and fake wood for a much larger car. Ford was returning the car to its roots as basically an economy car with a big engine after the previous car had gotten larger and become a decent road racing platform. Sales for the Mustang II were actually much better than the late 60s/early 70s Mustangs, but it alienated enthusiasts. Even after it got a V8, any performance benefits gained from the lighter, more nimble body were negated as Ford [[{{Nerf}} nerfed]] its engines in response to emissions regulations and fuel economy concerns; this lead led to disgruntled fans calling it the "Disgustang". Meanwhile, to add insult to injury, the Mustang's [[TheRival rivals]], the Chevrolet Camaro/Pontiac Firebird twins, underwent something of a GoldenAge in the '70s. While they too felt the effects of the new standards (they were nearly killed in 1972 due to a UAW strike concerning the new regulations), their performance didn't suffer nearly as badly as the Mustang's, and their bodywork wasn't nearly as garish as other cars during the era. The Camaro and, to a lesser extent, the Firebird outsold the Mustang by 1977, because they were some of the only cars at the time worth getting for sports car/post-muscle car enthusiasts (especially made all the more apparent with the release of ''Film/SmokeyAndTheBandit'', [[TheRedStapler which really boosted sales of the Camaro and the Firebird that year]]). To this day, the Camaro and Firebird are probably the only American performance cars to not have their legacy stained by WTH engineering/[[WTHCostumingDepartment designing]] departments even during TheSeventies. The only low point in the Camaro's career was the [[TheAllegedCar Iron Duke design]] of TheEighties, but that was a separate model and did rather little to hurt the Camaro's popularity[[note]]the Iron Duke engine option for both the Camaro and Firebird models would last from 1982 to 1984, and customers would rather choose the more powerful (though still rather flaccid by 80s standards at the time) V6 and V8 options for personal preferences[[/note]].



* Rail travel underwent a serious dork age in most of the West between (roughly) the 1950s and the advent of UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail. The decline was precipitated by the rise in private automobile ownership and lead to the abandonment of many lines as well as the bankruptcy of several private railroads. Some railroads tried their best to counteract the trend, but of course this was not always successful and some of the attempts to update the design were about as successful as "new coke". However, with the rise in gas prices as well as newer faster services such as the Shinkansen (Japan, 1960s) the TGV (France, 1980s) or UsefulNotes/DeutscheBahn 's ICE (1990s) rail travel recovered and even managed to put a dent in the numbers of air travel along short routes. Even the much laughed about UsefulNotes/{{Amtrak}} of the United States which was formed in the 1970s in order to keep the private railroads from collapsing under the weight of money losing passenger services has increased ridership by over 50% since 2000 and carries more passengers along the Acela-corridor (Boston-New York-Washington) than all airlines ''combined''.

to:

* Rail travel underwent a serious dork age in most of the West between (roughly) the 1950s and the advent of UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail. The decline was precipitated by the rise in private automobile ownership and lead led to the abandonment of many lines as well as the bankruptcy of several private railroads. Some railroads tried their best to counteract the trend, but of course this was not always successful and some of the attempts to update the design were about as successful as "new coke". However, with the rise in gas prices as well as newer faster services such as the Shinkansen (Japan, 1960s) the TGV (France, 1980s) or UsefulNotes/DeutscheBahn 's ICE (1990s) rail travel recovered and even managed to put a dent in the numbers of air travel along short routes. Even the much laughed about UsefulNotes/{{Amtrak}} of the United States which was formed in the 1970s in order to keep the private railroads from collapsing under the weight of money losing passenger services has increased ridership by over 50% since 2000 and carries more passengers along the Acela-corridor (Boston-New York-Washington) than all airlines ''combined''.
26th Mar '17 4:54:58 PM DavidDelony
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* Food in general took a nose-dive in quality during the early UsefulNotes/ColdWar, with the American diet becoming a giant buffet of artificial chemical garbage loaded with dangerous amounts of sugar and fat with trace amounts of real nutrients. Food preservation technologies developed during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, combined with the perceived need to stockpile food heavy with preservatives for UsefulNotes/ColdWar-era fallout shelters, and general public ignorance about the potential health risks of chemical additives spawned a wave of food production emphasizing price and speed over quality. Unsurprisingly, heart attack and cancer rates skyrocketed during TheFifties and TheSixties thanks in no small part to the garbage people were putting in their bodies. In America, this nearly destroyed drip coffee's reputation and spurred the organic and slow food movements as an explicit rejection of the trend. Entire websites like [[http://lileks.com/institute/gallery/ Lileks Gallery of Regrettable Food]] and [[http://www.midcenturymenu.com/ The Mid Century Menu]] show some of the awful recipes to come out of this era.

to:

