History Disney / Cinderella

17th Nov '16 8:14:01 PM erracht
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17th Nov '16 7:57:50 PM erracht
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17th Nov '16 7:57:27 PM erracht
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17th Nov '16 7:56:46 PM erracht
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17th Nov '16 6:13:37 PM erracht
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* HollywoodCostuming: A deliberate example. While other characters' style is fairly accurate for about the 1850s, Cinderella's outfits reflect the changes that were occurring in fashion in the 1940s. Her initial look has her with a shorter dress and hair worn down but with some body, as was in style during World War II. When she puts on her mother's dress, it is pink and has a bow in front like designs of Elsa Schiaparelli, whose style gave way to the "New Look" of Christian Dior; the latter is reflected in the long, full, wasp-waisted gown that the Fairy Godmother gives Cinderella, the "Dior" look being completed by Cinderella having her hair up.

to:

* HollywoodCostuming: A deliberate example. While other characters' style is fairly accurate for about roughly the 1850s, mid-19th Century, Cinderella's outfits reflect the changes that were occurring in fashion in the 1940s. Her initial look has her with a shorter dress and hair worn down but with some body, as was in style during World War II. When she puts on her mother's dress, it is pink and has a bow in front like designs of Elsa Schiaparelli, whose style gave way to the "New Look" of Christian Dior; the latter is reflected in the long, full, wasp-waisted gown that the Fairy Godmother gives Cinderella, the "Dior" look being completed by Cinderella having her hair up.
15th Nov '16 8:13:10 PM erracht
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* HollywoodCostuming: A deliberate example. While other characters' style is fairly accurate for about the 1850s, Cinderella's outfits reflect the changes that were occurring in fashion in the 1940s. Her initial look has her with a shorter dress and hair worn down but with some body, as was in style during World War II. When she puts on her mother's dress, it is pink and has a bow in front like designs of Elsa Schiaparelli, whose style gave way to the "New Look" of Christian Dior; the latter is reflected in the long, full, wasp-waisted gown that the Fairy Godmother gives Cinderella, as well as by the look being completed by Cinderella having her hair up.

to:

* HollywoodCostuming: A deliberate example. While other characters' style is fairly accurate for about the 1850s, Cinderella's outfits reflect the changes that were occurring in fashion in the 1940s. Her initial look has her with a shorter dress and hair worn down but with some body, as was in style during World War II. When she puts on her mother's dress, it is pink and has a bow in front like designs of Elsa Schiaparelli, whose style gave way to the "New Look" of Christian Dior; the latter is reflected in the long, full, wasp-waisted gown that the Fairy Godmother gives Cinderella, as well as by the "Dior" look being completed by Cinderella having her hair up.
15th Nov '16 8:10:45 PM erracht
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* HollywoodCostuming: A deliberate example. While other characters' style is fairly accurate for about the 1850s, Cinderella's outfits reflect the changes that were occurring in fashion in the 1940s. Her initial look has her with a shorter dress and hair worn down but with a lot of body, as was in style during World War II. When she puts on her mother's dress, it is pink and has a bow in front like designs of Elsa Schiaparelli, whose style gave way to the "New Look" of Christian Dior; the latter is reflected in the long, full, wasp-waisted gown that the Fairy Godmother gives Cinderella, as well as by the look being completed by Cinderella having her hair up.

to:

* HollywoodCostuming: A deliberate example. While other characters' style is fairly accurate for about the 1850s, Cinderella's outfits reflect the changes that were occurring in fashion in the 1940s. Her initial look has her with a shorter dress and hair worn down but with a lot of some body, as was in style during World War II. When she puts on her mother's dress, it is pink and has a bow in front like designs of Elsa Schiaparelli, whose style gave way to the "New Look" of Christian Dior; the latter is reflected in the long, full, wasp-waisted gown that the Fairy Godmother gives Cinderella, as well as by the look being completed by Cinderella having her hair up.
15th Nov '16 8:08:40 PM erracht
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Added DiffLines:

* HollywoodCostuming: A deliberate example. While other characters' style is fairly accurate for about the 1850s, Cinderella's outfits reflect the changes that were occurring in fashion in the 1940s. Her initial look has her with a shorter dress and hair worn down but with a lot of body, as was in style during World War II. When she puts on her mother's dress, it is pink and has a bow in front like designs of Elsa Schiaparelli, whose style gave way to the "New Look" of Christian Dior; the latter is reflected in the long, full, wasp-waisted gown that the Fairy Godmother gives Cinderella, as well as by the look being completed by Cinderella having her hair up.
8th Sep '16 3:32:10 PM margdean56
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* FlippingTheBird: After politely greeting girl after girl at the ball, the prince aims a yawn towards where his father sits when he wasn't greeting anyone. It may not seem much to a modern viewer, but at the time presented in the film it was like the prince gave his father the finger.