* Food in general took a nose-dive in quality during the early UsefulNotes/ColdWar, with the American diet becoming a giant buffet of artificial chemical garbage loaded with dangerous amounts of sugar and fat with trace amounts of real nutrients. Food preservation technologies developed during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, combined with the perceived need to stockpile food heavy with preservatives for UsefulNotes/ColdWar-era fallout shelters, and general public ignorance about the potential health risks of chemical additives spawned a wave of food production emphasizing price and speed over quality. The rise of fast food and the introduction of the microwave only made things worse. Unsurprisingly, heart attack and cancer rates skyrocketed during TheFifties and TheSixties thanks in no small part to the garbage people were putting in their bodies. In America, this nearly destroyed drip coffee's reputation and spurred the organic and slow food movements as an explicit rejection of the trend. Entire websites like [[http://lileks.com/institute/gallery/ Lileks Gallery of Regrettable Food]] and [[http://www.midcenturymenu.com/ The Mid Century Menu]] show some of the awful recipes to come out of this era.
16th Feb '17 3:49:03 PM Yalsaris63
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* The Ford Mustang II, 1974-78. Basically a [[EveryCarIsAPinto Pinto]] with a fancier body, no V8 option, and enough mid '70s chrome, vinyl, and fake wood for a much larger car. Ford was returning the car to its roots as basically an economy car with a big engine after the previous car had gotten larger and become a decent road racing platform. Sales for the Mustang II were actually much better than the late 60s/early 70s Mustangs, but it alienated enthusiasts. Even after it got a V8, any performance benefits gained from the lighter, more nimble body were negated as Ford [[{{Nerf}} nerfed]] its engines in response to emissions regulations and fuel economy concerns; this lead to disgruntled fans calling it the "Disgustang". Meanwhile, to add insult to injury, the Mustang's [[TheRival rivals]], the Chevrolet Camaro/Pontiac Firebird twins, underwent something of a GoldenAge in the '70s. While they too felt the effects of the new standards (they were nearly killed in 1972 due to a UAW strike concerning the new regulations), their performance didn't suffer nearly as badly as the Mustang's, and their bodywork wasn't nearly as garish as other cars during the era. The Camaro and, to a lesser extent, the Firebird outsold the Mustang by 1977, because they were some of the only cars at the time worth getting for sports car/post-muscle car enthusiasts (especially made all the more apparent with the release of ''Film/SmokeyAndTheBandit'', [[TheRedStapler which really boosted sales of the Camaro and the Firebird that year]]). To this day, the Camaro and Firebird are probably the only American performance cars to not have their legacy stained by WTH engineering/[[WTHCostumingDepartment designing]] departments even during TheSeventies. The only low point in the Camaro's career was the [[TheAllegedCar Iron Duke design]] of TheEighties, but that was a separate model and did rather little to hurt the Camaro's popularity[[note]]the Iron Duke engine option for both the Camaro and Firebird models would last from 1982 to 1984, and customers would rather choose the more powerful (though still rather flaccid by 80s standards) V6 and V8 options for personal preferences[[/note]].

to:

* The Ford Mustang II, 1974-78. Basically a [[EveryCarIsAPinto Pinto]] with a fancier body, no V8 option, and enough mid '70s chrome, vinyl, and fake wood for a much larger car. Ford was returning the car to its roots as basically an economy car with a big engine after the previous car had gotten larger and become a decent road racing platform. Sales for the Mustang II were actually much better than the late 60s/early 70s Mustangs, but it alienated enthusiasts. Even after it got a V8, any performance benefits gained from the lighter, more nimble body were negated as Ford [[{{Nerf}} nerfed]] its engines in response to emissions regulations and fuel economy concerns; this lead to disgruntled fans calling it the "Disgustang". Meanwhile, to add insult to injury, the Mustang's [[TheRival rivals]], the Chevrolet Camaro/Pontiac Firebird twins, underwent something of a GoldenAge in the '70s. While they too felt the effects of the new standards (they were nearly killed in 1972 due to a UAW strike concerning the new regulations), their performance didn't suffer nearly as badly as the Mustang's, and their bodywork wasn't nearly as garish as other cars during the era. The Camaro and, to a lesser extent, the Firebird outsold the Mustang by 1977, because they were some of the only cars at the time worth getting for sports car/post-muscle car enthusiasts (especially made all the more apparent with the release of ''Film/SmokeyAndTheBandit'', [[TheRedStapler which really boosted sales of the Camaro and the Firebird that year]]). To this day, the Camaro and Firebird are probably the only American performance cars to not have their legacy stained by WTH engineering/[[WTHCostumingDepartment designing]] departments even during TheSeventies. The only low point in the Camaro's career was the [[TheAllegedCar Iron Duke design]] of TheEighties, but that was a separate model and did rather little to hurt the Camaro's popularity[[note]]the Iron Duke engine option for both the Camaro and Firebird models would last from 1982 to 1984, and customers would rather choose the more powerful (though still rather flaccid by 80s standards) standards at the time) V6 and V8 options for personal preferences[[/note]].
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