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* FlippingTheBird: After politely greeting girl after girl at the ball, the prince aims a yawn towards where his father sits when he wasn't isn't greeting anyone. It may not seem much to a modern viewer, but at the time presented in the film it was like the prince gave his father the finger.



'''The King:''' Love. Bah! Just a boy meeting a girl under the right conditions. ''(pushes books off the table and puts together the male and female figurines together)'' So, we're arranging the conditions.

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'''The King:''' Love. Bah! Just a boy meeting a girl under the right conditions. ''(pushes books off the table and puts together the male and female figurines together)'' figurines)'' So, we're arranging the conditions.



* LeaveTheTwoLovebirdsAlone: Lady Tremaine wants to get a closer look at Cinderella, who was dancing with the Prince, only for the Grand Duke to close the curtains on her by orders of the King to let no one disrupt them.

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* LeaveTheTwoLovebirdsAlone: Lady Tremaine wants to get a closer look at Cinderella, who was dancing with the Prince, only for the Grand Duke to close the curtains on her by orders of the King to let no one disrupt disturb them.



* TheMusical: Lots of songs here, but oddly enough, they're only song by heroes. There's no VillainSong.

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* TheMusical: Lots of songs here, but oddly enough, they're only song sung by heroes. There's no VillainSong.



* SealedWithAKiss: Final scene-a kiss in a carriage after a wedding.

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* SealedWithAKiss: Final scene-a scene--a kiss in a carriage after a wedding.



* SilkHidingSteel: Cinderella was born of the upper-class, and she loses none of her noble grace and maturity when facing the movie's events. She reminds Anastasia and Drizella that she has the right to go to the ball because the King decreed that "all eligible girls" must attend, despite having a mountain of chores and no gown to wear.

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* SilkHidingSteel: Cinderella was born of the upper-class, upper class, and she loses none of her noble grace and maturity when facing the movie's events. She reminds Anastasia and Drizella that she has the right to go to the ball because the King decreed that "all eligible girls" must attend, despite having a mountain of chores and no gown to wear.



* SoMuchForStealth: This trope is the bane of Jaq's existence every time he goes anywhere with Gus. Gus is constitutionally ''incapable'' of keeping quiet. Which makes their stealing the key to free Cinderella all the more awesome, since Tremaine didn't notice two mice pickpocketing her or hiding in the tea cutlery.

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* SoMuchForStealth: This trope is the bane of Jaq's existence every time he goes anywhere with Gus. Gus is constitutionally ''incapable'' of keeping quiet. Which makes their stealing the key to free Cinderella all the more awesome, since Tremaine didn't notice two mice pickpocketing her or hiding in the tea cutlery.set.



-->'''Grand Duke:''' ''(playing with his monocle like a yo-yo)'' He looks up, and lo! There she stands - the girl of his dreams. Who she is or whence she came, he knows not, nor does he care, for his heart tells him that ''here'' is the maiden predestined to be his bride... Oh, a pretty plot for fairy tales, sire, but in real life, it was foredoomed to failure!

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-->'''Grand Duke:''' ''(playing with his monocle like a yo-yo)'' He looks up, and lo! There she stands - -- the girl of his dreams. Who she is or whence she came, he knows not, nor does he care, for his heart tells him that ''here'' is the maiden predestined to be his bride... Oh, a pretty plot for fairy tales, sire, but in real life, it was foredoomed to failure!
8th Sep '16 3:17:46 PM margdean56
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* DreadfulMusician: When Lady Tremaine is practicing music with Drizilla and Anastasia, Drizilla is shown to be a rather unpleasant singer, but not for lack of trying--she's on key and everything--but her voice is just so nasally, that it makes an otherwise pleasant song rather grating sounding, especially compared to how Cinderella is shown singing it not a few moments later. Lucifer is so revolted at the singing, that he covers his head under a pillow and then leaves the room altogether.

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* DreadfulMusician: When Lady Tremaine is practicing music with Drizilla Drizella and Anastasia, Drizilla Drizella is shown to be a rather unpleasant singer, but not for lack of trying--she's on key and everything--but her voice is just so nasally, that it makes an otherwise pleasant song rather grating sounding, especially compared to how Cinderella is shown singing it not a few moments later. Lucifer is so revolted at the singing, that he covers his head under a pillow and then leaves the room altogether.



* EvilIsPetty: Lady Tremaine abuses Cinderella and uses her as a servant for no given reason, even though having three GoldDigger would be more profitable than having two and Cinderella would also have an obligation to help her after marrying upward in mobility. This is shown most prominently in the moments when Cinderella points out she has a right to go to the ball, and when she realizes Cinderella was the girl the prince loved: instead of either outright telling her "yes" or "no," for the first occasion Tremaine creates a HopeSpot by invoking ExactWords to make Cinderella think she has a chance to go, while planning for the opposite. This leads to Cinderella going on her own later, in fact stealing the spotlight from Anastasia and Drizella by accident when they present themselves to the prince. As for the second scenario, Lady Tremaine has a girl that the prince wants to marry, who is related to her by marriage . . . and locks her up despite having a potential golden ticket to the royal family because she wants the prince to marry her girls. She also breaks the slipper in ''view'' of the Duke despite being caught violating a royal decree, and having lost at that point.

to:

* EvilIsPetty: Lady Tremaine abuses Cinderella and uses her as a servant for no given reason, even though having three GoldDigger {{Gold Digger}}s would be more profitable than having two and Cinderella would also have an obligation to help her after marrying upward in mobility. up. This is shown most prominently in the moments when Cinderella points out she has a right to go to the ball, and when she Lady Tremaine realizes Cinderella was the girl the prince loved: instead of either outright telling her "yes" or "no," for on the first occasion Tremaine creates a HopeSpot by invoking ExactWords to make Cinderella think she has a chance to go, while planning for the opposite. This leads to Cinderella going on her own later, in fact stealing the spotlight from Anastasia and Drizella by accident when they present themselves to the prince. As for the second scenario, Lady Tremaine has a girl that the prince wants to marry, who is related to her by marriage . . . and locks her up up, despite having a potential golden ticket to the royal family family, because she wants the prince to marry one of her girls. She also breaks the slipper in ''view'' of the Duke despite being caught violating a royal decree, and having lost at that point.



** The Prince swears to marry the girl who could wear the glass slipper. The King decides to hold him to his word, and issues a royal decree to that effect.

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** The Prince swears to marry the girl who could can wear the glass slipper. The King decides to hold him to his word, and issues a royal decree to that effect.



** Cinderella calls the giant clock in town a "killjoy" when it's bells disrupt her IWantSong. Later on, it stops Cinderella and the Prince [[AlmostKiss from kissing]] when it begins striking twelve, meaning the spell was about to break.

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** Cinderella calls the giant clock in town a "killjoy" when it's its bells disrupt her IWantSong. Later on, it stops Cinderella and the Prince [[AlmostKiss from kissing]] when it begins striking twelve, meaning the spell was is about to break.



** The prince treats all of the girls at the ball like this, when they come to bow to him, knowing that his father wants him to marry and have grandkids and the girls would be marrying up in social status by settlign down with him. In fact, the main reason he goes to Cinderella is that he sees her wandering around in the shadows, lost, and goes to help her. During the time they spent dancing, she didn't even know he was the prince, which contributed to why he fell "madly in love with her".

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** The prince treats all of the girls at the ball like this, when they come to bow to him, knowing that his father wants him to marry and have grandkids and the girls would be marrying up in social status by settlign settling down with him. In fact, the main reason he goes to Cinderella is that he sees her wandering around in the shadows, lost, and goes to help her. During the time they spent dancing, she didn't even know he was the prince, which contributed to why he fell "madly in love with her".



--->'''Grand Duke:''' Perhaps if we just let him alone --\\

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--->'''Grand Duke:''' Perhaps if we just let him alone --\\alone--\\
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Disney.Cinderella